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"RYL" 2008 Obituary


RYLAARSDAM  RYLANCE  RYLAND  RYLEY  RYLOTT 

RYLAARSDAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-28 published
HEYKOOP, Jentje " Jennie" (KUIPER)
Peacefully at Clinton Public Hospital surrounded by her family on Monday, May 26, 2008 Mrs. Jentje "Jennie" (KUIPER) HEYKOOP of Goderich in her 72nd year. Beloved wife of the late Nicolaas HEYKOOP (1995.) Loving mother and mother-in-law of Mary-Ann and John NEUTEL of Brucefield; Nick and Wilma HEYKOOP of Goderich Shirley and Jake RYLAARSDAM of Clinton; Irene and Steve GETTLER of Fullarton; Nancy and Peter BEYERSBERGEN of Lucknow; Linda and Steven WOLFE of Monkton and Mike and Theresa HEYKOOP of Holmesville. Loved and sadly missed by 26 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Gerrie and John BOS of Blyth Piet and Anne KUIPER of Stratford; Margaret KUIPER of Clinton and Theresa BAKKER of Fenwick. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by one granddaughter Laura NEUTEL and by 2 brothers Cornelis "Case" KUIPER and Henk KUIPER. Friends will be received at the Falconer Funeral Homes Ltd - Bluewater Chapel, 201 Suncoast Drive E., Goderich on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Trinity Christian Reformed Church, 321 Suncoast Drive E., Goderich on Friday, May 30, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Clinton Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the Clinton Public Hospital Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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RYLANCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-16 published
He used his brush as a weapon to empower the powerless
Once a sincere and ardent Communist, he spent more than 60 years depicting strikes, refugee camps, political rallies, native reserves and the lives of ordinary working people
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Toronto -- Bill STAPLETON was more than just another artist with a social conscience. His documentary art prodded, pushed, shamed, confounded and made people think (and sometimes squirm). He knew that not many people wanted to hang socially relevant art like his over their living-room sofas. It was just as well.
No bucolic landscapes, postcard portraits or pictures of fruit for him, but fulminations against inequality, oppression, poverty and the misery of society's dispossessed. These were powerful reminders of humanity's shortcomings, but also depictions of the inner strength and dignity of people accustomed to hardship.
In the words of his biographer, Mr. STAPLETON held "strong, unabashedly partisan empathy" with the compositions the artist called "Human-scapes."
Largely unsung, though he was once dubbed "the People's Artist," Mr. STAPLETON was a committed socialist, activist and a sensitive, persuasive man "who celebrated the dignity and independence of the human spirit without irony but not without humour," wrote C.H. (Marty) Gervais in People In Struggle: The Life and Art of Bill Stapleton (Penumbra Press; 1992).
Working in a variety of media - pen-and-ink, charcoal, watercolour, ink wash, oils and acrylics - Mr. STAPLETON spent more than 60 years depicting strikes and picket lines where workers squared off against police and company goons, refugee camps where he heard tales of torture, women's rallies and the lives of ordinary working people, and native reservations where he faithfully recorded disgusting poverty.
"Sketching is honest and immediate," he'd say. "You can't go back and pretty it up."
His artistic activism wasn't limited to Canada. He journeyed to Mexico and Central America to document injustice and despair with nothing more than brushstrokes.
"People have been neglected," Mr. STAPLETON explained on his 90th birthday, "and that's why I've concentrated on them. Social art doesn't play enough of a role in art." He saw his role as almost journalistic, a visual Upton Sinclair whose solidarity with his subjects only hardened. Mr. STAPLETON was committed to using his craft "as a tool and weapon for the benefit of the powerless and the denunciation of the powerful," Mr. Gervais found.
Collections of Mr. STAPLETON's work are housed in the National Archives of Canada and, ironically for a man who worked so hard toward peace, in the Canadian War Museum. In 2006, he donated more than 1,500 canvases and sketches to the Cabbagetown/Regent Park Community Museum in Toronto.
Born and raised in middle-class comfort in conservative small-town Ontario, his father was a salesman. A 1933 strike at a local food plant that was violently suppressed left a deep mark on him. "The father of a friend of his was beaten in that strike," said his daughter, Lynn TAILOR/TAYLOR. " That left a very raw impression. It had a lot to do with influencing his politics later in life."
He planned to become an engineer and, to that end, accepted a job surveying the Trans-Canada Highway in White River, Ontario, north of Lake Superior. The Depression was on and he was grateful for the work. His older brother, Bruce, an illustrator well known for his war-bonds and Red Cross posters, sent him some paints, and Mr. STAPLETON sketched the scenery and his fellow workers - 12 to a tarpaper bunkhouse. With little else to do after long, gruelling days, he honed his talents, sending pieces to his brother, who returned them with notations suggesting improvements.
He toiled in the north for 18 months and, with $800 in savings, headed to New York City where he studied art at the U.S. National Academy of Design, and where the apolitical 21-year-old first encountered radical politics. His roommates in a teeming tenement near Central Park were leftists, and the Big Apple was a magnet for Marxists. Finding and sketching hobos and street urchins a stone's throw from the gleaming towers of Wall Street helped seal his political views.
But New York was as competitive as people had warned. After two years, he failed to find work as an illustrator and came home. In Toronto, he worked as a printing salesman, which allowed him to take evening classes at the Ontario College of Art.
In 1941, Mr. STAPLETON was emboldened to join the Communist Party of Canada after Ottawa banned it. This was no act of petulance but a sincere belief that the party could better achieve the dreams of social justice than other leftist groups. (He would quit the party in the early 1950s, dismayed by Stalin's treatment of artists in the Soviet Union.)
Later in 1941, when the Soviet Union entered the Second World War, he signed up for service in the Royal Canadian Air Force and became a pilot. It was around this time he first achieved recognition. A work of his titled Canadian Airman was included in a travelling Canadian military exhibit.
Shipped to several bases in England, he ended up with the 418th Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron in North Yorkshire and trained on Wellington and Lancaster bombers. But the war ended before he could fly any missions.
Meantime, he'd sketched.
"It got so I was annoyed if we had to fly because it cut into my art time," he would recall to his biographer. "I usually rode a bicycle, with a small canvas bag I could sling over my shoulder, and I'd pedal off to sketch. Fortunately for me, when the fog set in - and this was quite often, English weather being what it is - we'd be grounded for two or three days. It was a great opportunity, and not having to make art to make money was like being subsidized."
At war's end, he chose to stay in London to study at the famed Slade School of Art. Though his own war art portfolio grew, an appointment as an official war artist eluded him, and he returned to Canada in time to document two seminal strikes, one by Stelco workers in Hamilton in 1946, and the other by the Canadian Seaman's Union in 1949 on the waterfronts of Welland, Toronto and Montreal.
That same year, he married Margaret (Mickey) RYLANCE. He'd met her at an art show, and later explained that he fell for her despite the fact she believed in God.
With a family to support, he started his own advertising agency and bought a cottage and a split-level house in Toronto. The middle-class life was maybe not what communists aspired to, but "with a wife and three daughters and a couple of mortgages, I had to have a job - so I went into the advertising business. It was a living." There was a line he once heard about working in advertising and loved to quote: "I never told my mother I was in advertising. She thought I played piano in a brothel."
In 1974, he visited Russia on a cultural exchange. Describing it as the trip that had the greatest impact on him, Mr. STAPLETON reconciled conflicted feelings. "They led the world in science and were the first to the moon. Freedom of the sexes, women were ship captains and factory heads. Socialism led the world then, but was betrayed from within and without. I still believe in revolution."
He divorced his wife after 23 years of marriage - there were no hard feelings and the two stayed Friends - and moved to Toronto's Cabbagetown neighbourhood ("it was here I joined the human race") where he began depicting ordinary people doing ordinary things. For about a decade, he was resident artist at three Toronto landmarks: The Hotel Winchester, the Paramount Tavern, and the Trojan Horse Coffee House. He'd sit for hours, sketching and painting exiled Chilean musicians, leftist activists, and the regulars.
"I liked pubs like the Paramount," he recalled. "It attracted a mostly black clientele. The guys were cocky, exuberant and graceful; they just had this way of moving and expressing themselves. And their music - wow! The mixed clientele provided a real slice of life - fights, shootings, stabbings and four police vans on a Saturday night."
As for his style, it had a relaxed structure but his lines were "direct and bold, drawn with rock-steady hand and a sharp eye," noted Carol MOORE- EDE, Mr. STAPLETON's friend and curator. "He painted in startlingly vibrant colours and bold strokes, as forthright in his technique as he was in his social convictions."
One reviewer lauded his oeuvre as being in the tradition of Edgar Degas and Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec.
His pace quickened in his sixties and seventies. He journeyed to Nicaragua in 1982 to sketch the suffering and despair caused by the country's political upheaval. In 1984, he went to Mexico to document the scores of Guatemalan refugees flooding the border in a struggle for safety and food. The following year, he was part of a delegation that travelled to Spain to seek recognition for the 1,239 Canadians of the Mackenzie-Papineau Battalion (the "Mac-Paps") who fought the fascists in the Spanish Civil War. And in 1989, he joined the Innu of Sheshatshit, Labrador, to protest low-level test flights of North Atlantic Treaty Organization fighter jets and bombers over traditional native hunting grounds. An exhibit was mounted in Toronto.
He belonged to Veterans Against Nuclear Arms, and in the early 1980s, helped mobilize artists in a national disarmament movement, Arts for Peace, chaired by novelist Margaret Laurence and numbering the likes of Pierre Berton, Norman Jewison, Margaret Atwood and Karen Kain.
In his later years, he volunteered for ArtHeart, a community-based effort that provides free access to studio space, instruction, and art supplies. He'd give away quick sketches to children.
Just last December, he received the Ontario Federation of Labour's first Lifetime Cultural Achievement Award. His age prevented his attendance but he received a standing ovation nonetheless.
Asked by his biographer whether, at 75, he still had "the fire" in him, Mr. STAPLETON reflected, "Sure, I still get passionate about causes, about inequity and inequality, about what's wrong with our society, with the environment and with the economic system… Look, you have to have anger, passion, indignation, love, tenderness - the whole gamut of human emotion - if you're going to be a real artist. Injustice is always with us, and one of the jobs of responsible artists is to respond to it. Art becomes an essential voice in all the chaos of our times: A tool for bearing witness, and a weapon for effecting change."
He never made a living at art, he admitted, "but I lived through it."
William Johnson STAPLETON was born in Stratford, Ontario on January 24, 1916. He died in Bracebridge, Ontario on February 5, 2008. He was 92. He is survived by daughters Lynn TAILOR/TAYLOR, Judith STAPLETON and Sharon SHERMAN. He also leaves his former wife, Mickey, and five grandchildren.
An exhibition of Mr. STAPLETON's selected works, is on display at Riverdale Farm, 201 Winchester Street, Toronto, Saturdays from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. until March 23.

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RYLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-25 published
WILLSON, Shirley (née RYLAND)
84, of Saint Thomas, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Thursday, April 24, 2008. Wife of the late Bartley E. WILSON (1975.) Mother of Norma COTTRELL of Paris, Elsie HUTCHINGS and her husband Lynn of Southwold, Kathleen HOULE and her husband Denis of Grand Prairie, Alberta, and the late Nancy WILLSON. Mother-in-law of Wayne Cottrell of London. Sister of Marie McQUEEN of Sarnia, Sheila HILL and her husband David of Windsor, and the late Ronald RYLAND, late June RYLAND and late Ivan RYLAND (his wife Anne of Saint Thomas). Also survived by numerous grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Born in Ilderton, Ontario, April 15, 1924, she was the daughter of the late George and Clarine (FORD) RYLAND. Shirley was a member of Iona Christian Fellowship Church, a former member of the Iona Women's Institute and a former associate member of Lord Elgin Branch #41, Royal Canadian Legion, Saint Thomas. A public memorial service to celebrate Shirley's life will be held at the Iona Christian Fellowship Church on Sunday, April 27th at 2: 00 p.m. Relatives and Friends will be received by the family one hour prior. If so desired, memorial donations to the charity of your choice will be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas.

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RYLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-23 published
TOVEY, John Edward
Peacefully at his residence in London, Ontario on Sunday, January 20, 2008 in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of Edith and beloved father of Mark. Brother of Beatrice (and the late Gordon) RYLAND of Winnipeg, Robert and Joan TOVEY of Vancouver, and the late James and Patricia TOVEY. Uncle of Donna and Alan, Winnifred and Michael, and Miro. Ted was born and raised in Darlingford and Winnipeg, Manitoba. He earned his B.A. at the University of Manitoba in 1953. At the University of Winnipeg he studied law and was called to the bar in 1954. He practiced briefly in Toronto with Lewis and Osler and spent most of his career practicing in London, Ontario. Visitation will be held on Thursday, January 24 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James St. at Richmond, London. Funeral arrangements private. Interment Mt. Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to CurePSP (The Society for Progressive Supranuclear Palsy), Executive Plaza III, 906-11350 McCormick Road, Hunt Valley, Maryland 21031, U.S.A., or the charity of your choice, would be gratefully acknowledged. On-line condolences may be sent privately through www.HarrisFuneralHome.ca.

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RYLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-18 published
DENOVAN, David McClintock
David and his dear wife, Nancy St. Clair Ryley DENOVAN, died on November 20, 2007 on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia. David was the son of Samuel Parker DENOVAN and Laura McCLINTOCK and the brother-in-law of George Moore RYLEY, all pre-deceased. He and Nancy were dearly loved and will be sadly missed by their niece Norah RYLEY of Toronto, nephew Peter RYLEY and his wife Denise HUPÉ of Ottawa, sister-in-law Jessica RYLEY of Toronto and many close Friends. Born on February 13, 1944, David grew up in Toronto and studied Engineering at the University of Waterloo. He began his career as a production film editor with Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television in Toronto in 1967. His editing credits included popular series such as Man Alive and The Nature of Things as well as many award-winning dramas and documentaries. His love of film extended to his personal life where he was an avid collector and home-theatre buff with a special interest in the science fiction genre. Later in life, he and his wife moved to rural western Canada where he became involved in environmental concerns and efforts to protect wilderness areas while also indulging his passion for skiing and hiking. Cremation has taken place and will be followed later by burial and commemorative gatherings. Memorial donations to the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, the David Suzuki Foundation or the Sierra Legal Defence Fund would be greatly appreciated.

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RYLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-18 published
DENOVAN, Nancy St. Clair (née RYLEY)
Nancy and her dear husband, David McClintock DENOVAN, died on November 20, 2007 on Salt Spring Island, British Columbia Nancy was the daughter of Alfred St. Clair RYLEY and Norah Frances MOORE and the sister of George Moore RYLEY, all predeceased. She and David were dearly loved and will be sadly missed by their niece Norah RYLEY of Toronto, nephew Peter RYLEY and his wife Denise HUPÉ of Ottawa, sister-in-law Jessica RYLEY of Toronto and many close Friends. Nancy was born on March 14, 1932, grew up in Montreal, did undergraduate studies at McGill and post-graduate work at the University of Toronto. Her subsequent career as a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television producer, director and writer was highlighted by her series of documentaries about Canadian artists, musicians and naturalists. Her choice of subjects reflected an abiding sense of a soul connection with nature. Her passion for Canadian art as a representation of that soul was captured particularly in her films about Emily Carr and Lawren Harris which received both national and international awards and continue to be shown in museums and art galleries. Later in life, Nancy and her husband left Toronto to establish their own connection with nature in rural western Canada. The proximity to the wilderness and her own garden sanctuary on Salt Spring Island gave her great joy. Her 1998 book, The Forsaken Garden, is based on her experience living with environmental illness and explores the deep psychological and spiritual relationship between the health of our bodies and souls and the health of the planet. To her, "the garden is a metaphor for the soul, a place where the most important thing is to live and grow; to return to our garden is to consciously return to a place of fullness and naturalness of being that the modern world in its frenzied pace has threatened to obliterate." Cremation has taken place and will be followed later by burial and commemorative gatherings. Memorial donations to the Canadian Parks and Wilderness Society, the David Suzuki Foundation or the Sierra Legal Defence Fund would be greatly appreciated.

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RYLOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-05 published
HAGERMAN, Lois Irene (née RYLOTT)
The family of Lois HAGERMAN sadly announces her passing at Georgetown Hospital, on May 3, 2008, in her 89th year. Predeceased by her husband Bertram "Bert". Beloved mother of Michael (Susan), Marty, Ken and Perry. Loving Nana of Sarah, Katherine, Steve (Holly), Louis, Henry and Max. Great-grandmother of Andrew and Marissa. Lois is survived by her brother Garfield RYLOTT. Dear friend of Marilyn HAGERMAN. Friends will be received at the Neweduk Funeral Home "Mississauga Chapel" 1981 Dundas St. W., (1 block east of Erin Mills Pkwy) from 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday May 7, 2008. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday May 8, 2008 at 10 a.m. Interment at Riverside Cemetery, Toronto. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.
Neweduk Funeral Home 905-828-8000. Online condolences at www.neweduk.com

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