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"PHI" 2003 Obituary


PHILLIPS  PHILPOTT 

PHILLIPS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-04 published
Raymond Kenneth " Ken" HAGEN
In loving memory of Raymond Kenneth "Ken" HAGEN who passed away Monday evening, May 26th, 2003 at Mindemoya Hospital at the age of 87 years.
Beloved husband of Pearl (SEWELL) HAGEN predeceased 1982 and Florence (McCULLIGH) HAGEN of Mindemoya. Loving father of Mary BEAULIEU (husband Guil) of Toronto, George HAGEN (wife Sharon.) Bob HAGEN (wife Linda) both of Lively, Daniel HAGEN (wife Suzanne) of Calgary, Susan RICHER and infant baby Martha Jane both predeceased, stepchildren Leila THURESON (husband Peter,) Karen VANZANT (husband Clyde predeceased,) Harley BAYER (wife Lorraine) and Shirley PHILLIPS predeceased. Cherished grandfather of 24 grandchildren, 17 great grandchildren and 4 great great grandchildren. Dear son of Dan and May HAGEN, predeceased. Dear brother of Edna JACKSON of Sault Ste. Marie and Alex HAGEN predeceased. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Rested at the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch St. Sudbury. Funeral service was held in the R. J. Barnard Chapel on Thursday May 29, 2003 at 1p.m. Interment was held in the Lakeview Cemetery, Meaford, Friday at 11 a.m. A memorial service was held on
Saturday, May 31 in the Mindemoya United Church.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Arthur Thomas H. BREATHAT
In loving memory of Arthur "Art" BREATHAT, a resident of Evansville, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, June 5, 2003 at the age of 50 years.
He was born in Sudbury, son of Gerald BREATHAT and Pauline (CRANSTON) VANEVERY. He worked as a machine operator at the Lafarge Quarry, Meldrum Bay for the past 9 years. Art enjoyed hunting, fishing and a good game of cards.
Dearly loved husband of Marilyn (DAMPIER) BREATHAT of Evansville. Loving father of Cheryl Lee BREATHAT and Aaron PHILLIPS and Arthur James BREATHAT. Dear brother of Robbie and Judy BJORKLUND of Spring Bay, Bonnie and husband Dave PATTERSON of Hornepayne and Peggy FARQUHAR and Jim DAVIES of North Bay. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends and relatives were received at the Culgin Funeral Home on Monday, June 9. There will be no funeral service and cremation will follow.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Theresa " Tessie" Elizabeth MARTEL
In loving memory of Tessie MARTEL, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay and formerly of Little Current passed away at the Lodge on Wednesday June 4, 2003 at the age of 94 years.
She was born in The Slash, daughter of the late Thomas and Fannie McMULLEN) BONUS. She was a homemaker, and enjoyed knitting, cooking and crocheting. Tessie was a hard working wife and mother, and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.
Predeceased by her beloved husband Fred MARTEL in 1952. Loving and loved mother of Frances DOMICH (husband Stan,) Winnipeg, Darlene WILSON (husband Bill,) Gore Bay, Allan MARTEL (wife Flora predeceased) Collingwood, Donald MARTEL (wife Ruth), Toronto, Donna SCHEELER, Wallaceburg, Norma GREEN (husband Allan,) Bruce Mines, Wayne MARTEL (wife Mercedes,) Winnipeg and Terry MARTEL (wife Jodie), Belleville. Predeceased by two children Gerald (Sonny) and Norman (Normie).+ Dear sister of Harry BONUS and Leah PHILLIPS both of Collingwood and predeceased by
brothers Allan, John, Herman, William and sisters Cecelia and Loretta. Dear grandmother of 16 grandchildren, 9 great grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, June 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Friday, June 6 from the Wm. G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home with Pastor Les CRAMP officiating. Interment Mountainview Cemetery, Little Current.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-10 published
Sarah Jane (Jennie) SPRY
In loving memory of Sarah Jane (Jennie) SPRY, November 14, 1912 to December 4, 2003.
Jennie SPRY, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge for the past 5 years, and formerly of Mindemoya, passed away at the Lodge on Thursday, December 4, 2003 at the age of 91 years. She was born at Manitowaning, daughter of the late Thomas and Letitia PHILLIPS. Jennie had a variety of interests, which included gardening, cooking and quilting. Her greatest joy and love was her family. A wonderful and loving wife, mother and grandmother, sister and friend, she will be remembered fondly by all her family and all who knew her. Her beloved husband Leonard (Toot) SPRY predeceased in 1992. Cherished mother of Jean PEARSON (husband Norris predeceased,) Evelyn TAILOR/TAYLOR and husband Ted, Leonard SPRY Jr., and his wife Carol and Keith SPRY and his wife Colleen. Forever remembered by seven grandchildren, twelve great grandchildren and one great great granddaughter. Beloved sister of Alice SPRY (husband Lloyd predeceased), and Harry PHILLIPS (wife Bessie predeceased). Predeceased by grand_sons Mike, Tom and Tim and son-in-law Norris PEARSON. Friends called The Mindemoya United Church on Sunday, December 7, 2003. The funeral service was conducted at the church on Monday, December 8, 2003 with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. Spring interment in Mindemoya Cemetery.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-01 published
CRASHLEY, Lt. Col. J. Douglas, C.M., C.D.
Died Thursday, March 27th, 2003 at the Doctor's Hospital in Nassau, Bahamas. Born in Toronto May 5, 1921. son of the late John Willard and Doris Sanderson CRASHLEY. Predeceased by his beloved wife Elizabeth INGLIS. Dear brother of Doris Crashley PHILLIPS (Brian) of Kennebunk, Maine. He will also be sadly missed by his nieces and nephews. He was a dear friend of Colleen CARMICHAEL and family.
He served with the Governor General's Horse Guards from 1940 was on active service with them from 1941-1945 in England and Italy. He commanded the regiment from 1952-1954. The motto of the regiment, Nulli Secondus (second to none), aptly describes him. He was Past Chairman of the Governor General's Horse Guards Board of Trustees.
He served as Division Chairman for the United Appeal for four years, Past Chairman of the City of Toronto Planning Board, Metropolitan Toronto Planning Board and the City of Toronto Redevelopment Advisory Council. Past President of the Board of Trade of Metropolitan Toronto 1974-1975 and headed a delegation of 100 members on a tour of Eastern Europe and the Baltic countries. Past President of the Art Gallery of Ontario 1972-1974 and Chairman of the King Tutankhamen Exhibition Committee in 1979.
He was the owner of Elgin Motors, Walker House Hotel, Ascot Hotel and Central Precision, and a major shareholder of many other corporations.
In 1978, he was made a Member of the Order of Canada. He was most proud of this honour.
He was a member of the Toronto Club, The York Club, Lyford Cay Club, Royal Canadian Military Institute and The Badminton and Racquet Club.
He will be remembered for his foresight, meticulous attention to detail and business acumen. He had the capacity for making strong personal relationships with many people.
The funeral service will be held at The Cathedral Church of St. James, 65 Church Street, Toronto, at 11: 00 a.m. on Monday, April In lieu of flowers, a memorial donation to the Governor General's Horse Guards Foundation, 137 Hall Street, Richmond Hill, Ontario L4C 4N9 or to a charity of your choice would be most appreciated.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-24 published
He ran O'Keefe Centre in its prime
Former accountant was an innovator: He booked a show using surtitles and a play about an interracial romance
By Carol COOPER Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, May 24, 2003 - Page F10
Late one spring night in 1963, a phone call awoke Hugh WALKER, the first managing director and president of Toronto's O'Keefe Centre for the Performing Arts. A police officer wanted to know if "we had a mad Russian called Nuri-something dancing at the O'Keefe Centre," Mr. WALKER wrote in his book, The O'Keefe Centre: Thirty Years of Theatre History.
After the opening performance of Marguerite and Armand, in which he starred with Dame Margot FONTEYN, Rudolph NUREYEV had danced up the centre of Yonge Street, attempting headstands on cars as he went. Police intervened in the interest of Mr. NUREYEV's safety, but after a scuffle, the dancer landed in jail for causing a disturbance.
Endlessly kind, courtly and patient, Mr. WALKER notified the Royal Ballet with whom Mr. NUREYEV was performing, and the dancer was released.
Mr. WALKER, the man who smoothed the way for the stars appearing at the O'Keefe as overseer of its operations and who had previously supervised its construction, has died at the age of 93.
O'Keefe Centre, now named the Hummingbird Centre, opened on October 1, 1960, with the first performance of Camelot in the country's first Broadway musical. The show starred Richard BURTON, Julie ANDREWS and Robert GOULET and played to a glittering crowd.
In The Toronto Star, Gordon SINCLAIR wrote: "A salaam to Hugh WALKER for bringing the O'Keefe Centre home on time after 30 months of strain on his patience, nerves and humour."
Mr. WALKER had, in fact, developed an ulcer during the centre's construction, and the strain didn't end with its opening. Shortly after the curtain, his wife, Shirley, smelled smoke. It turned out to be a burning escalator motor, and after the fire was extinguished, Mary JOLLIFFE, the centre's publicist, ran to a hotel across the street for air freshener. The audience came out at intermission none the wiser.
It took royalty to solve another problem. At the time, temperance sentiment remained strong in Toronto, and teetotallers criticized the fact the O'Keefe was funded by, and named for, a brewery.
Mr. WALKER set about to gain acceptance for the centre. Learning that the Queen was visiting Canada in June of 1959, he convinced her aides that she should stop briefly at the construction site and view a model of the building.
Before an audience of arts patrons and the press, the Queen inspected the model and showed such an interest that she overstayed her schedule, delaying the start of the Queen's Plate, her next stop, by half an hour.
Mr. WALKER didn't know that the Queen or the O'Keefe would be in his future when he became executive assistant to Canadian Breweries and Argus Corp. owner E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR in 1955.
It was only after his hiring that he learned that Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR had responded to a challenge made by Nathan PHILLIPS, then mayor of Toronto, for industry to build a desperately needed performing arts theatre in the city. For the project, Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR gave $12-million and the services of his new assistant.
With the slogan "To bring the best of live entertainment to the greatest number of people at the lowest possible prices," the 3, 211-seat multipurpose theatre, designed by modernist architect Peter DICKINSON, quickly became a predominant Canadian venue, predating the Place des Arts in Montreal and the National Arts Centre in Ottawa.
Pre-Broadway shows, musicals, ballets and plays from around the world came to the O'Keefe and it replaced Maple Leaf Gardens as the Toronto venue for the Metropolitan Opera. International stars such as Louis ARMSTRONG, Paul ANKA, Tom JONES, Diana ROSS and Harry BELAFONTE performed there.
During one of Mr. BELAFONTE's many performances at the centre, he experimented with a wireless mike. Accidentally, he tuned into the police frequency. "The O'Keefe audience had the unusual experience of listening in on a lot of police messages, while the police were able to enjoy hearing BELAFONTE sing Ma-til-da!," Mr. WALKER wrote.
Another O'Keefe story concerned Carol CHANNING. When the performer appeared at the centre in Hello, Dolly, she needed to make a number of quick costume changes. Since there wasn't enough time for Ms. CHANNING to run backstage to her dressing room, the crew put up a roofless tent in the wings.
From the fly bridge, the stagehands looked down on Ms. CHANNING, remaining quiet while they watched her change. After her last performance, she looked up at them and said, "Well, boys, hope you've enjoyed the show. 'Bye now."
Other more critical events are associated with the O'Keefe. In 1964, while awaiting her divorce from Eddie FISHER, Elizabeth TAILOR/TAYLOR stayed with Richard BURTON while he starred in Sir John GIELGUD's production of Hamlet at the centre. One weekend between performances, the couple stole off to Montreal and married.
And in 1974, ballet dancer Mikhail BARYSHNIKOV arranged his defection from the Soviet Union at the centre.
During the early 1960s, the O'Keefe became home to the National Ballet of Canada and the Canadian Opera Company. In his book, Mr. WALKER credits the centre with allowing the companies' artistic growth.
Still, not everyone spoke so kindly about the O'Keefe. Many critics denounced its acoustics and less-than-intimate size.
For that, Mr. WALKER had a ready answer. In 1985, Herbert WHITTAKER, then The Globe and Mail's drama critic, wrote: "Against the fading chorus of these ancient complaints, I hear an echo, the rather quiet British tones of Hugh WALKER: 'We know it [O'Keefe Centre] is too large for legitimate theatre, Herbert, but think of all the things Toronto would have missed if E. P. TAILOR/TAYLOR hadn't built it when he did?' "
Born on March 2, 1910, in Scotland to Brigadier-General James Workman WALKER, who fought in the Middle East during the First World War, and Jane STEVENSON, Hugh Percy WALKER was the middle of three children. After earning a B.A. at Cambridge University, he became a chartered accountant.
Mr. WALKER worked with firms in London, Palestine, Quebec, Scotland and Michigan before being employed by Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR.
Although a great lover of theatre, upon his appointment as the O'Keefe's managing director, Mr. WALKER had little experience with its business side. This led to some innocent faux pas, such as when he booked a photo shoot with the Camelot stars at 10 in the morning, impossibly early for actors. In response, Mr. BURTON exclaimed: "What, in the middle of the night?" Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Still, director and theatre critic Mavor MOORE said Mr. WALKER dealt with difficulties well. "He was very smooth," Dr. MOORE said. "He was very expert at handling people and situations. He was a calm man."
Mr. WALKER trusted his staff, Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was willing to take direction from staff people who had already been in the business, and that was unusual."
And he was gracious and courteous. "He gave great dignity to the performing arts profession and he treated people wonderfully," Ms. JOLLIFFE said. "He was a perfect model of a former era of English gentlemen."
Known for his hospitality, Mr. WALKER always visited the stars in their dressing rooms before opening night and entertained them afterward at First Nighters' parties with Mrs. WALKER.
When the WALKERs took Leonard BERNSTEIN to the Rosedale Country Club, Mr. WALKER tolerated Mr. BERNSTEIN's sending back the wine three times, Ms. JOLLIFFE said.
Along with bringing in commercial performances from the United States and Britain, Mr. WALKER showed some daring in booking shows. In 1961, Kwamina, the story of a romantic relationship between a white woman and a black man, played the O'Keefe.
Acknowledging Toronto's Italian population, Mr. WALKER arranged for Rugantino, the biggest musical hit in Italian history, to play at the O'Keefe in 1963. It was the first foreign-language attraction in North America to use "surtitles," and although plagued with technical difficulties, it played to 60-per-cent capacity.
Things changed for Mr. WALKER and O'Keefe Centre in the late 1960s. Initially, the centre had been a subsidiary of the O'Keefe Brewing Co., owned by Canadian Breweries, and was never intended to make a profit. The company wrote off its operating losses and property taxes.
When Mr. TAILOR/TAYLOR retired in 1966, directors of Canadian Breweries decided that they could not continue to pay the O'Keefe's high taxes. To resolve the situation, Metropolitan Toronto was given the centre in 1968.
A new and inexperienced board of directors brought a new way of doing things, and the centre's losses began to mount.
Mr. WALKER wrote that after the disastrous 1971-72 season, "what followed was not the happiest part of my 15 years at the O'Keefe Centre, and I would like to forget some of the things that happened."
In his final working years, Mr. WALKER dealt with both the centre's internal changes and rising competition from the Royal Alexandra Theatre, the St. Lawrence Centre and emerging alternative theatres.
After his retirement in 1975, he spent 10 years at the Guild of All Arts in Scarborough, Ontario, as the director of Guildwood Hall, curating former Guild Inn owner Spencer CLARK's historical architectural collection of artifacts, writing and illustrating a booklet on them, curating Mr. CLARK's art collection, making a film and lecturing.
He and his wife lived on the Guild's grounds for four years in the now-demolished Corycliff, where they hosted parties whose guests included many stars from the O'Keefe days.
Along with writing the O'Keefe Centre history while in his 80s, Mr. WALKER golfed.
Sue NIBLETT, who worked with him at the Guild, recalls seeing Mr. WALKER nattily attired in golf clothing and Wellingtons standing in two feet of snow driving balls into Lake Ontario.
"He had a love of life that I've never experienced or met in anybody before," Ms. NIBLETT said. "He didn't waste a day of his life as far as I could see."
Mr. WALKER died on May 2 and leaves daughters Katrina PARKER and Zoë ALEXANDER and two grandchildren. Another daughter, Sarah CHENIER/CHENÉ, and his wife, Shirley, predeceased him.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-11 published
Creator of Savage God
Theatre director was a Canadian nationalist, a fan of the avant garde and a champion of playwright George Ryga. He was also seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, October 11, 2003 - Page F9
John JULIANI was a provocateur in life as on stage. A man passionate about the possibilities of theatre, he roused reverence in some, antipathy in others.
His most infamous act was to challenge the Stratford Festival's newly hired artistic director to a duel. Robin PHILLIPS's offence was that he is British when Mr. JULIANI and others were certain a land as grand as Canada was capable of producing a director for its Shakespearean theatre.
What he called a "romantic gesture with tongue in cheek" earned cheers from Canadian theatre directors and sneers from much of the theatre establishment.
Mr. JULIANI, who has died at the age of 63, was an unabashed Canadian nationalist, a dedicated fan of the avant garde, an ardent defender of the right of actors to a decent living, a champion of playwright George Ryga and a tireless figure so commanding as to develop an intense loyalty among acolytes.
At the same time, he was seen as a kook, a dilettante and a street fighter. One critic called him "the Tiger Williams of Canadian theatre," his pugnacious approach earning him comparison to a notorious hockey goon. In his defence, Mr. JULIANI explained that he was merely a "true believer" with opinions on controversial subjects.
Mr. JULIANI's credits were long and varied, including spontaneous Sixties street happenings such as the staging of his own wedding as a theatrical performance and brief appearances on such 1990s television dramas as The X-Files.
From 1982 until 1997, Mr. JULIANI was executive producer of radio drama for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver. He helped to bring to air many celebrated productions, including the brilliant and provocative Dim Sum Diaries by playwright Mark LEIREN- YOUNG.
Mr. JULIANI also possessed a head-turning beauty, with a profile as striking as a Roman bust. Radio host Bill RICHARDSON commented on his handsomeness at a raucous memorial after his death, calling him a "hunka hunka burnin' love." Some said he had the looks and bearing of a Shakespearean king.
John Charles JULIANI was born in Montreal on March 24, 1940. Raised in a working-class neighbourhood, he attended Loyola College and was an early graduate from the fledgling National Theatre School.
He spent two seasons as an actor at Stratford before being hired as a theatre teacher at Simon Fraser University in 1966. The new university atop Burnaby Mountain east of Vancouver was a hotbed of radicalism in politics and the arts. Mr. JULIANI bristled at an imposed curriculum and so infuriated the administration that he was banned from the campus in 1969.
Mr. JULIANI was heavily influenced by the writing of Antonin Artaud, a Surrealist who championed a theatre based on the imagination. He long sought to erase the barrier between scripted text and sensory impression, between performer and audience, to mixed success.
After moving to the West Coast, Mr. JULIANI launched a series of experiments in theatre. He credited these productions to Savage God, which was less a troupe in the traditional sense than a title granted to any performance involving Mr. JULIANI. The name came from William Butler Yeats's awestruck reaction to Alfred Jarry's Ubu Roi: "After us, the Savage God?"
Savage God defied explanation, though many tried and even Mr. JULIANI offered suggestions. Savage God was "an anthology of question marks," he once said. (It was, after all, the 1960s.) "Savage God is simply the Imagination," he told the Vancouver Sun, "insatiable, unrelenting, fiercely energetic, wary of categorization, fond of contradiction and inveterately iconoclastic."
In January, 1970, Mr. JULIANI married dancer Donna WONG, a ceremony conducted as a Savage God performance at the Vancouver Art Gallery. He repeated the process at the christening of his son. Ms. WONG- JULIANI would be his domestic and drama partner for more than three decades.
In 1971, the streets of Vancouver were the scene of several spontaneous and sometimes incomprehensible -- performances under the aegis of PACET ("pilot alternative complement to existing theatre.") The $18,000 project, funded by the federal government, incorporated Gestalt therapy sessions in street performances.
Theatrical events took place willy-nilly across the city, including malls, the airport, the library and Stanley Park. Admission was not charged, nor did all spectators appreciate their role as audience to avant-garde performance. A scene in which bicyclists wearing gas masks pedalled along city streets left many scratching their heads in puzzlement.
In 1974, Mr. JULIANI moved to Toronto to set up a graduate theatre-studies program at York University.
He called the program PEAK (" Performance, Example, Animation, Katharsis") and perhaps should have found an acronym for PEEK, as the instructor and his class stripped naked to protest against a lack of classroom space.
The challenge to the new Stratford artistic director in 1974 was written on a piece of parchment and delivered in London by Don RUBIN, a York colleague. Alas, Mr. RUBIN could not find a proper gauntlet and wound up ceremoniously striking Mr. PHILLIPS with a red rubber glove, an absurd note to a theatrical protest.
In 1978, Mr. JULIANI took the stage in a Toronto production of Children of Night, portraying Janusz Korczak, a doctor and teacher who ran an orphanage in the Warsaw ghetto. The critics were appalled.
Gina MALLET of the Toronto Star said Mr. JULIANI's performance sullied Dr. Korczak's memory. Jay SCOTT of The Globe and Mail, noting "the dreadfulness" of Mr. JULIANI's acting, said the production robbed the dead of their dignity.
From the stage, Mr. JULIANI challenged the Star's critic to a public debate on the aesthetics of theatre. He also wrote a letter to the editor, noting that Holocaust survivors in the audience had wholeheartedly embraced the production.
Mr. JULIANI wound up in Edmonton, where he continued to condemn the "exorbitance, elitism and museum theatre" of the establishment.
In 1982, he directed and co-wrote Latitude 55°, a feature film with just two characters -- a slick woman from the city and a Polish potato farmer -- set in a snowbound cabin. "It is filled with a passionate conviction that evaporates in pretentious pronouncements," The Globe's Carole CORBEIL wrote, "filled with truthful moments that evaporate in the desire to use every narcissistic trick in the book."
In a 1983 book examining the alternative theatre movement in Canada, author Renate USMIANI devoted most of a chapter to Mr. JULIANI, a decision that got her a scathing rebuke from a reviewer who considered him worthy of little more than a footnote.
"His works are curiosities; at best, they are worthy experiments in Artaudian theory," Boyd NEIL wrote in a Globe review. "But they are neither popular... nor influential."
Mr. JULIANI's years at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in Vancouver were both productive and successful. Among the many projects he directed was a three-part adaptation of Margaret Laurence's The Diviners; King Lear, starring John COLICOS; a 13-part series titled, Disaster! Acts of God or Acts of Man?" and, famously, Ryga's The Ecstasy of Rita Joe, with Leonard GEORGE portraying a role once assumed on stage by his late father, Chief Dan GEORGE. The surprise selection of Mr. GEORGE was typical of Mr. JULIANI's often brilliant casting.
Mr. JULIANI directed a 1989 production of The Glass Menagerie at the Vancouver Playhouse with Jennifer Phipps and Morris Panych. Globe reviewer Liam LACEY praised a production that "opens up the play like an old treasure chest, and lets in some fresh air without rearranging or disturbing the work's original grandeurs and caprices."
Four years later, Mr. JULIANI was directing a production of the mystery thriller Sleepwalker when actor Peter HAWORTH took sick shortly before opening night. The director suddenly found himself as the male lead. "Not even the most colossal egotist would want to do this," he said.
Dim Sum Diaries, a series of monologues written by Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG, received protests when aired by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in 1991. One episode, entitled The Sequoia, in which the white vendor of a luxury home launches a tirade against the Hong Kong immigrant who cuts down two rare and spectacular trees on the property, was accused of being racist. The playwright's well-intentioned exploration of stereotyping was charged with fostering those very prejudices.
After directing Dim Sum Diaries, Mr. JULIANI urged the playwright to tackle an issue that was dividing his church. Mr. LEIREN- YOUNG remembers replying: "You're talking same-sex marriage in the Anglican church and you want a straight Jewish guy to write this?"
The resulting play, titled Articles of Faith: The Battle of St. Alban's, was staged at Christ Church Cathedral in downtown Vancouver to great acclaim.
The collaborations between young playwright and veteran director succeeded in achieving Mr. JULIANI's goal of inspiring dialogue through theatre.
Mr. JULIANI had a reputation as a demanding taskmaster for novice and veteran actors alike. Rehearsals were jokingly called "Savage God Boot Camp."
He maintained a breakneck pace, both in the theatre and in the boardroom. He was artistic co-director of Opera Breve, a small company dedicated to nurturing young singers; president of the Union of British Columbia Performers (Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists); and, a former national president of the Directors Guild of Canada, among many boards on which he served.
Feeling fatigued in early August, Mr. JULIANI was diagnosed with liver cancer. The end came swiftly. He died on August 21 at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver.
He leaves his wife of 33 years, Donna WONG- JULIANI, and a son, Alessandro JULIANI, an actor. He also leaves brothers Richard and Norman.
(Wit was long a part of the JULIANI mystique. The family pet, a canine named Beau Beau, was referred to in the family's paid obituary notice as a Savage Dog.)
For one who roused such passions, Mr. JULIANI felt that he led a conservative life. "I have always been a square," he once said.
A theatrical farewell to Mr. JULIANI attracted hundreds to St. Andrew's Wesley Church in Vancouver on Labour Day, a Monday and traditionally a quiet date on the theatre calendar. Those in attendance were encouraged to write remembrances on Post-It notes, which were then stuck to the church's pillars.
The City of Vancouver has declared next March 24, which would have been Mr. JULIANI's 64th birthday, to be Savage God Day.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
KERNOHAN, Kathryn Margaret (née KINNEAR)
Born December 29, 1911 died December 24, 2003 in Toronto, her birthplace. Beloved wife of the late Gordon E. KERNOHAN. Predeceased by her parents Thomas H. and Margaret G. KINNEAR (née NASMITH) and her brother T. Clark KINNEAR. Much loved and most loving mother of Susan SCACE (Arthur,) Kathy and Patrick KINNEAR (Ginny.) Adored ''Gammi'' of Jennifer and Patrick, Gordon and Cayleigh, and Sarah and Maggie. Special Grammi to Matthew, Jonathan and Adam. Cherished Auntie Kay to Bill KERNOHAN, the late Dodie PHILLIPS Tom, Bob and Bill KINNEAR and Margo HYDE. A heartfelt thank you to all the caregivers at Belmont House over the last ten years. A memorial service will be held on Monday, January 12, 2004 at 11 o'clock at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church. A reception will follow. If desired, donations may be made to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto M4V 1R5, or to a charity of your choice.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-30 published
KERNOHAN, Kathryn Margaret (née KINNEAR)
Born December 29, 1911 died December 24, 2003 in Toronto, her birthplace. Beloved wife of the late Gordon E. KERNOHAN. Predeceased by her parents Thomas H. and Margaret G. KINNEAR (née NASMITH) and her brother T. Clark KINNEAR. Much loved and most loving mother of Susan SCACE (Arthur), Kathy and Patrick (Ginny). Adored ''Gammie'' of Jennifer and Patrick, Gordon and Cayleigh, and Sarah and Maggie. Special Gammie to Matthew, Jonathan and Adam. Cherished Auntie Kay to Bill KERNOHAN, the late Dodie PHILLIPS Tom, Bob and Bill KINNEAR and Margo HYDE. A heartfelt thank you to all the caregivers at Belmont House over the last ten years. A memorial service will be held on Monday, January 12, 2004 at 11 o'clock at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church. A reception will follow.

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PHILLIPS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-31 published
KEELEY, Joyce Kathleen Phillips (née PHILLIPS)
Died peacefully at noon on December 30 at Sunnybrook Hospital. ''Joycie Girl'' was the beloved wife of Gerry KEELEY, mother of Kate and Doug, and 'gaga' of Ollie, Sam and Matti. She was the daughter of Kathleen NESBITT and Heber PHILLIPS, and sister of Bobbie and John. We will all remember Joyce as the girl who never missed an important putt or a good party, and brought joy and Friendship to everyone she met. She was an amazing mom and grandmother. A memorial service will be held at Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stoplights West of Yonge St.) in Toronto at 1 p.m. Monday, January 5th. A reception will follow immediately at the Badminton and Racquet Club at 25 St Clair Ave. West.

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PHILPOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-19 published
MURPHY, Reverend John Thomas
Of Heritage United Church, Musgravetown, Newfoundland, died November 16, 2003 while visiting in Ottawa. He is survived by his children Ryan, at Mount Alison University, Sackville, New Brunswick, and Erin, at L.B. Pearson United World College, Victoria, British Columbia; their mother Lori, of Lethbridge, Newfoundland and grandmother Phyllis PHILPOTT of Musgravetown, Newfoundland; by his parents Isabel and Stephen MURPHY, brother Doug (Marie KUSTERS) and aunt Mary MURPHY, all of Ottawa; and by aunt and uncle Ruth and Donald PARR of Guelph. John is also survived by cousins, a nephew and nieces in Ontario and Newfoundland. The funeral will be held at Heritage United Church, Musgravetown, Newfoundland, on Saturday, November 22 at 2: 00 p.m. with interment at the church cemetery. A service of remembrance will be held in Rideau Park United Church, 2203 Alta Vista Drive, Ottawa, on Saturday, November 29 at 10: 30 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to either the Manse Fund of Heritage United Church or to the Anniversary Scholarship Fund, c/o Heritage United Church.

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