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"YAL" 2005 Obituary


YALDEN  YALE 

YALDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-24 published
DUFF, Judith A. (née YALDEN- THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON)
Peacefully at her home in Wellington after a lengthy battle with cancer on Tuesday, June 21st, 2005. Beloved mother of Colin (Chinagi) of Japan and Jennifer of Toronto. Dear sister of Peter (Susie) and dear aunt to David. Loved grandmother of Allison. A true lady, her sense of humour and warmth will be sadly missed and lovingly remembered. Special thanks to Dr. Peter JOHANNSSON, Kathy SARTY (Access Centre) and all Victorian Order of Nurses staff for the wonderful care. A Memorial Service will be held and announced later in the summer. If desired, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to the Whattam Funeral Home, Picton. On line condolence and donations at www.whattamfuneralhome.com

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YALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-21 published
SHAINHOUSE, Louis
On Wednesday, July 20, 2005 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Louis SHAINHOUSE beloved husband of Aida. Loving father of Michael, and Deborah. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Sam and Beatrice, the late Rose and Irving SILVERSTEIN, the late Oscar and Florence SHAINHOUSE, Rivie and the late Joe COOPER, and Esther and the late Bernard YALE. Devoted grandfather of Jill and Marnie. Devoted uncle to all his nieces and nephews. Special thanks to Lorie and Thita. At Beth Tzedec Synagogue, 1700 Bathurst St. (Bathurst south of Eglinton) for service on Thursday, July 21 at 12: 30 p.m. Interment at Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva 3900 Yonge St. #502. If desired, memorial donations may be made to The Louis Shainhouse Memorial Foundation c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst St. Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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YALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-06-18 published
JONES, Elizabeth (née HERBERT)
Peacefully, in Mississauga, Ontario, in her 99th year. Beloved wife of the late Charles. Cherished mother of Elsie Elizabeth YALE and her husband Robert. Beloved grandmother of Joanne FLETCHER and her husband Peter of Geneva, Switzerland, and Susan TAILOR/TAYLOR of Mississauga, Ontario. Great-grandmother to Jessica, Christopher and Sarah, James, Ashleigh and Jillian. Great-great-grandmother of Nathaniel. Memorial Service will be held at The Simple Alternative Funeral Centre - Mississauga, 1535 South Gateway Road (Dixie Rd., 2 lights south of Eglinton) 905-602-1580 on Wednesday, July 6, 2005 at 2 p.m.

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YALE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-11-14 published
Linda HACKETT, 56: 'Upbeat' volunteer
Even chemotherapy couldn't dull Linda HACKETT's appreciation of life
Her many Friends recall an indomitable spirit
By Catherine DUNPHY, Lifelines
Linda HACKETT was just one of 375 volunteers who deliver 30,000 copies of Beach Metro News community newspaper. She'd been distributing 80 copies throughout 59 Edgewood, the low-rise apartment building where she lived, since September, 2001 as reliable as rain.
The paper's general manager, Sheila BLINOFF, had no idea HACKETT was blind until one day last spring when she showed up at the office to have her picture taken for the paper with her new guide dog Ginny.
"She was always so upbeat," BLINOFF said. "She told me it was a good thing we were taking her picture that day when she had her hair because she was starting a new round of chemotherapy the next week."
It was not her first run-in with the disease. She beat back advanced skin cancer in 1980 by having skin and muscle removed from her shoulder, then fought breast cancer with a total mastectomy in March, 2003, followed by chemo and radiation later that year. When the cancer flared again the next summer, she signed on for more chemotherapy. But on May 25 she was told her cancer was back, and this time, it wouldn't be going away.
Nevertheless, two days later she attended the regular monthly seniors' lunch program run by Meals Here and There, where she announced it was Ginny's birthday, to great fanfare.
The next day she gamely went out in a borrowed wheelchair to the annual Beaches Triangle neighbourhood garage sale, where she scored a keyboard. She loved garage sales, but this purchase was a special find for her because the chemo she had been undergoing had left her fingers numb and she wanted to exercise them.
But that night -- May 28 -- she was felled by a massive stroke and hospitalized again. In mid-June the doctors told her she had three months to a year to live and would never walk again. She immediately demanded physiotherapy to prove them wrong even as she was admitted to Bridgepoint's palliative care ward. By July she was organizing a Yahoo group to co-ordinate her visitors.
When a young, inexperienced nurse confessed she didn't know what to do with a blind patient, HACKETT said to her: "We have a hug."
But she knew she was slipping away.
"Colleen, I don't want to die," she told her friend Colleen PEACOCK, who heads Meals Here and There, where HACKETT used to do volunteer office work.
HACKETT's husband, Craig NEWMAN, moved into her room to be with her in the last few weeks. He slept on a chair at nights, going home during the day only to care for Ginny.
"Linda was scared," he said. "I would be too, to be blind and not be able to see if a nurse went by, to ask for help. She would have done it for me."
She died September 22 at 56. Her death stunned her Friends. If anyone was going to beat cancer, they thought, it would be her. She kept telling them she would. "I'm a fighter," she'd say. "They (doctors) don't know me, I'm going to beat this."
Of course, a lot of courageous people dealing with a cancer diagnosis say words like that. But they aren't HACKETT, who'd had to fight for everything in her life, including being able to stay in her adopted homeland of Canada. Not only did she win that battle, she also exacted in the process a promise from a cabinet minister to change the law.
Fighting back, fighting hard, had been her credo, or maybe her mantra, certainly her modus operandi since she was 10 months old and had both her eyes removed when retinal blastoma robbed her of her eyesight.
She was a timid girl from La Jolla hanging around the University of California's Berkeley campus when Mike YALE first met her in 1968. He, too, was blind but, unlike her at the time, he was a firebrand. YALE was a journalist and activist involved in the free speech, anti-war movements who was visiting Berkeley after moving to Toronto and being accepted into law school.
"Lynn was shy. I don't think she had finished high school and didn't have a lot of prospects. She did a lot of babysitting then," YALE recalled.
Her abusive father had left when she was still a toddler; her mother was an invalid and she had been raised by protective grandparents. So he was shocked to find HACKETT on his Toronto doorstep six weeks later. They were together three years, during which time HACKETT got her first guide dog and they spent a year living and working a farm with sighted Friends.
They had broken up -- but remained good Friends -- when HACKETT got a letter from the immigration appeal board telling her she couldn't stay in Canada because she was an epileptic. YALE leapt into action, phoning 23 members of Parliament over one weekend at their homes or their offices. The late Alexander ROSS, who wrote a city column for this newspaper, also championed her cause.
"The Immigration Appeal Board has decided that Lynn HACKETT must be deported and it makes me ashamed of my country," he wrote in November, 1972.
"The maddening thing is," he wrote in the same column, "she was disqualified on grounds which even department officials agree are obsolete -- the prohibition against epilepsy, a condition which Lynn admits to, but which doesn't bother her."
When the smoke cleared, HACKETT was deported November 9, but allowed back into Canada 24 hours later on a special visa granted to her by then-Immigration Minister Bryce MacKASEY, who vowed to lift the immigration ban on epileptics during the next session of Parliament. "I made it. I'm really home," she told a Toronto Star reporter.
Then she proceeded to make quite a life for herself. After working for $75 a week doing telephone customer relations with the Capitol Record Club, she moved to A and M Records and then to a position as an overseas telephone operator with Bell. She took up bicycle riding with the Tandem Bicycle Club for fun, belonged to a ham radio club, made jewellery and loved camping. With Yale, she was involved in starting Blind Organization of Ontario with Self Help Tactics in 1975.
"The whole point of The Blind Organization of Ontario with Self Help Tactics was to educate blind people to stand on their own feet and fight for themselves," he said.
When she was laid off from Bell in 2000, she began volunteering. She helped sort shoes to be sent to Cuba for one charity and, in 2002, she brought her Braille writer to PEACOCK's office to take down phone messages. Soon she was reminding clients of the dinners and scheduling rides.
"She had it all organized on thick cardboard," PEACOCK said. "I was amazed. After a while I forgot she was blind."
She never missed the movie night at her church, Glen Rhodes United. The minister there, Susan THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, was thrilled when HACKETT brought Ginny to the Sunday school and agreed to read at a special Lent candlelight service called Service of Shadows.
"I called Lynn and dictated the reading to her, she wrote it down in Braille, learned it and that night, out of the shadows, light appeared and her beautiful voice filled the room," THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said. "It was magical."
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON led the funeral service and PEACOCK provided a final resting place for their friend in her family's plot in nearby Saint John's Cemetery. Donations for a marker can be sent to Susan. J. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, c/o Glen Rhodes United Church, 1470 Gerrard St. E., Toronto.

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