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"GLA" 2007 Obituary


GLABB  GLADDERS  GLADSTONE  GLADWIN  GLANVILLE  GLASER  GLASGOW  GLASIER  GLASS  GLASSER  GLAZIER 

GLABB o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
JUBA, Mathew Michael
A resident of Chatham, passed away at the London Health Science Centre, Victoria Campus on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 at the age of 55. Born in Windsor, son of Mathew and Agnes HILLER) JUBA of Emeryville, Ontario. Beloved husband of Mary Elizabeth (Betty) KUCHTA. Dear father of Angela, John and Michael JUBA of Chatham. Brother of Pamela and Wyatt HOWICK of LaSalle, Karen JUBA- JELUSIC and Boris JELUSIC of Chatham, Randy and Vicki JUBA of Scarborough and Linda and Bill GLABB of Edmonton. Son-in-law of Mary KUCHTA of Chatham. Brother-in-law of Alex KUCHTA and Marie STARR of Mississauga. Also surviving are 8 nieces and nephews. Matt was a well know and respected lawyer in Chatham. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham on Friday 2: 00-4:30 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Funeral Home on Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. with Doctor Gordon SIMMONS of Sarnia officiating. Donation, made by cheque, to Canadian Diabetes Association or L.H.S.C., Victoria Campus Adult Oncology Floor appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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GLABB o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-12 published
JUBA, Mathew M.
Of Chatham, Ontario passed away peacefully early on the morning of January 10th, 2007 with his family by his side at Victoria Campus, London Health Sciences Centre. Mathew, 55, was born in Windsor, Ontario. He was a well-known and well-respected lawyer in Chatham, a spectacular father and an avid golfer and traveler. He is survived by his beloved wife and best friend, Betty KUCHTA, and their three children, Angela, John and Michael. He is also survived by his parents, Agnes and Matt JUBA of Emeryville; his grandmother, Katie JUBA of Angusville, Manitoba; his sister Pamela and husband Wyatt HOWICK of Lasalle; his sister Karen JUBA- JELUSIC and husband Boris JELUSIC of Chatham; his brother Randy and wife Vicki JUBA of Scarborough; his sister Linda and husband Bill GLABB of Edmonton; eight well-loved nieces and nephews; as well as loving aunts and uncles, including Theresa HILLER of Windsor. Son-in-law of Mary KUCHTA of Chatham, and brother-in-law of Alex KUCHTA and wife Marie STARR of Mississauga. Beloved friend to many. Past President of the Chatham Minor Hockey Association, Past President of the Kent Law Association, Lifetime member of the Macaulay Club of Chatham, Member of the Maple City Golf and Country Club and the Kent Club, Chaperone on many ESPC student trips. Thank you to the fabulous nursing team in the stem-cell transplant unit at London Health Sciences Centre. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham on Friday, January 12, 2006 from 2: 00-4:30 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held at 11: 00 a.m., at the funeral home, on Saturday, January 13, 2006 with Doctor Gordon SIMMONS officiating. Donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the London Health Sciences Centre Victoria Campus Adult Oncology Floor would be appreciated. 70% of individuals in need of bone marrow transplants do not have a related donor - call 1-888-236-6283 (Canadian Blood Services) to join the registry and donate to someone in need. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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GLADDERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-08-20 published
Hamilton police chase ends in double fatality
By Canadian Press, Mon., August 20, 2007
Toronto -- Two men who were killed when their car slammed into a Hamilton house during a police pursuit have been identified as Sheldon GLADDERS and Matthew LOYER, both 20 years old.
The province's Special Investigations Unit is reviewing the circumstances surrounding the police response and the collision, and is appealing for witnesses: to come forward.
Officials say a Hamilton police officer spotted a black Mercedes speeding eastbound on Main Street early Saturday morning.
The officer pursued the car for a short distance until it left the road near Cochrane and Lawrence roads and struck a house.
The Special Investigations Unit says a third man was taken to hospital with a broken leg.
The Special Investigations Unit is a civilian agency that investigates incidents involving police and civilians that result in serious injury, sexual assault or death.

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GLADSTONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
CHIUSOLO, Louis
Passed away peacefully at Sunnybrook Hospital on Thursday, January 4, 2007. Survived by his wife Agnes CHIUSOLO, his step-daughter Judy HENDLER, son-in-law Douglas HENDLER, and granddaughter Tracey HENDLER. A private family service will be held. In lieu of flowers, the family would be honoured by a donation to the North York General Hospital Foundation, honouring Doctor Richard GLADSTONE, (416) 756-6944 or by a donation to the Louis Chiusolo Brain Tumour Fund at Sunnybrook Hospital, (416) 480-4483.

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GLADSTONE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-05 published
GLADSTONE, Mia (née Miriam SIVAK)
On Saturday, November 3, 2007 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Mia GLADSTONE beloved wife of Alex. Loving mother and mother-in-law of David, Judy (Patrick,) Doctor Gila (Dr. Jeff MARTOW,) and Doctor Sara (Abba LUSTGARTEN.) Dear sister and sister-in-law of Doctor Jacob SIVAK (Dr. Barbara). Devoted Bubbie of Ella, Eden, Evan, Josh, Mitch, Jennie, Mattan, Lior, and Ayelet. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, November 5, 2007 at 2: 30 p.m. Shiva 70 Coldwater Court, Thornhill. Memorial donations may be made to Camp Shomria, Mia Gladstone Arts Program, 416-736-1339 (mail@campshomria.ca).

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GLADWIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-06 published
'Brilliant teacher' and professor explained politics to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation viewers
Political scientist triumphed not only as a scholar but also as a commentator. He could explain even the most erudite concepts succinctly and without condescension, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
In the great triumvirate of scholarship, administration and teaching, by which academics tend to be graded, political scientist Paul FOX's contribution lay in all three areas - but above all in the classroom.
"He was the most popular teacher in a very big department, one that prided itself on teaching," said his former colleague, the political scientist J.T. McLeod (who writes fiction under the name Jack MacLeod). "He had a wonderful ironic wit and he could make the study of politics very lively, and about people, not just about laws and constitutions. He was a brilliant teacher." Beginning in 1962, Prof. FOX was the lead editor of Politics: Canada, a collection of readings that went through eight editions and which for many years was the most widely used undergraduate textbook in the subject.
Prof. FOX "was one of those remarkable academic administrators who's a true gentleman," said philosopher Paul GOOCH, president of Victoria College in the University of Toronto. "He was a man of unfailing courtesy. That was my initial and lasting impression," he said of the man who served two terms as principal of Erindale College (from 1976-1986) on the Mississauga Campus of the University of Toronto and then sat on the Board of Regents at Victoria, after he retired from teaching.
The opposite of an ivory tower academic, Prof. FOX gave his discipline a public face through his accessibility to journalists - eager for sound bites and pithy comments - and his many appearances as a political commentator on radio and television and in print, especially during political campaigns and election-night coverage. Rail thin, with a glint of humour in his eyes, he could explain even the most erudite concepts succinctly and without condescension.
"He was humane, and he brought the world of politics to you in a way which made you feel that you could not only understand it, but participate in it," former governor-general Adrienne Clarkson said. The two met in 1965 when Ms. Clarkson was co-host of Take Thirty on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television. Prof. FOX, who shared in the "entertain-and-learn-along-the-way philosophy" of the program was a regular guest on Take Thirty for a decade. "I have not high enough words of praise for this man," Ms. Clarkson said.
Paul Wesley FOX was born in 1921, the younger of two sons of Paul Hazelton and Ida (née MEREDITH) FOX. On his father's side, his family pre-dated the United Empire Loyalists, having emigrated from the American Colonies to what is now Nova Scotia in the early 1760s. His mother's family heritage was English and Welsh. His father worked for the Canadian National Railway as an assistant superintendent of operations for several branch lines in eastern Ontario, and his mother was a homemaker.
Paul and his older brother Arthur were born in Orillia, Ontario, their mother's home town, probably because his father was at that time posted in northern Ontario. The family moved to Ottawa when Mr. FOX was transferred there by the Canadian National Railway. Paul went to First Avenue School, then Glebe Collegiate and finished high school in Barrie, after his father was transferred there.
He went to Victoria College in the University of Toronto in 1940 and volunteered in the Canadian officers Training Corps. An excellent student, Mr. FOX graduated in 1944 with the Ames gold medal in political economy and the Men's Senior Stick (an award given by the student body to the student they feel has made the greatest contribution) at Victoria College. He immediately was posted for officer training at an army camp in Brockville, Ontario, and then, with the rank of lieutenant, to what was then called Camp Utopia, near Gagetown, New Brunswick The war ended before he could be shipped overseas.
He went back to the University of Toronto in the fall of 1945 to undertake studies for a masters degree in political science, which he completed in 1947, while working in the department as a research associate. He won a British Council Scholarship and probably completed the residency requirements for his doctorate at the London School of Economics the following year, before interrupting his education to teach at what was then called Carleton College in Ottawa from 1948 to 1954. That's where he met Joan GLADWIN. They were married on June 20, 1951, and eventually had three sons, Rowley, Bruce and Nicholas.
The family moved to Toronto in 1954 after Mr. FOX accepted an appointment as an assistant professor at the University of Toronto in what was then called the Department of Economics and Political Economy. At the same time, he continued work on his doctoral thesis and received his doctorate from the University of London in 1959.
Prof. McLeod arrived at the University of Toronto from Saskatchewan in October, 1955 to begin his doctorate in political science and almost immediately met Prof. FOX. "He and his wife had me to dinner, the day we met, and I thought 'isn't Toronto such a friendly place,' and I never got invited any place else for about five years," Prof. McLeod said with a chuckle.
"He was a pleasure to work with and a privilege to know. Thoughtful, helpful co-operative and always ready to give sensible advice&hellip and a good man. I never heard anybody say anything critical of him."
Political scientist David COOK, now the principal of Victoria College, still remembers being in Prof. FOX's Politics 100 class when he was an undergraduate in the mid-sixties. The textbook was the second edition of Politics: Canada, edited by Prof. FOX. "He was a tremendous teacher with a wonderful sense of humour who knew many stories about political figures and could weave them into his teaching of the elementary aspects of Canadian government," according to Prof. COOK.
"He was able to establish an intimacy with the class" even in a large lecture hall. "You liked the man immediately."
Besides Politics: Canada, Prof. FOX was also the senior Canadian editor of The World Almanac from 1972-78, the general editor of the 24-book series, Politics, co-editor of the Canadian Journal of Political Science from 1974-77 and president of the Canadian Political Science Association from 1979-80. He also served on the Advisory Committee on Research for the Royal Commission on Bilingualism and Biculturalism 1964-68, the Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation from 1965-71, and as chair of the Ontario Council on University Affairs from 1987-88.
He was a mentor to younger academic colleagues and a very successful principal of Erindale College, according to Prof. COOK, who spent many years in the central administration of the university and had many opportunities to observe Prof. FOX in action. "He had an amazing ability to make relationships work and he transformed Erindale's relationship with the community in Mississauga," Prof. COOK said. "He delegated well and he gave the college a sense of itself."
After teaching at the University of Toronto for more than 30 years, Prof. FOX officially retired in 1987 and was named an emeritus professor. He returned to the college where he had spent his undergraduate years and served as Senior Research Associate from 1988-2004 and on the board of Regents, including a term as chair.
About three years ago, Prof. FOX developed pulmonary fibrosis, a progressive disease in which the air sacs of the lungs become replaced by fibrotic tissue, making it very difficult for the lungs to transfer oxygen into the bloodstream. He managed with supplementary oxygen but declined in the last year and went into palliative care at Grace Hospital in Toronto just after Thanksgiving.
Paul Wesley FOX, O.C., was born in Orillia, Ont, on September 22, 1921 and died in Toronto on October 18, 2007, of complications from pulmonary fibrosis. He was 86. He is survived by his wife Joan, his three sons, two grand_sons, his older brother Arthur and his extended family.

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GLANVILLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-22 published
Manhunt in Huron County
Ontario Provincial Police swarm a rural Huron County township seeking Jesse IMESON, 22, right, wanted in a Windsor killing.
By Kate DUBINSKI and April KEMICK, Sun Media, Sun., July 22, Const. Charlie RAE of the Huron Ontario Provincial Police stands watch over the perimeter of a cordoned area just south of Crediton, where police continued their hunt last night for a suspect in the slaying of a Windsor man. (Susan BRADNAM, Sun Media)
Police officers and dogs combed a rural area of Huron County yesterday as they searched for an "armed and dangerous" suspect in a Windsor homicide.
Dozens of Ontario Provincial Police officers and dogs scoured a five-kilometre-wide stretch of land in Stephen Township -- from Ausable Line to Parr Line north of Mount Carmel Drive -- in search of Jesse Norman IMESON, 22.
IMESON is wanted by police in connection with the slaying of Carlos RIVERA, 26, of Lasalle.
The search for IMESON -- which earlier had police scouring Grand Bend, after investigators found the slain man's car there -- began when RIVERA's Friends reported him missing to Windsor police on Wednesday.
He was last seen at 6 a.m. that day.
Investigators tracing RIVERA's movements went to the Tap, a gay strip club in Windsor where he tended bar. RIVERA didn't show up for his Wednesday night shift, which wasn't like him, Friends said.
RIVERA was last seen in his silver two-door Honda Civic, which was being driven by IMESON, police said.
Police went to IMESON's Erie Street apartment in Windsor Thursday night and found RIVERA's "decomposing" body, said Windsor police Staff Sgt. William DONNELLY.
Police then found RIVERA's car in Grand Bend early Friday.
There, investigators obtained video of IMESON and another man at Gables, a Main Street bar.
The surveillance images were taken sometime between Wednesday and Friday, police said.
Police fear the man in the video with IMESON might be in danger, and searched the town for clues to their whereabouts.
"We've been doing door-to-door searches, going to businesses and asking them if they recognize anyone," Lambton Ontario Provincial Police Const. Todd MONAGHAN said yesterday.
"We're hoping the public knows something, or perhaps Mr. IMESON can put an end to this and come speak to us."
The man with IMESON has collar-length hair and was wearing a dark ball cap and white shirt, police said.
IMESON is six-foot-one, 200 pounds with short, almost shaved brown hair, brown eyes and numerous tattoos on his arms.
Windsor police said IMESON is known to police.
Last night, an Ontario Provincial Police helicopter joined the manhunt for IMESON in Huron County.
As night fell, marked and unmarked cruisers -- along with armed officers -- lined a perimeter in Stephen Township that framed corn fields, wooded areas and the Ausable River.
Passing motorists were warned not to pick up hitchhikers, and area homeowners were told to keep vehicles and homes locked.
"I've got my doors locked and I'm staying inside, because you just don't know," said one woman, who didn't want her name used.
Wayne GLANVILLE, whose property borders the search area, said it's rare to see such a police presence in the quiet countryside.
"It makes me a little nervous," he said of the suspect on the loose.
The Stephen Township area is full of nooks and crannies where a suspect could hide, said Huron Ontario Provincial Police Const. Jeff WALRAVEN.
"There's so many different avenues -- trees, bushes, holes," he said.
But scouring for suspects is "something the Ontario Provincial Police excels at," he added.
WALRAVEN wouldn't comment as to how long police would remain on the perimeter.
RIVERA was a "nice guy" who always had a smile for everyone, said one Tap employee who didn't want to be named.
"It's really scary. I'm hoping the police can find who did this."
An autopsy on RIVERA was slated for yesterday in London. No results have been released.

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GLANVILLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-24 published
DARBYSHIRE, Ann
Comfortably at Garry J. Armstrong Nursing Home, Ottawa on November 22, 2007 at the age of 81. Beloved wife of the late James Edward DARBYSHIRE. Loving mother of Stephen (Christine,) Katherine (Werner,) Jean (Jesse) and William (Anca). Cherished grandmother to Anthony, Duncan and Nicholas. Predeceased by 1 brother John GLANVILLE. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Monday, November 26, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated.
Condolences/donations/tributes at www.mcgarryfamily.ca

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GLASER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-20 published
Czech wartime refugee became one of Canada's greatest composers
Originally a pianist, he forced himself to write a fugue a week until he had mastered composition. He rejected avant-garde electronic and 12-tone techniques in favour of laments and tributes that probably drew inspiration from his memories of Europe, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
A Czech refugee from Nazism, Oskar MORAWETZ was 23 when he arrived in Toronto, but he remained a European in his sensibilities and his musicianship throughout his long and prolific career as one of Canada's best known and most frequently performed composers. Known for his deep emotion, lyricism and melodic line, Prof. MORAWETZ wrote more than 100 orchestral and chamber works, including Carnival Overture, Piano Concerto No. 1, Memorial to Martin Luther King and From the Diary of Anne Frank. His music, both vocal and instrumental, was performed by such musicians as Glenn GOULD, Maureen Forrester, Ben Heppner, Anton Kuerti, Yo-Yo Ma, Lois Marshall and Zubin Mehta.
His knowledge of the great European composers was encyclopedic, which made him a valuable teacher and mentor. In his own work, he eschewed his colleagues' embrace of avant-garde electronic and 12-tone techniques in favour of deeply felt emotional laments and tributes that probably drew their inspiration from his memories of Czechoslovakia, as it was before Hitler occupied the country, and the trauma both of his own escape and the horrific fate of many of his Friends and extended family members.
Pianist Mr. Kuerti remembered Prof. MORAWETZ as a composer "whose eclectic style was reminiscent of music written 50 to 75 years earlier, as were, among others, Bach and Brahms in their time.
"He was in no way experimental or avant-garde, during a time when radical innovation and destruction of tradition were highly prized by the critics and other would-be oracles, if not by the general public. For this he earned considerable disdain. But his music is absolutely sincere, just as his personality was, and it was extremely well crafted and has a distinct aroma of its own.
"He had an uncanny memory for a great deal of music from the past, and from his acquaintance with it he knew thoroughly all about balance, form, orchestration and sound colours. Had he been a visual artist, one would admire how wonderfully he could draw, rather than just splash paint on a canvas. I think some of his best works should continue to keep a foothold in the repertoire."
As well as two Juno awards, three senior fellowships from the Canada Council and a Golden Jubilee Medal, Prof. MORAWETZ was awarded the Orders of Ontario and Canada. Although he could speak several languages, he never lost his heavy Czech accent.
Oskar MORAWETZ was born January 17, 1917, in Svetla nad Sazavou, Czechoslovakia, the second son of four children of a secular Jewish couple, Richard and Frida (GLASER) MORAWETZ. His father made his living running jute factories that had been founded by his grandfather. When Oskar was 3, the family moved to Upice, a mill town in the foothills of the Sudeten mountains in western Czechoslovakia, where Mr. MORAWETZ and his older brother owned a jute factory, although they continued to spend their summers at the ancestral family estate in Svetla. As a child, Oskar loved building blocks, playing the piano and listening to music. When he was 10, his father moved the family to Prague so that the children could attend high school. They lived in a large apartment in the centre of Prague close to theatres and coffee houses and enjoyed an affluent, cultured lifestyle, complete with skiing vacations at Christmas and Easter.
By 1932, Mr. MORAWETZ was president of the International Cotton Congress, and Oskar was studying piano and theory at the Prague conservatoire under Karel Hoffmeister and Jaroslav Kricka, in addition to his academic classes. Fascinated by music, Oskar was barely interested in other subjects and did poorly in school despite extra tutoring. He graduated in 1935 and then suffered such a severe nervous breakdown (exacerbated by a fear that his fingers would lose the ability to play the piano) that his parents took him to Vienna to see a psychiatrist, who treated him for several weeks before the overwhelming sadness lifted.
Oskar had such an acutely developed ability to sight-read orchestral scores that George Szell recommended him for a position as assistant conductor of the Prague Opera. Despite his longing to become a musician, he never questioned his father's wish that he take forestry at university. In 1937, two years after he began studying forestry, he finally won his father's permission to move to Vienna to study piano. A year later, after he watched Adolf Hitler parade through the streets of Vienna, the anti-Semitism he had already endured increased dramatically and, following a run-in with the Gestapo, he headed home to Prague.
That September, England and France signed the Munich Agreement, giving Germany the Sudetenland, the sections of Czechoslovakia that were heavily populated with Germans and contained most of the country's fortifications. Mr. MORAWETZ sent Oskar to Paris, ostensibly to study music, but really to get him out of the country, and sent his son John and daughter Sonja to England. On March 15, 1939, Hitler marched his troops into Prague, slept in the Royal Castle and boasted that Czechoslovakia had ceased to exist. Mr. MORAWETZ was doubly marked because of his Friendship with political leaders Jan Masaryk and Edward Benes. Nevertheless, he managed to acquire exit permits for himself and his wife and fled to England, then sailed for Canada, arriving in September of 1939.
Oskar, thinking he was safe in Paris, where he was enjoying his musical life immensely, had declined to accompany his parents. But he was treated like an enemy alien and his bank account was frozen. After a series of harrowing near-arrests, he acquired an exit visit that took him from France to Italy by way of Switzerland, where he was helped by a former business associate of his father. In March of 1940, three months before the fall of France, he flew from Rome to the Canary Islands and boarded a ship sailing to the Dominican Republic. From there, he set off for Canada, landing on June 17, 1940. His brother Herbert and sister Sonja had come here in December of 1939; his brother John and his bride Maureen arrived after the war in November of 1946. The family was finally safely reunited in Toronto, although many of their relatives had been murdered in concentration camps. By then, Oskar, who had been rejected for military service because a chest X-ray had revealed dormant tuberculosis cells, had become a naturalized Canadian citizen.
From afar, Oskar had seen Canada as a cultural backwater, but it actually provided him with a nurturing artistic environment. He lived with his parents and dedicated himself to studying music. He graduated with a bachelor's degree in music (1944) and a doctorate in composition (1953) from the University of Toronto, studying under Leo SMITH and Albert GUERRERO -- two of his fellow piano students were Mr. GOULD and John Beckwith. Initially, he wanted to be a pianist, but because he had to write an original composition to complete the prerequisites for his bachelor's degree, he forced himself to write a fugue a week.
"He was very frustrated at first," said his daughter Claudia, "but after writing 40 or 50 of them, he found them easier to do." His graduate composition was his first string quartet, Opus 1, and it won a Composers, Authors, and Publishers Association of Canada award. In 1946, he began teaching at the Royal Conservatory of Music, was appointed to the faculty of the University of Toronto as an assistant professor six years later, where he continued to teach composition and harmony for the next three decades.
On June 7, 1958, at the age of 40, he married Ruth SHIPMAN, a pianist and piano teacher from London, Ontario, in a ceremony at Bloor Street United Church in Toronto. (Mr. GOULD played the organ.) The MORAWETZes settled in a house in Forest Hill, with him occupying an upstairs room furnished with a Heintzman piano and a large oak desk, where he composed music. There was a second piano in the living room, a Steinway grand, that Prof. MORAWETZ played occasionally, but it was used much more frequently by his wife, who gave music lessons there. Her office, aside from the kitchen, was in the basement.
Two years after his wedding, Prof. MORAWETZ won the first of three Senior Arts Fellowships from the Canada Council, which gave the young couple the opportunity to travel in Europe, attending concerts and making connections with musicians and, coincidentally, conceiving Claudia, their first child (now a computer scientist) who was born in 1962. Their son Richard (an economist) followed in 1966.
About this time, Russian cellist Mstislav Rostropovich asked Prof. MORAWETZ to compose a work for cello and orchestra. He said later that he was having trouble finding the inspiration to write a note until he watched the "slow, sad and very moving" funeral procession for Martin Luther King in Atlanta, three days after the civil-rights leader's assassination on April 4, 1968. When he saw the inscription on Rev. King's gravestone, taken from his favourite spiritual - "Free at last, thank God Almighty I am free at last!" - he resolved to write a work dedicated to Rev. King's memory: "I saw clearly in front of me the form, content and orchestration of my composition." Memorial to Martin Luther King was first performed by the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in Another death, long after the fact, inspired another of his memorable musical eulogies. In a radio interview in 1990, Prof. MORAWETZ spoke about the inspiration for From the Diary of Anne Frank (1970), explaining that he hadn't read the diary when it was published in the early 1950s because it reminded him too painfully of the fate of so many of his Friends and family members. When he read it in 1968, he was haunted by the entry in which Anne writes about her friend Hanneli Goslar ("Lies Goosens" in the published diary), who was arrested and sent to a concentration camp while the Frank family was in hiding in Amsterdam. The two girls met up again briefly in Bergen-Belsen in the last months of the war. "I still think it's the most moving passage of the whole book… [it] is nothing else but a prayer for the survival of her friend Lies," Prof. MORAWETZ once said. Soprano Lois Marshall premiered the work with the Toronto Symphony Orchestra in May of 1970.
Prof. MORAWETZ's marriage was not a harmonious one. The couple separated in 1982 and divorced two years later. At 67, Prof. MORAWETZ found himself not only divorced, but retired from his teaching job at the U of T. After some initial dilemmas about housekeeping, he settled happily into a busy lifestyle of composing, giving guest lectures and travelling for most of the next decade. He gave his last performance as a pianist in March, 1992. Two years later, the Elmer Iseler Singers sang one of his last major commissions, Prayer for Freedom, at the inaugural concert in the North York Performing Arts Centre. The work, which was commissioned by the Canada Council, draws on two anti-slavery poems written by 19th-century African-American writer Frances E.W. Harper, reflects Prof. MORAWETZ's thematic commitment to human rights and social justice.
The following year, in May of 1995, he went back to Prague, the city he had fled nearly 60 years earlier. He fell into a depression that was compounded by his failing eyesight and the arthritis that stiffened his fingers and made it difficult for him to play the piano. The breakdown may have been a reverberation of the severe depression he suffered as a teenager, with both episodes linked by a fear of being cut off from his music. He was never able to compose music again.
Six years later, he fell and hit his head, suffering brain damage that severely affected his memory and his ability to express himself. In 2002, after being diagnosed with Parkinson's syndrome, he moved into a retirement home in Toronto. Several symphony orchestras in Canadian cities, including Toronto, Edmonton and Ottawa played concerts of his works in January to celebrate his 90th birthday, and the University of Toronto music faculty organized a tribute to the man and the musician.
Oskar MORAWETZ was born on January 17, 1917, in Svetla nad Sazavou, Czechoslovakia. He died in his sleep at Leaside Retirement Residence in Toronto on June 13, 2007, of complications from Parkinson's syndrome. He was 90. He is survived by two children, two grandchildren and extended family. There will be a memorial service on June 28 at 7 p.m. in Walter Hall at the U of T's Edward Johnson building.

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GLASGOW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
GONYOU, Fred Winfield
Of Dresden and formerly of Wallaceburg and longtime resident of Sombra Township, passed away peacefully surrounded by his family on Sunday, January 7, 2007 in his 85th year. Fred is the beloved husband of Phillis May (née KERR.) Loving father of Elaine and Louis GATT of Wallaceburg, Doug and Carolyn of Bramalea, Harold and Chris of Saskatoon and Jane and the late Stan HETHERINGTON of Dresden. Dear grandfather of 10 grandchildren and 12 great-grandchildren. Brother of Pearl ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Florene GLASGOW, Edwin and Gordon GONYOU, Ella MICKEL, Norma MELOCHE and the late Kenneth, Calvin, Lloyd and Hazel. Friends may call at the Haycock-Cavanagh Funeral Home, 409 Nelson Street in Wallaceburg from 6-9 p.m. on Tuesday. The funeral services will be conducted by Reverend George FLEMING/FLEMMING at the funeral home on Wednesday, January 10 at 1 p.m. The interment will follow at Riverview Cemetery. If desired, remembrances to Charlemont Free Methodist Church or the charity of your choice may be left at the funeral home 519-627-3231

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GLASIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-17 published
GLASIER, Sheila Isobel (née SNEATH)
(April 7, 1929-Sept. 17, 2000)
A beautiful gracious lady. Loved and, to this day, fondly remembered by all who knew her. We, Sarah, Evan, Sheila, Arch and I are thankful for the 51 years, in whole and part, we shared love, life and happiness. Love, Jack

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GLASS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-10 published
ZUZEK, Henry " Hank"
Suddenly, on August 8, 2007 in his 75th year. Beloved husband of Janet (Jan) ZUZEK. Predeceased by Ivanka ZUZEK. Loving father of Mike and Anna ZUZEK of Toronto, Lynn and Kevin McKELLAR of Kitchener and Marie ZUZEK of Toronto. Loving grandfather of Michael ZUZEK and Hank McKELLAR. Dear brother of Ivan (Sue,) Robert (Lorrie,) Mary SOLTES and Josie GLASS (Richard.) Stepfather to Greg, David (Mary) and Eric (Gail) TUFFORD. Dear brother-in-law of John STARK (Sylvia). Step-grandfather to Harlan, Ethan, Bianca, Keegan and Erica TUFFORD. Favourite uncle to many nieces and nephews and working buddy Beaver the cat. Hank was passionately involved in the Slovenian communities, the British Sports Car Club, the St. Catharines Old Car Club, Chairman of the Building Committee of St. Helen's Church, playing the button box accordian and countless projects at his cherished home, Bluebird Ridge. Mr. ZUZEK is at the Vineland Chapel of the Tallman Funeral HomeS, 3277 King Street, Vineland where the family will receive Friends on Saturday 7-8: 30 and Sunday 2-4 and 7-8:30 with Vigil on Sunday at 3:30. The funeral mass will be celebrated at Saint_Joseph's Church, 135 Lingston Ave., Grimsby on Monday, August 13 at 10: 30 a.m. with Rite of Committal to follow in Mount Osborne Cemetery, Beamsville. If desired, donation to St. Helen's Church building Fund would be appreciated by the family.

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GLASSER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-24 published
McCULLOCH, Mabel Elizabeth (HALL)
At Elgin Abbey, Chesley on Monday, October 22nd, 2007 at the age of 92 years, the former Mabel HALL of Chesley and formerly of Port Elgin. Dear wife of Ian McCULLOCH of Port Elgin. Mother of Jim and his wife Karen of Paisley, and Marilyn GLASSER of Kitchener, and step-mother of Joyce REINHART of Port Elgin. She is also survived by thirteen grandchildren and twenty great-grandchildren. Sister of Mary GRAHLMAN, Ruby HOLDAWAY, Edna HEWITSON, and Carl, Lloyd, and Wilbur HALL. She is predeceased by her husband Cecil McCULLOUGH, daughter Sheila WALSH, three brothers, one stepson, and two sons-in-law. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin, (Town of Saugeen Shores) from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. on Thursday, October 25th, 2007.. Funeral services will be conducted in the chapel on Friday at 11: 00 a.m. with the Rev. Ken MacDONALD and the Rev. Wendell GRAHLMAN officiating. Interment Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial contributions to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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GLASSER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-04 published
NEWMAN, Jay, PhD, F.R.S.C.
After a short battle with cancer, Jay Newman passed away peacefully in the early morning of June 17th at Guelph General Hospital. Services were held at Beth Isaiah Synagogue in Guelph, Ontario where he was a member. Jay was predeceased by his beloved mother Kitty and father Lou NEWMAN, and is survived by his cousin Stephen GLASSER of New York. He was born in Brooklyn, New York February 28, 1948. Jay earned his B.A. at Brooklyn College in 1968, M.A. at Brown University, 1969, and Phd, from York University in 1971, and was a popular professor of philosophy at the University of Guelph where he spent his entire teaching career starting in 1971. Jay was the author of 11 books specializing in the areas of religion, family, technology and mass culture. He had visiting professorships at a number of universities including the University of Calgary, the University of Birmingham, Polytechnic University (New York) and Ryerson University. He was made Fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1995 and was past president of the Canadian Theological Society. He received a Distinguished Alumnus Award of Honor from Brooklyn College in 1988 and was recipient of the 2001 University of Guelph's President's Distinguished Professor Award. Jay will be missed by his family, many Friends and colleagues and the thousands of students he has taught over the years.

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GLAZIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-05 published
SSAINTOI, Jess Russell
In loving memory of Jess Russell SSAINTOI, a wonderful spirit who touched the lives of many. Jess passed away peacefully on Tuesday, January 2nd, 2007. Jess will be greatly missed by his loving devoted wife, Sonja Sophie and family; daughter, Anne Alexandra SSAINTOI; son-in-law, Mark GLAZIER and nephew Russell Lloyd SSAINTOI. Jess was a devoted husband and best friend to his loving wife, Sonja. He was born on January 31st, 1924 in Cranbrook, British Columbia, where as a young man he excelled at many sports, including boxing and swimming. At the age of sixteen he hopped a freight train and made his way to Vancouver where he soon became a plumbing apprentice to support his family through the great depression. On March 29th, 1943 he became a member of the United Association of Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United States and Canada (UA), Local 170, where he fought for worker rights and pioneered pension, health and welfare plans for members and their families. In 1967, he became the Canadian organizer for the UA General Office where unselfishly spent his life dedicated to improving the lives of working, their families and their communities throughout Canada. From his successful efforts he rose to become the UA's first Director of Canadian Affairs in 1972 and Vice-President in 1976. He retired on March 29th, 1993 to enjoy his retirement with his beautiful wife, Sonja. In March 2005, Jess suffered a series of small strokes and would not have survived without Sonja's constant love and care. Visitation will be held from 6: 30-8:00 p.m. on Wednesday, January 10th, 2007 at Forest Lawn Funeral Home. A celebration of life will be held at 2: 00 p.m., Thursday, January 11th, 2007 in the Chapel of Forest Lawn Funeral Home, 3789 Royal Oak Avenue, Burnaby, British Columbia. Memorial donations may be forwarded to J. Russell St. Eloi, UA Local 170 Scholarship Fund, attention: Alex MacDonald, Suite 201-3876 Norland Ave. Burnaby, British Columbia V5G 4T9. 'Jess Russell SSAINTOI's legacy will forever be remembered' Forest Lawn 604-299-7720

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