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"KNO" 2003 Obituary


KNOLL  KNOTT  KNOWLES  KNOX 

KNOLL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-21 published
KNOLL, Francis Aileen
Passed away peacefully at the Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto of cancer and heart complications on July 17, 2003, at age 69. Frances is survived by her brothers Alan (Catherine) and Gerald (Fay,) her sisters Madeleine ARNOLD and Catherine CHAPUT (Armand) and many loving nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her brothers Jack, Jim and George, and her sister Mary Louise. Frances made the most of her dynamic personality and keen intelligence, following many pursuits over her career. Born in Vermilion, Alberta, she graduated from the University of Alberta at age 19 with a degree in psychology, after which she became a caseworker with the Catholic Children's Aid Society. This work led her to pursue a Master of Social Work at the University of Ottawa, which she obtained in 1961. After working for another 10 years in the family service field, Frances accepted the position of Assistant Professor in the faculty of Social Work at the University of Toronto, a position she held for eight years. Frances then attended Osgoode Hall Law School, from which she graduated in 1982, and was called to the Bar in Ontario two years later. From that point on, Frances used her varied background to work extensively with not-for-profit organizations in a wide variety of ways, reviewing operations and complaints, frequently acting as Interim Director, and becoming a Family Court judge, until her retirement in 2001. Throughout her life, Frances made many, many Friends. She was always a much sought-after dinner companion, cherished the arts, travelled extensively, and truly loved life. Her Friends and family remember Frances as someone who would always tell it like it was, while somehow managing to put a light-hearted spin on even the most serious of matters. The family wishes to express their heartfelt thanks to the teams at Mount Sinai and Princess Margaret Hospitals. A memorial service for Frances, which will be announced, will take place in the coming weeks.

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KNOTT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-24 published
Norman KNOTT
By Maurice SWITZER Friday, October 24, 2003 - Page A22
Norman KNOTT
Anishinabe artist. Born February 5, 1945, in Toronto. Died July 31, of a heart attack, in Haliburton, Ontario, aged 58.
The day before he died, Norman KNOTT (Waabshki ki Mukwa -- White Bear) called to give me hell, in a good way.
"Hey, chum, you're going to cost me money," the renowned Anishinabe artist joked.
It seems the caption in July's Anishinabek News, under a photo of his large, four-by-four-foot canvas titled Native Heritage, said he was willing to part with it for $4,000. The actual selling price is $15,000. Norman had already received several inquiries at the lower figure.
Collectors from all over the world sought him out to buy his paintings, which were owned by collectors including Johnny Cash, Queen Elizabeth, Lee Trevino, and the late Pierre Elliot TRUDEAU.
"I still get people from France and Italy looking me up," he told me, during a late June visit to the Union of Ontario Indians head office near North Bay. Like many lesser-known Native artisans and crafters, he had just pulled into the parking lot and set up shop in the reception area.
He had no business cards, no website, and he hadn't been selling his art on the pow-wow trail for years. What about people interested in buying his paintings of splashing loons and perching cranes, or intricately carved moose antler combs, or bear-tooth pendants with jade inlay?
"They'll find me," he shrugged. "I go out when I want. I could have shows but as long as I can pay my bills..." his voice drifted off. "This not having a hydro bill is something else!"
He was describing a new lifestyle. He and his partner Crystal had recently retreated to a 200-acre hideaway, where they would burn wood for heat and grow their own vegetables. It wasn't too far from his Curve Lake First Nation roots, Norman said, although he was careful not to be too specific.
The retreat was a long way from what he called "the world of champagne and caviar" that he enjoyed when his 16-by-20-inch paintings sold for $9,000. Those were heady times, when he and other Native Woodlands artists like Norval MORISSEAU were the darlings of the North American art scene. The times had taken their toll, leaving Norman with a heart condition and a face that looked like it had weathered more than 58 years. He said he hadn't had a drink for the last 16 or 17 years, after a car accident.
These days he was trying to get his paintings, carvings, and jewelry into the hands of as many people as he could, hawking it like a door-to-door salesman and giving it away to those who couldn't afford it. He said true happiness was making his art affordable to everyone who liked it. Minutes after he and Crystal had packed up the mobile Norman KNOTT art gallery outside our office, he returned, handing out Norman KNOTT originals as giveaways for those who didn't (or couldn't afford to) buy them earlier.
Then, several weeks later, two telephone calls. The first, from Norman, joking about me understating his prices. The next day, word about his heart attack and death. He is survived by Crystal, former wife Barb, sons Tony and Norman, and daughters Jessica and Naomi.
I hadn't heard a loon's call all summer until one day on a high place overlooking Lake Laurentian near Sudbury. It reminded me of the little painted paddle -- a Norman KNOTT original -- I had purchased from him for a mere $60.
May his spirit be in a better place and shine in the night sky with all the other stars.
Maurice SWITZER is director of communications for the Union of Ontario Indians in North Bay.

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KNOWLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
FRANCIS, Peter Norton
Suddenly, in Meaford on Wednesday March 5, 2003. Peter FRANCIS, loved husband of Elizabeth EARLY, of Meaford in his 61st year. son of the late Arthur and Jean (KNOWLES) FRANCIS. Loving father of Charles FRANCIS of Toronto. Dear brother of Janet (Ron) PURSER of Brockville. Also remembered by nieces Margaret, Beth and Barbara and great-uncle of Sarah and Amy. Also survived by a brother-in-law Steve EARLY. Funeral services will be conducted at Meaford United Church on Saturday, March 8 at 2: 30 p.m. with interment at Lakeview Cemetery following. Friends will be received at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher Street East, Meaford on Friday from 2 until 5 o'clock. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford Hall Restoration Fund or Meaford General Hospital Foundation would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home (519-538-1320).

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KNOWLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-10 published
FELICIANT, Peggy Penelope (formerly PERRY, née KNOWLES) 1926 Died early Monday morning, June 9, 2003, in Toronto, peacefully with her family. Beloved wife of the late David FELICIANT, she will be lovingly remembered by her sons Douglas PERRY (Lesley) and Stephen PERRY, her stepson David FELICIANT, her sisters Patricia ATKINSON (Ted) and Barbara GABRIEL (Fred,) her nephews Gary ATKINSON (Susan,) Gregory ATKINSON (Sharon,) Tim ATKINSON (Linda) and Andrew GABRIEL (Holly,) and her niece Carol GABRIEL. Peggy was a graduate in nursing of McGill University, and for many years was a public health nurse with the Borough of Etobicoke. Visitation will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), from 7 - 9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, June 11, at 11 a.m. Reception to follow. Private interment will take place at Cataraqui Cemetery, in Kingston, on Thursday. For those who wish, donations may be made in Peggy's memory to the Alzheimer's Society of Toronto.

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KNOWLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-26 published
He was the voice of the land
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation broadcaster oversaw radio programming that connected the country's isolated agricultural and fishing communities
By Carol COOPER, Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, December 26, 2003 - Page R15
It wasn't a great beginning. Racked with nerves during his first on-air stint for a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Winnipeg radio agricultural show in 1944, Bob KNOWLES gabbled the market reports in a record three minutes, instead of the scheduled 10, with the result that his boss had to spend the next seven minutes rereading them.
"I don't suppose anyone made any sense out of anything I'd read," Mr. KNOWLES told the Regina Leader Post in 1981.
Many voice and elocution lessons later, Mr. KNOWLES became an accomplished and well-loved farm broadcaster, who won the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation farm department's Cowhide Trophy for proficiency in broadcasting in 1951 and then rose through the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation ranks to become the national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts.
Mr. KNOWLES, who in that capacity, oversaw programs such as Country Calendar, Country Magazine, Summer Fallow and the daily agricultural noon-hour shows, died in his sleep recently. He was 83.
Farm shows on radio and television offer up-to-date market information, advice on growing crops and raising animals, and news on the latest agricultural research from the universities to their busy and isolated rural audience. In days gone by, when many more Canadians made their living from the land without modern communication methods, radio farm shows were particularly important.
As national supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts, and chair of National Farm Radio Forum's executive committee for a number of years, Mr. KNOWLES contributed to one ground-breaking Canadian show. Launched in the early forties as an adult-education program for farmers, Farm Radio Forum brought farmers, their wives and often their children together in an early version of interactive radio. Gathering weekly throughout the winter in living rooms, kitchens and community halls across the country, they listened to the show's broadcasts.
After hearing a panel discussion, the group discussed questions presented in study guides. A secretary recorded answers, which were sent back to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, some to be aired the following week. Their responses helped shape agricultural policy across the country and initiated several projects, said Rodger Schwass, a former national secretary of Farm Radio Forum and professor emeritus from York University.
As its chair during the late fifties and early sixties, Mr. KNOWLES helped choose show topics and panelists and became involved in one of its projects, Radios for India.
Forums across Canada raised money to help start a radio forum in India, one of several countries, including Jamaica, Belize, Ghana and Nigeria that adopted the Canadian idea. When the head of Indian radio came to Canada for three months to study radio forums, Mr. KNOWLES shepherded him around the country. In turn, Mr. KNOWLES participated in a training program in India. Radio forums became the chief means of disseminating information during India's Green Revolution, which ended up doubling the country's food production.
Robert Gordon KNOWLES was born on February 5, 1920 to Gordon and Catherine Finn KNOWLES on the family's homestead in Rutland, Saskatchewan. The family had settled there from Ontario in 1907, in the town that no longer exists, roughly 160 kilometres west of Saskatoon. Affected by mild cerebral palsy resulting from a difficult birth, Mr. KNOWLES walked with a mild limp and was unable to use his right hand.
Although Mr. KNOWLES wanted nothing more than to become a farmer, his father feared his son's disability would make that difficult. Instead, he encouraged Mr. KNOWLES to continue his education. Upon completing his B.Sc. in agriculture at the University of Saskatchewan in 1942, and with a low service rating because of his disability, Mr. KNOWLES did not enlist during the Second World War. Instead, he completed his master's degree in agriculture at the university in 1944, where he had met Pat APTED, an honours graduate in arts and biology, whom he married in 1943.
With so many men overseas, Mr. KNOWLES had three job offers upon graduation: as a district agriculturalist in Alberta, as a land inspector for the Canadian Pacific Railway, or as a western farm commentator with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. He chose the people's network. "At that time, the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation was only eight-years-old and it seemed like a very glamorous position," Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News in After his first position in Winnipeg, he transferred to Edmonton for a similar job, staying nine months, before returning to Winnipeg as regional farm-broadcast commentator in 1950.
Of his early days in broadcasting, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon paper, "I made my work pass the following test: Is it of interest and value to the farmer to know about this and why? I think I did all right because I've been criticized equally by all farm organizations at one time or another."
In 1954, Mr. KNOWLES and his family packed up and moved to Toronto, where he became the assistant supervisor of farm and fisheries broadcasts and 19 months later, the supervisor.
Not only did he manage the section's budget, set its policy and advise regional announcers across the country, but at least once provided the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation with a breaking story.
In 1963, Mr. KNOWLES and most of the network's farm department were on a flight that crashed during landing at Toronto International Airport.
Uninjured, Mr. KNOWLES left the plane to be put into a holding room with fellow passengers. Once there, he demanded to call home to reassure his wife and young family. Granted the privilege, he immediately called the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's newsroom.
In 1967, with a major network restructuring under way, Mr. KNOWLES took a three-year leave of absence to work for the Food and Agriculture Organization in Rome on the development of farm broadcasts.
Upon returning to Canada, he found his job had disappeared. Mr. KNOWLES took the only Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-Radio farm commentator's job available, where he reported, wrote and delivered approximately 6,000 broadcasts for Radio Noon in Regina, until his retirement in 1980.
Said Bonnie DONISON, producer of Radio Noon. "Because he was so friendly and warm, people really liked to talk to him and And he held some interesting interviews, once with a trouserless federal minister of agriculture, Otto LANG. Mr. LANG had ripped his pants getting out of a taxi, so he removed them, sent them aside for mending and carried on, recalled Gerry WADE, a fellow farm-broadcaster who worked with Mr. KNOWLES in Regina.
Of his broadcasting career, Mr. KNOWLES told the Vernon Daily News, "I can honestly say that during all of my time as a journalist, there never was a day I didn't want to go into work."
Mr. KNOWLES also helped create the Canadian Farm Writers Federation and was inducted into the Saskatchewan Agricultural Hall of Fame in 1990.
He died on November 5 in Ottawa. His first wife Pat, predeceased him in 1997. He leaves his second wife Marney, children Tony, Laura, Alan and Janet, seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren.

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KNOX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-25 published
Died This Day -- Alexander KNOX, 1995
Friday, April 25, 2003 - Page R13
Actor, scriptwriter born January 16, 1907, in Strathroy, Ontario educated at the University of Western Ontario; in 1929, made stage debut in Boston; appeared in 70 movies, including Gorky Park and Two of a Kind; celebrated for title role in 1944 presidential biopic, Wilson; received Academy Award nomation and won Golden Globe for best actor; specialized in character parts; divided time between Hollywood and Britain; died of bone cancer at Berwick-Upon-Tweed, England.

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KNOX o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-07 published
COSTELLO, Mary Paula Christine (née CASTONGUAY)
Born October 15, 1919, died November 6, 2003 at Formosa, Ontario. Lovingly remembered by her three children Michael COSTELLO, Mary KNOX and her husband Brian, Bob COSTELLO and his wife Brenda sadly missed by her grandchildren Riley and Jessie KNOX; Allie, Darryl and Dru COSTELLO. Predeceased by her husband Robert E. E. COSTELLO and infant son Patrick William Gerard. Visitation at Cameron Funeral Home, Walkerton, Ontario. Funeral mass 11 am Saturday, November 8, 2003 at Immaculate Conception Church, Formosa, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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