DICCECO o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-07-25 published
SMITH, David Stanley " Capt'n Crunch"
(Retired Firefighter)
Passed away at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood on Tuesday, July 17, 2007. Dave SMITH of Wasaga Beach, In his 71st year. Beloved husband of Shirley (née TUCK.) Dear father of David (Kim) of Barrie, Sonya (Dave) of Collingwood, Christine (Mark) of Bright and Mark (Amy) of Nottawa. Loving grandfather of Paula, Sabrina, Bradley (B.J.), Ashlee, Karla, Kyle, Lucas, Graydon and Gavin and great-grandfather of Chantelle, Brooklyn and Julianna. Brother of Viola (Lorne) RANCE, Norma DICCECO, Doreen CARTER, Marjorie SLOANE and the late Thelma COLUMBUS, Audrey MAW and Edward SMITH. Brother-in-law of Terry TUCK (late Maureen) and Gary (Addie) TUCK. Friends may call at the Lynn Stone Funeral Home, Elmvale from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service at the Prince of Peace Anglican Church, Wasaga Beach on Friday, July 20 at 2 p.m. Cremation to follow. Memorial Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Condolence book may be signed at www.lynnstonefuneralhome.com
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DICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-09 published
DICK, The Honourable Kenneth Y.
Died quietly in his sleep at dawn Friday, 5 January 2007 at Saint Michael's Hospital. Born 11 December 1909 and raised in Milton, he was predeceased by three brothers and two sisters and his wife Helen née WINFIELD. He is survived by sisters Kathleen (Kitty) GIBB of Toronto, Willamine (Billie) MARSHALL of Milton; daughter Sally ORVISS (Claire,) Toronto, son Kenneth (Carol) of Guelph; grandchildren Andrea (Hans), Vancouver; Sara (Shane), Houston, Texas; Laura (Steve), Whitehorse; Avril (Jason) and Gordon of Guelph; and great-grand_sons Dylan, Jackson and Jakob. Graduate of Osgoode Hall, University of Toronto, he practiced law in Milton both before and after World War 2, during which he served as an Officer with the Lorne Scots and the Sherbrooke Fusilliers. Upon his appointment to the bench in Oxford County, mother and dad moved to Woodstock in the middle '60s. Sally and I extend great gratitude to the staff and Chaplaincy (Toni) of Saint Michael's. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Following cremation, a memorial service will be held at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church (King and Simcoe), 2 p.m. Saturday, 20 January 2007. Arrangements entrusted to Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

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DICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-28 published
DICK, Kenneth Young
Country lawyer, D-Day tank commander, judge, parliamentary candidate, Blue Jays fan, amateur chef, father, grandfather, great-grandfather, friend. Born December 11, 1909, in Milton, Ontario Died January 5 in Toronto in his sleep, aged 97.
By Phillip S. UTTING, Page L6
Ken DICK was a tall and slender 6-foot-plus gentleman who was physically perfect for the title "Judge" even if he had never become one.
Born the son of a country lawyer, he was one of eight children and graduated from university in Toronto in 1932, just in time to experience the Great Depression.
In 1940, he married a young lady from Hamilton, Ontario - Helen WINFIELD. Unfortunately, the Second World War had broken out, and while Helen gave birth to their first child (a son) he volunteered for military service. In order to serve in a front-line combat role, he did not disclose his law degree. He eventually rose through the ranks to officer status in the armoured corps.
As a tank commander, Capt. DICK and his squadron were among the first waves to hit the Normandy Beach on D-Day, June 6, 1944 it wasn't long before a shell struck Ken's tank with devastating effect. His driver was killed instantly and another crewman died before his eyes, while he too was badly wounded.
Indeed, for him the battle of Normandy was over and he spent the next six months recovering in a military hospital in England. After he recovered, the army discovered that he was a lawyer and commanded him to serve as an army lawyer until the war ended in 1945, at which time he returned to civilian life in Canada.
He resumed his law practice in Milton and enjoyed life with Helen and his son, Kenneth. In due course a daughter, Sally, was born. Ken served as president of the Rotary Club and the chamber of commerce while accepting the nomination and running for the federal Liberal party under Prime Minister Lester B. Pearson.
In 1965, there was a vacancy for the federally appointed judge in Oxford County (Woodstock), some 160 kilometres to the west and he decided to accept it. He served in that role for the next 20 years.
Helen died as the result of breast cancer in 1982 and, by regulation, he was retired from the bench in 1985. He was close to his children and from them received wonderful support during those difficult days, and with their help he relocated to Toronto, to a centrally located condominium (close to theatres, the Toronto Symphony, libraries, Blue Jays baseball and interesting dining facilities).
He also volunteered at Toronto General Hospital and regularly attended (until he was 85) lectures at U of T.
Ken went to St. Lawrence Market regularly. Some of the vendors looked out for their friend "the Judge" every Saturday morning. Having been raised in a rural setting, he spoke their language and could discuss vegetable crops and the best cuts of meat as well as marketing problems.
Such discussions were not frivolous, for often his market procurements were in preparation for a major dinner party, seating as many as 10 or 12 people.
He prepared them by himself, and they were wonderful presentations (complete with fine wines and soft classical music in the background).
When it came to Blue Jays baseball, there were few fans who understood and empathized with the team more than he did.
As one watched a game with him that became clear - he always referred to the players by first name: "Oh good! Jimmy's up to bat next… and he's got that pitcher figured out, you watch!" Or, "Did you see the way Roberto snagged the line drive? Gad, he's good!"
Well over 200 people attended his memorial service, including members of the legal/judiciary profession, the military, hospital and university personnel, and yes, vendors and shopkeepers from along Front Street and the St. Lawrence Market.
Phillip S. UTTING is a friend of Ken DICK.

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DICKER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
SMITH, Anne Marie (née SCHROEDER)
(formerly of London, Dixie and Campbellville). Peacefully at home, in Peterborough, on Tuesday, January 09, 2007. Anne was born January 16, 1928 in Dashwood, Ontario. Beloved wife of Frederick SMITH for almost 57 years. Cherished Mom of Lynda CLARK of Peterborough and Tom SMITH and his wife Vicki of Windsor. She was Grams or Annie to her grandchildren Jessica and Heather PALLETT, Adam, Erik and Amanda SMITH and great-grandchildren Andrew and Ryan. Dear sister of Harold and his wife Jean, Jacob and his wife Patricia and the late Hubert and his wife Audrey. Sister-in-law of Ethel and Doug HOGG, Carole Ann and Frank DICKER, Jack BAXTER and his late wife Jeanne, Bert HAGGIS and his late wife Phyllis and the late Ellen and her husband Bill McGIBBON. She will be fondly remembered by her many nieces and nephews and her many special Friends. Visitation will take place on Friday, January 12, 2007, from 1: 00 p.m. till the time of the service at 3:00 p.m. in the chapel of Comstock Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 356 Rubidge Street, Peterborough, (705) 745-4683. In lieu of flowers memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be greatly appreciated by Anne's family.

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DICKER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2007-01-09 published
BAXTER, Jeanne Florence (née SMITH)
Suddenly, at London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Campus, on Friday, December 15, 2006, Jeanne Florence BAXTER (née SMITH) of Strathroy. Best friend and loving wife of John (Jack) BAXTER. Loving and devoted mother to Mary-Ellen (Terry) BROWN of Strathroy and Rob BAXTER of Sherwood Park, Alberta. Jeanne was a most loving and devoted, proud grandma to J.J. BROWN (Laura) of Strathroy, Terry BROWN (Tess) of London, Angela BROWN of Strathroy, Stephanie BAXTER of Mississauga and Warren BAXTER of Sherwood Park, Alberta. Great-grandmother to a very special little man, Quentin MITCHELL of Strathroy. Cherished sister of Fred (Ann) SMITH of Peterborough, Ethel (Doug) HOGG of London, and Carole Ann (Frank) DICKER of London. Sister-in-law of Bert HAGGIS of London. Predeceased by parents Bill and Florence (née BILTON) SMITH, sisters Ellen McGIBBON (2005,) Phyllis HAGGIS (2000) and brothers-in-law Bill McGIBBON (1996) and Ray MAHOOD. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends called at the Elliott-Madill Funeral Home, Mount Brydges, on Sunday, December 17 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service followed on Monday from Saint_John Anglican Church, 34 head Street North, Strathroy, commencing at 11 a.m. Father Willi KAMMERER officiated. A private family interment to follow at a later date. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the charity of ones choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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DICKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
ARENA, Julian Jackson
Julian Jackson was born at home Saturday August 25, 2007, 9 lbs, at 6: 07 p.m. Julian is welcomed into the world and surrounded by loving grandparents, aunts, uncles, and many family and Friends. Paul and Clare (née DICKER) would like to thank the truly amazing midwives Mary SHARPE and Chris STERNBERG from Riverdale Community Midwives for being there.

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DICKERHOF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-14 published
DICKERHOF, Sister Pulcheria, S.S.P.C.
(Missionary Sister of St. Peter Claver)
Peacefully at Saint_Joseph's Infirmary on Friday, July 13, 2007. Predeceased by her parents Jakob and Maria Theresia and by her three brothers and two sisters. Lovingly remembered in Canada by her great niece, Brigitte REGENSCHEIT and her daughter, Kori KELLER and in Zurich by her nieces Hedwig REGENSCHEIT (Anton) and Agnes (Ferdi) LUETHI and nephew Max (Doris) BOHN. Visitation at Saint_Joseph's Convent, 3377 Bayview Avenue, Toronto, from 3: 00 p.m. to 8: 00 p.m. on Sunday, July 15, 2007 with Vigil Service at 4:00 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial on Monday, July 16, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. at Saint_Joseph's Convent followed by interment at Holy Cross Cemetery.

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DICKEY o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2007-07-25 published
DICKEY, Nancy Arlene (SOMERVILLE) (March 16, 1958-July 29, 2005)
Since Nancy left us nearly two years ago, not a day has passed that we don't think of some special way she touched us with her incredible qualities of love, faith and hope. According to W.E.B. Dubois, "There is in this world no such force as the force of a person who is determined to rise. The human soul cannot be chained". Nancy's indomitable spirit, enthusiasm and compassion for others imparted courage and determination into all those who knew her and we continue to dance to the beautiful music she played for us each day of her earthly journey. Remembered lovingly by your family and Friends.
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DICKIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-18 published
'Brilliant alchemist' inspired Toronto and its artists
Conductor's determination transformed the Canadian Opera Company - and made its new home a reality, writes Sandra MARTIN
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Everything about Richard BRADSHAW was big: his personality, his intellect, his appetite for ideas and experience, his ambition, his optimism, his heart and his faith in God. He lived in Toronto for fewer than 20 years, but his impact was huge. His vision and determination built the Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, one of the world's very best theatres for ballet and opera, both acoustically and architecturally. He transformed a regional opera company into an internationally recognized one; he gave us our first full production of Richard Wagner's Ring Cycle he pushed the artistic boundaries of who should direct and perform opera. He made opera the hottest ticket in town.
Tall, grey-haired and bold, with florid cheeks and eyes encased in black Buddy Holly glasses, Mr. BRADSHAW was both an artist who could inspire his musicians and an entrepreneur who could sell his vision. Asked in an interview which came first during what he liked to call "the 30 years war," making music or building an opera house, he replied: "In the middle of the night, I worry about money. When I get up in the morning, I look forward to conducting."
Writer Margaret Atwood captured that dual capacity in an e-mail message from Scandinavia. "Richard BRADSHAW was one of a kind. He was passionate about the work itself - whatever it might be - and set the highest standards for it. But he was playful and innovative as well, and a joy to work with. We saw the premiere of The Handmaid's Tale in Denmark together - and I could just hear him thinking about how he would do it if he could get it to Toronto - which he did, triumphantly. His specialty was making silk purses out of the sow's ears handed to him time and time again by our mingy politicians. Nobody could make two cents stretch as far as he could.... The best tribute to him will be to try to match his commitment to excellence, and his grand vision of what we can be - as opposed to what we sometimes all too drearily are."
Richard James BRADSHAW was born in Rugby in the British Midlands, the only child of Alfred James BRADSHAW, an accountant, and his wife, Florence Mary (DUNKLEY.) When Richard was quite small, the family moved to Higham Ferrers in Northamptonshire. From his father, an amateur musician and a dedicated rereader of Charles Dickens, he inherited a love of literature. His mother passed on her acutely sensitive ear - he once scored 100 per cent in an aural exam.
When Richard was 8, his parents took him to a piano performance of Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, and it stuck as his earliest musical memory. As a boy, he was also learning to play the piano and the organ. By the time he was 12, he had a paying job playing the organ at the local church. Two years later, he took at least symbolic steps toward his career goal when he conducted a rehearsal of Beethoven's Pastoral Symphony with the Kettering Orchestral Society. But music was not his entire life. He loved sports, especially cricket and rugby, and collected stamps and indulged in the peculiarly British pastime of trainspotting.
To please his accountant father, who wanted him to have a broad educational background, he studied English literature at the University of London, graduating with an honours degree in 1968. At the same time, he was continuing his musical education, playing the harpsichord, organ and even the flute and studying conducting privately with Sir Adrian Boult.
After university, he returned home and founded Music at Higham, serving as its musical director for four years. Then, with his entrepreneurial juices flowing, he moved back to the capital and founded the New London Ensemble and conducted the Saltarello Choir from 1972 to 1975. He said later (in a Toronto Life profile) that these years were "among the most wonderful" in his life because there was government money for the arts, and he felt, with the confidence of youth, that he "could do anything."
What he needed, though, was a boost so that he could work with a major orchestra. That came in the usual way: a combination of luck, talent and chutzpah. A musician friend's father heard him and introduced him to conductor Sir Colin Davis, who was intrigued enough to attend one of Mr. BRADSHAW's rare London concerts. Sir Colin then called the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic, which had already declined to hear Mr. BRADSHAW conduct, and secured him an audition. Mr. BRADSHAW won a fellowship to work with the prestigious orchestra and went on to Glyndebourne in 1975 as the chorus director of its opera festival. That was where he made another fortuitous connection, with administrator Diana HEPBURNE- SCOTT. They were married on June 30, 1977. In many ways, she was Mr. BRADSHAW's antithesis - shy, intensely private - but also his steadying counterbalance - ironic, stalwart, commonsensical. It was an extremely rare rehearsal or performance that didn't find her quietly sitting in the audience, listening and watching intently.
That same year, he was invited to join the San Francisco Opera as resident conductor, a position he held for the next dozen years, mostly under Kurt Herbert Adler as general director. Mr. Adler, a Teutonic maestro who controlled every aspect of the company, from costumes and sets to maintenance budgets, was a grandiose influence on Mr. BRADSHAW. While working at San Francisco Opera, Mr. BRADSHAW often accepted appointments as a guest conductor, which is how he first came to the Canadian Opera Company in Toronto in 1988, to conduct Tosca.
In 1989, he was hired as the Canadian Opera Company's chief conductor and head of music, arriving just in time to see the elaborate plans to build a ballet and opera house in midtown Toronto jettisoned by the provincial government because of cost overruns and fundraising shortfalls. He was promoted to artistic director in 1994 after the abrupt and choleric departure of Brian DICKIE, the man who had hired him four years earlier, and was named general director in January, 1998, making him the first musician to lead the Canadian Opera Company since Ettore Mazzoleni in the late 1950s.
He conducted more than 60 operas during his tenure with the Canadian Opera Company and kept up a steady off-season life travelling around the world as a guest conductor. While he was criticized for not putting more Canadian operas on the stage - he refused to compromise his musical standards to nationalist fervour - he did commission at least two homegrown operas, The Golden Ass and The Scarlet Princess. Meanwhile, he continued the composer-in-residence program established by predecessor Lotfi Mansouri and spiced up the lineup of crowd-pleasing operas such as Carmen, The Barber of Seville and Rigoletto with edgier modern offerings, including Bluebeard's Castle, Salome and Jenufa. He also persuaded talented and innovative directors from film and theatre to work in opera.
Mr. BRADSHAW was "so passionate" about such provocative and novel approaches to presenting both new and classical work, according to film director Atom Egoyan. After seeing Mr. Egoyan's Exotica, Mr. BRADSHAW approached him about directing Salome.
"He was a brilliant alchemist who was able to put together designers and directors and singers. That was his craft," Mr. Egoyan said yesterday between preproduction meetings for his next film, Adoration. "And then he was able to respond to the production and colour the orchestra to accommodate the vision he is seeing on the stage. He was the glue that put it all together."
Salome and François Girard's production of Oedipus Rex with Symphony of Psalms (which won eight Dora Mavor Moore awards in 1997) attracted younger audiences, and Mr. BRADSHAW's decision to take productions such as Robert Lepage's double bill of Bela Bartok's Bluebeard's Castle and Arnold Schoenberg's Erwartung to the prestigious Edinburgh Festival won the company international acclaim that resounded in the box office back home. He would return to these directors when he undertook his audacious scheme to present a full Ring Cycle -- all 17 hours of it -- in 2006 to coincide with the opening of the opera house.
Journalist Barbara Amiel, a devotee of Wagner, has seen the Ring Cycle in Bayreuth, Munich, London and Berlin, among other places. "Musically, BRADSHAW's Toronto Ring matched any of them and in places, exceeded some," she said in an e-mail message this week.
"To do this with any orchestra would be magnificent. To do this with a Canadian orchestra that essentially had to learn a new language is a miracle," she said. "He sweated musicality and that orchestra he loved mopped it up. All the young musicians he laboured over and encouraged (they look like none of them have seen the other side of 30) are as much his monument as the bricks and glass of his opera house."
And it very definitely was his opera house. Architect Jack DIAMOND has been widely praised for designing an auditorium that has glorious acoustics and ambience and a building that embraces audiences and the city, but it was Mr. BRADSHAW's vision and grit that made it happen.
"What was extraordinary about Richard was his relentless optimism," said Kevin Garland, former executive director of the Canadian Opera House Corp. and now executive director of the National Ballet of Canada. "He never gave up and never stopped being determined that it would happen and never stopped badgering governments to make sure that they knew it was important to support the arts."
Richard James BRADSHAW was born in Rugby, England, on April 16, 1944. He died in Toronto of a heart attack on August 15, 2007. He was 63. He is survived by his wife, Diana, two children and extended family.
A day in the life
There must have been times when Richard BRADSHAW was in resting mode, but they aren't on record. In 2003, I shadowed him for a day that began before 9 a.m. with a planning meeting for the Ring Cycle, followed by a press conference to announce the new season, a lunchtime lecture at which he twisted a few fundraising arms, a Bay Street meeting with architect Jack Diamond before the Canadian Opera Company board's building committee, a quick trip home for dinner, during which he snatched time to play Bach's Goldberg Variations on the piano before heading to the Hummingbird Centre to oversea a rehearsal of A Masked Ball that lasted until almost midnight, when he headed home for a stack of paperwork and a large Scotch before climbing into bed. The next day, he was at it again, except he also conducted the orchestra at the dress rehearsal of Jenufa.

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DICKIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-18 published
Conductor, diplomat, dreamer, wit
By Robert EVERETT- GREEN, Page R5
Opera has many heroes; few of them are found in orchestra pits. Richard BRADSHAW came to the Canadian Opera Company in 1989 in a supporting role, but by the time he died on Wednesday night, he had become a hero in the opera community and in his adopted city of Toronto.
He was the kind of figure that many arts organizations see only once, a master builder who raised his company to a permanently higher level. His monument stands on a busy corner in downtown Toronto, where the opera house he dreamed of for two decades opened scarcely a year ago.
All this past year, the company's first season in the new Four Seasons Centre for the Performing Arts, Bradshaw's entry into the pit on performance nights became a ritual moment for the audience, which never failed to give him a long, loud ovation. I'm sure that as someone who knew the ups and downs of a life in the theatre, he was both flattered and amused to be cheered before a single note had been played.
He was a man of large appetites and tremendous spirit, who in our last extended conversations told me that the only irresponsible option in art was to avoid taking risks. At crucial moments in his career, BRADSHAW took bold chances whose benefits will long outlast him.
He had a diplomat's sense of where alliances could be built, and a field commander's instinct for the timely seizure of new ground. He was a wit and a great storyteller, who loved to appear to be letting you in on a secret whose exposure usually moved him a small step closer to some strategic objective.
It's strange to think how easily he might have missed finding his true life's work. When he arrived at the Canadian Opera Company 18 years ago, he was an itinerant opera conductor who had never led a major company. He was hired not as artistic director but as chief conductor, essentially the same job he had held for 12 years at the larger, more prestigious San Francisco Opera. He was given a narrow mandate to improve musical standards in a company that was preparing for rapid growth and a move into a new ballet-opera house.
The house never happened, the economy went sour, and the company's general director, Brian DICKIE, left abruptly with five years still on his contract. After a cursory search for a replacement, the board named BRADSHAW artistic director in early 1994.
The predictable next act would have seen the new man making all the hard choices and painful cuts, before being nudged aside for a more experienced leader. The budget shrank 8 per cent during BRADSHAW's first year, and subscription sales were crumbling. But if opera was a poker game, and he was a player with a shaky hand, he much preferred to double his bet than to fold. He was soon building ambitious productions that the company really couldn't afford, and making annual raids on its modest endowment fund.
The Canadian Opera Company seemed headed for disaster when BRADSHAW became general director in 1998. But he had already half-convinced the board and many donors that his optimistic vision of the company's future could become true.
His Canadian Opera Company was a broad endeavour that engaged artists from film, theatre, dance and literature (and by extension, the audiences for those forms), as well as a civic project that needed a proper place to flourish. He understood the importance not just of putting on good shows, but of making the art form itself seem exciting and even hip. He engineered a gradual change in the Canadian Opera Company's public image and sense of self that had begun when Dickie brought in Robert Lepage and Michael Levine for the company's landmark 1993 production of Schoenberg's Erwartung and Bartok's Bluebeard's Castle.
BRADSHAW built on that success, the Canadian Opera Company's cultural credit began to rise and an adventurous new audience joined the old one. Against all odds, BRADSHAW charmed and lobbied and bullied his way to a new opera house. His most daring gambit may have been to announce that the company would begin staging Wagner's four-part Ring cycle in 2003 (later postponed by a year), and in the next breath to say that it was "inconceivable" for such a thing to happen without a new theatre.
At that point the company still had no land and no proof of government support. BRADSHAW had said for years that the company needed a place to do big projects like the Ring; now he was insisting that the hall must be built because the Ring was going to happen there.
It was a crazy-brave move, and he knew it. He compared himself to the poker-playing heroine of Puccini's The Girl of the Golden West, who wins the game with an extra deck of cards hidden in her stocking. "I must think I've got another pack," he said.
All the while, he was continuing with his very first mandate: to improve musical standards. The Canadian Opera Company orchestra improved enormously during his tenure. Many gifted Canadian voices passed through the Canadian Opera Company ensemble, though Canadians could be sparse in shows whose casts sometimes seemed to have been airlifted en masse from Eastern Europe. But in recent years, Canadian singers such as Isabel Bayrakdarian, Adrianne Pieczonka, Michael Schade and Russell Braun took leading roles in Canadian Opera Company performances and on the company's seven CD recordings for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
BRADSHAW expanded the Canadian Opera Company's repertoire to include major operas by Janacek, Debussy and Mussorgsky, as well as rare but important works by Rossini, Stravinsky and Handel. He programmed contemporary operas by Hans Werner Henze and Poul Ruders, and made a success of them. But in his 13 years as artistic head, he brought only one Canadian opera to the company's mainstage. His flair for building alliances didn't extend to those who might have helped develop a strong Canadian repertoire for the Canadian Opera Company.
As a conductor, he had a practical, down-to-earth approach. His performances emphasized energy, precision and balance. He was often less effective at exposing the poetic aspects of a score. His great talent was for bringing together all the forces that an opera company needs, both onstage and off.
Last year's Ring cycle, the biggest single project he and the company had ever attempted, was a triumph beyond BRADSHAW's own high expectations. He often talked about the lure of the "unobtainable ticket," and last season that became true for the Canadian Opera Company, which sold out its entire first year at the Four Seasons.
BRADSHAW died at the peak of his achievement and popularity. It would be absurd to say his work was done; he was only 63, and had great plans for the future, including the Canadian Opera Company premiere (later this season) of Janacek's From the House of the Dead, and a promised rendezvous with Prokofiev's War and Peace. But the goals he had set his heart on had been achieved. He fought the good fight with all his strength, and as far as is possible in the arts, he lived a hero's life.

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DICKINSON o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-06-20 published
An Essay on the Anniversary of my Father's Death
By Gary EDWARDS, Page 6
David Francis EDWARDS (February 7, 1956-June 17, 2006.
Upon my father's death last June, one of the more pressing questions we faced was a matter of two saddles. What to do with them? David was, at best, an aspiring horseman and, from the beginning, his equestrian ambitions were the topic of many (often nasty) arguments in the Edwards household.
I was 15 when he brought, in conspiracy with my sister, the Arabs home. Most might recoil at purchasing livestock without even a few acres of land on which to stable it. My father's hallmark practicality (he trained as a Certified Management Accountant, let's not forget) was, how ever, voiceless against his unbridled desire for a horse - or two We could have lived in a sewer on the moon and would eventually find ourselves owning the beasts.
Of course, our horsies never ended up being more than lawn ornaments. This is not to say David lost interest. He just never quite got around to breaking them. One by one, a number of things accrued around them: a lunge line used once or twice, bridles, a beautiful 30 acre farm, the most oddly painted barn in Grey Co., combs and brushes, fencing books, magazines. And, of course the two saddles. If we'd set them up in the living room and invited guests to sit on them, they'd have seen more use.
I'm sure a lot of people, myself included, laughed at my father for his flight of fancy. But we laugh when we ought meditate. David didn't break the horses because he didn't need to. For all of his account books, number crunching and shrewdness, he was essentially a dreamer who could be just as easily satisfied with what might be as with what is. He was a grasshopper masquerading as an ant.
The memory of my father I put the highest price on is not my own but one I inherited from him. When he was a little boy of about four, still living at Edwards Lake in Singhampton, he was very envious of his brothers and sisters simply because they had the great privilege of attending school. Refusing to miss out, he would head to the orchard to conduct his own mock-school. I doubt Wordsworth could conceive a more beautiful image than that of a little blonde boy making a schoolhouse out of the orchard.
David did make it to a real school where reality proved less appetizing than fantasy. Unaware of the miniature hierarchies that grow free as weeds where people are concerned, the young boy made the great mistake of sitting in a desk regularly occupied by a schoolmate of rather larger proportions. The two boys were quite mystified by one another: the older boy at the nerve of the younger and the younger at being ejected from his chosen place. He quickly shed his orchard-nourished notions about schooling.
Daddy thereafter made a career out of running away from school. Ellen DAVIDSON remembers his daily escapes. He would show up and apparently, when he'd decided he'd learned enough for the day, make for the road Poor Ellen, of course, would be in hot pursuit. It was only after more "persuasive" discipline that he managed to stay in his desk the entire day.
It did, as life often does, get better. In her eulogy - for my father, Rosemary DICKINSON told a story I shall carry to my own death with pride. In those days, Rosemary liked to have her students discuss current topics in formal debate. She would present the topic, designate the "Yea" and "Nay" sides of the room and allow students to choose their preferred positions. Only once did the plan almost falter. While the class would usually sort themselves into piles of "Yes" and "No", one day a topic (long-forgotten) brought them all over to one side of the room. Rosemary looked, probably with some distress, at the empty half and wondered aloud if a debate would be possible. A lone boy emerged, offering to take the opposing side, thus pitting himself against the rest of the class. Other students eventually joined him but it was my father who was willing to "do it" alone. This courage is a quality from which my mother, my sister and I benefited our entire lives.
David grew up in what was, even in the 50's and 60's, a large family. His parents, Lillian (née WINTERS) and Francis, managed a grand total of 9 children: Bonnie, Bill, Jim, Marion, Joyce, David, Paul, Kenny and Brian. To call the Edwards boys boisterous would be putting it lightly. I have heard enough Dukes of Hazzard-esque tales about my uncles to know why eyebrows raise when I inform people I'm an Edwards. Of the boys, my father (along with his younger brother Kenny) was considerably more docile. This is not to say David couldn't be difficult&hellip
He had, for example, a tendency to know everything. Whether it was on the matter of how to birth a calf, when to plant or the state of the nation, young David was expert. Of course, he made the mistake of sharing all his knowledge - which irritated his own father to no end. Rare is the Edwards who cannot recall the shouting matches and temper tantrums (approaching fisticuffs) that would unravel between father and son at the kitchen table. Years later, seeing my own infallible knowledge set against my father's, my grandmother would note "just like old times". The continuity pleased her.
Though a bit enraptured with his own intelligence, David was clearly a very smart young man, as former teacher Edna LUKIANCHUK has it, "a silver tongue". Becoming a management accountant, he found an outlet for his combination.
I cannot imagine how difficult life must have been for my father. To be in school with a pretty wife and two young children is unthinkable to me. While most students in their early-to-mid twenties are preoccupied with the flutterings of the heart, making the rent and maybe passing the odd exam, my father had a stay-at-home wife, an infant daughter with an enchanting smile and a toddler son whose favourite game was, "Let's bother Daddy while he's studying." When all of that was finally finished and the diploma was mounted on the wall, David had to figure out just what to do with his family. And so, like all good sons of Osprey, he moved home.
It wasn't long before David and his wife Sandra (née BERRIAULT) were building their house on Inglis Drive just off the 8th Line. For their home, they selected a ravine lot with a spectacular view of the Beaver River behind.
Meanwhile, David served Craigleith Ski Club as Chief Financial Officer. There, he made a number of lasting Friendships, most notably with his dear cousin Lois PARKS. Dad was a kind and capable, though volatile, boss, were there a thermometer measuring emotional temperatures in the office, it would have burst many times. Despite the heated arguments (perhaps because of them), David and his staff retained exceptional solidarity. At Devil's Glen (where David became General Manager in 2003), he began to develop similar bonds.
It was, however, as a community leader that David made his most resounding public success. Those days of community work were tireless. There was the Feversham Fair Board, the Hospital Board (first Markdale and then on to Owen Sound), Municipal politics, Heritage Celebrations, Hall Boards and so forth. All of these civic projects meant little sleep and much stress but also a feeling that he was contributing to the thing he cared about (after his family) most: the community his ancestors built 150 years before. David particularly distinguished himself on Osprey Council where his terrier-like tenacity, know-how with numbers and lathe-like tongue made him darling to some, pest to others. This, I am learning as I grow older, is another family trait. Indeed, when asked why he would vote for David in one election, an older gentleman (perhaps remembering David's grandfather's tenure as Deputy Reeve) said, "Well he's an Edwards and they don't take orders from nobody." Whether or not this quality is a mark of integrity or sheer contrariness only heaven will say.
The more shoes Jennifer and I outgrew, the less involved Daddy became in civic life. His interests slowly turned to more personal passions: his horses, hobby farming and reading. Shortly after the horses, there came a farm near Rob Roy at the end of a blind sideroad. This was, with neighbours almost 1 km away, a lonely place where passing cars provided heart-racing excitement and endless speculation. He and Mother, however, found immense peace here.
For David, if not for me, there was always something to do on the farm. Jennifer, my sister, saw these jobs as a source of amusement that (to me) bordered on the perverse. They performed the tasks joking and chattering away like jaybirds - staging mock executions with the chainsaw, performing elaborate imitations, teasing the dog. For me, each task was a race against time. David, conversely, considered a job worth doing was worth doing thoroughly. My experiments with "time conservation" were not appreciated.
There were also the famous trees. Over the years, hundreds of them - ranging from costly maples and mountain ash to little pine seedlings - made their way into the soil. They were all placed, planted and maintained with a clock-maker's precision.
Reading, however, was a thing over which we could bond. Like many readers, Daddy was greedy with time. "Oh", he would moan and wail, "why can't everyone just leave me alone to finish my book." Only Mother could pry his hands from the covers.
One can't talk about my father without mentioning a tendency to a little innocent gossip. "What's the scoop?" he would ask, hurling himself into conversation. Hearing and telling little stories of minor misdeeds was the lifeblood of our family. This is not to say we're a malicious bunch -curious (I hope) is a better adjective.
Up until the death of David's mother in July, 2005, my father and I would regularly head over to the home farm to hear gossip that was recent, twenty years old or even one hundred years past. Together, they would talk about people I'd never met, sometimes my father had never met and occasionally people my grandmother never met. Yet, these little narratives (these gossips) were so intricately woven as to appear life-like. There are times when my Great-Great-Grandmother (who disappeared in the Huckleberry Marsh in 1915 and may or may not have been murdered) seems more real to me than the people I spend hours with each day. Perhaps this is because many of the most intimate relationships have always formed around gossip and story -- around memory.
On the night my father died, we went for a drive - our habit on summer evenings. The week had been busy: I was in the throes of an essay on Milton and terrorism and recovering from food poisoning; my sister graduated days before; he and Mother had just planted a number of trees; there were lots of things to worry about at work. We went down to Tim Horton's where he (for once) denied his famed sweet tooth and chose a tea biscuit. I had yogurt. We had a quiet drive home.
In the morning, we had a pair of saddles.

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DICKINSON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-05-31 published
WITTING, Edward Leslie " Les"
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Southampton, on Tuesday May 29, 2007. Les WITTING of Southampton and formerly of Saugeen Township in his 84th year. Brother of Marjorie DICKINSON of Allenford. Dear Uncle of Donna DICKINSON of London, Barb CARSON of Owen Sound, Larry DICKINSON (Karen) of Allenford, and Steven DICKINSON (Sherry) of Owen Sound. Uncle Les will be fondly remembered by his many great nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents William and Charlotte, and by his brothers Wilbert, and Sidney. Cremation. A Graveside Service will be held on Saturday June 2, 2007 at Sanctuary Park Cemetery, Port Elgin, at 11 a.m. Expressions of Remembrance to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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DICKINSON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-09-19 published
DICKINSON, Robert " Bob" Hugh
Passed away peacefully with his family at his side at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Monday, September 17, 2007 in his 64th year. Bob was a best friend and husband to Janie (nee McROBB) for the past 39 years. Loving father to Rob, wife Debra (MOTHERSELL) of Owen Sound; Terrina, husband Robin LAING of Medicine Hat, Alberta; Scott, wife Michelle (LANKTREE) of Gore Bay, Ontario and Kristopher (Kris) and his wife Paula CRAWFORD of Brampton. Also survived by five grandchildren McKayla, Zoe, Parker, Rachel and Cuinn. Survived by two sisters Joan ACHESON (Doug) and Patricia GEORGE (Al,) his sister-in-law Marg DICKINSON and his numerous nieces and nephews. Predeceased by father Hugh (Brunie) DICKINSON and mother Robena (Beanie) DICKINSON and two brothers Stanley and Jerry. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home for visiting on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and Friday from 12 noon until service time. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock with Rev. Claire MILLER officiating. Interment, Elora Cemetery. Memorial donations to Sleeping Children Around the World would be appreciated. Messages of condolence are welcome at www.tannahill.com

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DICKISON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-20 published
ACTON, Wilfred " Rex"
At the Chesley Hospital on Friday, October 19th, 2007 in his 72nd year, Rex ACTON of Paisley. Dear husband of the former Mary FARROW. Father of Scott ACTON and his wife Carrie of Huntsville and Rob BUTCHART and his wife Cindy-Jo of Paisley. Grandfather of Matthew and Carly. He is also survived by his sister Eva and her husband Jim CRAWFORD of Walkerton, brothers-in-laws, Charlie COLLINS of Port Elgin, Gordon TANNER and his wife Reita of Cargill and sisters-in-law Sandy ACTON of Waterloo and Nina NASTKE and Keith DICKISON of Mildmay. Predeceased by sisters Iona TANNER and Peggy COLLINS and by his brother Jack. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Paisley Chapel, 216 Queen St. S., Paisley, from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. on Sunday, October 21st, 2007. Funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Monday at 2: 00 p.m. Interment Douglas Hill Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Royal Canadian Legion Br. #295, Paisley, the Canadian Diabetes Association, or the Grey Bruce Chapter of the Victorian Order of Nurses would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. The Royal Canadian Legion Br #295 will hold a memorial service in the funeral home chapel on Sunday evening at 6: 45 p.m. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-17 published
PRIDDLE, Stanley Alexander
Stanley Alexander PRIDDLE of Markdale passed away suddenly in the Grey-Bruce Regional Health Centre in Owen Sound on Sunday evening, September 2, 2007.
He was born on July 10, 1930 in Osprey Township, the only son of Roy PRIDDLE and Jessie (BADGEROW) PRIDDLE. He and his three sisters attended S.S.#2 McIntyre in Osprey Township where his parents farmed. In 1944 Stan's father purchased a home near Dundalk where the family resided for many years.
Stan's working career started after high school when he found employment with Aitchison's Bakery in Dundalk. He worked there for 12 years and learned the baking trade. In 1957 he took over the bakery in Markdale which had been started by Allen SMITH of Dundalk. Two years later he purchased a building across the street and moved the business there.
On October 24, 1959 he married Vivian DAWSON of Dundalk and together they owned and operated Priddle's Bakery. And that bakery was a great success. People still rave about it today. Just last year someone told his daughter Brenda that she used to go to his bakery and had to hide the pastries she bought in different areas of her house so people wouldn't eat them before meal time. Many of the pleasant memories shared by those who attended visitations and the funeral revolved around the bakery.
After Stan sold the bakery in 1972, he worked as a baker for Vern's Donuts in Owen Sound His employer, Vern BARBER, remembered Stan as someone who always had a smile on his face, and his co-worker, Paul DICKSON/DIXON said that Stan taught him how to be a good baker. Stan worked for Vern for 17 years before ill health forced him to retire.
Stan's favourite pastime was to drive a car. He enjoyed travelling to many places, both locally and far away. He has been in every Canadian province and in many parts of the United States, to the Bahamas and to Jamaica. "If you're not going, you're not living!" was his motto.
In retirement years he and Vivian purchased antique cars and attended local parades and car shows. If a stranger wanted a ride in one of his cars, he gave him one. They had many adventures with these cars and met many new people along the way.
Stan had a good sense of humour. He was generous, quiet kind and considerate. He was held in good esteem by all who knew him.
Stan is survived by his daughters, Brenda CATCHER of Owen Sound and Evelyn (Reg) CREGO of Burlington and by his son David (Camilla) PRIDDLE of Manotick, near Ottawa. He also has four grandchildren, Ryan and Allison DEMERCHANT and Cole and Brock PRIDDLE. He is fondly remembered by his friend Joyce ROWE of Hanover who has arranged to have a tree planted in his honour near Griersville. He is also survived by his sisters Rosetta MUIR of Dundalk, Margaret BROWN of Shelburne and Verna MARKOVICH of Shelburne. His mother-in-law Lillian DAWSON of Shelburne and his brother-in-law Tom DAWSON of Dundalk also survive. He was predeceased by his parents Roy and Jessie PRIDDLE, and by his brothers-in-law Bill MUIR, Donald BROWN and Stephen MARKOVICH.
A funeral was held on Friday, September 7 at the Donald and May Funeral Home in Markdale. His daughter Brenda wrote the eulogy and his son David delivered the eulogy along with his own thoughts. His other daughter, Evelyn, prepared a collage of pictures of Stan at various stages in his life. Rev. Mark WAUGH officiated at the service and David FRIES played the organ. A floral arrangement was made for Stan by Bernice TUPLIN of Feversham.
Friends and relatives were present from Markdale, Dundalk, Owen Sound, Chesley, Cambridge, Burlington and Manotick.
Page 3

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-12 published
McKEAN, Evelyn Sophia (née HAMILL)
Passed away peacefully in Owen Sound on Wednesday, January 10th, 2007 in her 97th year. She was the wife of the late Hartley McKEAN, daughter of the late Erwin P. HAMILL and the late Sophia Saunders) HAMILL and the last surviving member of their family. Survived by 2 sisters-in-law: Mrs. Ruth HAMILL of Massie and Mrs. Mary HAMILL of Victoria, British Columbia. Predeceased by sisters: Mabel (Ramage) McKAY, Ethel FARROW, Mae LONG and Gertrude DICKSON/DIXON and by brothers: Percy HAMILL, Carman HAMILL, and Rev. Alvin HAMILL. Evelyn will always be lovingly remembered and adored by her many nieces and nephews and also the McKEAN relatives. Friends will be received at the Currie Funeral Home in Chatsworth for visitation on Saturday, January 13, 2007 from 12 noon until service time at 2 p.m. The funeral service for Evelyn will be officiated by Rev. James H. McKEAN. Interment will be in the McKean family plot in the Union cemetery of Clarksburg/ Thornbury. If so desired, memorial contributions to a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-07 published
BOYD, Bessie Louella (DICKSON/DIXON)
Passed away at the Meaford Long Term Care Center on Sunday August 5th 2007. The former Besie DICKSON/DIXON in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Elwood BOYD. Loving mother of Lewis and his wife Sharon of Rocklyn, William and his wife Dora of Meaford, and Orville and his wife Sue of Meaford. Sadly missed by nine grandchildren and seventeen great-grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by seven brothers and one infant sister. Resting at the Gardiner-Wilson Funeral Home where a service will be held on Thursday August 9th, at 11: 00 a.m. Visiting on Wednesday August 8th from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and from 7:00-9:00 p.m. Interment at Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Meaford Long Term Care Centre.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-31 published
HILL, Ernest Hugh Knowles, B.Th., M.A., M.Li.S.
The family is saddened to announce that suddenly, as the result of a recent illness, Hugh HILL, Library director at Emmanuel Bible College, passed away on Monday, October 29, 2007 in his 50th year. Hugh was the loving husband and best friend to Gail (née McMILLAN) and adoring Dad to Liam and Miriam. He is survived by his father Stanley HILL, sister Alexis DICKSON/DIXON (Scott) of Orangeville, and brother John of Kitchener, Hugh was loved as a son by in-laws Don and Eileen McMILLAN of Owen Sound, and also leaves brother-in-law Eldon McMILLAN (Linda,) sisters-in-law, Sheila TEDFORD (Richard) and Carol WALKER (Wayne) all of Owen Sound. Also lovingly remembered by many nieces and nephews. He was predeceased by his mother Elva (1989.) Ernest Hugh Knowles HILL was born in Ballymena, Co. Antrim, Northern Ireland on August 14, 1958, Hugh emigrated to Canada as a child with his family, residing first in Toronto and then Brampton, and following his marriage to Gail, the family settled in Kitchener, were both Liam and Miriam were born. Hugh was an ardent student of many forms of literature, but was particularly well-read in his field of Christian theology. He was a passionate collector of books and loved to search out new titles to acquire. As an ardent bird-watcher, he also amassed a collection of prints and water colours depicting many of his favourites. An accomplished musician Hugh expressed his abilities in practical ways through he and Gail's involvement in the music ministry at several Kitchener churches, most recently Bethany Evangelical Missionary Church. Friends are invited to join the family for visitation on Tuesday, October 30 from 7-9 p.m. and again on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener, 519-749-8467. Funeral services will be held at Bethany Evangelical Missionary Church 160 Lancaster St. E. Kitchener on Thursday, November 1, 2007 at 2 p.m. Doctor Rev. Virgil GINGERICH, Dr. Rev. Olu PETERS and Rev. Bill ANDERSON officiating. Cremation to follow. As expressions of sympathy donations may be made to Emmanuel Bible College or to the charity of your choice. Visit www.henrywalser.com for Hugh's memorial. Psalm 91: 1

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-03 published
MOTHERSELL, Henry Alexander " Alick"
Veteran of World War 2
Peacefully at Central Place on Sunday, December 2nd, 2007. Henry Alexander (Alick) MOTHERSELL, of R.R.#7, Owen Sound, in his 87th year. Dearly beloved husband of Margaret MOTHERSELL (née DICKSON/DIXON.) Loving father of Susan BURK/BURKE and her husband, Doug, of Meaford and Jim MOTHERSELL and his wife, Sarilee, of Wiarton. Lovingly remembered by his grandchildren, Rudy, Michelle, Sonya, Amy, Kelly; his four great-grandchildren, Arlo, Ryland, Willie, Kara his great-great-grand_son, Gage. Predeceased by his parents, Kelly and Elizabeth MOTHERSELL; his brothers, Kelly and Bart MOTHERSELL his sister, Lillian PARFREY; his son-in-law, Rudy POHL. Alick was a Veteran of World War 2, a member of Branch 6 of the Royal Canadian Legion, Owen Sound and an employee of Black-Clawson Kennedy for 43 years. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, (519-376-7492) on Tuesday evening from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service for Alick MOTHERSELL will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, December 5th, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. with Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. Spring interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Georgian Bluffs. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Code Blue Team of the Grey Bruce Health Services or the Canadian Cancer Society for transporting patients to London for treatments as your expression of sympathy.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
VENTON, K. Patricia " Pat" (MARTIN)
Peacefully, at Exeter Villa Nursing Home, Saturday, January 6, 2007, K. Patricia "Pat" (MARTIN) VENTON, age 89. Beloved wife of the late John Edwin VENTON (1999.) Loved mother of Penelope "Penny" VENTON of Exeter, J. Peter and Anne VENTON of Toronto, Robert "Bob" VENTON and companion Heather SMITH of Collingwood. Loving grandmother of Scott, Margot, Michelle, Tory and great-grandmother of Meredith. Remembered by favourite cousins, Susanne BAWDEN of California and Mary Lou DICKSON/DIXON of Exeter. Predeceased by her sister Margaret ZWICKER. Resting at the T. Harry Hoffman and Sons Funeral Home, Dashwood, with visitation Thursday 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m.; where the funeral service will be held Friday, January 12, 2007 at 11 a.m. The Rev. Harry DISHER officiating. Interment Exeter Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations would be appreciated to the William Gartshore Chapter, Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire London, Grand Bend United Church, or Ausable Bayfield Conservation Authority, Exeter. Condolences at www.hoffmanfuneralhome.com

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-10-10 published
London man dies in fiery crash
The identity of the victim in the fatality near Lucan has not been released.
By Joe BELANGER, Sun Media, Wed., October 10, 2007
Fatal: Doug GRAHAM, media officer with Middlesex Ontario Provincial Police, examines the burnt wreckage of a pickup truck at the scene of a collision that happened at 11 a.m. yesterday on Highway 4, just north of the Clandeboyne curve. The driver, and sole occupant of the pickup, which witnesses: say swerved into the path of an oncoming cement truck, was pronounced dead at the scene. (Susan BRADNAM Sun Media)
A head-on crash near Lucan between a pickup truck and a cement truck early yesterday killed a London man when the pickup exploded in flames.
The crash followed a deadly long weekend on Southwestern Ontario roads, with three people killed and another left fighting for life in hospital.
witnesses: to yesterday's crash along Highway 4, and its aftermath, painted a picture of sudden horror.
"There was lots of fire," said Londoner Gavin DOUCHERTY, who passed by the scene moments after the crash.
"There were (vehicle) parts everywhere along the road. They were trying to put the fire out with small extinguishers," he said.
An unidentified driver of a second pickup truck said he was following the cement truck shortly before 11 a.m.
"There was a huge burst of dust and a loud bang. I saw a pickup sliding across the road and then the cement truck rolled to a stop ahead of me," said the unidentified man.
The victim -- a man in his 20s, whom police hadn't publicly identified died instantly, Middlesex Ontario Provincial Police said. [The victim was subsequently identified as Ivan STIMAC.]
The cement truck driver, John DICKSON/DIXON, 42, wasn't hurt.
The crash occurred about eight kilometres north of Lucan and Mooresville Drive.
The northbound pickup crossed the centre line and collided with the southbound cement truck, Ontario Provincial Police said.
The impact appeared to have happened unexpectedly at full speed, with no tell-tale skid marks suggesting braking by either truck.
A kilometre-long stretch of highway was closed for hours as police investigated and road workers cleaned up.
The unidentified man from the second pickup said he went to check on the cement truck driver after the crash.
"I could tell (the pickup driver) was gone, so I went over to the cement truck and helped (the driver) get his door open and helped him from the cab. He was okay."
About 100 metres of highway was littered with debris from both trucks, a large tire from the cement truck thrown into a field 20 metres away.
The pickup, almost unrecognizable, was charred and torn, and the road badly scarred.
The Lucan-Biddulph fire department put out the blaze.
Meanwhile, a 30-year-old Bayham Township man was fighting for his life in hospital yesterday after the pickup he had been driving went out of control and rolled before hitting a tree Monday night.
The name of the victim, thrown from the pickup, wasn't released.
Elgin Ontario Provincial Police said the crash occurred about 11: 40 p.m. near the intersection of Talbot Line (Hwy. 3) and Hacienda Road in Malahide Township.
Police said it appeared the truck hit two road signs before rolling and hitting the tree.
Malahide Fire Department and Elgin-Saint Thomas Emergency Medical Services raced to the scene and found the driver, suffering "severe" trauma.
Taken to Saint Thomas airport, he was flown to London Health Sciences Centre where he was in critical condition.
Earlier Monday, a Sarnia man was killed after he lost control of his car and was ejected from the vehicle.
Phillip KREMER, 30, of Sarnia, was driving north on Brigden Side Road near Confederation Line about 6 p.m. when his car went into one ditch, crossed the road and ended up in another ditch. Kremer was pronounced dead at the scene.
Huron Ontario Provincial Police said a 19-year-old woman was killed at 3: 30 p.m. Monday when her car rolled on Goshen Line in South Huron.
Jolene UNWIN, of South Huron, was thrown from the car and killed.
In another crash, Friday at 6 p.m., an 81-year-old man died from a medical condition after a two-car crash on Goderich Street in West Huron.
Deborah DILLON of Huron East is charged with failing to yield from a private driveway.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-10-11 published
Crash victim identified
By Free Press Staff, Thurs., October 11, 2007
The identity of a London man who died in a fiery collision was released by police yesterday.
Ivan STIMAC, 25, was driving a pickup on Richmond Street near Mt. Carmel Drive when it collided with a cement truck at about 11 a.m., Middlesex Ontario Provincial Police said. The pickup truck caught fire. STIMAC was pronounced dead at the scene. The driver of the cement truck, a 42-year-old Parkhill man, [previously identified as John DICKSON/DIXON] was not injured. Police said charges are not expected.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-10 published
Deadly triangle
A London teacher and one man are found dead in a car. Another man is shot in a parking lot.
By Joe BELANGER, Patrick MALONEY and Joe MATYAS, Sun Media, Mon., December 10, 2007
A London teacher is dead and a colleague recovering in hospital after a stunning parking lot ambush yesterday that preceded an apparent murder-suicide 300 kilometres away.
Angela SEDORE, 40, was found dead in her sport utility vehicle near Peterborough just hours after Ed DICKSON/DIXON -- a fellow teacher at Ashley Oaks elementary school -- was shot by SEDORE's boyfriend outside a south London plaza, family members say.
SEDORE's sister said she had been dating a man named Ray KING for two years.
The bodies of KING and SEDORE were found, apparently shot to death, in her sport utility vehicle south of Peterborough following a police chase.
"This guy obviously came for one thing and that was to kill all three of them," DICKSON/DIXON's father, Ken DICKSON/DIXON, said.
DICKSON/DIXON's father said it appears a phone call to his son's home from a colleague whom his son had just started dating may have set the tragic chain of events in motion early yesterday.
DICKSON/DIXON, 36, told his father SEDORE sounded distraught and wanted to meet him, so he decided to go see if everything was all right. He later described to his father a chilling scene.
Upon arriving at the parking lot outside the A and P store at Wellington and Commissioners roads about 1: 40 a.m., he approached the woman's vehicle when a man hopped out, armed with a gun.
The man fired, the bullet ripping through one side of DICKSON/DIXON's stomach and out the other, then through the window of his Jeep, he told his father.
"If he didn't turn (his body,) he'd be a dead man," Ken DICKSON/DIXON said after visiting his son in the hospital. "A gunshot wound to the stomach, you're a dead man."
Remarkably, Ed DICKSON/DIXON told his father he jotted down the licence plate number as the vehicle drove off.
Within an hour, SEDORE's apartment on the second floor of a quaint Hyman Street home was swarming with police officers whose dramatic arrival stunned neighbours.
Durham regional officers, east of Toronto, were on alert for SEDORE's sport utility vehicle in connection with the London shooting and would soon be following it.
About 4: 45 a.m. yesterday, the Ontario Provincial Police was asked to follow the sport utility vehicle as it travelled north on Highway 115, which runs from Highway 401 to Peterborough, SEDORE's home town.
The sport utility vehicle drove over a police spike belt and went into a ditch, about 10 kilometres south of Peterborough. SEDORE and a man found inside were dead of apparent gunshot wounds.
Police sources told Sun Media the dead man in the sport utility vehicle is Ray KING, 41.
A neighbour, who described SEDORE as a "wonderful" person, said the teacher had been dating a man named Ray.
Having dramatically changed his appearance -- dropping 30 pounds and getting a new haircut -- he was visiting her in London this weekend, the neighbour said.
Officers from the Ontario Provincial Police and city police were at SEDORE's apartment for much of yesterday, taking away a slew of items including her computer, a neighbour said.
SEDORE's birth mother, who only met her now-grown daughter three years ago, was stunned by yesterday's tragedy.
"There's no words to say how I feel," Johanna YATEMAN said when contacted at her Peterborough home. "I feel great, great loss."
The Special Investigations Unit, which probes any civilian death involving police, is investigating the case.
"This is a tragic circumstance and there's a lot to be done," the Special Investigations Unit's lead investigator, Allan EATON, said.
Ken DICKSON/DIXON, who travelled to London from Detroit during the weekend for a family Christmas party, said his son was conscious but struggling in the aftermath of his close call. "He's starting the goofy stuff -- 'I should have called the police (before going),' " he said.
Several teachers at Ashley Oaks, reached at their homes yesterday, declined comment.
A huge swath of the parking lot at the busy south-end plaza -- which houses several restaurants and a busy grocery store -- was taped off for hours as officers scoured around DICKSON/DIXON's green Jeep, a bullet hole clearly visible in its side window.
Shoppers coming in and out of the A and P were stunned by the scene.
"This city is getting bad," said one elderly woman. "You've got to have eyes in the back of your head."
DICKSON/DIXON's shooting happened fewer than 24 hours after the death of Anthony BRUN in an Old South home a few blocks away. A man [later identified as Gordon Tyler McCURDY] has been charged with second-degree murder in the 24-year-old's death.
What Happened
Late Saturday Night: Londoner Ed DICKSON/DIXON gets a distraught-sounding call from a fellow teacher at Ashley Oaks elementary school. He goes to meet her at the A and P store parking lot at Wellington and Commissioners roads, arriving about 1: 30 a.m. yesterday.
A man with a gun exits the woman's vehicle and fires a shot that rips through DICKSON/DIXON's stomach. The vehicle takes off. Wounded, DICKSON/DIXON jots down the licence plate and calls police.
Yesterday, 4: 45 a.m.: Durham Regional Police ask Peterborough Ontario Provincial Police to intercept an sport utility vehicle, wanted in a London investigation, along Highway 115, which extends north from the 401 toward Peterborough.
The sport utility vehicle runs over a police spike belt south of Hwy. 7A and ends up in a ditch, 10 km south of Peterborough.
Ontario Provincial Police find the bodies of a man and a woman Ray KING of Belleville and London teacher Angela SEDORE -- in the sport utility vehicle. They appear to have been shot to death. The sport utility vehicle is registered to SEDORE.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-26 published
Widow found slain
Her son is charged with murder in the death in the complex in Westmount.
By Katherina DEHAAS, Patrick MALONEY and Daniela SIMUNAC, Sun Media, Wed., December 26, 2007
Cranbrook Trace is a caring little community, a clutch of high-end London condos where residents greet their neighbours by name and keep an eye out for one another.
Some in the Westmount complex would dutifully check in on Helen VICARY, calling every few days to say hello and see how the kind, elderly widow was getting along.
Then, a few weeks ago, she stopped answering the phone.
She was no longer seen picking up her mail, either.
Now, a 48-year-old man, identified by neighbours as VICARY's son, is charged with second-degree murder in the death of a woman whose body was found at his mother's home on Christmas Eve.
Police haven't publicly identified the woman.
"We did notice that we hadn't seen (VICARY) in awhile," Eric JOHNSON, who lives a few doors away, said yesterday. "In the last month, we hadn't seen her at all."
Monday, London police swooped down on the VICARY home, unit 23 at 505 Cranbrook Rd., while searching for someone reported missing that morning.
A woman was found dead inside.
That night, neighbours say police went door-to-door asking about Helen VICARY.
Craig James VICARY, 48, whom, neighbours identified as Helen's son, is charged with second-degree murder. He had been living at the condo, police said yesterday.
With investigators still scouring the home for evidence, neighbours who would be otherwise occupied with the holiday were shaking their heads over the city's sixth homicide of the year.
"Obviously, we're all shocked by it," said one man. "It's really not hit home yet. We really haven't had a whole lot of time to reflect on it."
One neighbour said VICARY moved into the condo about three years ago but had lived alone since her husband died Christmas Day two years ago. Her grown children live in the area.
Investigators were first called to the condo Monday after a report of a missing person. Police haven't said who notified them of the disappearance.
Police then searched for a brown, four-door Pontiac Grand Am, which was registered to Helen VICARY.
JOHNSON, who described the elderly VICARY as kind and friendly, said the homicide is "unnerving… a close community. A lot of elderly people and we watch out for each other."
The Christmas Eve discovery marked the third serious incident in London this month. Early December 8, 24-year-old Anthony BRUN was found injured outside an Old South home and later died in hospital. Gordon Tyler McCURDY, 33, is charged with second-degree murder. Later that day, teacher Ed DICKSON/DIXON was seriously hurt in a south-end parking lot shooting. Angela SEDORE, who taught with DICKSON/DIXON, was killed in a murder-suicide, apparently at the hands of Ray KOVACS, whose body was found in her sport utility vehicle after a police chase.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.strathroy.age_dispatch 2007-01-09 published
STONER, Barb (JERVIS)
At Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital, on Thursday, December 21, 2006 with her family by her side, Barb STONER (JERVIS) of Strathroy, in her 69th year. Beloved wife of Glen STONER. Loving mother of Allan and Cheryl STONER of Poplar Hill, Rob STONER and Toni of Strathroy, and Sandy STONER of London, and grandmother of Sydra STONER. Also survived by her brother-in-law Ross DICKSON/DIXON and his companion Marion MOORE of Strathroy. Predeceased by her parents, Harold and Ella JERVIS and her sister Joan DICKSON/DIXON. Visitation was held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, on Friday, December 22 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where funeral service was held on Saturday at 1 p.m. with Rev. Fr. Willi KAMMERER officiating. Interment in Strathroy Cemetery. Donations to the Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital Foundation, or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Barb.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-03 published
KERFOOT, James Henry " Harry"
Harry died on Tuesday, January 2, 2007 at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital in Bracebridge. He is survived by his caring wife, Eleanor and daughters, Constance DICKSON/DIXON and Mary KERFOOT. Daughter Elizabeth predeceased him in 1991. According to Harry's wishes cremation has taken place and interment of his remains will take place at the Toronto Necropolis Cemetery. Harry was born in 1922 in Toronto, the only child of Ada Willey KERFOOT, formerly of Leamington, Ontario and Roy KERFOOT, formerly of Minesing, Ontario. The family will receive Friends at the W.J. Cavill Funeral Home, 215 Bay Street, Gravenhurst, on Wednesday, January 3, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will be held at Trinity United Church, 290 Muskoka Road North, Gravenhurst, on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. In memory of Harry, donations made to the South Muskoka Hospital Foundation, 75 Ann Street, Bracebridge, Ontario, or to a charity of your choice, would be appreciated.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-29 published
DICKSON/DIXON, Kent, (November 2, 1947-May 27, 2007)
Kent passed away peacefully at Saint_Joseph's Hospital early Sunday morning. Kent battled many illnesses during his life. He will be remembered for his courage, stamina and sense of humour. He will be greatly missed by his loving wife Gerry, his mother Margaret, sister Beverley, nephews Adam and Jesse, and cousins David and Michael. For Friends and family who were a part of his life, he will be loved, cherished and remembered forever. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W., Etobicoke, (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) on Friday June 1, 2007 from 2 p.m. until the time of Service of Remembrance in the Chapel at 3 p.m. If desired, remembrances may be made to the Ankolysing Spondlitis Association (Arthritis Society), 250 Bloor St. E., Toronto, Ontario, M5G 1E6

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-09 published
DICKSON/DIXON, Betty Evelyn
At the Lennox and Addington County Hospital in Napanee, on Sunday, July 8, 2007. Betty Evelyn DICKSON/DIXON of Napanee at age 87. Beloved wife of the late Bob DICKSON/DIXON and dear mother of Jane REIDY (Tom) of Maryland and the late Donald. Sister of June NEEDHAM of Montreal and the late Sybil LINDOP and Honor LEMON. The family will receive Friends at the Wannamaker-Tierney Funeral Home, Napanee on Tuesday evening from 7-9 p.m. Service in the Chapel on Wednesday, July 11 at 11: 00 a.m. Memorial donations made to the Lennox and Addington County Hospital Foundation would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.wtfuneralhome.com

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-01 published
DICKSON/DIXON, Elizabeth Jane
Elizabeth DICKSON/DIXON died on Saturday, July 28th, 2007 at North York General Hospital at the age of 49 after a heroic, year-long battle against cancer. Liz is the beloved daughter of Jane DICKSON/DIXON and the late Angus DICKSON/DIXON, sister of Catherine and Michael. She was a teacher, an actress, a singer and a writer of songs and her vibrant spirit will be greatly missed by her family and many Friends. Our heartfelt thanks to the Oncology and Palliative Care Unit of the North York General Hospital for their dedication and compassionate care and to the Toronto Community Home-Care Team who made it possible for Liz to stay in her home with her beloved cat for as long as possible. The visitation and celebration of her life will be held at the McIntosh-Anderson Funeral Home, 152 King Street East, Oshawa, on Thursday, August 2nd from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at St. Gregory the Great Catholic Church, 194 Simcoe Street North, Oshawa on Friday, August 3rd at 10: 30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to the Arthritis Society of Canada, Philip Aziz Centre (hospice care) or a charity of your choice.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
POUPORE, Daphne H. (née OWEN)
Peacefully, at the Hospice at May Court in Ottawa, on Monday, August 27, 2007, in her 86th year. Beloved wife of the late Gordon A. POUPORE. Loving mother of David (Paula,) Tim (Sonia) and Bill. Devoted Grandma to Christian, Michael, Taylor and Rafael. Dear sister of Damaris BURCHETT (Peter) of North Saanich, British Columbia and the late Dilys FREDERICK (Fred) of Montreal and Ottawa. Daphne will also be fondly remembered by nephews John FREDERICK (Pamela), Ian BURCHETT (Andre), and Andrew BURCHETT, and by Tom DICKSON/DIXON, husband of her niece, the late Ann DICKSON/DIXON. The family would like to express their sincere thanks to Jennifer Thomson, Karen Mohammed and the staff and volunteers of The Hospice at May Court. Friends are invited to visit at the West Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 150 Woodroffe Avenue (at Richmond Road) in Ottawa, on Wednesday, September 5th from 7 to 9 p.m. and on Thursday, September 6th from 9 a.m. until time of the Memorial Service, in the Chapel at 10: 00 a.m. In memoriam donations to The Hospice at May Court would be appreciated. Condolences/donations/tributes at www.mcgarryfamily.ca

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-24 published
'It's a tragedy and should never have occurred'
By Guy DICKSON/DIXON, Page L1
The Toronto woman who died after undergoing a routine liposuction procedure last week was young and in good health, her employer said yesterday.
Tom BOSLEY, president of Bosley Real Estate, the Toronto real-estate company where Krista STRYLAND worked, said he couldn't even understand why she had the procedure in the first place.
"It's a tragedy and should never have occurred," said Mr. BOSLEY. "Basically she went to a clinic she shouldn't have been at… I don't understand why she even was doing it, to be honest with you. She was young, vibrant, very healthy, absolutely nothing wrong with her."
A successful realtor in Toronto's leafy Davisville neighbourhood and a mother in her 30s, Ms. STRYLAND's heart stopped soon after having liposuction in her abdomen at the Toronto Cosmetic Clinic on Thursday. She went into cardiac arrest while still at the clinic and later died at North York General Hospital.
The coroner's office is investigating the death.
The doctor who performed the operation is a general practitioner who specializes in liposuction and is not a licensed plastic surgeon, according to reports.
Many plastic surgeons say that Ms. STRYLAND's death has highlighted a major problem in the Canadian medical world: While plastic surgeons must undergo licensing and adhere to strict regulations, there's little to stop general practitioners from calling themselves cosmetic surgeons and performing such procedures, even though they don't have the training that plastic surgeons do.
Sean RICE, a plastic surgeon at North York General, was on duty Thursday and was called down to help revive Ms. STRYLAND. "I think the big question people need to ask is who is the physician performing the procedure. The push now is that everyone is calling themselves a cosmetic surgeon," said Doctor RICE. "And there's no regulation at this point in time to [stop physicians from] calling themselves 'cosmetic surgeon' and not even be a surgeon."
No one at the Toronto Cosmetic Clinic was available to comment yesterday; a receptionist said she wasn't able to relay any messages. According to the clinic's website, Behnaz YAZDANFAR is the resident liposuction specialist. Doctor YAZDANFAR is listed on the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario website as a general practitioner with no specialty.
She was not available for comment yesterday.
"The only way that the public can educate themselves would be to phone the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons and ask them whether [a doctor] is a real plastic surgeon, or call the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario and look up that person's name and their qualifications. Because right now, you can call yourself anything you want," Doctor RICE said.
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario has been debating new regulations to govern doctors who branch out into lucrative, uninsured practices such as cosmetic surgery. Procedures like liposuction can earn doctors thousands of dollars. At the Toronto Cosmetic Clinic, the cost of liposuction starts at $2,500, according to its website.
In November of 2000, the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario drafted a policy effective October of 2002 stating that physicians changing the scope of their practice must "obtain an appropriate assessment of their knowledge, judgment and skills in the new area of practice, and possibly, appropriate education or training if the assessment results so indicate."
The policy statement even used the hypothetical example of "a family physician who wishes to perform cosmetic surgical procedures."
The College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario has since announced "its intent to require physicians to report a change in their scope of practice," according to the most recent issue of Dialogue, a College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario publication.
"College policies rely on physicians to come forward of their own volition if they wish to change their scope of practice or re-enter practice," reported the July 2007 issue of the publication. "The consequence of voluntary self-reporting is that some physicians do report and undergo the training, supervision and assessment required by the policies, while others do not. The policies are intended to ensure that a physician has the skills, training and experience necessary to practise in the area in which the physician chooses to practise."
In the last four years there has been a 150 per cent jump in the number of Ontario doctors who say they are performing cosmetic surgeries, according to a recent report by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation.
"It is one of those incredibly unfortunate events for everyone involved," Doctor RICE said. "It's a very rare occurrence following any cosmetic procedure - or any procedure, period. Following liposuction, there have been some [occurrences] in the past. But with new changes in guidelines and new equipment, the chances are very, very minimal.
"What the actual cause was will have to come out of the coroner's inquest."
Ms. STRYLAND's boss said her death was completely unnecessary.
"Being a family company, we feel like we lost a member of our family," Mr. BOSLEY said. "Our agents are just devastated. It should never have happened."

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-01 published
PORTER, Phyllis Patricia (née DICKSON/DIXON)
86, of Bermuda Village passed away Friday, September 28, 2007 at Forsyth Memorial Hospital. She is survived by her husband of 66 years, Doctor Arthur PORTER of Bermuda Village; son, Doctor John and daughter-in-law Kathy PORTER of Bermuda Run; grand_sons, Ian of Georgetown, D.C. and Gregory of Edinburgh, Scotland; granddaughter, Jennifer GRIFFIN of Huntsville, Ontario and great-granddaughter Haley GRIFFIN. Mrs. PORTER is also survived by her sisters-in-law, Elsa DICKSON/DIXON and Georgina PORTER with whom she spent the war years in England. A survivor of the London Blitz 0f 1940, Mrs. PORTER lived in London, Toronto and Belfountain, Ontario, Naples, Florida and North Carolina. She was active in the arts, painting and literary circles and gardening. Widely traveled with her husband, Mrs. PORTER was a renowned social and academic hostess. The memorial service will be conducted at 4 p.m. Monday, October 1, at Bermuda Village. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to either the National Canadian Multiple Sclerosis Society or the National British Multiple Sclerosis Society.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-23 published
DICKSON/DIXON, Joan Elizabeth (née CASSIN)
In her fifty-ninth year, loving life to the end and surrounded by family, Joan passed away peacefully on October 20, 2007. Beloved wife and best friend of Arthur. Devoted and loving mother of Jennifer. Step-mother of Linda (Bill HARRISON, Brody and Michael) and Angela, all of Vancouver. Daughter of Jean and the late Jack. Dear sister of Mark (Caroline TAILOR/TAYLOR) and aunt of Christopher and Gillian, all of Toronto. A dedicated community volunteer, Joan was active in Scouting and later in Girl Guides of Canada as a Guider and District Commissioner. Funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Monica's Parish, 6405 de Terrebonne Avenue, Montreal on Thursday, October 25 at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, at Joan's request, donations to the Cedars Cancer Institute at the McGill University Health Centre (Royal Victoria Hospital, 687 Pine Avenue West, Suite E3.15, Montreal, Québec H3A 9Z9) or Mount Sinai Hospital Foundation (5690 Cavendish Boulevard, Montreal, Québec H4W 1S7) would be greatly appreciated. The family wishes to thank Doctor Gerald Stanimir and Doctor Martin Chasen and the nurses and staff of the Oncology Day Centre at the Royal Victoria Hospital, Doctor Judith Levitan and the palliative care team of the Montreal General Hospital, the palliative care team of the N.D.G. centre local de services communautaires, in particular Sophie Dupont, and Dr. Golda Tradounsky and the nurses, in particular Judith Marchessault, and staff of Mount Sinai Hospital for their exceptional care and compassion.

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DICKSON/DIXON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-15 published
GRAY/GREY, Muriel May (née BEAUFIELD)
Passed peacefully away on Wednesday, December 12, 2007, at Arborstone Enhanced Care after a twelve-year struggle with Parkinson's Disease. She was in her 74th year and was predeceased in 2005 by her devoted and beloved husband of 46 years, Peter Forbes GRAY/GREY, her mother Margaret in 1996, father Charles in 1980 and brother Raymond in 2003. Leaving to mourn, her daughter Susan (Clayton DICKSON/DIXON) and grand_son Oliver, Halifax, Nova Scotia; son John (Lisa) and grand_son Gunnar, San Diego; two brothers, Calmond (Daisy), Ship Cove, Newfoundland, and Guy (Juanita), Saint_John's, Newfoundland and five sisters, Faye (Ross SWEENEY,) Halifax, Nova Scotia Marie (Scott SMITH), St. Andrews, New Brunswick; Patricia (Bud BEST) and Elaine (Hedley LANGDON,) St. Anthony, Newfoundland Pamela (Brian GUY,) Saint_John's, Newfoundland, and a large number of relatives and Friends. Described by her siblings as effortlessly clever, she completed high school at the age of fifteen and began teaching at the age of sixteen, first at L'Anse au Clair, Labrador, and later at her hometown, Raleigh. In 1953, after receiving her Laboratory Technician Certificate, she began working at the St. Clairs Mercy Hospital, Saint_John's, Newfoundland. Beautiful but shy, Muriel was introduced to her future husband Peter by a friend of the family. At the time, Peter was working with McNamara Construction building a highway in the Witless Bay area. He was young, handsome and had a charming wit that was rumoured to have won Muriel's heart by whispering in her ear 'You sure smell better than the guys at the bunkhouse!' Muriel and her family lived in Toronto, Ottawa, and Sudbury before moving to Halifax in 1973. Apart from being a dedicated mother, wife, and homemaker, she also worked for a time as an interior decorator and was known for her personal touch of having a 'sense of style'. Muriel was also respected as a tireless volunteer and committee member of the Royal Nova Scotia Yacht Squadron where she served for some thirtythree years. Muriel was beautiful in mind, body, and spirit she had a musical laugh and a wonderful, self-depreciating sense of humour, and a gentle touch that made her unique to all who knew her. She adored her two grand_sons and was well enough to enjoy them both as young children. A sincere thank-you to the thirdfloor staff of Arborstone Enhanced Care for their kindness and dedication to Muriel and her family these past two years. Donations in Muriel's memory may be made to the Parkinson's Society of Canada. E-mail condolences to: susang@ca.ns.sympatico.ca.

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DICRESCE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-27 published
HATT, Bertha Winnifred (née SHAW,) R.N.
Bertha HATT (née SHAW) passed away peacefully with her family by her side November 25, 2007 in Burlington, Ontario. Bertha was born June 22, 1916 in Lion's Head, Ontario. Bertha retired from the Ontario Hospital, Queen St. Toronto, in 1981 after a 43 year career as a nurse. Her husband Wilfred predeceased her in 1971. She is survived by her son Larry and his wife Janice, and her daughter Lorrie CANSFIELD (the late Charles,) her brother Ross SHAW (the late Dorothy) and sisters Jean SAMPSON/SAMSON (Gilbert) and Sheila HATT (Gerald.) Bertha will be missed greatly by her grandchildren Shari DODSWORTH (Terry,) Nicole LEBLANC (Chris CHARLWOOD), Wes HATT (Sarah), Lisa CANSFIELD (Quintin DICRESCE), Laura McDONALD (D'Arcy,) Andrea JOHNSON (Kevin,) and Shelly WOODS (Jason,) her great-grandchildren Macgregor and Logan DODSWORTH, Sydney and Chloe McDONALD, Somerset and Luc CHARLWOOD, and Isabelle and Adeline WOODS and many nieces and nephews. The family are grateful to the wonderful people at Beechwood in Mississauga and Creekway in Burlington for the care and love they showed Bertha. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street (one block North of City Hall), Burlington (905-632-3333), on Wednesday evening 7-9 p.m. and Thursday, November 29, 2007 from 12 p.m. until the time of the funeral at 1 p.m. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society of Canada or the Alzheimer Society of Canada may be made as an expression of sympathy. www.smithsfh.com

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DICRESCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-26 published
HATT, Bertha Winnifred (née SHAW,) R.N.
Bertha HATT (née SHAW) passed away peacefully with her family by her side November 25, 2007 in Burlington Ontario. Bertha was born June 22, 1916 in Lion's head Ontario. Bertha retired from the Ontario Hospital, Queen St. Toronto, in 1981 after a 43 year career as a nurse. Her husband Wilfred predeceased her in 1971. She is survived by her son Larry and his wife Janice, and her daughter Lorrie CANSFIELD (the late Charles,) her brother Ross SHAW (the late Dorothy) and sisters Jean SAMPSON/SAMSON (Gilbert) and Sheila HATT (Gerald.) Bertha will be missed greatly by her grandchildren Shari DODSWORTH (Terry), Nicole LEBLANC (Chris CHARLWOOD), Wes HATT (Sarah), Lisa CANSFIELD (Quintin DICRESCE), Laura McDONALD (D'Arcy), Andrea Johnson (Kevin), and Shelly Woods (Jason), her great-grandchildren Macgregor and Logan DODSWORTH, Sydney and Chloe McDONALD, Somerset and Luc CHARLWOOD, and Isabelle and Adeline WOODS and many nieces and nephews. The family are grateful to the wonderful people at Beechwood in Mississauga and Creekway in Burlington for the care and love they showed Bertha. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street (one block North of City Hall), Burlington (905-632-3333), on Wednesday evening 7-9 p.m. and Thursday, November 29, 2007 from 12 p.m. until the time of the funeral at 1 p.m. If desired, donations to the Parkinson Society of Canada or the Alzheimer Society of Canada may be made as an expression of sympathy. www.smithsfh.com

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