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"ATK" 2003 Obituary


ATKIN  ATKINS  ATKINSON 

ATKIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-02 published
SHARPE, David Buscombe
Born October 22, 1924, died after a brief illness on May 29, 2003. Loving husband of Bette (née ATKIN,) father of Joanne, Nancy WILLIAMS and husband Richard. Father-in- law of Nancy SHARPE, grandfather of Ian SHARPE, David and Kevin WILLIAMS. Pre- deceased by his sons John David SHARPE and Brian William SHARPE. The family will receive Friends at W.C. Town Funeral Chapel, 110 Dundas Street, East, Whitby (905-668-3410) on Wednesday, June 4, 2003, from 1 to 3 and 7 to 9 p.m. Service at All Saints Anglican Church, 300 Dundas Street West (at Centre Street), Whitby on Thursday, June 5, 2003, at 11 a.m. Private family interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery, Toronto at a later date. For those who wish in lieu of flowers, donations made to the Lakeridge Health Whitby Foundation or All Saints Anglican Church would be appreciated.

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ATKINS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-26 published
Mary-Ann Elizabeth DAWSON
In loving memory of Mary-Ann Elizabeth DAWSON. A graduate of Ontario Ladies College, B. A. in Sociology, University of Toronto, Director of Social Assistance, Community Services and Housing Department, York Region. Peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, February 21, 2003 at the age of 52. Mary-Ann, beloved wife of Patrick. Loving mother of Tracy ATKINS and loving step-mother of Tammy BOUCHARD and her husband Michael, Julie and Matthew. Proud grandmother of Shelby. Loving daughter of Alma McDOUGALL and the late Lauchlan McDOUGALL of Gore Bay. Dear sister of Ross McDOUGALL and his wife Deone and Connie TURNER. Dear sister-in-law of Michael and Elizabeth DAWSON. Loving aunt of Kyle, Neil, Nicole, Cole, Peter and Katie. Mary-Ann will be deeply missed by many Friends and family. A funeral service takes place on Wednesday, February 26 at the Aurora United Church. Arrangements entrusted to the Thompson Funeral Home, Aurora. 905-727-5421. A memorial service will be held in the spring in Gore Bay followed by an interment at the Gordon Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

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ATKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DAWSON, Mary-Ann Elizabeth
Graduate of Ontario Ladies College, B.A. in Sociology University of Toronto, Director of Social Assistance, Community Services and Housing Department York Region. Peacefully with her family by her side on Friday, February 21, 2003 at the age of 52. Mary-Ann, beloved wife of Patrick. Loving mother of Tracy ATKINS and loving step-mother of Tammy BOUCHARD and her husband Michael, Julie and Matthew. Proud grandmother of Shelby. Loving daughter of Alma McDOUGALL and the late Lauchlan McDOUGALL of Gore Bay. Dear sister of Ross McDOUGALL and his wife Deone and Connie TURNER. Dear sister-in-law of Michael and Elizabeth DAWSON. Loving aunt of Kyle, Neil, Nicole, Cole, Peter and Katie. Mary-Ann will be deeply missed by many Friends and family. Visitation will be held on Tuesday from 2-3 and 7-9 p.m. at the Thompson Funeral Home, 29 Victoria Street, Aurora, 905-727-5421. A Funeral Service will be held on Wednesday at 1 p.m. at the Aurora United Church, 15186 Yonge Street, Aurora. A Memorial Service will be held in the spring in Gore Bay followed by an interment a the Gordon Cemetery, Manitoulin Island. Memorial donations may be made to the York Region Breast Cancer Society or Sunnybrook Cancer Clinic.

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ATKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-05 published
JONES, Carolyn (( DUNCANnée) McKAY)
Born in Halbrite, Saskatchewan, December 5, 1908. Carol died in North Vancouver, British Columbia on June 24, 2003. She was predeceased by her first husband Lewis DUNCAN, Picton, Ontario., and her second husband William JONES of Merrickville, Ontario. Also predeceased by her brother Eric McKAY, her sisters, Doris ADAM/ADAMS, Marion SARKISSIAN and Elizabeth LEE, her niece Elinor BREWERTON and nephew Don McKAY. Carol is survived and will be sadly missed by her nephews Peter HEPPLEWHITE and Ted McKAY, her niece Shirley ATKINS and all of their families as well as many Friends throughout Canada, U.S. and Great Britain. In lieu of flowers, donations in Carol's memory to a charity of their choice will be gratefully acknowledged. Arrangements entrusted to First Memorial Funeral Services, North Vancouver, British Columbia 604-980-3451.

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ATKINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-17 published
ORZECHOWSKI, Jim
October 11, 1944 - November 12, 2003. Jim died on Wednesday night at 8: 30 p.m. in the medical intensive care unit at the St. Boniface General Hospital, after being admitted to hospital on October 8. He fought hard as was his wont, with courage, strength and love, and we his family, were all privileged to be with him. Jim and his wife Simone (née GUERTIN) celebrated their 36th wedding anniversary on September 2nd of this year. She and their children, Kristina BRAUN, Lasha ORZECHOWSKI and son-in-law Jeffrey BRAUN now have a huge void in their lives. Jim was such a presence passionate, loving, generous to a fault, intelligent, funny, fun to be with and demanding of himself and those he cared about. He was the most positive and optimistic man. We love him and miss him so much, husband, father and friend. Jim was the youngest of four sons born to Lawrence and Anastasia (HRYBOK) ORZECHOWSKI. He is survived by his oldest brother Nick (Rose) and a large loving family of nieces, nephews, brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law. Jim and Simone's son Demion died on April 14, 1998. Jim's father Lawrence, mother Anastasia, brother Alexander, brother Peter, mother-in-law Marie-Louise GUERTIN and father-in-law Tony Sr. (Antoine) GUERTIN have all predeceased him. Jim enjoyed a demanding and fulfilling career as an Architect. He was the Chief Executive Officer of Smith Carter Architects and Engineers Inc. when he died. He joined Smith Carter in June of 1970, was elected to the Associate Group in 1973 and became a partner in 1974. Over the years there have been a number of articles in the press outlining the achievements of Smith Carter. With vision and forward thinking all of the dedicated people in this firm have come to enjoy a pre-eminent role in not only Manitoba, but nationally and internationally as well. Family, Friends and colleagues have all heard from Jim at one time or another: ...
Do your homework...
Take the high road...
Work hard and smart...
Enjoy whatever you do.
Jim loved Winnipeg and Manitoba. Underrated - Central - Safe - Caring -Affordable - Four beautiful distinct seasons. And so he felt a need to promote and nurture this wonderful community. He served as a volunteer member on many of this city's boards - educational, cultural, professional, health and civic. Due to Jim's strong respect for the Art of Architecture and the inherent discipline, he was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada and inducted as a member to the Royal Canadian Academy of Arts. This recognition by his peer group allowed him a quiet and appreciative pride. Jim, as many people know, enjoyed breeding and showing Newfoundland dogs - just having animals, horses, dogs, cats - planting trees - working outdoors. He was an expert skier, strived to be a better sailor, was frustrated with his golf game, loved our fifth-wheel and all the opportunity that it represented for fun in the sun. His funeral service will be held at St. Ignatius Church, southwest corner of Corydon and Stafford, Thursday November 20 at 12: 00 p.m. with Father Peter MONTY, S.J. officiating. His pallbearers will be Jeffrey BRAUN, Wayne HEKLE, Philippe GUERTIN, Jason ORZECHOWSKI, Todd ORZECHOWSKI and Jack SMYTH. His honourary pallbearers will be Nick ORZECHOWSKI, Tony GUERTIN Jr., Jean Paul GUERTIN, Ken ZORNIAK, Ron PIDWERBESKY, John ATKINS, Bob SPARROW, Curtis HANSTEAD, Scott STIRTON, Jim YAMASHITA, Dr. John FOERSTER and Dr. Jack LEZACK. Donations may be made to the Jim Orzechowski Memorial Fund at the St.Boniface General Hospital Research Foundation, 409 Tache Ave., Winnipeg, Manitoba R2H 2A6 Funeral arrangements entrusted to: Chapel Lawn Funeral Home Cemetery and Crematorium 885-9175

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ATKINSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Albert Jeffrey MICHIE
(United Steel Workers of America Local 2784 Associate Member, RCL #43) In Oshawa on Sunday, January 12, 2003 in his 65th year.
Beloved husband of Carrollynn. Predeceased by his wife Theresa ROCHON. Loving father of Carol FILLION, David MICHIE (Sherri), Louise (Sue) MAY, Danny MICHIE (Andrea). Step father of Candy SHELLEY, George ATKINSON (Dianne) and Paul ATKINSON (Jennifer.) Dear brother-in-law of Bernard and Linda JONES. Lovingly remembered by his grandchildren James, Matthew, Tara, Tanya, Jennifer, Cheyenne, Chantelle, Amanda, Philip, Tess, Lisa, Corey, Renne, Danielle, Eric and by his great granddaughter Jennifer. Predeceased by his brothers Bill, John "Bud", Orton, Roland, Austin and Edward. Sadly missed by all of his family and Friends. Funeral service was held at Thornton Cemetery Chapel on Saturday, January 18, 2003. Cremation. Armstrong Funeral Home Oshawa.

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ATKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-09 published
A local hero, first and last
Canadian Press Friday, May 9, 2003 - Page R11
Niagara Falls, Ontario -- Steve ATKINSON, a right winger for the Buffalo Sabres in the 1970s who began his career as a Niagara Falls Flyer, died Tuesday of a heart attack. He was 54.
Born in Toronto in 1948, Mr. ATKINSON made his National Hockey League debut during the 1968-69 season, playing one game for the Boston Bruins. In 1970, Mr. ATKINSON joined the expansion Sabres and played four seasons with them. He also skated for the Washington Capitals.
However, it was his years with the Flyers that provided lasting satisfaction, scoring 77 goals in four years. However, the one goal that local fans remember most was scored April 26, 1968, at Memorial Arena. That's the night Mr. ATKINSON fired home the winning goal in Game 8 of the Ontario Hockey Association championship series to eliminate the Kitchener Rangers.
"It was probably the greatest game in hockey for me, Mr. ATKINSON said in an October profile looking back at the 1967-68 season. "We were all over them."
The Flyers went on to defeat Verdun in the Eastern Canada final and then beat Estevan to capture the Memorial Cup. Mr. ATKINSON scored 19 goals in the Flyers' 29 playoff games that spring, including five goals and 12 points against Estevan.
"He was a super guy and a mainstay on that Memorial Cup team. He was a great player, Flyers teammate Garry SWAIN said.
After the Cup win, Mr. ATKINSON joined the Oklahoma City Blazers of the Central Hockey League. In his one season with the Blazers, he scored 40 goals and 80 points in 65 games en route to being named the league's rookie of the year.
He made his National Hockey League debut during the 1968-69 season, playing one game for the Boston Bruins.
In 1970, Mr. ATKINSON joined the expansion Buffalo Sabres and went on to play four seasons with them. He also suited up for the National Hockey League's Washington Capitals, North American Hockey League's Erie Blades and the Toronto Toros of the World Hockey Association. In 1977, he helped the Brantford Alexanders win the Allan Cup.
Mr. ATKINSON leaves his wife, Karen and children Kimberly and Kristin, and adult children James and Lisa.
The funeral is today at St. Andrew's United Church in Niagara Falls at 11 a.m.

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ATKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-10 published
FELICIANT, Peggy Penelope (formerly PERRY, née KNOWLES) 1926 Died early Monday morning, June 9, 2003, in Toronto, peacefully with her family. Beloved wife of the late David FELICIANT, she will be lovingly remembered by her sons Douglas PERRY (Lesley) and Stephen PERRY, her stepson David FELICIANT, her sisters Patricia ATKINSON (Ted) and Barbara GABRIEL (Fred,) her nephews Gary ATKINSON (Susan,) Gregory ATKINSON (Sharon,) Tim ATKINSON (Linda) and Andrew GABRIEL (Holly,) and her niece Carol GABRIEL. Peggy was a graduate in nursing of McGill University, and for many years was a public health nurse with the Borough of Etobicoke. Visitation will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Avenue West, Toronto (2 stoplights west of Yonge Street), from 7 - 9 p.m. on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Wednesday, June 11, at 11 a.m. Reception to follow. Private interment will take place at Cataraqui Cemetery, in Kingston, on Thursday. For those who wish, donations may be made in Peggy's memory to the Alzheimer's Society of Toronto.

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ATKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-28 published
Mary Amelia Fowler ATKINSON
By Bob ATKINSON Thursday, August 28, 2003 - Page A20
Wife, mother of 12, grandmother of 23 and great-grandmother of seven. Born May 9, 1913, in Joggins, Nova Scotia Died January 20 in Saint Mary's, Ontario, of a stroke, aged 89.
Constancy is the word that best describes Mom. The namesake of Amelia Earhart, she was the youngest daughter of immigrants from Scotland, James FOWLER and Amelia Christine McCORMICK.
Mom shared many memories of life along Nova Scotia's Gold Coast. "The warmest water north of Florida," she used to say. And she was always fascinated by the power of the Fundy tides. Her Dad managed a coal mine in Joggins and her mother cared for a family of six. As a child, Mom excelled at school, eventually ending up at a local business school where she graduated at the top of her class.
She married Harold (Pat) ATKINSON from Amherst in 1936. Getting married and living during the Depression had a profound influence on Mom. She learned how to do without and I think she instilled a bit of that in all of us. Mom and Dad eventually left the east coast and moved to Hamilton, Ontario During the early years, they moved around... 11 times in seven years. They lived in Hamilton, Galt, Jackson, Michigan -- eventually settling down in Saint Mary's in 1952. Mom loved Saint Mary's and the big house on Widder Street. Ours was always the home where the neighbourhood kids found refuge if they needed a bandage for a scraped knee or relief from the weather. Our home was always full of kids! In spite of the challenges running a household with 12 kids (six boys, six girls), Mom still found time for others. She would often take time to fix our old clothes and give them to folk in the town who needed them.
Mom was the single most interesting person I ever knew. She would debate anyone on any subject -- politics, business, religion. I think this is best seen in the personalities that Mom read and listened to: Mordecai Richler, Robbie Burns, Stephen Leacock, Ogden Nash, Barbara Amiel, Diane Francis, Barbara Frum, Rex Murphy, Gordon Sinclair, Jeffrey Simpson. All very bright, articulate people with strong convictions. She didn't always agree with them but she always listened... just as she took the time to listen to her children.
Mom had a natural curiosity and a real thirst for learning. Books were her window to the rest of the world. She always wanted to travel but her devotion to her kids kept her close to home. I think this devotion was best seen when her father died and Mom felt she should not leave us to travel home for Papa's funeral. When she had the rare opportunity to travel with Dad, she really enjoyed it.
After Dad died in 1997, we had talked about a trip to Scotland so Mom could visit the birthplace of her parents, but it never happened. Caring for Dad in his final years had taken its toll. She was completely devoted to her children and as she neared the end of her life, she feared that we would lose touch with each other. In Mom's will, she instructed us to exchange the family rings, in person, to the next child in line every year. In this way, Mom will continue to touch us. Her greatest joy was getting together with everyone -- she loved a party. But she never made you feel guilty if you couldn't make it home. She always understood.She never made you feel like she was owed something. Her impact on people's lives is best seen in the grandchildren who rarely missed an opportunity to drop in and visit with her.
She loved to watch hockey and baseball... but she loved radio most! She never took herself too seriously; had very quick wit and a great sense of humour. She loved to laugh. She taught us all not to take life too seriously, but she will always remain our constant: our touchstone.
Bob is one of Amelia's sons.

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ATKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-03 published
ATKINSON, Catherine " Penney"
On behalf of our beloved daughter and sister, Penney ATKINSON, who died on August 26, 2003, we would like to thank everyone who expressed their condolences to us, sent flowers and mass cards to us from Ireland, Australia, Vancouver, Saskatchewan, London, Woodstock, Bright, Toronto and the Greater Toronto Area. We cherish your prayers, thoughts and kindness immeasurably at this sad time. Special thanks to Father Bob GLYNN for his beautiful service, to our Friends and neighbours, to St. Rita's Catholic Women's League and to St. Rita'a Prayer Group. Tom and Jean ATKINSON (R.R. #1, Bright), and all of Penney's sisters and and brothers, their husbands and wives, nieces, nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles.

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ATKINSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-26 published
A scholar and a gentle man
'Fine example of a great Canadian' who founded Ontario's Brock University was once private secretary to prime minister Mackenzie KING
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, November 26, 2003 - Page R9
In an almost Zen-like fashion, James GIBSON knew the value of not acting. In the late 1960s, when a group of student radicals seized part of Brock University, hoping to be dragged away kicking and screaming, Dr. GIBSON, who had helped found the institution a few years earlier, reacted in a way no other university president did when faced with the same problem: He did nothing. The protesters, he reasoned, may have had legitimate grievances, but their unseemly actions offended his firm sense of propriety. In time, the students simply went away.
It was an effective, though uncharacteristic, action for a man who embodied Brock's Latin motto: "Surgite," freely translated as "push on." That he did, through some 65 rich years of advancing higher education and in public service, most notably as a private secretary to former prime minister Mackenzie KING, whose penchant for soothsaying and assorted eccentricities Dr. GIBSON kept mainly to himself until later in life.
Just five days before his death in Ottawa on October 23 at the age of 91, Dr. GIBSON was doing what he loved: Watching a new group of graduates receive their diplomas at the fall convocation of Brock University in St. Catharines, Ontario, the school he had launched as founding president in 1963.
At a recent memorial service at Brock, David ATKINSON, the university's president and vice-chancellor, recalled a man whose attributes a strong moral fibre, clarity of thought and a general uprightness, all tempered by a warm and gentle touch -- harkened to a quaint, bygone era. "It's unlikely we will meet anyone like him again," Dr. ATKINSON said.
In the House of Commons on October 27, Dr. GIBSON was praised by St. Catharines Liberal member of parliament Walt LASTEWKA as "a fine example of a great Canadian."
Dr. GIBSON, whose knowledge of Canadian history and government were legend, was in the news this past summer as the oldest of over 1,000 Rhodes Scholars who flew to England for a five-day bash honouring the centenary of the trust. With his brother William, also a Rhodes Scholar, Dr. GIBSON dedicated a re-leaded stained-glass window at the chapel of Oxford's New College.
A normally discreet man, he had sharp words for former prime minister Brian MULRONEY, not an Oxford graduate, who surprised guests at the alumni dinner -- and raised a few eyebrows -- when he took a seat on the podium alongside Oxonians Bill CLINTON and Tony BLAIR, and guest Nelson MANDELA. Many alumni, Dr. GIBSON included, felt that Mr. MULRONEY, who had been invited by The Independent newspaper chain, had no business being there. Though upset, Dr. GIBSON retained his dignity, saying simply, "I was offended."
James Alexander GIBSON was born in Ottawa, in 1912, to Canadian-born parents of Irish-Scottish stock with strong Methodist and Quaker leanings. Raised in Victoria, he graduated with a B.A. in history from the University of British Columbia at age 18. Less than a year later, he was one of the youngest boys at Oxford.
"That was the real dividing line in my life," he told The Globe and Mail last July. "The economic depression was beginning to take over and some of the graduates in my year at University of British Columbia ended up digging ditches, but I had a guaranteed income for three years."
The annual stipend was only £400 but it enabled Dr. GIBSON to live comfortably and travel to the rest of Europe when he wasn't studying modern history, debating in the Oxford Union Society and keeping wicket for the New College cricket squad, the Nomads.
Back in Ottawa and armed with a doctorate in history, he joined the Department of External Affairs. On his second day on the job, he was whisked to the prime minister's office for a six-month secondment that lasted nine years. Mr. KING, who was also External Affairs minister, blocked Dr. GIBSON's promotions to postings abroad three times because "he told me I stopped him getting into trouble."
The prime minister was a notorious taskmaster, calling on his assistant to work most evenings and weekends to draft letters and speeches. Throughout, "Dad never complained about anything," said his daughter Julia MATTHEWS. " But as he got older, he loosened up a little."
According to his daughter, he came to describe the famously erratic leader as "a very grumpy man and a very lonely man, insensitive, and quite damaging to work for."
Ultimately, it occurred to the clan that perhaps the unmarried prime minister was simply jealous of Dr. GIBSON's status as a beloved family man and father of three children. "Whenever we went on a family holiday, Dad always got called back," remembered Ms. MATTHEWS.
But a high point came in the spring of 1945, when Dr. GIBSON accompanied Mr. KING and 380 other delegates to San Francisco and the founding of the United Nations. During the historic two-month conference, Dr. GIBSON got personal glimpses of such leaders as the Soviet Union's Andrei GROMYKO and Britain's Anthony EDEN, but the task at hand, he later recalled, was to keep the Canadian prime minister "on the rails."
Fearing he would never advance in the public service, Dr. GIBSON resigned in 1947 and took a teaching post at Ottawa's Carleton University, where he later served as the first dean of arts and science and deputy to the president. By the early 1960s, he was courted by a group of community leaders in the Niagara peninsula to establish Brock University. When he began as founding president, the school had seven faculty (known as "the magnificent seven"), 29 students and a "library" consisting of a shelf of books. Today, it boasts more than 15,000 students and 47,000 alumni.
His first order of business at Brock was the creation of a library.
Now housed in the campus's Schmon Tower, it has become something of a landmark on the Niagara Escarpment. Dr. GIBSON, fondly known by faculty as "James A.," remained as Brock's president until 1974. He was named to the Order of Canada in 1992, and the library was named after him in 1996.
He was also a leading figure in the Unitarian faith, serving for a time as chaplain of the Unitarian Congregation of Niagara.
Asked what dinner-table conversation was like at home, Ms. MATTHEWS sighed good-naturedly. "Oh, God. There was a lot of current events. He had all the answers. He was always lecturing, but he could be really charming." Even after his vision started to fail, he travelled, read and wrote. "He never felt old."
After moving from his beloved St. Catharines to an Ottawa retirement home, Dr. GIBSON lectured residents on "governors-general I have known."
Dr. GIBSON was predeceased by his wife of 57 years, Caroline (née STEIN,) and leaves three children, seven grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, his brother, and a sister, Isobel SEARLS.
His final days were summed up poetically by Josephine MEEKER, a former professor at Brock. After attending the university's convocation last month, Dr. GIBSON "went for a long walk, returned to his residence, went into the lounge area, took off his coat and folded it up, put it on the back of his chair, sat down, folded his hands in his lap, closed his eyes, and died."

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