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"IBR" 2005 Obituary


IBRAHIM 

IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-06-14 published
RAYA, Archbishop Joseph M. (1916-2005)
In hospital, 10 June, 2005 in Barry's Bay, Ontario. Former Greek Catholic Metropolitan of Akko, Haifa, Nazareth and all Galilee 1968-1974. Key spokesman for justice for dispossessed Palestinians and for the dignity of both Arabs and Jews in Israel. Nominee for this year's Nobel Peace Prize. Born in Zahle, Lebanon, to Michael and Almaz RAYA. Survived by one brother, Frank (and Leila) RAYA of Nevada, and nieces and nephews Michael and Margaret RAYA, Bob and Cheryl RAYA, Rosemary RAYA, George and Sylvia BUSHALA, all of California; Albert and Linda RAYA of Texas; and Greta RAYA DE SESIN of Mexico. In lieu of flowers, donations may be given to the poor through Madonna House, 2888 Dafoe Road, Combermere, Ontario, K0J 1L0. Please indicate if for the works of Madonna House or for the House of Grace in Israel.
Services will begin 17 June in Ottawa at Sts. Peter and Paul Melkite Church, with Archbishop M. Ibrahim IBRAHIM, Eparch of the Greek Catholics of Canada, leading a Wake Service Friday evening and the Divine Liturgy Saturday morning. Services continue at Madonna House in Combermere, beginning Saturday evening with two evening Wake Services and a Byzantine Burial Service on Monday at Noon. See www.madonnahouse.org for details.

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IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-07-21 published
Joseph RAYA, Cleric, Scholar And Writer 1916-2005
Melkite Greek Catholic Archbishop sought peace in the Middle East, marched with Martin Luther King Jr. and was beaten by the Ku Klux Klan. He retired to a small Ontario village and, this year, was nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Thursday, July 21, 2005, Page S7
Toronto -- Archbishop Joseph RAYA would have loved it. Yesterday, July 20, would have marked the 65th anniversary of his becoming a deacon in the Melkite Greek Catholic Church, one of the minority Eastern rites of Catholicism, and the 64th anniversary of his ordination as a priest. Today is also the 40th day -- a biblically significant number -- following his peaceful death in the town of Barry's Bay, Ontario at the age of 88.
To boot, yesterday was the feast day of St. Elias the Prophet. In Israel, and in Archbishop RAYA's native Lebanon, the day is commemorated with night-long fireworks displays because Elias is believed to have ascended to heaven in a fiery chariot. So last night, not far from the peaceful setting of Madonna House, the Catholic lay community in Combermere, a village 200 kilometres west of Ottawa to which Archbishop RAYA retired in 1990, there was a display of fireworks along the Madawaska River to celebrate a life spent preaching peace and non-violence. Besides, the bishop loved fireworks.
It seems there isn't much, or anyone, Archbishop RAYA didn't love. He is remembered for an easy smile and for loving unconditionally, perhaps even inordinately. "He was a great, loving human being," recalls Lesya Sabada-Nahachewsky of the department of religious studies and anthropology at the University of Saskatchewan, who is writing a biography of Archbishop RAYA. "He knew that one of the hardest things to do -- probably the hardest -- is to love and forgive the enemy."
He lived that Christian ethic, literally, during and after at least two beatings administered by members of the Ku Klux Klan. It was the early 1960s in Birmingham, Alabama, and Archbishop RAYA was a parish priest in one of the most segregated cities in the American south. He was a friend of Martin Luther King Jr. and had linked arms with him and other black leaders in civil-rights marches. He was also an outspoken critic of segregation, including at his own church. As a result, Archbishop RAYA received three hooded visitors at his rectory one hot night. He was dragged out of town and thrashed.
"While they were beating him, they called him a nigger lover," says Prof. Sabada-Nahachewsky. "And he responded, 'Yes, I am a nigger lover, and I am a Ku Klux Klan lover too.' "
Just 14 months ago, the ailing cleric took a phone call at Madonna House. "Is this Father Joe?" the creaking voice queried. It was one of the Klansmen. He had tracked down his erstwhile victim to rural Ontario to ask forgiveness. Since Archbishop RAYA was in the forgiveness business, it was granted.
Friends and followers recall a globetrotting priest best known for seeking reconciliation between Christians, Muslims and Jews in the Middle East, and for his translation of the Byzantine liturgy from Arabic to English. For his life's work, he was nominated, just prior to his death, for this year's Nobel Peace Prize.
Joseph RAYA was born in Zahle, in Lebanon's Bekaa Valley, on the Feast of the Assumption ("I was not yet born when my blood started praying," he later wrote). Following primary studies in Paris and ordination from the White Fathers' seminary in Jerusalem, he taught in his native town and was later assigned to become superintendent of schools in Cairo.
He immigrated to the U.S. in 1950 and, from 1952 to 1968, served in Birmingham in the thick of the historic and often violent battle for civil rights. "Few major decisions were made in the civil rights struggle without his participation and blessing," wrote Karl Friedman, a member of Birmingham's Jewish community, in documents supporting Archbishop RAYA's candidacy for the Nobel Prize.
Recognizing the need to modernize his church, he translated the Byzantine missal from Arabic to English. A decade later, he produced an English rendition of Byzantine Daily Worship, which won hearty endorsement from his Orthodox counterparts and is still considered the standard. His first connection to Madonna House, founded in 1947 by Russian baroness Catherine de Hueck Doherty and now a community of about 200 laypeople and priests who lead lives of poverty, chastity and obedience, was in 1959, when he became its first associate priest.
He served as a research aide during the historic Second Vatican Council of 1962-1965, which sought to update the church.
Consecrated an archbishop in 1967 with the title of Metropolitan of Akko, Haifa, Nazareth and All Galilee, he moved to northern Israel and took up the Palestinians' cause in the sensitive period following the 1967 Six-Day War. In August of 1972, he ordered all his Galilean churches closed one Sunday and directed what was until then the largest demonstration by a non-Jew in Israel when he led 24,000 Muslims, Christians and Jews on a peaceful march on the Knesset in Jerusalem to demand the return of residents to two Arab villages that had been evacuated in the 1948 War of Independence.
"He cultivated life while he inhabited deadly realities," commented Prof. Sabada-Nahachewsky. "His peaceful, nonviolent approach to conflicts really endeared him to people on both sides of often bitter disputes." Indeed, Archbishop RAYA became a popular figure among Israeli peaceniks. But he also angered his own higher-ups when he sold church lands to Arab farmers at bargain prices.
In 1974, he abruptly quit (though he kept the title and office). Various accounts of his life and his own letter of resignation provide cryptic reasons for the resignation, but the trigger was straightforward.
"It was interference from higher authorities within the Vatican and his own hierarchy," explains Prof. Sabada-Nahachewsky. He felt, she added, that the Vatican favoured Roman Catholics and ignored its Eastern siblings. "His problem with the Vatican was that it was colonizing Eastern Christians there."
He then established a permanent residence at Madonna House, wrote, and taught at various institutes of higher learning, including St. Paul's University in Ottawa. The bucolic life lasted until 1985, when he was asked to return to war-torn Lebanon to teach at a seminary and later, to head a diocese in the country's south, where he helped plant thousands of trees and vineyards.
His return to Madonna House in 1990 was for good and he used the time to write more than a dozen books on Byzantine liturgy, culture and worship. "God is not an old bachelor in the sky," he would insist. "God is relationship!"
God also had a sense of humour, he reasoned, and so did he. Rev. Ron CAFEO, Archbishop RAYA's aide-de-camp for the last 25 years, recalls: "He used to carry a card saying that he wanted to donate his body to science. Then, during one hospital trauma, we were changing his gown and he saw himself in a full length mirror... naked, and exclaimed, 'Oh, my God! Ron, tear up that card! Nobody would want this body!' And that was the end of that."
Despite heart troubles, he continued attending overseas synods of Melkite bishops, the last in 1998. "He was always pushing his Melkite church to be more authentic to its roots," Father CAFEO said.
Archbishop RAYA's manifold spiritual skills were perhaps best summed up in his eulogy by Bishop Ibrahim M. IBRAHIM, head of the Melkite Catholics in Canada: "He never stopped being a generator of peace, an engine of hope, a fountain of generosity, an ocean of honesty, a forest of pride, a fortress of charity, a planet of knowledge, a Melkite dynamo and a garden of love. He was all of that and much more, because he had Christ living within him and because he reflected the bounty of the son of Manitoba"
The bishop's own advice was plain enough, though it's worth wondering how many of us could live it: "Give a little, it costs a lot. Give a lot, it costs a little. Give everything, it costs nothing at all."
Joseph Marie RAYA was born in Zahle, Lebanon, on August 15, 1916. He died of heart failure on June 10, 2005, in Barry's Bay, Ontario, at the age of 88. He leaves one brother and several nieces and nephews.

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IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-05 published
3 reservists charged in transient's death
Autopsy of homeless Toronto man reveals injuries consistent with beating
By Jen GERSON, Monday, September 5, 2005, Page A9
Toronto -- Paul CROUTCH, a homeless man who Friends say was harmless and avoided trouble, spent the last night of his life in a sleeping bag in a downtown Toronto park, weathering the wet remnants of hurricane Katrina.
The 59-year-old had spent the past three years sleeping on the streets, or sometimes in shelters. Until recently, Mr. CROUTCH spent a lot of his time on a traffic island two blocks from where he was killed. But, worried about drug dealers, he picked up his meagre possessions and began sleeping in Moss Park, an area frequented by transients and close to the Moss Park Armoury, home to the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada regiment.
He told Friends he felt he would be safer there.
But in the pre-dawn hours last Wednesday, he was beaten to death, allegedly by three part-time members of the Canadian Armed Forces Reserves now charged with second-degree murder.
Shortly before 5 a.m., after receiving two 911 calls, police arrived at Moss Park and found Mr. CROUTCH unconscious in his sleeping bag. He was taken to nearby St. Michael's Hospital, where he died with his case workers from a local hostel at his bedside, said Dion OXFORD, of the Salvation Army's Gateway Shelter.
"He didn't cause trouble, he didn't cause fights, he was harmless," said Mr. OXFORD, who had known Mr. CROUTCH since he started going to the hostel in December of 2002.
Mr. CROUTCH usually slept outdoors but periodically stayed at the shelter, Mr. OXFORD said. The Armoury is often used as a shelter for the homeless, for example during this summer's extreme heat alerts.
Toronto homicide Detective Wayne FOWLER said there was no sign that Mr. CROUCH put up much of a fight when he was attacked.
An autopsy showed that his injuries were consistent with being punched, kicked or stomped upon, police said.
Det. FOWLER credited people in the area with coming forward "with any information they had," which led to the arrests on Friday.
Jeffery HALL, 21, Mountaz IBRAHIM, 23, and Brian DEGANIS, 21, all of Toronto and all members of the Queen's Own Rifles, have been charged with second-degree murder and assault causing bodily harm. The three appeared in court on Saturday and are expected to be back in court later this week.
Captain Mark GILES, spokesman for the National Investigation Service with the Canadian Armed Forces, said that each of the three accused had at least two years experience with the forces, and that all were trained for combat.
"This is a tragic situation, it's a very serious matter," he said in a telephone interview from Ottawa yesterday.
Capt. GILES said that the case is now before the courts, and so he could offer no further details about the accused. Toronto police and the National Investigation Service were involved in the investigation.
Army officials confirmed that a regimental social event took place at Moss Park Armoury last Tuesday night, but could not confirm whether the accused men attended the party.
Police said a woman who tried to intervene on behalf of Mr. CROUTCH suffered bruising. The woman lives in shelters and was prompted by members of the community to contact police, Det. FOWLER said.
"She sought her own medical treatment," he added. "She's sore, but she's going to be okay."
Mr. CROUTCH spent every day at the Good Neighbours' Club, a day centre for homeless senior men located in a nondescript white building near the Moss Park Armoury.
Mr. OXFORD said Mr. CROUTCH was in good physical health, adding that he last saw him at a softball game in Moss Park last Monday.
Bob SEGUIN, a support-care worker with the Good Neighbours' Club, said Mr. CROUTCH was essentially a good man but suffered from paranoia and could sometimes be a bit of a handful.
He had been barred from most of the local shelters and so slept outside most of the year, only sleeping indoors during severe weather. Mr. CROUTCH came by the club to shower, do his laundry and sleep.
"He slept a lot here because he didn't sleep a lot at night," Mr. SEGUIN said.
Mr. SEGUIN said he believed Mr. CROUTCH ran a newspaper in a small town in British Columbia some years ago, but fell on hard times and suffered mental problems.
"He kept to himself," Mr. SEGUIN added. "He had a good sense of humour, a witty, intellectual, dry type of humour."
The Gateway Shelter will hold a memorial service for Mr. CROUTCH next week.

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IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2005-09-07 published
Defeated by his demons, man met violent end on a Moss Park bench
By Anthony REINHART, Wednesday, September 7, 2005, Page A1
Last Tuesday night, Paul CROUTCH laid down his life, or what little was left of it, safe in the belief that he could handle any threats.
He bedded down on his usual bench in Toronto's Moss Park, which, to his mind, was a damn sight safer than the shelters, with their drunken bullies and bedbugs, their tuberculosis, their thieves.
When the former British Columbia resident wound up dead the next day, beaten almost beyond recognition on a rough and desperate patch of the city's downtown, few would have expected police to find $300 in his pocket, right there where he'd put it.
Fewer still would have guessed he had been a newspaper publisher, minor hockey coach, homeowner and the father of a scientist before his demons defeated him.
And no one who was thinking straight would have anticipated where the finger would point: at three part-time reserve soldiers from the armoury next door, three young men trained to lay down their own lives to save others.
As often as death walks the tired streets around the park, "you wouldn't expect people that are charged with our protection to take this kind of action," said Don HARRIS, who runs the Good Neighbours' Club, a men's drop-in centre where Mr. CROUTCH, 59, visited daily.
For all its optimism, the centre's name suggested only irony yesterday, given what police allege to have happened after three members of the Queen's Own Rifles left the Moss Park Armoury and visited the park next door.
There, police say, a woman saw three men beating a homeless man, and they turned on her when she tried to intervene.
There, at 4: 40 a.m., officers found an unconscious Mr. CROUTCH, suffering what the coroner would call "blunt impact head trauma... consistent with being punched, kicked or stomped."
And there, they pursued leads, along with the National Investigation Services of the Canadian Forces, that resulted in Jeffery HALL, 21, Mountaz IBRAHIM, 23, and Brian DEGANIS, 21, being charged with second-degree murder and assault causing bodily harm.
In due course, a court will answer the questions. Yesterday, those closest to Mr. CROUTCH could only wait, wonder and remember.
"Paul wasn't always a crazy homeless person," said Marilyn HOWARD, his former wife of 25 years, from Dawson Creek. "He was incredibly brilliant, and that was probably a lot of his difficulty."
Difficulty quickly followed Mr. CROUTCH's birth, in Toronto, on November 6, 1945. He was placed in a foster home with a family called CROUTCH, but they never adopted him.
At 12, he renamed himself Paul Richard Franklin CROUTCH, taking his first three names from his favourite hockey players.
When the young couple met in 1966, Mr. CROUTCH worked for aircraft maker McDonnell Douglas, and after they married, he started his own fabricating business.
"His mental illness was starting even then," Ms. HOWARD said. "His big problem was, he was always right," and too often saw the rest of the world as wrong.
The couple moved to Vancouver in 1973, then north to Dawson Creek two years later, where Mr. CROUTCH worked as a travelling auto-parts salesman for Ford. Twice a month, even in winter, his work took him deep into the Yukon via the Alaska Highway, a desolate but essential lifeline for northerners.
"He did lots of favours for people on the highway," Ms. HOWARD said, recalling how her husband would pick up a half-dozen lobsters on sale at Safeway, or a side of beef from a farmer, and deliver them to far-flung Friends along his route.
Mr. CROUTCH left the road after their daughter, Shannon, was born in 1977. He joined the Peace River Block News as advertising manager, but when its owners cut salaries, he left. With his wife and some Friends, he started a weekly, The Mirror, in 1980, and focused his coverage exclusively on good news.
The paper prospered, but Mr. CROUTCH's mental illness became ever more evident, both at home and in the paranoid tone of his editorials.
"The worse it got, the less he realized how much help he needed," said Ms. HOWARD.
And he would go on refusing help until the day before his death.
The couple divorced in 1993, and soon after, Mr. CROUTCH sold The Mirror and moved to Grande Prairie, Alberta.
"I got reports of him just sitting in the mall [in Grande Prairie], looking like a zombie," Ms. HOWARD said.
She lost track of him from there, but in the late 1990s, as his daughter was earning her master's degree in plant science, Mr. CROUTCH made his way back to Toronto.
When he walked through the stainless steel doors of the Good Neighbours' Club in 1999, he filled out a form to become a member. In the box marked "next of kin," he wrote "none wished."
From then on, he was a fixture, albeit a quiet one, at the drop-in centre, where he showered, did his laundry and sent faxes to the social agencies that helped him.
"He was really smart, and he really felt he'd been wronged," said Gary McCRIMMON, a worker at the centre, referring to Mr. CROUTCH's phantom fears of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police, the government, whoever. "I think it consumed him and it was a large part of his downfall."
As evening fell last Tuesday, Mr. CROUTCH turned aside a doctor's concerns with his usual phrase: "I'll be dead in a couple days." He also refused, as usual, to sleep in a homeless shelter.
"I gave him two bottles of water and he set off for the park," Mr. McCRIMMON said.
When a detective called the centre on Wednesday morning, Mr. McCRIMMON answered. When told of Mr. CROUTCH's death, and of the bruising on his face, his first thought was that he had fallen.
"She said, 'Oh, no, no, this is a homicide,' " he said. "When I went and identified the body, I could see what she meant."
Ms. HOWARD, who spent yesterday taking condolences on the sidewalks of Dawson Creek and arranging a Toronto cremation by phone, said she hopes to be in court to see her ex-husband's alleged killers face justice.
"Paul's life was over, in many ways, years ago," she said. "These people who did this have got to atone for what they've done."

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IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-04 published
3 reservists face murder charges
Homeless man beaten to death in Moss Park
By Hilda HOY, Staff Reporter
Three members of the Canadian Armed Forces Reserves are facing second-degree murder and assault charges after a homeless man was beaten to death in a downtown park and a woman coming to his aid was attacked.
Paul Richard CROUTCH, 59, died at St. Michael's Hospital on Wednesday as his case manager stood nearby. An autopsy performed Friday found the cause of death was trauma to the head, and the injuries were consistent with being punched, kicked or stomped.
Police were called to an assault in Moss Park, near Sherbourne and Shuter Sts., shortly before 5 a.m. on Wednesday. An unconscious CROUTCH was rushed to hospital but died later that morning.
A woman who witnessed the beating and intervened was treated for soft-tissue damage and bruising, police said.
CROUTCH had been a resident of the Salvation Army's Gateway Shelter, around the corner from the park on Jarvis Street, since 2002. Gateway will host a funeral next week.
He has family on the West Coast who have been notified.
"He was very mild-mannered and soft-spoken," said Gateway director Dion OXFORD. "He was harmless."
Last time he saw CROUTCH, he was watching the Gateway softball team play in the park.
"He kept to himself most of the time," remembered Gateway chaplain Ron FARR.
Brian DEGANIS, 21, Jeffery HALL, 21, and Mountaz IBRAHIM, 23, all of Toronto, were arrested and charged Friday after a joint investigation by Toronto police and the army's National Investigation Services.
The three men are part-time members of the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, a reserve infantry unit that trains at the Moss Park Armoury adjacent to the park where CROUTCH was found.
Each has received at least two years of combat training, although the exact length of their service could not be confirmed. They had attended a "social function" at the armoury that evening but were not in uniform, investigation services spokesman Capt. Mark GILES said.
"Uniform or no uniform, these are very serious charges and we take it very seriously," said GILES.
Because the incident took place in the park and not on armoury property, the investigation falls under city police jurisdiction. The National Investigation Services provided support and will continue to do so as needed, GILES said.

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IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-14 published
Homeless man's defiant life honoured
BARTLEMAN met slaying victim
CROUTCH spoke of his mental illness
By John GODDARD, Staff Reporter
Paul CROUTCH attracted more attention at his funeral yesterday than he likely ever did in life, as the victim of a fatal beating that has galvanized the downtown homeless community and moved the Queen's representative in Ontario to sympathy.
Lieutenant Governor James BARTLEMAN and his small entourage mixed with social workers, street people, a few of CROUTCH's former Friends and his ex-wife at a shelter on lower Jarvis St. to pay tribute to CROUTCH as a man, not a statistic.
"I met him two years ago, at about 6 a.m.," BARTLEMAN told about 130 mourners at the yellow-brick chapel of the Salvation Army Gateway shelter, where CROUTCH sometimes stayed. "I was part of a Salvation Army breakfast run and I had on a Salvation Army jacket."
BARTLEMAN recalled getting out of a van and serving coffee and soup to a man sitting on a park bench.
The man, not aware he was speaking to the lieutenant governor, told of owning a newspaper in British Columbia and falling on hard times due to mental illness. BARTLEMAN recognized the same details in newspaper accounts of the beating.
"He was well spoken, obviously well read and very likeable," the lieutenant governor recalled.
CROUTCH, 59, could also be anti-social, paranoid, fatalistic and self-neglectful, Friends and other supporters said of his decline. And in the early hours of August 31, he was beaten to death in his sleeping bag next to the Moss Park Armoury at Queen and Jarvis Sts.
Three reserve soldiers with the Queen's Own Rifles, attached to the armoury, are charged with second-degree murder in the case. They are Brian DEGANIS, 22, Jeffrey HALL, 21, and Mountaz IBRAHIM, 23.
All three had been celebrating with other reservists the night before, after 10 days of war games at Canadian Forces Base Petawawa, northwest of Ottawa.
The anti-poverty group Toronto Disaster Relief Committee has called on Ontario's attorney general to prosecute the killing as a hate crime, saying CROUTCH was targeted as a homeless person.
The group also helped pay for CROUTCH's ex-wife, Marilyn HOWARD, to travel from Dawson Creek, British Columbia, to attend the funeral, and is arranging for her to meet senior Crown attorney Fred BRALEY this week to discuss the hate crime proposal.
At the crowded chapel yesterday, HOWARD spoke of CROUTCH as a spirited family man and entrepreneurial talent. The two met in Toronto in 1966, she said, and later moved to Vancouver and the northern British Columbia town of Dawson Creek.
In 1977, their daughter was born. She did not attend the service, but a recent photograph showing her as a smiling blonde stood on the altar next to a container holding CROUTCH's ashes, and two snapshots of CROUTCH playing with her as a baby.
CROUTCH stopped seeing his daughter when she was 14 as his creeping mental illness turned serious. The couple divorced in 1993. Their daughter recently graduated with an M.A. in plant sciences in the United States, HOWARD said.
"(Over the years), he owned six houses, including a section of farmland, and was a partner in seven businesses," HOWARD said.
At one point, he started his own weekly newspaper in Dawson Creek, the Mirror, which is still publishing. Earlier on, he worked as a travelling auto-parts salesperson for Ford.
"Every second week, he would drive 700 miles of the Alaska Highway," HOWARD said. "He was extremely well known. He'd get calls from all over the North -- 'Hey, I hear Safeway has a sale on lobsters, can you bring some with you?' He would do those things for people."

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IBRAHIM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2005-09-27 published
DEMLAKIAN, Justine (née IBRAHIM) (1908-2005)
Passed away peacefully at her home with her family at her side on Sunday, September 25, 2005; devoted wife of the late Shafik DEMLAKIAN, loving mother of Nairi, wife of the late Abraham SOUVALIAN and of Tom with his partner Victor SO; doting grandmother of Paul and Mark SOUVALIAN; Haig and Aram CHURUKIAN, Nairy EL- KEILANI and their families in Cairo; Simé, Zaven, Vazken, and the late Peter DEMLAKIAN and their families in Sydney, Australia; Rita APKARIAN and her family in Seattle; Vahan DEMLAKIAN and his family in L.A.; sister of the late Dr. Gilbert IBRAHIM of Cairo and the late Victor IBRAHIM, her nieces Justine PIPER and Salma RANDALL and their families in Reading, England; and numerous family members and Friends in Egypt, Lebanon, Syria, England, the U.S., Australia, Montreal and Toronto. Born August 3rd, 1908 in Mosul, the Ottoman Empire, to the Reverend Thomas IBRAHIM and Salma SPEAR, Justine spent her youth in Mardin, Turkey and her late teens in Egypt, graduating from the American University at Cairo in the 1930's with a B.A. in Education and became a teacher in the English Mission College, Heliopolis. Justine married Shafik DEMLAKIAN of Mousa Dagh in 1941 and devoted her talents to the Armenian Red Cross and the Housaper Club in Cairo. In 1974 she joined Tom and Nairi with her family in Toronto and made Canada her home. With her poise, patient determination and nurturing nature she taught her children and grandchildren discipline, perseverance and true values. She will live forever in our hearts. The family extends its special gratitude to the Community Care Access Centre staff, the Mt. Sinai Palliative Care Program, the North York General Hospital and her family physician, Dr. David TANNENBAUM of Mt. Sinai Hospital for many years of compassionate care. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue, from 12: 00 noon-1:00 p.m. on Wednesday, September 28th. Funeral service in the Chapel at 1: 00 p.m. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery.
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