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"McKR" 2005 Obituary


MCKREAVIE  MCKRELL 

McKREAVIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-08-18 published
GORD, Nancy
On Wednesday, August 17, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Nancy GORD beloved wife of Marvin, loving mother and mother-in-law of Sharon ARBUS, Lisa and Izy HEMI, Jemmie and Neil SILVER and the late David Jay GORD. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Dorothy and Frank SANELI, Betty and Ken McKREAVIE, Joan McMULIN. Devoted grandmother of Debbie ARBUS, Paul ARBUS, Adam and Colleen ARBUS, and Rachel, Jason and Michael HEMI, and Aaron, Joel and Daniel SILVER and great-grandmother of Ben. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave., W. (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday August 18 at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Nancy Gold Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3 416-780-0324.

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McKREAVIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-08-18 published
GORD, Nancy
On Wednesday, August 17, 2005 at Baycrest Hospital. Nancy GORD beloved wife of Marvin, loving mother and mother-in-law of Sharon ARBUS, Lisa and Izy HEMI, Jemmie and Neil SILVER and the late David Jay GORD. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Dorothy and Frank SANELI, Betty and Ken McKREAVIE, Joan McMULIN. Devoted grandmother of Debbie ARBUS, Paul ARBUS, Adam and Colleen ARBUS, and Rachel, Jason and Michael HEMI, and Aaron, Joel and Daniel SILVER and great-grandmother of Ben. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. W. (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, August 18 at 3: 00 p.m. Interment Pardes Shalom Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to Nancy Gold Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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McKRELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-04-19 published
Agnes JACKS, Ringette Promoter: 1923-2005
As a champion of a sport known as the little sister of hockey, she took up the banner from Sam JACKS, its inventor
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Tuesday, April 19, 2005, Page S9
In the early days, enthusiastic young girls and women flooded onto outdoor rinks in northern Ontario, wearing discarded hockey skates and clutching broken hockey sticks. Up and down the ice they skated, chasing a ring. Most of the players didn't wear uniforms, and some preferred pink sweaters and matching pink sticks to keep the neighbourhood boys away from the rink.
It was 1963, and ringette was born. Agnes JACKS was there watching the emergence of the game her husband had invented to give girls and women their own winter team sport. Over the next 40 years, she saw it grow from a handful of young women in northern Ontario to a presence in half a dozen countries around the world. In Canada alone, it counts more than 25,000 players competing on nearly 2,000 teams. Even today, the sport is primarily for women and girls.
Over the years, Ms. JACKS became known as the ringette ambassador for Canada. She tirelessly travelled the world to boost the sport that Mr. JACKS invented in North Bay when he was the city's parks and recreation director. When he died of cancer in 1975 at 59, she continued her husband's legacy.
"In the early 1960s, there was a great need for girls' and women's sports," Ms. JACKS told the Kitchener-Waterloo Record in 2003. "Sam could see the need."
Mr. JACKS patched together hockey and basketball rules to create a fluid, non-contact game that soon became one of the fastest team sports on ice. Six years after he invented ringette, which has been called the little sister to hockey, the Ontario Ringette Association was founded with a government grant of $229.27. At the time, it numbered 1,500 players in 14 communities.
The sport boomed after the mid-1970s when the other provinces took an interest and formed ringette associations. In particular, it gained a firm footing in Quebec and first appeared there in Mount Royal where it was introduced by Herb LINDER, a good friend of the JACKS. In the late 1970s, the United States also started leagues. By all accounts, former Toronto Maple Leafs coach Roger NEILSON used ringette during the late 1970s to vary routines at practice. That got the attention of the then coach of the Czechoslovak national hockey team, who took home information on the game and adopted it in training and for his country's universities.
Ms. JACKS, who became honorary president of the International Ringette Association, didn't play the game herself but sponsored trophies and scholarships for outstanding players, coaches and officials and faithfully attended as many ringette tournaments and championship events as she could. In March, she was at the Ontario provincial AA championships in Ottawa. Young athletes flocked to her to ask for autographs and for words of encouragement.
"She always told us that we were 'her girls' and you believed it," said Laura WARNER, ringette's Team Canada captain. The one bit of advice she repeatedly gave to the girls was "stay out of the penalty box." When she said this to you, said Ms. WARNER, you felt she was honestly encouraging you to play ringette in the true spirit of the game -- fair play, sportsmanship and teamwork.
Like hockey, ringette is played on ice with skates and sticks and six players on each team -- a goalie and five skaters. But instead of a puck, the players pursue a rubber ring, which must be shot into a standard hockey net. The ring is passed to another player, rather than carried from zone to zone, all of which makes it a very team-oriented game. Wingers carry bladeless, red sticks so that an official can identify them if they illegally enter their own zone. Defence players have blue sticks and are not allowed in the attacking zone. The rules allow for fast play and little congestion in any zone. While hockey has become a game associated with body contact, ringette is not. A player receives a penalty for any body contact.
Like boys' hockey, ringette is divided into divisions: petite for girls 10 years and under, tweens for 12 and under, juniors for 14 and under, belles for 17 and under, debs for 18 and under and ladies for those over 20. It is not uncommon to find 25-year-old players who first took up the game at 6. Some dedicated veterans are in their mid-50s.
When they first take up the sport, young girls can be self-conscious about wearing boys' skates but soon stop worrying about it. Eventually, they give up wearing figure skates -- even for public skating and some abandon figure skating in favour of ringette.
Ms. WARNER remembers the first time she saw Ms. JACKS. She was just 14 years old and excited to be at the opening ceremony of the national ringette championships. Suddenly everyone around her stood and started cheering. She looked up and saw a petite, Scottish woman walking onto the stage.
"As soon as she started talking you couldn't not be drawn to her. "This [was] someone with an unparalleled love of the sport," Ms. WARNER said. "You could feel her love for the game."
In 2001, Ms. JACKS was appointed a member of the Order of Canada for her devotion to the sport. "She is an example of integrity, selflessness and devotion," the citation reads. "For over 30 years, she has promoted ringette as a medium for girls and women to benefit from the physical activity and personal growth derived from team sports... She has become a goodwill ambassador, imparting the importance of perseverance, good conduct and fair play to tens of thousands of young athletes."
Agnes MacKRELL was a Scottish lass who, during the Second World War, moved to England to work in a munitions plant. It was at a dance where she met Sam JACKS, a young Canadian soldier and recreation director in the army. After the war, he took her back home with him to Canada. They arrived in Halifax and made their way to Toronto and then in 1946 to North Bay. While Ms. JACKS didn't see her husband's dream of ringette becoming an Olympic sport fulfilled, she did see it inch closer to that goal. She remained faithful to the sport and its community until the end and had planned to attend the 2005 Canadian Ringette Championships that would up in Winnipeg on Saturday.
"I love the game," Ms. JACKS told a reporter in 2003. "It has everything a sport needs -- skill, speed, passion and no checking."
Agnes JACKS was born in Scotland on August 17, 1923. She died of heart failure on April 1, 2005, at the North Bay General Hospital. She was 81. She leaves her sons Barry, Bruce and Brian; three brothers and two sisters; 11 grandchildren and five great-grandchildren.

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McKRELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-04-07 published
WARING, Elizabeth (née MacKRELL)
Peacefully at Specialty Care, Mississauga on April 5, 2005 at the age of 78. Beloved and devoted wife of 50 years to Edward. Cherished mother of Janet and her husband John DAWSON, Linda and her husband David BATCH, Kenneth and his wife Lynda WILSON. Very proud grandmother of Alexander, Lindsay, Karen and Douglas. Much loved sister of Anne, John (Maureen), Arthur, Edward (Joy), Patricia and the late Agnes, Ellen and James. The family will receive Friends at the McEachnie Funeral Home, 28 Old Kingston Road, Ajax (Pickering Village), 905-428-8488 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday, April 8, 2005. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Isaac Jogues Roman Catholic Church, 1148 Finch Avenue, Pickering on Saturday, April 9, 2005 at 1 p.m. A reception to follow at the Funeral Home. Should family and Friends so desire, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated. A book of condolence may be signed at www.mceachnie-funeral.ca

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