WILLIAMSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-11 published
BREYFOGLE, Elizabeth ''Betty'' (née HOPWOOD)
Peacefully on March 5, 2003, at home in Victoria. Betty has gone to join her beloved husband, William A. BREYFOGLE, who died in Vermont in 1958. She is fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews, Peter and Jo BREYFOGLE, Joan and Derek BARTLETT, Christopher WILLIAMSON and their families. Many thanks go to her friend Joan MOODY and to Bruce CALE of Victoria for their Friendship and support.

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WILLIAMSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
WILLIAMSON, Betty, 87, an accomplished artist, author, photographer, teacher, fashion illustrator, and gardener
Died on Thursday, June 26, 2003. Betty was born in Ottawa, attended Ottawa University, and the Ontario College of Arts. In 2002, Lee Valley published her first book, Reflections on the Fungaloids, which highlights her talent as an artist and author. Over the years, many of her photographs have been published in numerous magazines and books, and her home and garden have been featured in ''City and Country Homes''. Prior to her career as an art teacher at Cantebury High School, she won local and international awards for her fashion illustrations as the art director for Murphy-Gamble Ltd. At the time of her death, she was working on two more books

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WILLIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-16 published
Harold Albert WILLIS
In loving memory of Harold Albert WILLIS, who passed away at his home on Saturday, July 12, 2003 at the age of 60 years.
Beloved son of George WILLIS of Gore Bay Lodge and Marie (predeceased April 19. 1998). Dear brother of Ted and wife Maria of Sheguiandah, Joyce and husband Wayne KERR of Naughton. Remembered by many nieces and nephews. Graveside service was held Monday, July 14, 2003. Burial in Hilly Grove Cemetery. Arrangement in care of Island Funeral Home.

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WILLIS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-11-19 published
Vernon Oscar ROBINSON
In loving memory of Vernon Oscar ROBINSON, June 7, 1927 to November 11, 2003, who
passed away at the Manitoulin Health Centre, Little Current. at the age of 76 years.
Vernon was a great advocate of self-government for First Nations, helping many reserves in Northern and Southern Ontario to accomplish this. He retired from the Department of Indian Affairs after 30 years. He then was a consultant for them the following 11 years. Vern had a great appreciation and love for the outdoors, his work and his church, ministering to others.
Born in Sheguiandah to Samuel and Edith (WILLIS) ROBINSON. Will be dearly missed by his loving wife Barbara and their children Loree of California, Richard of Pentanguishene, Elizabeth of Arizona, Laura and husband Arther SMITH of Tahiti, Christopher and wife Heather HORNING of Florida. Will be remembered by grandchildren Sahara, Alannah, Sebastian, Eric, Elizabeth, Erik, Emily, and Erin. Dear brother to Marjorie SHEPPARD (predeceased), Leighton and wife Irene, Jean and husband John BRADLEY, Shirley and husband Ed BOTTING, Erma and husband Jim BRADY, Calvon and wife Betty and Merlin (predeceased).
Visitation was held on Thursday, November 13, 2003 at the Island Funeral Home. Funeral service was held on Friday, November 14, 2003 at Community of Christ Church, Little Current, Ontario with Elder Humphrey BEAUDIN officiating. Cremation.

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WILLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-21 published
The soul of Canadian basketball
The coach who led national teams to Olympics, world championships, was a well-loved motivator on and off the court
By James CHRISTIE Monday, April 21, 2003 - Page R5
Jack DONOHUE knew how to win. His underdog Canadian basketball teams won games against National Basketball Association-bound superstars -- and Mr. DONOHUE won every heart he touched.
The former national basketball coach and famed motivator was arguably the most beloved figure in Canadian amateur and Olympic sport. Mr. DONOHUE died Wednesday in Ottawa after a battle with cancer. He was 71.
With his trademark New York Irish accent and gift for telling inspirational and humorous stories, Mr. DONOHUE was the soul of basketball in Canada for almost two decades and led the national team to three Olympic Games and three world championship tournaments.
His great players included a high schooler in New York named Lew ALCINDOR (later Kareem ABDUL- JABBAR;) Canadian centres Bill WENNINGTON and Mike SMREK, who went on to get National Basketball Association championship rings with Chicago and Los Angeles respectively Leo RAUTINS, a first-round draft pick of Philadelphia 76ers in 1983; guards Eli PASQUALE and Jay TRIANO, who is now assistant coach with the Toronto Raptors.
"For all he's done for basketball in this country -- not just with the national team, but with clinics and all his public speaking he should get the Order of Canada," Mr. TRIANO said.
Under Mr. DONOHUE, Canadian teams stayed among the top six in the world for 18 years. Canada finished fourth at the 1976 Montreal and 1984 Los Angeles Olympics and claimed gold at the 1983 World University Games in Edmonton. In the process they beat a team of U.S. college talents that included future National Basketball Association stars Charles BARKLEY, Karl MALONE, Kevin WILLIS, Ed PINCKNEY and Johnny DAWKINS. The monumental win over the United States came in the semi-final. The gold medal match was just as much a stunner, as Canada beat a Yugoslavian team built with members of the world championship squad.
Globe and Mail columnist Trent FRAYNE recorded how the loquacious Mr. DONOHUE had steered the Canucks to the improbable triumph, making them believe in themselves:
"You've got to appreciate how much talent you have," Jack would say, hunkering down beside a centre or a guard or, every now and then, an unwary newshound (Jack is ready for anybody). "You are unique. Think about that: there's nobody else in the world like you. If you want to be happy, try to make other people happy. Hey, if you want to be loved, you must love others. The way to improve is to do something you have never done. Don't be afraid of your emotions. Let 'em all hang out. Emotions are your generator. The intellect is the governor...."
And now, in the seventh month of July, it has all come about just as Jack promised. On Saturday night in Edmonton, his players, Jack's Guys, hoisted him upon their shoulders, and, for once, Jack's jaw was still. Blue eyes blinking rapidly behind silver-rimmed spectacles, white hair tousled, Jack put the scissors to that final strand and held the net aloft.
Coaching was a passion, not so much for the trophies, but for the human victories, personal challenges and little triumphs.
"I remember my father coming home tired and dirty every night. That's not for me. I love what I'm doing, so it doesn't seem like work and never will," he said.
Since retiring as national coach in 1988, Mr. DONOHUE has been the darling of the motivational speakers' circuit. In that regard, Mr. DONOHUE never quit being The Coach. He urged captains of industry to get the most out of themselves and build teamwork among employees as he did his players.
Often, Mr. DONOHUE told them to find opportunity even in the midst of problems: "It's all a matter of attitude. A guy leaves the house wearing his new, expensive suit for the first time, trips and falls in a puddle. He can get up and curse; or he can get up and check his pockets to see if he caught any fish, " he said in an interview with The Globe and Mail before the Los Angeles Olympics.
Mr. DONOHUE, who was born June 4, 1931, received a bachelor's degree in economics at New York's Fordham University and a master of arts in health education before serving with the U.S. Army in the Korean War. He began teaching in American high schools in 1954 and eventually wound up at New York's Power Memorial Academy, where he coached Mr. ABDUL- JABBAR and amassed a 163-30 record.
He later moved up to Holy Cross College in Worcester, Massachusetts., before taking the reins of the Canadian program -- at first coaching both the men's and women's teams. Mr. DONOHUE was inducted into the Canadian Basketball Hall of Fame in 1992. He is also in the New York City Basketball Hall of Fame, and was awarded a Canada 125 medal by the Governor-General.
When the National Basketball Association expanded north into Canada in 1995, Mr. DONOHUE became director of international public relations and director of Canadian player development for the Vancouver Grizzlies.
One of Mr. DONOHUE's proudest times in basketball came when Mr. TRIANO followed in his path as a national coach. At the 2000 Olympics, Canada -- with Steve NASH and Todd MacCULLOCH -- finished with a 5-2 record, defeating mighty Yugoslavia once again, as it had in 1983.
"We talked about everything from how to guard guys on the perimeter to dying. I think he's at peace with it," Mr. TRIANO said of his mentor at a recent Raptor practice.
"He taught with humour," Mr. TRIANO said of Mr. DONOHUE's coaching style. "We learned a lot because we were laughing all the time."
A colourful broadcaster, naming names -- at least pronouncing them correctly -- wasn't one of Mr. DONOHUE's many strengths. He didn't earn the nickname "Jack Dontknowho" for no reason, Mr. TRIANO said. "It was always, 'that guy,' or 'you over there,'" he said. "I've seen him struggle to introduce his kids because he couldn't remember their names. He always told me he liked doing colour for the European teams, because no one knew if he wasn't saying their names right."
He travelled the world, but the dearest sight for Mr. DONOHUE was always his own front door, in Kanata, Ontario, where he spent his last days. Behind that door were wife Mary Jane, his six kids and his grandchildren.
"We're asking you to hug your families, extra special, and we're asking you to enjoy life, because we sure did and we still are," Mary Jane DONOHUE said this week.
Somewhere, the busy coach found time for all he needed to do. He used to keep a block on his desk reminding him that there are 86,400 seconds in a day, time enough if he organized himself. Family was a priority. At least five minutes of Mr. DONOHUE's day had to be reserved for hugging his kids. He was a believer in family and in human contact. In his coaching years, when he returned from a road journey, there would be a lineup awaiting him at home, the kids taking their turns to make up for the lost minutes of hugging during his absence.
"I met him at a dance he didn't go to," Mary Jane DONOHUE said in the pre-Los Angeles Games article. "My girlfriend and I went and he had several Friends who were very up on it. But Jack said he'd rather go to a movie and would meet them later. He came through the door as my girlfriend and I were walking out.
"He asked why we were leaving so soon, and said there were two gentlemen he wanted us to meet. He introduced my friend to one of his, then I asked who the other gentleman was supposed to be. Guess who?"
Mary Jane DONOHUE felt trust instantly. "I could have gone across the country with him that night and felt safe. If he's for you, he's for you all the way."

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WILLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-16 published
WILLIS, Warren
In memory of a dear son and brother who died 19 years ago today. You are sadly missed and will be in our hearts forever. Love, Dad, Arlene, Adrienne and Meghan.

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WILLISON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-27 published
Died This Day -- John Stephen WILLISON, 1927
Tuesday, May 27, 2003 - Page R7
Journalist and historian born on November 9, 1856, at Hills Green, Ontario; from 1890-02, edited Liberal Globe; from 1903-17, the Conservative News; in 1925, launched Willison's Monthly; from 1909-27, Canadian correspondent for Times of London; advised Prime Ministers Laurier and Borden; member of the Round Table Movement to promote the British Empire; as early free trader, became president of protectionist Canadian Reconstruction Association wrote biography of Laurier (1903) and Reminiscences (1919).

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WILLISTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-18 published
Nova Scotia's marathon man
Cape Breton boy was Boston's most surprising victor
By Kevin COX Wednesday, June 18, 2003 - Page R5
Halifax -- Johnny MILES was first the determined champion, then the gentle grandfather of Canadian distance running.
His first major running prize was a sack of flour in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, in 1922 -- he finished third in the three-mile race but was first to sprint by the store. After four years of training including sprints behind his grocery cart, the humble, unknown 20-year-old Cape Breton delivery boy and Sunday-school teacher stunned the running world by defeating its best athletes to win the prestigious Boston Marathon.
It was a win that Mr. MILES and his father had calmly predicted to a policeman and a race official the day before. But even Johnny MILES had his doubts on that chilly April Monday as he pounded along the 26.2-mile course on his 95-cent shoes from the Co-op store in his hometown.
At the 22-mile mark, Mr. MILES was running stride for stride with leader and Finnish running legend Albin STENROOS when he looked over and saw a blank and exhausted expression on his rival's face.
"I knew right there that I had him and I had to make a move," he recalled with the gleam of a fierce competitor in his eye in an interview 54 years later. "He was rubbing his side and he had a stitch, so I didn't look back. I speeded up and I think that took the heart out of him."
He is still widely hailed among running raconteurs as the most surprising victor in the 107-year history of the event. Mr. MILES's time -- then a world marathon record -- was so unbelievable that race officials measured the Boston course -- and found it 176 yards short of the classic 26-mile, 385-yard distance.
"I don't know what all the fuss is about," he said in an interview in 1995. "I had a God-given gift and I used it."
Mr. MILES, his father and his mother arrived in Boston by train a few days before the marathon. The day before the race, father and son walked the course, got lost and ended up asking a burly Irish policeman for directions and received some advice that was not exactly a vote of confidence.
"My son needs to know the route because he's entered in tomorrow's race." The friendly officer smiled and said, "Tell your son to just follow the crowd."
On race day, Mr. MILES wore a red, homemade maple leaf on a white undershirt. His performance shattered the 1924 record held by the other race favourite, Clarence DEMAR, the four-time winner of the event.
"That boy ran the best marathon since that Indian [Canadian Tom LONGBOAT] in 1907," a stunned Mr. DEMAR was reported to have said.
A year later, he again challenged the gruelling course but suffered an embarrassing setback when he had to withdraw from the race with serious burns to his feet. His dad had taken a pair of his 95-cent sneakers and shaved down the soles with a straight razor so they wouldn't be so heavy. His feet -- tops and bottoms -- had bled.
It was a rare retreat. Mr. MILES, who trained on rural Cape Breton roads, dominated Canadian distance running through the late 1920s and early 1930s. He captured the Boston crown again in 1929 and won a bronze medal at the British Empire Games in 1931 and also ran the marathon in the Olympic Games in 1928 and 1932.
Born in Halifax, England, on October 30, 1905, Mr. MILES moved with his family to Cape Breton the following year. He worked as a grocery delivery boy at the time of his big win. But his first job as a young teen was in the Cape Breton coal mines. He went to work there to help support his family when his father went off to fight in the First World War.
Mr. MILES left the mines a few years later and entered his first contest -- a three-mile race in Sydney, Nova Scotia -- with the hopes of winning some fishing supplies.
He is revered in his home province of Nova Scotia even though he moved to Hamilton, Ontario, to train and take a job with International Harvester in 1927.
After his victories, some parents even named newborn children after the marathon hero. One of those babies, Johnny Miles WILLISTON, went on to become a driving force in establishing the Johnny Miles Marathon in New Glasgow, Nova Scotia.
The victories on the tracks and roads by a local boy who had worked as a child coal miner at the age of 11 injected some joy and hope into Cape Breton's coal-mining towns at a time when the industry was going through tough times and work underground was brutish and dangerous.
After he hung up his thin-soled racing shoes in 1932, Mr. MILES became an ambassador for fitness and clean living. He became a manager at International Harvester and worked in many parts of the world for the company after being told by a company executive that he could make something of himself if he put the same effort into his work that he exerted in running.
When running regained popularity in the 1970s, he was startled to become a celebrity among the new set of competitors who recognized his accomplishments. While Quebec runner Gérard CÔTÉ would dominate the Boston Marathon in the 1940s, winning it four times, Johnny MILES's time of 2: 25:40 stood as the Canadian record for the event until Jerome DRAYTON ran 2: 14:46 in 1977.
He was taken aback in 1967 at being named to the Canadian Sports Hall of Fame.
"That I should now be in the same illustrious company as the great stars of hockey, football, track and field, and other Canadian sports was a bit mind-boggling," he told author Floyd WILLISTON in the biography Johnny MILES: Nova Scotia's Marathon King in He was also caught off guard by being named to the Order of Canada in 1983.
"It's not going to change my life -- same hat size and shirt size," he told the New Glasgow Evening News.
Mr. MILES, who regularly attended races in the Hamilton area as a spectator in the 1980s, wondered how well he might have run with the technology offered to runners today.
"I think now I wouldn't eat steak before a race and I'd get these cushioned shoes and I'd know how to train," he said in an interview in New Glasgow at the marathon that was created and named after him in 1975 and still bears his name.
Mr. MILES and his wife Bess were fixtures at the Johnny Miles Marathon, which took place this past Sunday shortly after his death. Runners best remember him for his personal attention, anecdotes, quiet kindness and his enthusiasm for the sport.
Jerome BRUHM, a long-time Halifax runner and historian, remembered his first encounter with the running legend at the Johnny Miles Marathon in 1981.
"He was there and I'm nobody -- I'm just a runner. He came over and I said it was my first marathon and I was kind of nervous. He took me aside and talked to me and he said, 'Do you think you'll win the marathon'? Mr. BRUHM recalled this week. "I said, 'No, I'm a slow runner.' So, he said, 'Then go out there and do that -- finish the race and enjoy it.' He came over to me after the race and asked me how I did and how I felt. I thought that was fantastic that he would talk to me before the race and come over and check on me after the race."
He was a humble, personable man, Mr. BRUHM said.
"When he was inducted into the Canadian Running Hall of Fame, I went over to talk to him and he only wanted to talk about other people, not about what he had done."
Nova Scotia Premier John HAMM praised Mr. MILES for bringing international attention to his home province.
"We will always remember with pride his athletic accomplishments at the Boston Marathon and numerous other competitions as well as his success in business and accomplishments in life," the Premier said Monday.
In 2001, Boston Marathon officials celebrated the 75th anniversary of his startling 1926 win -- but at the age of 95, Mr. MILES said his health prevented him from attending the festivities. However, he promised to try to attend the 75th anniversary of his last Boston triumph.
Will CLONEY, long-time Boston Marathon official, had only praise for Mr. MILES. " There hasn't been a Johnny MILES in Boston since Johnny MILES."
Now there never will be.
Kevin COX is Atlantic correspondent of The Globe and Mail. He has completed 50 marathons -- including the Johhny Miles Marathon and the Boston Marathon.

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WILLISTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-29 published
MYLES, George Alexander
George was born on October 21, 1915 at the Woman's Hospital in Toronto, but life took him to many continents and through many adventures before its circle ended at the Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on December 23, 2003 in the presence of his wife, Elizabeth (Bette). Despite his advancing age and declining health, George died suddenly, maintaining his wit, charm and penchant for crosswords until his last days. Growing up on the ''Danforth'', at the age of 23, he embarked on a journey to Southern Rhodesia in 1938, where he later joined the Royal Air Force and reported to #49 Squadron at Scampton, Lincolnshire, on January 15, 1941. Returning to Africa after the war, he stayed until 1948, then returned to Canada. George retired in 1980 after 30 years working for the Department of Veteran's Affairs. He leaves two sons, John, of Harrison Springs, British Columbia and George (Leslie) of Carleton Place, Ontario; grandchildren Angus, Garth, and Lauren sisters Mary DOBIE (nephew Alan) and Audrey TAILOR/TAYLOR (niece Barbara) sisters-in-law Dorothy PIKE (Boston) and Shirley WILLISTON (Dartmouth, Nova Scotia). George's legacy to his family is a 340 page autobiography that uniquely traces the footsteps of a Canadian born during the First World War, his youth through the Depression, and his service years during World War 2. Ever one for sayings and adages, he believed strongly in the special mystery of the Universe. His autobiography concludes with the following prose dedicated to his grandchildren and their children: ''I had a happy childhood. My parents were responsible people. My family believed in God. I appreciated the Wonders of Nature.'' The family received Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A. W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7-9 p.m. Sunday, December 28th. Service in the Chapel Monday, December 29th at 3 p.m. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery.

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WILLMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-04-12 published
REIMER, Waldemar (Wally) H., A.A.C.I.
Passed away peacefully in his sleep, at Victoria General Hospital, in Winnipeg on April 7, 2003, after a lengthy and courageous struggle with many health issues.
Beloved husband of Mary TOEWS for 50 years; dear father of Henry (who died in infancy), Hélène (Peters) and Tim Green Mississauga, Paul and Brenda REIMER of Calgary, Judy and Vic WARKENTIN and Margaret and Jeff HARASYM of Winnipeg. Opi of Lora and Neil PETERS, Paul WARKENTIN, Andrew REIMER and Stephen HARASYM. Brother to Elvera and Gerry THIESSEN; John and Annelies REIMER, Ruth and Nelson EDWARDS and Elaine REIMER. Predeceased by his parents Henry REIMER, Sara (BRAUN) Reimer PANKRATZ, step-father, Nicholas PANKRATZ, brother Victor, sisters Annie POETKER and Mary WILLMS, brother-in-law Henry POETKER.
Formerly of Waterloo, Wally was a well known member of the business community through his years at Mutual Life, various real estate and development companies and then for 26 years, as President of W.H. Reimer Limited.
Funeral services were held in Winnipeg on Friday April 11, 2003. A memorial service to celebrate Wally's life will be held at W-K United Mennonite Church in Waterloo, on Tuesday, April 15, 2003, at 10: 30 a.m. A time to visit with the family will follow the service. Interment will take place at Mount Hope Cemetery, Waterloo.
Donations to the Waterloo Adult Recreation Centre, Mennonite Central Committee, Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Lung Association of Waterloo Region would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy and can be arranged through the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, phone (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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WILLSEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-06 published
Journalist and musician was at centre of smalltown life
By Randy RAY Special to The Globe and Mail Thursday, March 6, 2003 - Page R9
Ottawa -- It's a wonder Steve FORSTER wasn't late for every appointment he ever made.
Whether he was strolling along the main drag in Perth, Ontario, where he lived and once ran the weekly newspaper, or cruising the corridors at Algonquin College in Ottawa where he taught journalism, Mr. FORSTER often bumped into someone he knew.
Inevitably, he'd crack a joke, tell a story or initiate a conversation about music, politics or work.
"He was probably one of the most well-known citizens in Perth, says Ralph WILLSEY, a Perth resident and Ottawa Citizen copy editor, who was best man at Mr. FORSTER's wedding in 1992. "He couldn't walk down the street without someone yelling 'hello.'"
He was also a popular figure at Algonquin College.
"He was a big guy... you couldn't help but notice him and he certainly knew lots of people both inside and outside the journalism faculty, says Abla SHERIF, dean of the school of media design at the college, where Mr. FORSTER was on staff for 14 years.
Mr. FORSTER, who was diagnosed with cancer in May, 2001, died at his home in Perth last month. He was 53.
For the better part of his life, journalism and music were Mr. FORSTER's passions. These, as well as his gregarious nature, deep voice, love of storytelling and physical stature -- six-foot, three inches and 290 pounds -- gave him a presence wherever he went.
Mr. FORSTER was born in England into an air force family and came to Canada at age six, living for a time on a military base near the southwestern Ontario community of Centralia where his father Alan was a firefighter.
He spent his teen years in Ottawa and studied journalism at Algonquin before landing his first journalism job in 1970 at The Courier, a weekly newspaper in Perth, about an hour west of Ottawa. He left briefly to work at The Windsor Star and The Ottawa Citizen, but returned to Perth to become editor of the Courier. He joined Algonquin College in 1989 and remained there until illness forced him to take leave in 2001. He also served four years on Perth town council.
"Nobody will ever fill Steve's shoes -- they don't make them like that any more, says Mr. WILLSEY, who met Mr. FORSTER in 1979 when both were reporters covering the Perth area.
Mr. WILLSEY feels his friend's greatest achievements may have been as a musician. Mr. FORSTER, who played bass and guitar, was well-known in the Perth area as the lead singer of rhythm-and-blues groups Powersnooze, and later, Big Steve and the Mudcats, both of which helped him win a wide following in Perth and recognition on the streets of the community. He also played in a band with staff at Algonquin.
He loved rhythm and blues and was a great admirer of James Brown and Smokey Robinson. Musically his work resembled Long John Baldry.
"He could really belt out a song... not everybody can make an arena full of people dance. That was quite an achievement, " said Mr. WILLSEY, who for years jammed with Mr. FORSTER and other musicians, often playing R&B standards such as In the Midnight Hour by Wilson Pickett and Sweet Little Angel by B. B. King. The bands he fronted played the bar scene in Ottawa, Kingston, Ontario, and Lanark County and often appeared at the Crown and Thistle and the Red Fox, both popular nightspots in Perth.
"Other than writing, I would have to say music was right up there as one of his favourites, says Mr. FORSTER's wife Rachel, who sang with Big Steve and the Mudcats. "He was involved in music from his days as a young teen until he passed away."
Mr. FORSTER was also a fiercely dedicated journalist and teacher. As editor and columnist with the Perth Courier, he had a nose for news and distaste for politicians who wasted public money, said Mr. WILLSEY.
After being diagnosed with cancer, Mr. FORSTER wrote several columns about his illness and the treatment he was receiving.
"You can't measure success by money, power or prestige, " said one column. "Success is measured in personal fulfillment, in the joy of life and in the goodness found in Friends, neighbours and family."
In May, 2002, he received the Silver Quill Award from the Ontario Community Newspapers Association for 25 years of service in community journalism.
Mr. FORSTER leaves his wife Rachel, daughter Natasha, father Alan, mother Beatrice and sister Susan.

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WILLSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Arthur CASSIDY
In loving memory of Donald Arthur CASSIDY " Hop" at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Monday January 6, 2003 in his 75th year.
Beloved husband of Lillian (née FLAHERTY.) Predeceased by parents Ernest and Helen CASSIDY. Brother of Eunice SCOBIE of Dundas and Beatrice WHITE/WHYTE of Columbia, South Carolina. Predeceased by brother Leonard and sister Madeline. Cherished father of Janice BOOKER of Ridgeway, William (Bill) of Port Colborne, Ruth WILSON (Bruce) of Little Current, Beverly CASSIDY (Scott MURRAY) of Welland and Roger of Little Current.
Beloved grandfather of Derek, Tammy, Scott, Gregory, Joshua, Sarah, Valerie, Brett, and Brian. Great grandfather of three. Uncle of many nieces and nephews. Visitation from 2: 00 until Memorial service at 3: 30 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-04-16 published
Edward WILSON " Zhi Zhe" THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON "Eddy"
In loving memory of Edward WILSON THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON who began his journey home on April 10, 2003 where he will be met by his mother, Maggie, his father, Levi, brother Ronnie and sister Polly for their long awaited reunion. Along with many other family, Friends and in-laws. Left to carry on his memory, his love, kindness and generosity are: his brothers, Norman and wife Louise, Francis, (Viola), John and wife Kari, and Lawrence ( and wife ). And sisters: Beatrice and Georgina. All residents of Sheguiandah First Nation. Also survived by many much loved nieces and nephews, grand nieces and nephews, Friends, relatives and "Bingo Buddies". The wake was held Friday, April 11, 2003. Burial was Saturday, April 12, 2003 in the mid-afternoon. A feast was held Monday, April 14, 2003.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-07 published
Ruby WILLSON
In loving memory of Ruby WILLSON, May 15, 1937 to April 30, 2003.
Ruby WILLSON, a resident of Ice Lake, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Wednesday, April 30, 2003 at the age of 65 years. She was born in Kagawong, daughter of the late Nelson and Lillian (TRUDEAU) PIERCE.
Ruby was an "Adventuress" and enjoyed life to its fullest. She had worked as a hostess at Harbour Island as well as being a navigator on sail boats, and had sailed many places, including the open seas. She enjoyed many things, such as needlework, baking, reading and especially loved to entertain and host people. Her favourite place was Harbour Island. A loving wife, mother and grandmother, she will be sadly missed, but many happy memories will be cherished. Dearly loved wife and best friend of Chuc WILLSON. Loving and loved mother of Dennis BECKETT and Deanna BENOIT both of Kagawong, Rob BECKETT of Pefferlaw and Juanda GEORGE of Espanola. Proud grandmother of James, Charles, Kevin, Crestienne, Aaron, Brandon and Sheldon. Also survived by Lake WILSON and his daughter Jasmine. Dear sister of Sandra JAMES. Predeceased by husbands Robert BECKETT, Carl REINGUETTE and John PETRIE and brother Reynold PIERCE.
A private family funeral service will be conducted at the Culgin Funeral Home, followed by cremation. A public memorial service will be conducted at Lyons Memorial United Church on Thursday, May 15, 2003 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Maxine McVEY officiating. If so desired, donations may be made to Strawberry Point Christian Camp or the Mindemoya Hospital Auxiliary. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-06-11 published
Theresa " Tessie" Elizabeth MARTEL
In loving memory of Tessie MARTEL, a resident of the Manitoulin Lodge, Gore Bay and formerly of Little Current passed away at the Lodge on Wednesday June 4, 2003 at the age of 94 years.
She was born in The Slash, daughter of the late Thomas and Fannie McMULLEN) BONUS. She was a homemaker, and enjoyed knitting, cooking and crocheting. Tessie was a hard working wife and mother, and will be fondly remembered for her pride, love and enjoyment of her children, grandchildren and great grandchildren.
Predeceased by her beloved husband Fred MARTEL in 1952. Loving and loved mother of Frances DOMICH (husband Stan,) Winnipeg, Darlene WILSON (husband Bill,) Gore Bay, Allan MARTEL (wife Flora predeceased) Collingwood, Donald MARTEL (wife Ruth), Toronto, Donna SCHEELER, Wallaceburg, Norma GREEN (husband Allan,) Bruce Mines, Wayne MARTEL (wife Mercedes,) Winnipeg and Terry MARTEL (wife Jodie), Belleville. Predeceased by two children Gerald (Sonny) and Norman (Normie).+ Dear sister of Harry BONUS and Leah PHILLIPS both of Collingwood and predeceased by
brothers Allan, John, Herman, William and sisters Cecelia and Loretta. Dear grandmother of 16 grandchildren, 9 great grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called the Culgin Funeral Home on Thursday, June 5, 2003. The funeral service was held on Friday, June 6 from the Wm. G. Turner Chapel of the Culgin Funeral Home with Pastor Les CRAMP officiating. Interment Mountainview Cemetery, Little Current.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-07-02 published
Dorothy Mary WILSON
In loving memory of Dorothy Mary WILSON of Espanola who passed away at the Espanola General Hospital on Saturday, June 28, 2003 in her 74th year.
Dorothy was a former President of the Office Workers Union at the E. B. Eddy Paper Mill and had worked on the Espanola Town Council as a Councillor, Deputy Mayor and Mayor.
Beloved wife of the late Cyril WILSON. Loving mother of Debbie MUNERA HEDGERS of Sydney, B.C. and Kathy May MASKEL (husband Walter) of Whitefish Falls.Will be sadly missed by grand_sons Dylan and Sean HEDGER. Dear sister of John SHAMESS of Elliot Lake, Alfie SHAMESS of Michigan and the late Joe SHAMESS and half-sister to Laurie LUKKARILA of Sudbury.
Visitation will be Thursday, July 3rd from 7-9 p.m. at the Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola. A Memorial Service will be held Friday, July 4, 2003 at 10: 00 a.m. at the Calvary Baptist Church, Espanola with John FAULKNER officiating. Interment of the ashes will be in the Espanola Cemetery.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-20 published
WILSON
-In loving memory of Nellie WILSON who passed away August 22, 1996.
Sweet memories will linger forever
Time cannot change them, It's true
Years that may come cannot sever
Our loving remembrance of you.
-Always remembered by husband Gordon, and family members Edwin and Judy, Patricia and Bob, Marie and Bob, Don, Jeff and Christina, and grandchildren.

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-09-03 published
Ina ADDISON
In loving memory of Ina ADDISON, August 27, 1914 to August 22, 2003.
Ina ADDISON, a resident of Gordon Township, passed away at Manitoulin Lodge on Friday, August 22, 2003 at the age of 88 years. She was born in Gordon Township, daughter of William and Ida (WOOD) LINLEY. Ina was predeceased by brothers William and Herbert and sisters Edith (CAMPBELL, WILSON) and May (MORDEN.) Ina enjoyed quilting, flowers and gardening. Her greatest love other than the cattle was her family and all the gatherings they enjoyed over the years. Ina married Joe WILSON on August 9, 1933 and they lived their married life on the farm in Gordon, where Ken and Beth GIBBS now reside. Joe died on April 27, 1981 and on May 4, 1985 Ina married Clarence ADDISON. Clarence died on March 18, 1995. Ina's daughter, and only child, Eldean GIBBS (Mrs. Jack,) died on March 29, 1995. Ina's faith in God got her through this sad time but she spent many lonely days. Clarence and Ina lived in Evansville where his daughter Sheila and her husband Frank HARLEY now spend their holidays. They then moved to Mill Site Apartments and in October 2002, Ina moved to Manitoulin Lodge. Ina leaves to mourn her son-in-law, Jack GIBBS (friend June,) grand_son Ken GIBBS (wife Beth) and her beloved great-grandchildren, Loren, John, and Krysten GIBBS, and her stepchildren, Chester ADDISON (wife Pat deceased,) Stan and Joan ADDISON, Sheila and Frank HARLEY and step-grandchildren and great-grandchildren. She will also be remembered by many nieces and nephews to whom she was a very special aunt. Friend called the Culgin Funeral Home on Sunday, August 24, 2003. The Funeral Service was held on Monday, August 25, 2003 with Pastor Erwin Thompson officiating. Interment in Gordon Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home 282-2270

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WILSON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-10-29 published
Theodor NAGLER
In loving memory of Theodor (Ted) NAGLER, 76 years, Friday evening, October 24, 2003 at the Mindemoya Hospital, Manitoulin Island.
Beloved husband of Marie (BURT) NAGLER. Loving father of Dr. James (Faye) NAGLER,
Susan (Larry) TOBIN, Marcia (Michael) BOND. Cherished Papa and Grandpa of Emily and Lauren NAGLER, Felice, Jocelyn, Benjamin and Jacob TOBIN, and Jenna and Rebecca BOND. Dear brother of Maria PETROVIC (husband Stephan (predeceased) of Kapuskasing (formerly Sudbury) and Lydia NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria. Predeceased by his mother Maria and father Josef NAGLER of Zell am See, Austria and brother-in-law Harold (Rena) BURT. Sadly missed by nieces Anne MILLS and Mary Lynn WILSON, and nephew Stephan PETROVIC. Ted retired in 1986 as Director of Plant Maintenance after 30 years of service at Sudbury Memorial Hospital. Following his retirement he moved to Mindemoya where he enjoyed all the outdoor activities each season brings on the Island.
Visitation was held on Monday, October 27, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Funeral service was held on Tuesday, October 28, 2003 at St. Francis of Assisi Anglican Church. Island Funeral Home

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-02-24 published
DUNSMUIR, James Smith
Jimmy DUNSMUIR, on Saturday, February 15, at Hamilton General Hospital after a lengthy battle. Born in Kilmarnock, Scotland on January 17, 1918. Jim was married to Nancy WILSON of Ballyclare, Northern Ireland, who predeceased him in 1985. Survived by his daughter Mollie (Michael CLELAND) of Ottawa; his companion of 15 years, Mary Ann HENDRICKS of Hamilton; his brother David (Ermie) of Toronto; his sister Betty (Hodge) of Buffalo, New York; his nieces Judy of Toronto and Marcia of Illinois; his nephews, Derek of North Carolina, David of Vancouver, and Jim, Harry, Douglas, Bruce and Kevin all of Toronto. Predeceased on January 24, 2003, by Michael's mother Sheila of Vancouver; two families joined in sadness. Jim, who always described himself as ''a lover, not a fighter'', fought his way, with some reluctance but considerable success, from Dunkirk through North Africa. Sicily and Italy, from 1939-1945, for a war he thought was worth fighting. Thanks to the staff of the Hamilton General, in particular Kevin and Anna, and Ann RUSH. In lieu of donations, please consider when you make your next charitable gift, adding a little something in memory of Jim. Arrangements entrusted to Canadian Cremation Services, 80 Ottawa Street, North, Hamilton 905-545-8889.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-04 published
CADE, Gladys Ann (née MIDGLEY)
On March 1, 2003 in her 85th year. Cherished and devoted wife of Don, loving mother of Marilyn and her husband Larry SCHREINER, Darlene and her husband David FRASER and Jim and his wife Cathy. Sister of Margaret MOLLARD and the late Walter MIDGLEY and fondly remembered by their families. Her grandchildren Ross and Duncan FRASER, Laura, Sarah and the late Robert SCHREINER and Matthew, Emily and Paul CADE will each hold in their hearts warm memories of ''Gan'', and of her love of life and laughter. She was proud of each of them. Glad and Don celebrated with their#60 great years of marriage last September. She will be forever remembered for her generosity, her compassion and her guidance. Her family is thankful, as was she, for her long and happy life. Surgeons Dr. Dana WILSON, and Dr. Peter SCHAAL, the medical and nursing staff of the Trillium Health Centre, Mississauga site, provided extraordinary care. During her short stay at the McCall Wing Continuing Care Centre she received comforting care and attention. A very special personal thanks to Dijana, Marietta, Oxana and Anna from Thornbrook Home Care Service for their love and wonderful care in the past months. A reception will be hosted by the family on Tuesday March 4, 2003 from 2-5 p.m. at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke (between Islington and Kipling Avenues). Service arrangements are private. Donations in memory of Gladys Ann may be made to the charity of her choice, the Children's Wish Foundation Ontario Chapter, 1730 McPherson Court Unit 30 Pickering L1W 3E6.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-05 published
DUTTON, Gary Richard (1933-2003)
After a lengthy illness, Gary passed away March 3, 2003, in his 70th year. Beloved husband of Margaret Mary (née MOSS,) dearest father of Mark S. (Christine) and Myles (Helen.) Gary DUTTON, a renowned member of the Society of Graphic Designers of Canada as well as the Heraldry Society of Canada, was a loving grandfather of Janice, Warren, Lucas and Charlotte. Gary was predeceased by his mother Edith WILSON and will be sadly missed by his step father Robert WILSON. The family has arranged for a private memorial service to be held at a later date. Floral tributes are gratefully declined, however, donations would be appreciated to the Bridgepoint Health Centre (formerly Riverdale Hospital), whose caring staff have provided outstanding long term care and support.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-07 published
JONES, Hazel Ethyl
85, of Brooklyn, Hants Co., Nova Scotia, passed away Wednesday, March 5, 2003, at Queen Elizabeth 2nd Health Sciences Centre, Infirmary Site, Halifax, Nova Scotia. Born in Elora, Ontario, she was a daughter of the late Gilbert and Daisy WHEELER. Hazel is survived by her husband, Harrison 'Gray' JONES, Brooklyn daughters Judith 'Judy' (Gerry) JOHNSTON, Rawdon, and Wendy JONES, Brooklyn; granddaughter, Jenni JOHNSTON; great-granddaughter, Moira JOHNSTON; a sister, Helen WILSON, Peterborough, Ontario Besides her parents, she was predeceased by a brother, Blake. Cremation has taken place. Memorial service will be held Sunday, March 9, 2003 at 3: 00 p.m. in Windsor United Church, Windsor, Nova Scotia, Reverend Bill GIBSON officiating. Private interment at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Lohnes-Beazley Funeral Service Ltd., 419 Albert Street, Windsor, Nova Scotia Messages of condolence may also be made on-line at www.familycare.ca

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-08 published
LENT, Maida Mary Freda (née SCHROEDER) M.A. Queen's University
Suddenly on March 2nd, 2003 at Sunnybrook and Women's College Health Science Centre in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Elton LENT (1998.) Left to mourn are his daughter Ellie LEGGE (Randy) and his son Ryck LENT (Barbara,) grandchildren Dallas and Devin LEGGE and Krissa and Tiffany LENT, great-grand_son McLeod WILSON, nephews Tony and David (Mary FINCH.) Predeceased by her sister Ilse FINCH. Maida taught French and German ay Galt Collegiate, Scarborough Collegiate and Humberside C.I. in Toronto. According to her wishes, her body has been donated for research to the University of Toronto. A Memorial Service will be held at Eglinton St. George's United Church, 35 Lytton Blvd. (at Duplex) on Thursday, March 13th at 1 p.m. with a reception afterwards in the Eglinton Room. If desired, remembrances may be made to the charity of your choice.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-21 published
BEAN, Susanne Duff (née WILSON)
Born May 11, 1936, Susanne died peacefully at the K-W Health Centre of Grand River Hospital on Tuesday, March 18, 2003.
Beloved mother of Elizabeth Louise and Geoffrey Alexander. Cherished sister of Judi CONACHER (Lionel.) Devoted Aunt of Lionel (Joannie,) Duff and Bryce (Trish) CONACHER and Mary, Tupper (Emma) and Bryan BEAN and sadly missed by their mother Bonnie BEAN and their father Donald (Irene) BEAN.
Susanne is predeceased by her parents Bea and Fin WILSON.
She will be fondly remembered by her many, many, many Friends.
A private family service and cremation were held. A celebration of Susanne's life will be held at Trinity United Church, 74 Frederick Street, Kitchener on Friday May 9, 2003 at 11 a.m.
The family would like to thank all of Susanne's doctors and the nursing staff of 6B Oncology at Grand River Hospital for their care and compassion.
In lieu of flowers, donations made to Trinity United Church, Kitchener and Waterloo Community Foundation or Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family and may be arranged by contacting the Edward R. Good Funeral Home, Waterloo at (519) 745-8445 or www.edwardrgood.com

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-03 published
HALL, Louise Mary
Born Rainham, Kent, England, 22 June, 1911; died Victoria British Columbia, 30 April, 2003. Predeceased by her beloved husband Alfred (d. 2001) and survived by their two children Patricia (Ted WILSON) of Ancaster, Ontario, and Roger (Sandra MARTIN) of Toronto. She will be missed by all, especially her grandchildren Michael (Judy), Timothy (Susan), Laurie (Edwin), Jeffrey and Louisa; and her great-grandchildren, Ann, Matthew, Jackie and Madelyn. Lou was an original. She came to Canada with her war-widowed mother after World War 1, and settled in Regina, where she began a career as a legal secretary and bookkeeper. In 1933 she married musician Al HALL, a fact that had to be concealed because of social strictures at the time that frowned on the employment of married women. Her quick mind and analytical skills helped build a career lasting more than half a century that was capped by successful business ventures in partnership with her husband first on the prairies and later in Victoria. Lou was a voracious reader. Well into her nineties she followed complex social, economic and political issues with a clear eye and firm criticism of those who did not live up to her high standards. A skillful writer, she particularly liked good prose, and was a fierce defender of individual talents. In retirement, she was a founding member of the Fairfield New Horizons Senior Centre and was much looking forward to the celebration of their 25th anniversary later this month. In lieu of flowers please send donations in her memory to the British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals or the Cowichan Cat Hospital. A funeral service will be held at First Memorial Funeral Services, 1155 Fort Street, Victoria, on Monday, 5 May at 12: 00 Noon. All of her many Friends are welcome.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-07 published
Bureaucrat 'invaluable' to ministers
Analyst was a key negotiator in talks that led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Saturday, June 7, 2003 - Page F11
Gerry SHANNON could have been a professional hockey player like his father, but decided instead to play in a much bigger arena.
Mr. SHANNON went on to become a top career public servant who helped to formulate the federal government's policies on international trade. At one time, he held the No. 2 posting in the Canadian embassy in Washington and was a key negotiator in the talks known as the Uruguay Round, which led to the formation of the World Trade Organization in 1995.
Mr. SHANNON, who died recently in Vancouver at the age of 67, is remembered as a fair, tough and passionate trade-policy analyst who was a trusted adviser to ministers in the successive cabinets of Pierre TRUDEAU and Brian MULRONEY in the 1980s.
"Gerry was a larger-than-life character," said Peter SUTHERLAND, a former director-general of the World Trade Organization. "He played a crucial role in the conclusion of the Uruguay Round. He had a belief in the multilateral system that he combined with an intense Canadian patriotism. His personality was also a factor in bringing peaceful resolution to difficult negotiations."
"He was a straightforward guy -- you always knew where you stood with him," said Marc Lalonde, a former Liberal finance minister. "He was a man with a very solid judgment. He was a good team player in that regard, the kind of guy you would want to have as a senior public servant."
Born in Ottawa in 1935, Mr. SHANNON received an early lesson from his father -- hockey player Jerry SHANNON, who played for the Montreal Canadiens, Boston Bruins and other National Hockey League teams -- on the necessity of appearing strong, no matter what. Once, after a puck knocked out the boy's two front teeth, his father shouted, "Get up, son, shake it off!" Young Gerry did so and stayed in the game.
The same spirit of toughness also probably helped him cope with the death of his mother when he was 10.
Despite an offer to try out for the Bruins, Mr. SHANNON took his father's advice and went to university. Graduating from Carleton University's school of journalism, he worked as a reporter for the Sudbury Star for several years before lifting his sights once again. He wrote a foreign-service exam and was accepted as a diplomat in 1963. "He realized that being a small-town reporter was great and he enjoyed it, but he wanted to be involved in the big world," said his wife, Anne Park SHANNON.
His first posting was in Washington, where, despite any formal training as an economist, he handled matters of trade and economic policy. "He was good at pursuing Canadian interests with the Americans. They liked him," Ms. Park SHANNON said. "He was very affable and very good at just getting to the essence of things."
He also served as Canada's senior foreign affairs representative in Belgrade in the former Yugoslavia, and as ambassador to Korea, one of Canada's youngest ambassadors at the time.
In the mid-1970s, at the height of the Trudeau era, he became director of commercial policy for the department of external affairs. After several years, he returned to Washington as the embassy's second-in-command at a time when Canada's national energy program generated heated discussions.
Recalled to Ottawa about 1982, he became the assistant deputy minister of finance for the Liberals, then deputy minister of international trade for the Progressive Conservatives. In these capacities, he advised Mr. LALONDE and Tory ministers Michael WILSON and Barbara McDOUGALL.
"He was a very professional public servant, he had a sense of professionalism, he had a very good mind, he was tough, and he understood very well the role of the senior public servant, " Ms. McDOUGALL said. "He never tried to be the minister and he was a straight shooter, which many of us appreciated when we realized that this was the exception and not the rule.
"I worked with a lot of great public servants, but he was certainly right up at the top," she said.
Anne Marie DOYLE, who worked extensively with Mr. SHANNON in various government departments, recalls that he would go out on a limb for employees when he thought that they were in the right, and he possessed "iron in his spine" that made his superiors respect him as steadfast and trustworthy.
"He had this phenomenal gift -- the ability to take a very complex problem, see to its core and express it in just two or three very articulate sentences so that someone like a minister or prime minister would have found him just invaluable," she said. "They would have his complex briefing and he would say, 'Well, Minister, what it boils down to is just this, ' and it would be just brilliant."
Mr. SHANNON was "one of the giants of Canadian trade policy of the '80s and '90s," said Bill DYMOND, executive director of the Centre for Trade Policy and Law at Carleton University. "The politicians trusted him because he was blunt, honest and loyal to the government."
Known for his enthusiasm and for being indefatigable on the job, Mr. SHANNON performed an astonishing array of official duties while in Geneva from 1989 to 1995. As Canada's chief negotiator for the Uruguay Round, he developed a binding dispute-settlement system that was hailed as a major breakthrough. He was Canada's first ambassador to the World Trade Organization as he had been to its predecessor, the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade.
As an occasional ambassador to the United Nations, he gave to its committee on disarmament the " SHANNON mandate," a significant negotiating protocol still in use today.
Mr. SHANNON was known as a loyal defender of Canadian interests. Soon after leaving government in 1995 to work as an international trade policy consultant, he wrote an article for The Globe and Mail on Canada's seemingly never-ending softwood-lumber dispute with the United States.
"We always get roughed up in dealing alone with the Americans on issues they deem to be critical to them," he observed. "They simply have too many guns and they persevere until they win."
Mr. SHANNON enjoyed hiking, gardening, opera, travelling, dogs, crossword puzzles and playing hockey.
He and his wife moved from Ottawa to Victoria about a year ago with the intent of retiring there. He was sick only a few weeks before he died on April 26.
He leaves his wife, Anne Park SHANNON, and sons Michael and Steven from a previous marriage. He also leaves a sister, Carol SCHWARZ, of Ottawa.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-09 published
PASK, William Arnold (Bill)
Died at home Friday, June 6, 2003 after a brief but difficult experience with cancer. He faced his illness with courage and dignity and died peacefully in the presence of his family. Bill was a long time employee of the Toronto Board of Education in the photographic/audiovisual department. After his early retirement he began a new career in film, print and television. In this second career that spanned more than a decade, Bill appeared in over a hundred movies, television shows and commercial advertisements. A the time of his death, Bill was working on his memoirs, a project that had occupied him for the last year.
Bill is survived by his wife Eleanor, son Andrew, daughter Elizabeth and his brother Don (sister-in-law, Audrey). He is predeceased by his parents Clarence and Daisy and brothers Cliff and Roy. His many family members and Friends will remember him for his kindness, generosity and unique sense of humour.
The family would like to express their gratitude to Dr. David KENDAL of the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care of Mount Sinai, St. Elizabeth Health Care especially Britt Westdahl, VHA Home Healthcare, especially Gloria THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON and Cheri WILSON of the North York Community Care Access Centre. It was the care each provided in concert with the support and caring of many Friends and family that made it possible for Bill to remain in the comfort of his home with his family during his illness.
The family will welcome Friends from 2: 00-3:00 p.m. Wednesday, June 11, 2003 in the chapel of Saint John's Anglican Church York Mills, 19 Don Ridge Drive. The service will follow at 3: 00 in the church with interment following in the church cemetery. A reception will be held in the church.
In lieu of flowers the family would appreciate donations to the Temmy Latner Centre (416-586-4800 ext. 7884), St. Elizabeth Health Care (416-498-8600) Interlink Community Cancer Nurses (416-599-5465) or a charity of your choice.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-04 published
Patricia BLYTH
By Sam BLYTH Friday, July 4, 2003 - Page A18
Wife, mother, teacher, headmistress, priest. Born January 10, 1916, in Reigate, Surrey. Died May 20 in Ottawa, of cancer, aged In the middle of the night, in the middle of February 1953, in a blinding snowstorm, mother disembarked from the Canadian in Brandon, Manitoba, with her five young daughters in hand. Dressed in a full-length mink coat and direct from London via Halifax, she watched as the porter hurled her trunks onto the platform and told her: "If this is where you are going to live -- God help you." Fifty years later she dryly observed that He certainly did.
Mother was born Patricia WILLIAMS to a gentler life in England. Educated at Cheltenham Ladies College and Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford, she read English and was tutored by C.S. LEWIS and J.R.R. TOLKIEN. Oxford life between the wars was both elegant and edgy, with the likes of John PROFUMO and Harold WILSON in her year. While mom inherited a strong Christian work ethic from her great-grandfather, Sir George WILLIAMS, she was not above enjoying some of the better things in life.
The war brought both drama and excitement and then devastating loss as her only sibling Graham was killed in action.
She met my father on a golf course in Kent during the darkest days of the war. He was a clean-cut Canadian from Regina who went on to command a flight squadron. Their romance played out in London during the blitz and on their wedding night the fires burned so brightly that they could read at night without turning the lights on. Undeterred, they produced three children before the end of the war and went on to have three more, including a son born in Camp Shilo, Manitoba, where mom was bound that February in 1953.
After the family relocated to Ottawa, Mom's career as a mother and a military wife soon gave way to a second career of teaching at Elmwood School. Success in the classroom led to her appointment as headmistress. Mrs. BLYTH was an imposing figure and not to be trifled with. But she was also caring of her students and they returned her devotion.
It must have been with a heavy heart that she gave it all up to accompany dad to diplomatic posts in England, West Germany and Greece. In Bonn, she decided to learn to drive and, after buying an orange Volkswagen, took to the roads and autobahns with a determination that impressed even the locals. Her third career as a diplomatic spouse was unfulfilling.
Mom's fourth career was perhaps her calling in life. Following dad's death in 1985, she started as a lay reader in a small Anglican parish in the West Country of England. Soon she ran up against the Church of England's refusal to ordain woman so she relocated one last time to Ottawa, where she was ordained shortly before her 70th birthday. Every summer thereafter she returned to Devon, installed herself at the local inn and met her former parishioners.
For the last 17 years in Ottawa, she spent her life ministering to the elderly and dying in a large public health facility. In this grim setting she was superb and much loved by both the patients and the caregivers. In her last months, she cared for people who were likely both younger and healthier than Mom as she dealt with terminal lung cancer. Typically, she refused to see a doctor, knowing that the diagnosis would be bad and perhaps curtail her day-to-day life. When she finally agreed to see a doctor she would have less than a week to live.
Several weeks prior to that she summoned the priest in charge of her church to discuss her funeral arrangements. She told him that he should do what he thought was best and then proceeded to tell him exactly what to do. At the funeral, he told an enormous congregation that Pat had insisted that there be no eulogies and then proceeded to deliver one. It was a fitting tribute.
Sam BLYTH is Patricia BLYTH's son.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-29 published
OLSEN, Eric Guthrie
After a long battle with cancer, Eric died in Toronto on July 26, 2003. He was predeceased by his loving first wife, Marjorie and his son Michael. He will be missed by his sisters Margaret ORAM and Brenda OLSEN in England, and his loving children Barbara WILKES (Andy), Geoffrey OLSEN, Brenda KROEKER (Henry), and Robert OLSEN, and by his grandchildren - David and Julia WILKES, Jesse and Sheena OLSEN, and Christine WILSON. Eric was born in Yorkshire, England in 1927, immigrating to Canada with Marjorie in 1951. After years with Dominion Bridge, Eric founded Amhurst Drafting Company Ltd. in 1959 with the support and ongoing participation of Marjorie. The company was known in the steel industry for its excellent work, high ethical standards, skilled employees and excellence in training. After nearly 30 successful years, the company was closed. A special thanks goes to Dr. M. SHERMAN and his team at Toronto General Hospital for the clinical trial of the new cancer drug that gave us another three years with Dad. And also to Dr. John RIEGER of the Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care for the support that made it possible to Dad to stay home with family. Visitation for the hour before the service will be held at St. James-the-Less Cemetery Chapel, 635 Parliament Street, Today Tuesday, July 29, 2003 at 2: 00 p.m with service following at 3: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations ''In memory of Eric Olsen'' to the Canadian Cancer Society would be greatly appreciated.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-23 published
PARK, Olive Elizabeth (née WILSON)
Betty PARK (née WILSON) died peacefully at George Hees Wing, Sunnybrook Hospital, September 14, 2003; predeceased by her husband Dr. Norman S. PARK. She will be missed by her daughter Dr. Elizabeth PARK, her husband Dr. Michael GATES, and their children Kirstin, Norman, Russell, and Thomas. Also sharing in this loss are her son Dr. Norman PARK, his partner Dr. Brenda TONER, and their children Jessica, Emma, Sari, Lindsay, and Michelle. She is survived by one brother, Dr. John WILSON, predeceased by two brothers Fred WILSON and Eric WILSON, Royal Canadian Air Force aircrew World War 2. If desired, memorial donations may be given to the Bob Rumball Centre for the Deaf, 2395 Bayview Avenue, Toronto.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-18 published
Black pride of Canadian track and field
First Canadian-born black athlete to win an Olympic medal was member of relay team at 1932 Los Angeles Games but could find work only as a railway porter
By James CHRISTIE, Tuesday, November 18, 2003 - Page R9
Ray LEWIS's event in Olympic track and field was officially the 400-metre sprint, a flat race. His enduring place in Canadian sport history, however, was earned for hurdling a barrier.
Mr. LEWIS, who died in his native Hamilton at age 94 on the weekend, was the first Canadian born black athlete to stand upon the Olympic medals podium. He won a bronze medal as a member of the Canadian 4 x 400-metre relay at the Los Angeles Games in 1932.
At a time where racial discrimination was the way of the world, Mr. LEWIS didn't get to live a hero's life. Viewed today as a pathfinder for talented black athletes, in the 1930s Mr. LEWIS had to all but quit his athletics training because of the demands of his job as a railway porter with the Canadian Pacific Railways. He spent 22 years on the trains making 250 trips from Toronto to Vancouver. To try and stay fit, Mr. LEWIS would train by running alongside the rails when the train stopped on the prairies.
"He deserved so much more than he ever received," said Donovan BAILEY, who won two gold medals at the 1996 Atlanta Olympics in the 100 metres and 4 x 100-metre relay. "I benefited from his going before.
"I had the honour and good fortune of having lunch with Ray LEWIS and talking with him. I couldn't imagine what it was like in his day. It was so different. Ultimately, he's one who inspired me."
Raymond Gray LEWIS was a Hamiltonian, cradle to grave. James WORRALL, honorary member of the International Olympic Committee and Canada's Olympic flag bearer in 1936, recalled the family roots in the area went back to the 1840s when his great grandparents escaped slavery in the United States and settled near Otterville, Ontario
The youngest child of Cornelius LEWIS and Emma GREEN, Ray LEWIS was born October 8, 1910, at 30 Clyde St. He began running races for fun at age 9 when he entered as contest at a local picnic. He began formal training in track and field at Central Collegiate where the autocratic John Richard (Cap) CORNELIUS was his coach. In 1929, he established a Canadian high-school track-and-field record of four championships in one day, taking the dashes at 100, 200, and 440 yards as they were measured then, and anchoring the one-mile relay. In 1928 and 1929, Mr. LEWIS was part of the Central relay team that won the United States national schoolboy title.
He briefly attended Marquette University in Milwaukee but returned to Canada during the Depression and joined the Canadian Pacific Railway.
Besides his Olympic medal performance with teammates Phil EDWARDS, Alex WILSON and Jimmy BALL, Mr. LEWIS was also a Canadian champion several times and competed in the inaugural British Empire Games in 1930 in Hamilton and the 1934 Empire Games in London. where he won a silver medal in the mile relay. Mr. EDWARDS was actually the first black athlete to win an Olympic medal for Canada in 1932, getting the 800-metre honour about a half-hour before the relay with Mr. LEWIS. Mr. EDWARDS, however, was native of British Guyana, while Ray LEWIS was a local.
Mr. LEWIS, who in 2001 was awarded the Order of Canada, had a life-long attachment to the Empire Games, later renamed the Commonwealth Games. He was an adviser to the bidders who recently sought the 2010 Games for Hamilton and vowed that if the Games were coming back, he'd be there to greet them at the official opening at age 100. The Hamilton bid lost out last week to one from New Delhi, India. He lit the torch during the opening ceremonies at the International Children's Games in Hamilton July 1, 2000.
Mr. LEWIS wrote an autobiography entitled Shadow Running in which he detailed his life "as porter and Olympian." He was featured in a 2002 TVOntario documentary series on racism, Journey to Justice. "It [racism] felt worse here, because it wasn't supposed to happen here," he recalled in the video.
Whereas white athletes had an opportunity for coaching jobs after their careers, Mr. LEWIS did not. His position as a porter was one of the few jobs open to men of his race.
"The first time I met him, the Canadian team was on its way to Fort William, Ontario, for the Canadian championships in 1933. They travelled by Pullman and Ray was the porter. He couldn't get the time off to compete. But he did make the 1934 Empire Games team and was presented to the Prince of Wales, something that was a point of honour for him. He felt it was something to rub into all those people who had kept him off teams and out of places because he was black," Mr. WORRALL said.
Mr. LEWIS married Vivienne JONES in 1941, and they adopted two children, sons Larry and Tony.

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-17 published
Life was good for MAGNUSON
By Eric DUHATSCHEK, With a report from Allan MAKI Wednesday, December 17, 2003 - Page S1
It was one of those "catching up with" features newspapers run every so often. Last January, the Chicago Sun-Times profiled Keith MAGNUSON, one of the most popular players ever to pull on a Chicago Blackhawks sweater.
To the thousands who used to pack the old Chicago Stadium, MAGNUSON's ever-lasting appeal came from a rough-and-tumble playing style that produced a cracked cheekbone, three knee injuries requiring surgery, a torn Achilles' tendon, two broken ankles, a dislocated elbow, three broken jaws, a broken vertebra, a broken wrist, a dislocated shoulder, three missing teeth and more than 400 stitches.
MAGNUSON, after reflecting on his career, his hobbies and all the aches and pains that resulted from a 10-year National Hockey League career, observed: "Otherwise, I feel great. Cindy [his wife] and I are real proud of our kids."
"Life is good," MAGNUSON concluded.
Life for MAGNUSON ended at the age of 56 in a fatal automobile accident on Monday afternoon as he was returning home from a funeral for National Hockey League alumni association chairman Keith McCREARY, who died last week of cancer. MAGNUSON was the passenger in a car driven by former National Hockey League player Rob RAMAGE, the vice-chairman of the alumni association.
MAGNUSON played 589 National Hockey League games for the Blackhawks, and on his retirement in October of 1979, he joined the team's coaching staff, as an assistant to Eddie JOHNSTON. JOHNSTON, now the Pittsburgh Penguins' assistant general manager, remembered MAGNUSON yesterday as "the ultimate competitor. I mean, when Keith MAGNUSON put on the skates on, you didn't just get 100 per cent, you got 110 per cent every night. He just played with so much passion, it was unreal."
The Blackhawks made it to the Stanley Cup final twice in MAGNUSON's career, in 1971 and 1973, losing both times to the Montreal Canadiens. It was the heyday of hockey in Chicago. The Blackhawks had Dennis and Bobby HULL, the legendary Stan MIKITA and Tony ESPOSITO, a future Hall Of Fame member, in goal. MAGNUSON's job was to protect ESPOSITO, and he did it with a passion that JOHNSTON said was contagious in the Blackhawks' dressing room.
"What he always did very, very well was set the tone early in the game. He let the opposition know that when you dropped the puck in the game, "This was what you were going to see, guys, for 60 minutes.' "
MAGNUSON, who most recently was the director of sales for Coca-Cola Enterprises, grew up in Saskatoon as an all-round athlete. He was a boyhood chum of former National Hockey League coach Dave KING. The two attended Churchill elementary school and used to play 1-on-1 hockey: KING as a forward and MAGNUSON as a defenceman.
Eventually, MAGNUSON and four other teenagers from Saskatoon earned scholarships at the University of Denver and helped the Pioneers win two National Collegiate Athletic Association championships. MAGNUSON and Tim GOULD played every sport together and were also teamed as defence partners.
"We never missed a shift," said GOULD, whose wife, a nurse in Calgary, woke him early yesterday to inform him of MAGNUSON's death. "He was the greatest guy and a good friend."
GOULD said he and MAGNUSON used to dream up ways to get MAGNUSON to hockey, football and baseball games on Sunday.
MAGNUSON's parents were Baptists and considered the Sabbath a day of rest. It became GOULD's job to sneak into the MAGNUSON home while they were at church and take Keith's equipment to the rink or the diamond.
"Of course, if we scored a goal or a run, our names would be mentioned in the newspaper the next day," GOULD said. "But we thought we were keeping it secret."
GOULD said MAGNUSON was best known among his Friends for having a poor memory. Once in Saskatoon, MAGNUSON drove his dad's car to the rink for a Blades game, only to drive home with a teammate, the two of them completely immersed in the game they had just played.
The next morning, MAGNUSON's father asked where the car was. "Keith had to run back to the rink to get it," said Dale ZEMAN, another of MAGNUSON's former junior and college teammates. "There was also the night Keith and I went bowling when we were freshmen at Denver. We came out and couldn't find the car. It had rolled backwards three blocks because Keith forgot to put it in park."
GOULD said: "He was awful forgetful. We're having a reunion in June [for Denver University hockey] and we had a card printed up, and Keith's quote on it was: 'I'm going to be there -- and Cliff [KOROLL] is going to remind me.' The memories, that's what get you through this."
MAGNUSON is survived by his wife, his daughter, Molly, and his son, Kevin, a former University of Michigan defenceman who had a tryout with the Blackhawks. Recently, after a short playing career in the East Coast Hockey League, Kevin had gone back to school for his law degree, JOHNSTON said.
"To have something like this happen, this close to the holidays, the timing couldn't be worse. It's never good, but geez, here he is, going up there for a funeral for Keith McCREARY and then to have something like this happen.
"God, it's awful," he said. "We'll miss him. He was such a big part of the community in Chicago, an icon. Everybody knew Keith MAGNUSON. It's an awful tragedy."
San Jose Sharks general manager Doug WILSON, another of MAGNUSON's close Friends, was badly shaken by his former teammate's death. WILSON said he thought of MAGNUSON as something of a father figure. "Keith has had a profound influence on my life." Really, all I can say is, all my thoughts and prayers are with Cindy and the kids right now."
Jim DEMARIA, the Blackhawks executive director of communications, worked closely with MAGNUSON in his role as the founder and president of the Chicago alumni association.
"Any time you needed something, you could call Maggy," DEMARIA said. "He was the first guy in line to help any kind of charity you had. I mean, he was just that kind of person. And when the team wasn't doing real well, he was down in the room, talking to the coaches, telling the players, 'keep your chin up, keep working, things will turn around.' He was a real positive guy."

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WILSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-27 published
KISSICK, John Gardiner Canning (Jack)
Died peacefully, on Christmas Eve, with his family by his side, after a short stay at Lakeshore Lodge, Etobicoke, in his 102nd year. Predeceased by his first wife, Margaret and second wife Flossie. He will be remembered with great love and many fond memories by his son, William (Sarah), grand_sons, David (Cindy), Douglas (Lisa) and Andrew; great-grandchildren, Matthew and Sara step-daughter, Elsie (Alf THOMAS;) grandchildren, Lynda and Randy great-grandchildren, Alan and Michael; step-son, Bob WILSON (Edie) grand_son, Stephen. John was a member of The Temple, R.B.P. 292, Tobermore L.O.L. 2391; Sons and Daughters of Ireland; Apprentice Boys of Derry; and Morningside-High Park Presbyterian Church, where Jack was an Elder. Jack was very committed to helping others and will be remembered fondly by his neighbours and wide circle of Friends. He could be seen from morning to dusk in his garden which gave him much pleasure. Special thanks to home caregivers, Susan and Margaret, and to Lakeshore Lodge. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street West, at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service to be held in the Chapel on Tuesday, December 30 at 1 p.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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