VAN o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-26 published
Engelina Johanna (TRYSSENAAR) VELDHUYZEN
On Tuesday, November 4, 2003 at the Coleman Care Centre, Barrie, in her 93rd year.
Beloved wife of the late Benjamin, formerly of Corunna and Stayner. Loving mother of Hendrika VAN KOOTEN (Jerry) of Minesing, Benjamin (the late Elsie) of Evansville, Trudy MARSHALL (Bruce) of Bethany and Hendrik (Carol GOVER) of Pt. Claire. Dear sister of Laurens (Christina) of Listowel, Johanna BOS (John) of Elmira and the late Theodorus JACOBUS, Hendrika VAN DELFT and Pieter. Grandmother of Michele and Jerry VAN KOOTEN, Frederick, Allen, and Janet VELDHUYZEN, Krystina and Scott FIRTH. Great-grandmother of Angelina Nicole and Michael VAN KOOTEN. A Service to celebrate Engelina's life will be held on Saturday, November 29 at 1 p.m. in the Anten Mills Community Centre, 3985 Horseshoe Valley Road, Anten Mills. Arrangements and cremation entrusted to Peaceful Transition, Barrie.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-09 published
Canadian comic actor Billy VAN dies at 68
Thursday, January 9, 2003, Page A6
Billy VAN, the diminutive, manic comic actor who starred in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television's Nightcap in the 1960s and the Hilarious House of Frightenstein in the 1970s, died yesterday. He was 68. He was a familiar fixture on Canadian television for decades and worked in the United States on variety programs such as The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour and The Bobby Vinton Show. Mr. VAN, who had been battling cancer for about a year and had a triple heart bypass in 1998, died at Sunnybrook Hospital. C.P.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-01-10 published
The castle lights are growing dim
Canadian television icon made his mark as star of The Hilarious House of Frightenstein
By John McKAY Canadian Press Friday, January 10, 2003, Page R11
Billy VAN, the diminutive, manic comic actor who starred in Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Television's Nightcap in the 1960s and The Hilarious House of Frightenstein in the seventies, died Wednesday. He was 68.
Mr. VAN, who had been battling cancer for about a year and had a triple heart bypass in 1998, died at Toronto's Sunnybrook Hospital, said his former wife, Claudia CONVERSE.
While a familiar fixture on Canadian television for decades, he also worked in the United States on variety shows such as The Sonny and Cher Comedy Hour, The Ray Stevens Show and The Bobby Vinton Show.
Mr. VAN even gained fame for the Colt .45 beer commercials he made for 15 years and for which he won a Clio Award.
But he invariably returned to Toronto in shows like The Party Game, Bizarre with John Byner, The Hudson Brothers Razzle DAzzle Show and Bits and Bytes.
His wife, Susan, said that while he had opportunities in the U.S., Mr. VAN had no regrets about staying in Canada.
"He was quite happy when he came back," she said. "He had the taste of the life down there and [said] 'Okay, that's fine, I'd rather be at home.' "
Ms. CONVERSE agreed that Mr. VAN had been happy with his career and had worked non-stop until his heart bypass.
"I don't know of many Canadians that stay in Canada who get their full recognition," she said. "When he went to the States, definitely. But there isn't a star system in Canada so it's kind of difficult."
Mr. VAN -- then Billy VAN EVERA -- went into show business at the age of 12 and back in the 1950s, he and his four musically inclined brothers formed a singing group that toured Canada and Europe. Most also went on to adult careers in show business.
After his heart surgery, Mr. VAN was semi-retired but continued to do voiceover work for commercials and animated programs. His last major on-screen role was as Les the trainer in the television hockey movie Net Worth in 1995.
Mr. VAN and long-time colleagues Dave BROADFOOT and Jack DUFFY made appearances in recent years to support the fledgling Canadian Comedy Awards.
"I'm all for that enthusiasm," Mr. VAN said about the awards launch in 2000.
"Billy was one of my closest Friends," said Mr. DUFFY, who added that he called Mr. VAN several times a week after he became ill.
"We were sort of buddies under the skin. We got to know each other really well at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and then we worked on Party Game together for a number of years. He was a close friend and I will miss him very much."
Mr. DUFFY said a lot of doors opened for Mr. VAN when he did The Sonny and Cher Show,but he was happy to come home to his native Toronto, where he was born in 1934.
"He came back and we were glad to have him back."
Entertainer Dinah CHRISTIE, with whom Mr. VAN worked on The Party Game for a decade, called him a brave and glorious person.
"He would take on anything and was . . . a totally gracious guy," she said. "I'm just going to miss him like we all are going to miss him. He soldiered through this bloody cancer thing so wonderfully. I knew he was just trying to get through Christmas."
Ms. CHRISTIE said Mr. VAN had some hideous experiences in the U.S. He had seen a man shot to death next to him in a New York hotel, and had his Los Angeles home broken into twice.
"He never felt safe there. And he was such a Canadian that he always felt safe here."
Mr. VAN's picture is on the Canadian Comedy Wall of Fame at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Broadcast Centre in Toronto, along with those of Al WAXMAN, Wayne and Shuster and Don HARRON.
The Hilarious House of Frightenstein starred Vincent PRICE, with Mr. VAN as host and a variety of characters, including The Count, a vampire who preferred pizza to blood and who wore tennis shoes as well as a cape. The hour-long episodes were taped at Hamilton's CHCH-Television and are still seen in syndication around the world.
Nightcap was a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation satirical show that predated Saturday Night Live by a dozen years. Its cast included Al HAMEL and Guido BASSO and his orchestra.
Mr. VAN leaves his wife, Susan, and two daughters from previous marriages, Tracy and Robyn.
A private funeral will be held in Toronto on Monday.
Billy VAN, actor and entertainer; born in Toronto in 1934; died in Toronto on January 8, 2003.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
Politician, chef, farmer cooked for presidents
He first came to Canada after the Second World War at the invitation of the Dutch ambassador
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, March 5, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- Anton WYTENBURG was a proficient chef who had little time to prepare meals for his wife and 10 children because he was often too busy cooking for others, including presidents and other dignitaries.
"He was never a chef at home, because he was always working in a hotel somewhere or at the bakery, " says his son Rudy of Ottawa, who says his father's specialties were Dutch pastries and cakes.
At one point, Mr. WYTENBURG was a cook at the venerable Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York, where he helped prepare meals for U.S. presidents Dwight EISENHOWER and Harry TRUMAN, and president-to-be John F. KENNEDY. In 1945, he worked as a chef for General Henry CRERAR at a Canadian Officers' Club in Holland.
Mr. WYTENBURG, a native of Delft, the Netherlands, died in Ottawa on January 30. He was 83.
The son of a Dutch tailor, Mr. WYTENBURG completed Grade 8 in Delft and landed a job at a bakery. Later, he moved to Scheveningen to work as a sous chef in an oceanside hotel.
While working there, he learned to speak German, French and English and, during the Second World War, used his language skills as part of the Dutch resistance in its fight against the invading Germans.
Later, while working for Gen. CRERAR, Mr. WYTENBURG was asked by Dr. Jan VAN ROYEN, the Dutch ambassador to Canada, to come to work for him as a chef at the Dutch embassy in Ottawa.
"Anton gladly accepted the opportunity. The Dutch were and are forever grateful for the support of the Canadians during the war, " said Rudy. In 1947, he came to Canada to work at the embassy in Ottawa.
In 1950, when the Dutch ambassador was transferred to Washington, Mr. WYTENBURG worked as a chef at the French embassy in Ottawa before buying a bakery in Ottawa that became the first Dutch pastry shop in the city. The business, renamed Anton's Select Pastries, later expanded to include five outlets.
In 1952, he married Catharina VAN VUGT, also a native of the Netherlands, whom he met when she was a nanny for the secretary to the Dutch ambassador. That year, Dutch Queen Juliana paid a visit to one of Anton's bakeries.
While running their bakeries, the WYTENBURGs made many Friends, including some who farmed outside Ottawa and spoke highly of life in the country. This led them to buy a small farm west of Ottawa in 1962 and in 1964 would see the family give up its bakeries in favour of full-time agriculture on larger Ottawa Valley spreads, first in Richmond and later in Renfrew, where dairy farming would become the family's bread and butter.
As a farmer, Mr. WYTENBURG took a keen interest in agricultural organizations and committees. "He had a way with people, he could diffuse tense situations and always find a solution, " says Rudy.
Over the years, Mr. WYTENBURG's sons took on more of the farming responsibilities, leaving their father with more time for the many organizations he worked with, including the Ottawa-Carleton Safety Council and the Richmond Agricultural Society. In the late 1970s, Friends and neighbours urged him to consider politics.
In 1978, he won a councillor's seat in the rural ward of Goulbourn in 1980, he ran for mayor but lost; he tried again in 1982 and was successful, sitting as Mayor of Goulbourn Township from 1982 through to 1991. He was also on the council of the former Regional Municipality of Ottawa-Carleton.
Moving a large family around the community and the farm was difficult, until Mr. WYTENBURG bought a used, fully stretched Cadillac limousine.
"It sure raised a few eyebrows when we were being chauffeured to the hay fields in a black limo, " recalls Rudy. "It often made for a bit of fun when the boys would ask an unsuspecting gal out on a date."
Mr. WYTENBURG left politics and farming in 1991 at age 72. After retiring, he continued to volunteer his time to help out on committees and task forces and as a strong supporter of the church. At the age of 75, he was the oldest participant in a walkathon for a local charity.
Mr. WYTENBURG leaves 10 children who live in California, Vancouver, Calgary, Toronto, Renfrew, Ottawa and in England. Two of them continue to operate the family's 440-hectare farm near Renfrew.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
The day the music didn't die
Beloved Toronto trumpeter credited with helping preserve a unique form of New Orleans jazz
By Sarah LAMBERT Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Toronto -- The tightly knit world of New Orleans traditional jazz has lost one of its greats with the death, last month, of Cliff (Kid) BASTIEN, leader of Toronto's treasured Happy Pals.
The trumpeter is credited as having nothing less than single-handedly kept alive the unique, raw, New Orleans style of jazz, through his leadership and mentorship of hundreds of musicians.
Saddened fans and musicians filed into the city's Grossman's Tavern all week last month to pay tribute to Mr. BASTIEN at the long-time home of the Happy Pals, where the walls are lined with photos of his fans and musicians. It was a send-off worthy of New Orleans, birthplace of the kind of jazz Mr. BASTIEN played with his seven-piece bands, the Camelia Jazz Band and later the Happy Pals, during the 30 or so years he played at the Toronto landmark.
"He was never late. Never, never ever, said Christine LOUIE, whose family inherited Mr. BASTIEN's Saturday-afternoon gig when Al GROSSMAN sold the bar in 1975.
So it was with sinking hearts on February 8 that his loyal audience and band members watched the minute hand tick past 4 o'clock, waiting for him to arrive, brass trumpet in hand.
When he was found later that afternoon still sitting in his armchair, apparently looking up a new song in his hymn book, the Happy Pals played on and raised a glass in tribute to their leader who died as he lived, surrounded by music. He was 65 years old.
Noonie SHEARS, a long-time friend and leader of the traditional impromptu parade that would inevitably snake through Grossman's as Saturday afternoon wound down, said she thought Mr. BASTIEN was looking up I'll Fly Away, the old gospel song recently dusted off in the movie O Brother, Where Art Thou?
The band played it for the first time at Mr. BASTIEN's official memorial at Grossman's the Saturday following his death.
Born in 1937 in London's East End, Mr. BASTIEN emigrated to Canada in 1962 after a stint in New Orleans. It was there that he heard trumpeter (Kid) Thomas VALENTINE play and, experiencing a kind of epiphany, Mr. BASTIEN followed him from club to club and studied his style. It ultimately inspired a lifelong ambition to keep alive New Orleans-style traditional jazz.
A purist who drew a distinction between his chosen genre of music and the more popularized Dixieland Jazz, Mr. BASTIEN once said: "Had I never heard that music, I wouldn't have become a musician. I wouldn't play anything else."
I Like Bananas, Caledonia, All of Me and Louisiana Vie en Rose were just a few of his standards. But, as Happy Pals' trombonist Roberta TEVLIN explained, Mr. BASTIEN wasn't content to simply recycle the old chestnuts.
"Cliff kept adding songs. I've probably played 1,000 different tunes with him. He was particularly notorious for finding songs outside the standard jazz list, said Ms. TEVLIN, who joined the band 20 years ago, along with her saxophonist husband, Patrick.
Bob Dylan, Creedence Clearwater Revival, Western Swing numbers, Nigerian folk songs and Dean Martin could all tumble out during a set, said drummer Chuck CLARKE.
Mr. BASTIEN's Friends and peers point out that he was known for three primary qualities: His love of music, his scorn for fame or publicity and his mentoring of local musicians.
During the memorial at Grossman's, Downchild Blues Band headman Donny WALSH arrived from Florida to sit in with his harmonica, as he had done regularly with Mr. BASTIEN in the 1970s. Juno-nominated bluesman Michael PICKETT was there, as well as jazz singer Laura HUBERT, formerly of the Leslie Spit Treeo, pianist Peter HILL, The Nationals and many more.
From the worldwide New Orleans jazz community, among those who came to pay their respects were saxophonist Jean-Pierre ALESSI of France, trumpeter Roger (Kid Dutch) UITHOVEN of Orlando, Florida, clarinetist Kjeld BRANDT from Denmark and Toronto's Brian TOWERS, Jan SHAW and Joe VAN ROSSEM.
"I cannot imagine the Toronto traditional jazz scene without Cliff BASTIEN and his raw, emotional New Orleans-style jazz, Mr. TOWERS wrote in a notice posted on the Internet shortly after he learned of the death of his friend.
"He was probably the most popular and influential figure on the Toronto traditional jazz scene. He taught many others to play their instruments in the style and introduced thousands to the joys of New Orleans traditional jazz.
"We went to Grossman's after our own gig and Jan and I played some hymns with the Happy Pals. A sadder and more emotional scene I have rarely seen."
Toronto musician Joanne MacKELL, leader of the Paradise Rangers, wonders how things might have been if she had not met Mr. BASTIEN when she was just starting out.
"Though I was young and inexperienced, Kid would always invite me up to sing, Ms. MacKELL said, recalling how the band took her under its wing when she discovered them in the early 1970s.
"Kid didn't care about money or popular opinion. He filled Grossman's Tavern every Saturday for some 30 years because he played great music with honesty and integrity and he inspired me to try and do the same."
Until just last year, Mr. BASTIEN, who feared flying, avoided the lure of the road, taking only an annual sojourn to New Orleans for the French Quarter Festival. Finally, in the fall of 2002, he accepted an invitation to tour Scandinavia with the Danish/Swedish band New Orleans Delight, playing with George BERRY on tenor sax. A new Compact Disk is due to be released this spring.
His official recordings are few, numbering about a dozen, as Mr. BASTIEN preferred to play to an audience. Though, as Ms. TEVLIN pointed out: "There are bootleg tapes all over the place."
His legacy, the band says, is keeping the New Orleans style of jazz alive.
"Kid Thomas VALENTINE was one of the greats, and when he was gone, Kid BASTIEN carried on. Kid BASTIEN was one of the greats, and now Kid's gone. So who's going to carry the music on now? We will, said saxophonist Mr. TEVLIN on behalf of the Happy Pals, who intend to continue the Saturday-afternoon tradition at Grossman's.
In another side to his life, Mr. BASTIEN was an accomplished commercial artist whose hand-crafted signs, woodwork and acid-etched glass can be seen in many local pubs, including Toronto's Wheat Sheaf Tavern. His work can be found across Ontario, Quebec, British Columbia and California, as well as in Europe.
Mr. BASTIEN's wish was to be buried in New Orleans.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-23 published
Rolf O. KROGER, Ph.D. Professor Emeritus of Psychology University of Toronto
Rolf died, as he lived, with grace, courage, humour and dignity, at home on April 18th, 2003, of advanced prostate cancer. He was the devoted and beloved husband of Linda WOOD. He was the cherished son of Erna KROGER and son-in-law of Adele WOOD; loving brother of Harold and Jurgen KROGER; dear brother-in-law of Wilma KROGER, Edelgard DEDO, Lorraine WOOD, Robert and Deborah WOOD, and Reg WOOD; much loved uncle of Andrew KROGER and Stephen KROGER, Christina and Linda JUHASZ- WOOD, Taylor, Genna and Devon WOOD, Jonathan and Nicole WOOD, Phillippe NOEL, and Jose and David TILLETT, and nephew of Liesl WINTER, Otto WINTER and Alf and Sue MODJESKI. Rolf was born in Hamburg, Germany, on September 28th, 1931. He emigrated to Canada in 1952, and completed a B.A. in psychology at Sir George Williams College (now Concordia University) in 1957. Following his M.A. (1959) at Columbia University, New York, he received his Ph.D. in psychology from the University of California at Berkeley in 1963. His advisor, Prof. Theodore R. SARBIN (Prof. Emeritus, University of California, Santa Cruz,) has continued to be a valued colleague and dear friend, together with Rolf's fellow graduate student, Prof. Karl E. SCHEIBE of Wesleyan University and Karl's wife Wendy. Rolf joined the Department of Psychology at the University of Toronto in 1964 and continued his research and writing in social psychology after retiring in 1996. Rolf's work addressed a variety of topics concerning the individual in the social system. His articles and papers on the social psychology of test-taking, hypnosis, history, epistemology, methodology and the discipline of social psychology all reflected his dissatisfaction with the status quo combined with proposals for new directions. For more than 20 years he has worked with Linda A. WOOD (University of Guelph) on topics in language and social psychology (e.g., terms of address and politeness), and most recently on a book on discourse analysis. At the time of his death, he was working on a discursive critique of the 'Big Five' personality theory enterprise and on stories of his experiences growing up in Germany during the Second World War. Rolf also took great pleasure in teaching and greatly valued the opportunity to work for almost forty years with so many talented and enthusiastic students, both undergraduate and graduate. Rolf was privileged to have many long-lasting Friendships, and he was grateful for the encouragement, help and comfort given by so many, especially Bogna ANDERSSON, Eva and Fred BILD, Clare MacMARTIN and Bill MacKENZIE, Frances NEWMAN and Fred WEINSTEIN, Jesse NISHIHATA, Anne and Michael PETERS, Andrew and Judi WINSTON and Lorraine WOOD. We have also been sustained by the kindness of our neighbours on Walmer Road. We express our particular thanks and appreciation to family physician and friend, Dr. Christine LIPTAY. Our thanks go also to the staff of Princess Margaret Hospital, to the physicians and nurses of the Hospice Palliative Care Network Project, especially Dr. Russell GOLDMAN and nurses Francine BOHN, Joan DYKE, Dwyla HAMILTON, Lynda McKEE and Ella VAN HERREWEGHE, and to the nurses of St. Elizabeth, especially Liz LEADBEATER, Sylvia McCALLUM and Cecilia McPARLAND. Cremation was private. There will be an Open House for remembrance and celebration on Sunday, April 27th (3-7 p.m.), Monday, April 28th (4-8 p.m.) and Tuesday, April 29th (4-8 p.m.) at 98 Walmer Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2X7. Please direct any queries to Frances NEWMAN (416-351-0755.) In lieu of flowers, donations to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care (700 University Avenue, Third Floor, Toronto, Ontario M5G 1Z5) or Amnesty International would be appreciated.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
BRITNELL, P. May (Paulson)
Born in Winnipeg, 1907, died in Toronto on Wednesday, May 21st, 2003. Predeceased by her husband George E. BRITNELL. Survived by her daughters Margaret VAN HAMME (Doug) and Elin GRAHOLM (Leonard,) and grandchildren Daniel, Simon, Kristin and Erica. A Memorial Service will be held in Saskatoon on June 27, 2003. Donations may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Suite 1000, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3P9.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-26 published
BRITNELL, P. May (Paulson)
Born in Winnipeg, 1907, died in Toronto on Wednesday, May 21st, 2003. Predeceased by her husband George E. BRITNELL. Survived by her daughters Margaret VAN HAMME (Doug) and Elin GRAHOLM (Leonard,) and grandchildren Daniel, Simon, Kristin and Erica. A Memorial Service will be held in Saskatoon on June 27, 2003. Donations may be made to the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, 250 Bloor Street East, Suite 1000, Toronto, Ontario M4W 3P9.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-02 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel DAVIS, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-06 published
DAVIS, Curtiss Gridley
Born August 31, 1916 in Rochester, New York died after a long and courageous battle, on July 31, 2003 at the Guelph General Hospital. He was a resident for the past year at St. Joseph's Health Centre, Guelph. Predeceased by his first wife Grace TURNER. Lovingly remembered and missed by his wife Audrey LIVERNOIS. Dearly loved father of Natasha VAN BENTUM (Henri) and Bruce Gridley DAVIS (Janet WRIGHT,) of Vancouver. Stepfather of John LIVERNOIS of Guelph, and Laurie STATHER of Belleville; dear brother of Joyce LOVETT (Bob) of Kitchener and Jim DAVIS (Mary) of Maple grandfather of Rachel Davis, Celine and Jacob RICHMOND, Nicole STATHER, Michael STATHER (Tabitha), Ryan STATHER, and Ali and Becky LIVERNOIS; and great grandfather of four. Fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews, family and Friends. During World War 2, he served with the Toronto Scottish Regiment in England and Europe. He will be remembered for his thirst for knowledge and as a gifted writer and reader. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, August 6, 2003, at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox Presbyterian Church, 20 Quebec Street, Guelph, with the Reverend Thomas KAY officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial contributions may be made to Knox Church, or to the charity of your choice. (Arrangements entrusted to Wall-Custance Funeral Home and Chapel, 206 Norfolk Street, Guelph (416) 822-0051 or www.wallcustance.com).

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-19 published
SCOTT, Lewis Clayton - August 16, 1909 - September 17, 2003
Died peacefully at Southlake Village Nursing Home, age 94, after a full and distinguished life as a sportsman. In an era when shooting, fishing, hunting and riding were the epitome of sportsmanship, Scott excelled at all.
Born on August 16, 1909 in Vermillion, South Dakota, Lew came to Toronto at an early age with his family. One of his first employers was the Toronto Carpet Company (where he met his future wife Alice PARKER.) He then moved on to the brokerage business with Barrett Sye and Co. as well as in the Toronto Grain Exchange. He established L.C. Scott Construction Company in the 1940's which operated in Canada, the United States and England. After World War 2, the company built a large number of schools and hospitals in Southern Ontario as well as some of the post war homes that were built in New Toronto and North York.
Lew had a lifelong passion for horses. During a family stint in California when he was a youngster, he first galloped racehorses at Hollywood Park and when he grew too big, switched to exercising polo ponies. After his business career was established, he acquired property in Markham - Wyndstone Farm - from which he bred and raised thoroughbred racehorses, steeplechasers and sport horses as well as bird dogs and prize- winning Shorthorn cattle.
Lew was an equestrian sportsman of international stature. He competed in steeplechasing and timber racing in Canada and the United States winning a number of prestigious trophies including the Prince of Wales trophy three times. He played polo in Canada, the United States, England and Barbados and competed at horse shows across Ontario. He was a keen foxhunter and served as the whipper-in for the Toronto and North York Hunt for 20 years prior to becoming a Master of Foxhounds in 1972, a position he held until 1990.
He raised bird dogs and competed with them all over North America in the 40's and the 50's. He was a top fly fisherman and enjoyed duck and pheasant hunting. Both he and his wife Alice were crack shots and long time members of the Toronto Gun Club. As a young man, he was a member of the Argonaut Rowing Club.
At one time, a member or director of the Toronto and North York Hunt, the Canadian Hunter Society, the Canadian Equestrian Team, the Canadian Thoroughbred Horse Society, the Toronto Polo Club and several U.S. polo clubs, the Cowdray Polo Club, United Kingdom Canadian director of the Master of Foxhounds Association of America, the Goodwood Club and the Argonaut Rowing Club. He was also an accomplished pilot who loved flying and had owned several planes.
In 1989, after 54 years of marriage, he lost his beloved wife Alice whose charm, hospitality and hard work was the foundation of the family and the basis which allowed Lew's energetic pursuit of his interests.
Predeceased also by his only son Lewis Christian (Skipper). Leaves daughters Alice FERRIER (Glen) and Susan Jane ANSTEY (Michael VAN EVERY,) granddaughters Jennifer ANSTEY, Elizabeth TRACEY, Janet Louise GAYFORD, Mary FRALEIGH and Margaret Ann SPROULE. Great grandchildren Owen TRACEY, Will FRALEIGH, Jamie FRALEIGH and Tom FRALEIGH.
He will be remembered for his enthusiasm, toughness, loyalty and keen interest in the people and things around him.
If desired, donations in his memory may be made to Think First Canada (for injury prevention in sports and recreation), Med-West Medical Centre, Suite 2-227, 750 Dundas St. West, Toronto, Ontario M6J 3S3 or to the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair Endowment Fund.
A Private family service was held. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora (905-727-5421).

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-08 published
Mary VAN RIJN
By Kiran VAN RIJN Wednesday, October 8, 2003 - Page A26
Teacher, traveller, wife, mother. Born in Lowestoft, England, on September 19, 1912. Died on April 30, 2003, of natural causes, in Vancouver, aged 90.
In 1973, a Toronto English teacher named Mary VAN RIJN broke her pelvis. Hardly a newsworthy event: But just nine days later, according to the Hamilton Spectator, she was "badgering the Humberside Collegiate principal to allow her to resume lessons with 140 high school students in five classes. As Mrs. VAN RIJN couldn't travel the five blocks from her home, the principal allows the students to go to her. She says they come through all weather." She told the newspaper, "I happen to love teaching... I can't think what else I could have done." That newspaper clipping symbolizes my remarkable grandmother's independence, determination and resourcefulness, and her intense love of teaching.
In her childhood in England, a lone teacher saw promise in a girl who, some of her relatives predicted, would come "to no good end." When her parents emigrated to rural southwestern Ontario, her strange accent, her bright red hair, her unfamiliarity with farming culture, and her myopia were the butt of mockery. One math teacher openly declared his dislike of redheads and told her to sit at the back of the room. Yet Mary prevailed, and graduated near the top of her class at teachers' college in 1932.
In 1938, her success as a teacher in Waterford, Ontario, earned her an invitation to teach at the Canadian Academy in Kobe, Japan. She eagerly accepted. Before returning to Japan for a second year, she and two Friends visited Germany. It was August, 1939. Falsely accused of being spies, they caught the last Trans-Siberian Express out of Berlin; refugees filled their train as it travelled eastward. She resumed her job in Japan, but in 1941 was advised to catch a boat for Canada.
The next year, she enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force, and rose to the rank of captain. In 1943, she met Arie VAN RIJN. A bodyguard for the Dutch Royal family, he was stationed in Ottawa. They married the following year and, at war's end, went to Indonesia, where Arie worked as a chief of police. They had a son in 1946, and after a three-year stay in Indonesia, they returned to Canada, where their daughter was born in 1951.
As her children grew, Mary resumed teaching. Beginning in 1957, she taught night school for new Canadians, then returned to school herself, earning a B.A. in English from the University of Toronto. From 1966 to 1978, she taught English at Toronto's Humberside Collegiate Institute; she passed on to her students her love of literature, especially Shakespeare and Jane Austen, and reluctantly retired at age 65.
Mary and Arie moved to Vancouver, where their son's family lived, and she went back to university again, completing her M.A. in English at the University of British Columbia in 1983, at the impressive age of 70.
She cherished her grandchildren, and travelled with us to Europe (when I was 8, my grandmother waited patiently as I explored the ramparts of Caernarvon Castle).
At 76, Mary and a friend travelled to China. Her timing was as lucky as it had been in Berlin: They left for Hong Kong the night of the government crackdown in Tiananmen Square.
Arie, her rock, died in 1994. At first she continued to tutor young children, but two broken hips and the gradual decline of her once sharp mind compelled her to spend her final years in the University of British Columbia hospital.
Mary always tried to foster the potential in her students, Friends and family. For us, she epitomized the poet Robert Browning's exhortation that one's reach should exceed one's grasp.
Kiran VAN RIJN is Mary's grand_son.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
STONEMAN, Douglas Wright, D.D.S., F.R.C.D. (C.) Professor Emeritus U. of T. Faculty of Dentistry, former Captain Royal Canadian Air Force Dental Corps ''The Rainbow Squadron''
Died suddenly on November 7, 2003 in his 82nd year at Sunnybrook Hospital surrounded by family. Survived and never to be forgotten by his beloved wife Lucy of 57 years, sons Bill, Rick, John, daughter-in-law Jane and grandchildren Pete, Katie and Courtney. Doug's long and remarkable life was made all the richer by family, Friends, patients and colleagues. Private family arrangements.
Special thanks to Doctors PANG and CHAPMAN and the nurses in The Schulich Cardiac Centre for their skill, expertise and most of all compassion. The family would also like to make special mention of Emergency Medical Services paramedics Ryan VAN POORTEN and Rod SHORTT who like Doug always knew the right thing to do and then did it. A life truly well lived.
Donations in Doug's memory can be made to The Schulich Heart Centre, Sunnybrook Health Science Centre, Toronto, Ontario.

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VAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-15 published
VAN DER POL, Nicholas Alexander (January 6, 1987 - November 12, Died tragically on November 12th as the result of an accident. Nicholas was the beloved son of Balthasar (Balty) and Diane, cherished brother of Christian and pet Sylvestra. Loving grand_son of Janet EDGERLY and Margheritta VAN DER POL. Fondly remembered by his Aunts and Uncles Peter (Helen), Heather (Glen), Adeline (Murray), special Aunt Adelina, (Florio) and by his cousins Morgan, Melayne, Tyler, Spencer and many Friends. Nicholas will always be remembered for his sense of humour, his quick wit, questioning mind, passion for flying, rockets, baseball, magic tricks and quick ability to do Rubik's cubes. Friends are invited to visit the family at Chapel Ridge Funeral Home, 8911 Woodbine Ave., (3 lights north of Highway #7) (905) 305-8508 on Monday, November 17th from 2: 00 ­ 4:00 p.m., and 7:00 ­ 9:00 p.m. Funeral service will be held on Tuesday, November 18th at 11: 00 a.m. at Unionville Alliance Church, 4898 16th Avenue. Reception to follow at Chapel Ridge Funeral Home. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Children's Wish Foundation would be greatly appreciated.

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VANCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-11 published
Hockey News co-founder had winning formula
By James CHRISTIE Friday, April 11, 2003 - Page S10
Toronto -- No one was going to get rich from The Hockey News, Ken McKENZIE freely admitted. The wealth he shared was in the information it contained for fans and those in the hockey industry.
McKENZIE who died Wednesday at Trillium Hospital in Mississauga, was co-founder 1947 -- along with Will CÔTÉ -- of the publication that came to be known as hockey's Bible. He was 79.
His son, John McKENZIE, said Ken died suddenly when he went into septic shock following surgery for colon cancer.
Ken McKENZIE and CÔTÉ birthed a magazine that was a landmark in the Canadian periodicals industry -- a sport publication that survived when so many failed and folded. It evolved from a house organ for the National Hockey League -- McKENZIE was originally an National Hockey League publicist -- into an encyclopedic, authoritative publication. The content matured from reprints of stories by hockey beat writers in six National Hockey League towns to exclusive columns by The Hockey News's own editors and writers such as Steve DRYDEN and Bob McKENZIE (no relation,) who could challenge the National Hockey League and international hockey establishment. Ken McKENZIE was presented with the Elmer Ferguson Award for his pioneering role on the magazine's 50th anniversary in 1997 and inducted into the Hockey Hall of Fame.
"He loved hockey and sports of all kinds," said John McKENZIE, a correspondent with American Broadcasting Company News in New York. "He had this idea when he was in the Royal Canadian Air Force. He got up on a table in the mess hall and called his buddies around and said 'If I started a hockey paper, would you guys buy it?'
"They all cheered. He started with only $383 and The Hockey News was born."
Ken McKENZIE cited the figure as precisely $383.81 in a 50th anniversary story in The Globe and Mail. He was famed for keeping a close eye on finances down to the penny.
Along with editing associate Charlie HALPIN, McKENZIE operated the paper on a shoestring with a handful of employees. Newspaper beat writers in each team's city were paid only a few dollars.
"When I paid those guys, it was 10 bucks, later on 50 bucks, whatever, it was the going rate," McKENZIE said. "It was always cheap. You weren't going to get rich in this business.... I'd say to a guy, 'You may be big in Calgary or Edmonton or Vancouver, but if you write for this paper, they'll know you all across Canada.' A lot of guys liked that."
As the National Hockey League's publicity director from the 1940s into the late 1960s, McKENZIE developed press and radio guides and had access to teams' statistics and mailing lists. He and CÔTÉ used those to convince almost 4,000 fans to send in $2 each ($3 in the United States) as advance subscription payments to finance the first issue. The circulation was 20,000 by the end of its first year.
The Hockey News under McKENZIE maintained its comfortable relationship with the National Hockey League. McKENZIE bought out COTE's interest in the mid-1960s, then eventually sold 80 per cent of the magazine to New York's WCC Publishing in 1973 for a reported $4-million and the balance in the 1980s. The headquarters moved from Montreal to Toronto and McKENZIE stayed as publisher intil 1981.
He wanted to continue writing and working, rather than retire, and after leaving the hockey paper, he and HALPIN bought into Ontario Golf News. McKENZIE was still associated with the golf paper at his death, said Ontario Golf advertising executive Ted VANCE.
"I know it was first viewed as a house organ, but go through his stuff in the early years and it wasn't strictly milquetoast, said DRYDEN, The Hockey News editor from 1991 to 2002. "He may have had favourites and protected some people. As National Hockey League publicist, he could not be a vociferous critic. But long before the sale of The Hockey News, it was getting an edge to it. In the end, it was a helluva idea."
Added Bob McKENZIE: " Whatever anyone says, it's a good legacy to have started The Hockey News and to see where it's at today." Parent corporation Tanscontinental Publishing said The Hockey News has a paid circulation of more than 100,000.
Ken McKENZIE is survived by his wife Lorraine of Mississauga, four children -- John McKENZIE and Jane Mckenzie KOPEC of New York, Kim McKENZIE in Oakville, Ontario, and Nancy Mckenzie PONTURO in Redding, Connecticut., -- and five grandchildren. His funeral will be 11 a.m., Monday April 14, at St. Luke's Anglican Church on Dixie Road, Mississauga.

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VANCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-10 published
Acting up helped PoW survive camp
But working in the salt mines took its toll on Canadian soldier in First World War
By Gloria GALLOWAY, Monday, November 10, 2003 - Page A3
First World War soldiers were rarely taken prisoner.
Most of the Allied casualties died in the mud with a German sniper's bullet in their head, or riddled with shrapnel, or drowned in their own mucus after poison gas filled their lungs. Of the more than 600,000 Canadians who fought in the War To End All Wars, only 4,000 were captured.
Private William McLEISH was among the unfortunate few. He was captured in France in April of 1915 and spent the last 2½ years of the war at Rennbahn PoW camp near Munster, Germany.
Pte. McLEISH survived, while nearly 60,000 other Canadians perished, but it would be wrong to say he was lucky. The hardships he endured took away his ability to function in a postwar world. He could not provide for his family or enjoy the life he had fought to protect.
In Rennbahn, at the age of 22, Pte. McLEISH was put to work in the salt mines, a gruelling task overseen by civilian bosses who treated the PoWs like slaves.
But camp life was a world of bizarre contrasts and the unfortunate souls who found themselves the unwilling guests of the Germans did what they could to alleviate the cycle of toil and tedium. Thus the Rennbahn Empire, a stage troupe of prisoners, was formed.
Mr. McLEISH died in 1966 after spending his last decades in and out of mental hospitals, a victim of what is now called post-traumatic stress disorder. He left a box of mementos that his daughter, Glen FAYET, submitted to the Memory Project organized by The Globe and Mail and the Dominion Institute.
They include cast photos of the plays her father and other prisoners performed. The men took all parts, slipping into dresses, wigs and hats as required by the script. In the yellowing photos they pose with faces contorted into character.
Jonathan VANCE, a history professor at the University of Western Ontario and a leading expert on the lives of prisoners of war, says it wasn't uncommon for First World War PoWs to be permitted to put on plays.
"It kept them out of trouble, for one thing," he said. "For another thing, international laws provided for prisoners to take advantage of recreation opportunities, including intellectual opportunities. So most camps had not only theatres, but libraries and art classes and occupational therapy classes... orchestras in some cases."
A book of remembrance created by prisoners of Rennbahn thanks family and Friends for sending props, costumes and even grease paint into the camps.
"In the First World War, you could get in pretty well anything. You could get food hampers sent in from major London department stores," Dr. VANCE said.
The theatrical paraphernalia made it possible to stage performances at Rennbahn every Wednesday. The shows had titles like Roll on Blighty! and Le Danseur Inconnu. Listed on the playbills is one W. McLEISH.
"We didn't think that he had that type of outgoing personality," Pte. McLEISH's daughter, Ms. FAYET, said with a quiet laugh.
Her father had immigrated to Montreal from Scotland in 1911 when he was 18 and joined the army reserve soon after his arrival. He signed up when war was declared and was quickly shipped overseas.
While on leave in Britain, Pte. McLEISH visited an aunt in Edinburgh, where he met Margaret WATSON. Love quickly followed, and the Canadian in uniform remained in Ms. WATSON's thoughts after he returned to the front.
Then came word of his capture. Ms. WATSON wrote to the Red Cross, asking his whereabouts. He was in the camp near Munster, she heard. But "this man does not write very often," said the official response.
Many soldiers emerged from captivity "with job-related injuries that would prevent them from earning a living for the rest of their lives," Dr. VANCE said. "You have all kinds of stories about people losing hands and feet, getting arms mangled in machinery, getting bit of their bodies blown off in mine explosions."
This was William McLEISH's life for nearly three years. It must have been a very strange existence, Dr. VANCE said, to be working in such trying conditions for 12 to 14 hours then return to camp to take part in a music hall or a play.
Certainly the men would have derived some comfort from the performances. But the evening diversions weren't enough to keep Pte. McLEISH whole.
When he was freed after Germany surrendered, he found the Scottish lass and they wed. They settled in Canada and had a son and a daughter.
"He was quite well to begin with," Ms. FAYET said, "but then he had problems dealing with everyday life and eventually he could no longer go into the office to work."
He quit his job at the Grand Trunk Railway and his wife became the family's breadwinner.
"She took any job that she could in order to supplement the income. As I understand it, they received $25 a month for four people to live on from the government," Ms. FAYET said.
Her father's nerves were shot and he became a regular patient at the veterans' hospital in Ste. Anne de Bellevue. "People knew that there was such a thing as shell shock, but, in a lot of minds, that was a moral failing rather than a physical or psychological failing," Dr. VANCE said. "It wasn't really appreciated, the degree to which prolonged stress has physiological impacts on the brain."
But Mr. McLEISH's family knew the toll it had taken. Ms. FAYET said he never talked about the war, except occasionally to mention a practical joke someone had played or an amusing anecdote.
The horror of the war remained buried inside Mr. McLEISH until he died. Perhaps it was softened by a box of photographs and fading playbills that bear his name.

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VANEVERY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-23 published
VANEVERY
- In loving memory of a dear wife, mother and grandmother, Shirley, who passed away April 26, 2002.
We cannot control the
movement of time
nor can we control
our own destiny
or the destinies of those we love
but we can take comfort
in knowing
that those who have lived in
our hearts
are never really gone.
For as long as we keep them
with us,
in our hearts and our
thoughts,
they will be with us always.
For love, which is timeless.
never ceases to exist.
-Sadly missed, always loved and remembered by Clarke, John, Lyle, Joan and families

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VANEVERY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-30 published
VANEVERY
-In memory of a dear friend, Shirley Jean, April 26, 2002.
A year may wipe out many things,
But this they'll wipe out never.
The memory of those happy Thursdays
Each week we spent together.
-Missed and remembered by Ann ADDISON

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VANEVERY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
In loving memory of my two nieces, Shirley VANEVERY and Dean BRYAN,
who passed away April 2002.
-Always remembered by Aunt Jean (McCAULEY.)

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VANEVERY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
John CLARKE VANEVERY
Clarke VANEVERY, a resident of Meldrum Bay, passed away at Mindemoya Hospital on Friday, June 6, 2003 at the age of 72 years.
He was born in Gore Bay, son of the late John Wesley VANEVERY and Ada Elizabeth Christina (CLARKE) VANEVERY. He timbered for many years as a way of supporting his lifelong passion, farming. He also enjoyed the annual family hunt, snowmobiling, and many other outdoor activities. His greatest love was spending time with his family and in particular his grandchildren. Clarke took an avid interest in all of his grandchildren. With the boys the number one passion was hockey. On any given Sunday, Clarke would be there cheering them on. With his granddaughters his relationship was of a more caring nature. Last summer he and his oldest granddaughter Elizabeth set up house together in Meldrum Bay as she experienced her first summer job. Then there is Caroline. The entertainer, speechmaker extraordinaire, figure skater and all around treasure. Last but not least is our miracle baby, Rachel, a shining light in a difficult time. His whole being would lighten up when she was with him. He was a loving and caring husband, father, grandfather, brother, uncle and friend and will be sadly missed. Many fond memories will be cherished by all who knew him. Predeceased by his beloved wife Shirley (McCAULEY) VANEVERY in 2002. Loving father of John (wife Wendy) or Gore Bay, Lyle (wife Janice) of Lively and Joan SHEPPARD (husband Willis) of Mindemoya. Loving and loved grandfather of Elizabeth, Colin, Caroline, Graham, Evan, Owen and Rachel. Dear brother of Blanche VANEVERY, Bill (wife Pauline) VANEVERY, Maude Falls (husband Matt,) Helen Clarke, Dale VANEVERY (wife Joan,) Jim VANEVERY (wife Helen,) Don VANEVERY (wife Rose.) Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Saturday June 7. The funeral service was held in the Wm. G. Turner Chapel on Sunday, June 8 with Erwin THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON officiating. Interment to follow in Meldrum Bay Cemetery.
also linked as linked as CLARK

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VANEVERY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Arthur Thomas H. BREATHAT
In loving memory of Arthur "Art" BREATHAT, a resident of Evansville, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, June 5, 2003 at the age of 50 years.
He was born in Sudbury, son of Gerald BREATHAT and Pauline (CRANSTON) VANEVERY. He worked as a machine operator at the Lafarge Quarry, Meldrum Bay for the past 9 years. Art enjoyed hunting, fishing and a good game of cards.
Dearly loved husband of Marilyn (DAMPIER) BREATHAT of Evansville. Loving father of Cheryl Lee BREATHAT and Aaron PHILLIPS and Arthur James BREATHAT. Dear brother of Robbie and Judy BJORKLUND of Spring Bay, Bonnie and husband Dave PATTERSON of Hornepayne and Peggy FARQUHAR and Jim DAVIES of North Bay. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends and relatives were received at the Culgin Funeral Home on Monday, June 9. There will be no funeral service and cremation will follow.

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VAN surnames continued to 03van002.htm