WHIDDON o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-22 published
Margaret Clara LEWIS (Nee WHIDDON)
In loving memory of Margaret Clara LEWIS who died peacefully, January 19, 2003 at the Manitoulin Lodge, age 91 years.
Beloved wife of William LEWIS (predeceased in 1996.) Loving mother of Jack (Myrna,) Carol (Carl HALL,) Lyle (Paulette.) Very special grandmother to Wendy, Michael, David, Stacey and Sherry. Cherished great grandmother to Justin, Adrien, Parker, Ally and Hunter. Dear sister of Bill (Lena) and Nora (Nick predeceased), predeceased by John and Dorothy. Dear sister-in-law of Doreen GRANGER (George,) Madeline HOLOWACK, Mary KERHANOVICH (Earl), Catherine GIFFEN (Garth). Predeceased by Ina and George BREATHAT and Margaret and Arden LEWIS. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews.
Margaret was born in Fort Frances, Ontario and graduated as a registered nurse in 1932. She moved to Manitoulin Island where she married her husband in 1941. A hard working woman, Margaret raised her children, worked on the family farm, and nursed until her retirement. She lived her later years in Little Current, and most recently at the Manitoulin Lodge in Gore Bay. Visitation from 10: 00 until Funeral Service 11:00 a.m. Wednesday, January 22, 2003 at Island Funeral Home. Cremation with burial of ashes in Elmview Cemetery.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHIDDON - All Categories in OGSPI

WHISSEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-06 published
Evelyn Iris DEVER- BOCK
In loving memory of Evelyn Iris DEVER- BOCK who passed away on Saturday, August 2, 2003 at Extendicare Falconbridge, Sudbury at the age of 93 years.
Beloved wife of Clifford DEVER (predeceased) and Melvyn BOCK (predeceased.) Loved mother of Herman and wife Nora DEVER of Sudbury, Iris and husband Norman WHISSEL of Edmonton, Dan and wife Bev DEVER of Sudbury and Norman and wife Bev DEVER of Lively. Fondly remembered by many grandchildren and great grandchildren. Evelyn was an avid curler and will always be remembered for her large garden and raspberry patch in Little Current. Visitation from 11: 00 am until Funeral Service at 2:00 pm Wednesday, August 6, 2003. Burial in Mountain View Cemetery. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHISSEL - All Categories in OGSPI

WHITEHEAD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-05-21 published
A character in life and work
Toronto-born actor played supporting roles in hundreds of films and television shows, including the cult-hit sitcom Mary Hartman
By Bill GLADSTONE Special to The Globe and Mail Wednesday, May 21, 2003 - Page R5
As a genial, six-foot, balding performer who wore a trademark mustache and glasses, Graham JARVIS was not the leading-man type. The Toronto-born actor from a privileged background, who died last month in California at 72, courted but never achieved stardom and instead gained a kind of small-roles fame by appearing in hundreds of supporting parts in film and television productions.
Mr. JARVIS took character parts in films as diverse as Alice's Restaurant, Cold Turkey, Middle Age Crazy, Silkwood and Misery, and a similar assortment of television shows including Star Trek, ER, Murder She Wrote, Gunsmoke, The X-Files and Six Feet Under.
His first role was as an understudy in a mid-1950s Broadway production of Tennessee Williams's Orpheus Descending, and his last was as the grandfather in an episode of the television series Seventh Heaven, which aired four days after his death in April.
He is perhaps best known for his portrayal of Charlie Haggers, the devoted husband of a country singer in the 1970s television sitcom Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. "Nobody outside the business knows my name, but it doesn't bother me," he told an interviewer in 1982. "Fans still know me as Charlie, years after we went off the air. Fans went nuts over that character for some reason and I love the guy myself."
A scion of the historic Toronto family for whom JARVIS Street is named, Graham Powely JARVIS was also the grand_son of John LABATT Jr., who built up the famous Labatt brewery. A strain of theatrical talent obviously runs in the Labatt blood: His cousins include two legendary theatre personalities -- nonagenarian actor Hume CRONYN and Broadway producer Robert WHITEHEAD, who died last year.
It was Mr. WHITEHEAD who helped Mr. JARVIS attain the gig in Orpheus Descending and an audition at the Barter Theatre in Abbingdon, Va., where he trained for three seasons. Mr. CRONYN also helped him land a Broadway role, Mr. JARVIS said in 1982, adding that he rarely liked to mention the celebrated theatrical connections within his own family.
"This is the first time I've let this information out because I've tried not to trade on it," he said. "But I guess I've been around long enough now not to worry about it."
His father, an investment banker who was instrumental in founding what is today known as Scotia McLeod and was later president of Labatt, moved the family to New York when Graham was 5. He was sent to Bishop Ridley College, a prep school in St. Catharines, Ontario, and later to Williams College in Williamstown, Massachusetts. A confused dropout at 23, he found work on the midnight shift in a penny arcade on 42nd Street in Manhattan. Then a friend invited him to watch an off-Broadway troupe in rehearsal and a light went on in his head. "I can do that!" he told himself, and he never looked back.
"Graham was such a great character actor because he could just go into character," said his niece, Sandra JARVIS of Toronto. "He was just brilliant that way. You'd be having a conversation with him and he'd just don a role, and it would take you a second to realize that Graham was now acting. Anyone who knew him well could just see this glow in his eyes -- this glint that told you he knew he was having fun with you."
"He loved acting," said his friend, actor Wil ALBERT. " When he was acting he was like a little boy going to the candy store."
Mr. JARVIS was a graduate of the American Theatre Wing acting school as well as of the Barter Theatre. He was an original member of the Lincoln Center Repertory Theater and a veteran of many Broadway and off-Broadway productions.
His first film role (in Bye Bye Braverman, 1968) enticed him to move to Hollywood, and he soon landed the part of the narrator in the stage production of The Rocky Horror Show at the Roxy Theatre on Sunset Boulevard.
Television producer Norman LEAR spotted him there and eventually recommended him for Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman. Mr. JARVIS also appeared in the show's sequel, Forever Fernwood. Another memorable role was of John Erlichman in Blind Ambition, a well-received 1979 television miniseries about the Watergate political scandal.
Relishing the idea of free airfare to Toronto where he had family and Friends, Mr. JARVIS took occasional work from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer Ross McLEAN once told of auditioning him as a talk-show host, but felt his bald dome would need to be covered. Mr. JARVIS owned a hairpiece but had left it in California.
"Makeup pulled 20-odd rugs out of storage," Mr. McLEAN wrote. "Everything he tried on looked absurdly out of place." Ultimately, Mr. JARVIS arranged for his L.A. agent to go to his house, find the hairpiece and rush it to Toronto.
"The rug made it on time," Mr. McLEAN noted, adding that "I have rarely seen a less convincing thatch of regrouped Hong Kong hair." In short, Graham JARVIS looked best -- and did the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation audition -- as himself.
In a 1980s television series called Making the Grade, Mr. JARVIS played a buck-passing inner-city high-school principal who didn't care that a student couldn't read. In real life, however, he worked as a volunteer to teach literacy skills to young offenders.
"It was really fascinating to hear him talk about it," said his wife, JoAnna. "He felt they couldn't read because they couldn't speak -- they were speaking a street patois. He went back to college to get his teaching certificate so he could do this on a regular basis." Active in civic politics, he pushed for handgun control and helped voters get to the polls on election day. He also sang in his church choir and worked in its Sunday school.
"I think the consensus among almost everyone who knew Graham is that he was a very warm, enjoyable man," said actor Jerry HARDIN, a friend for almost 50 years.
"You came away feeling he was a good human being if you had any contact with him. He was very empathetic. He had compassion for people's difficulties and problems, and he would help them if he could."
Friends and family also recall his storytelling skills and his joy at giving visitors detailed historic tours of New York and later Hollywood. By all accounts, he was a humble man.
"He didn't think he was nearly as successful as he was," said Barbara WARREN, a niece. "He was always extremely surprised and delighted when people would stop him on the street and ask him for his autograph.
"He loved to deliver the lines and get the shock on your face," Ms. WARREN said. "You never saw him poise himself, he just walked right in as if he was that person."
Mr. JARVIS died at his home in the Pacific Palisades area of Los Angeles on April 16. Besides his wife, JoAnna, he leaves sons Matthew and Alex in California and sister Kitty Blair in Toronto.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITEHEAD - All Categories in OGSPI

WHITEHOUSE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-31 published
WHITEHOUSE, Gladys Yolande Laviolette
Died peacefully at Toronto Western Hospital on Tuesday, July 29, 2003, in her 100th year, one of eight daughters of the late Joseph B. LAVIOLETTE and May Emma SMITH, predeceased in 1961 by her husband, Robert Victor WHITEHOUSE, beloved sister of Dorothy BAIRD of Norwood, Ontario, and Gwyneth NEHER of Peace River, Alberta, and brother-in-law, George NEHER of Newmarket, Ontario, loving aunt of Debbie NEHER, Ginnie NEHER, Gwendy NEHER and Charles NEHER. Longtime member of the congregation and, with her late husband, a most generous benefactor of the Church of the Transfiguration (Anglican), 111 Manor Road East, Toronto. Funeral at the church on Friday, August 1, 2003 at eleven o'clock. Visitation at the church for one hour prior to the service. Cremation. Ashes to be interred beside her husband in the Laviolette family plot in Notre Dame du Neige Cemetery, Montreal. Arrangements entrusted to Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITEHOUSE - All Categories in OGSPI

WHITFIELD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-12 published
NESBITT, Robert Samuel
Born 26 April 1913, died peacefully 11 September 2003, of complications following a broken hip, in his ninety-first year. Beloved husband of Jean (née BOOTH) and loving father of Catherine (Bob LECKEY,) Shelagh (Doug WHITFIELD) and Robbie (deceased.) Proud grandfather of Bill (Shelly,) Rob and Aaron (Lynne DESPRES) WHITFIELD and of Amelia BAILEY (Mark) and Robert LECKEY (Josý NAVAS) and great-grandfather of Amy and Ashley WHITFIELD and of Corbin BAILEY. Predeceased by sisters Joyce (Clarence LOCKWOOD,) Patricia (Ben THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON) and, in childhood, Eleanor and brother George. Bob's life was marked by his dedication to his family, Friends, neigbours, church and community. The family will receive Friends at the Walas Funeral Home, 130 Main Street, Brighton on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held from St. Paul's Anglican Church, Brighton on Monday, September 15th at 1 o'clock. Interment Mount Hope Cemetery Cemetery, Brighton. As an expression of sympathy, donations to St. Paul's Anglican Church, Belleville Hospital or The Red Cross, care of Box 96, Brighton, Ontario K0K 1H0, would be appreciated by the family.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITFIELD - All Categories in OGSPI

WHITFORD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-05 published
COSTA, (GREGOR) Val
The beloved wife of Tibor GREGOR died peacefully on December 3rd, 2003 after a courageous battle with cancer. She will be fondly remembered by her husband, daughters Tania, Stacy and her fiancé Nelson WHITFORD and her family in Australia. She will be missed by Jan GREGOR, Anne Gregor ROSE, Fred and Martha ROSE and by her life-long friend Val THOMAS and her numerous other Friends. Val was a member of the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club, the Art Gallery of Ontario, the Royal Ontario Museum and a ballet enthusiast. A celebration of Val's rich life will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 stop lights west of Yonge St.) on Tuesday December 9th at 1: 00 p.m. with a reception to follow at the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital would be appreciated by the family.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITFORD - All Categories in OGSPI

WHITING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-28 published
HORN, Helen Joyce (née WHITING)
Born on October 16, 1925 in Aurora. Died on Saturday, July 26, 2003 at the Willet Hospital in Paris, Ontario of complications from Parkinson's Disease. Beloved wife of James, devoted mother of Brian and Pauline HORN and Brenda and Mike HILLABY. Cherished Nana of Kevin and Peter HORN and Kiera HILLABY; Survived by her sister Doris KNAPP and predeceased by her sister Grace YOUNG. Resident of St. George, Ontario and member of Holy Trinity Anglican Church. Cremation has taken place. A memorial service to celebrate her life will be held at Holy Trinity Anglican Church, St. George on Saturday, August 9 at 2: 00 p.m. Reception to follow at the family home. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Parkinson's Foundation would be appreciated. Arrangements by Wm. Kipp Funeral Home, Paris 519-4423061.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-23 published
COLLINS, Joyce Amanda (formerly WHITING, née JOHNSON)
Died October 21, 2003 at St. Joseph's Villa, Dundas in her 83rd year. She was born on February 1, 1921 in Maidstone, Saskatchewan to Frank and Amanda JOHNSON, the youngest of 6 children. She is predeceased by her brothers Fred and Enos, sisters Ruth, Elma and Hilda. Joyce is also predeceased by her first husband Frank WHITING. Survived by her husband William and her sons Robert WHITING (Lan Wei), Kenneth WHITING (Jane), Douglas WHITING (Darlene) and daughters Margaret (Fraser FLETCHER,) Susan WHITING (Alan DESCHNER) and step-daughter Patti (Randy SKINNER.) Also survived by 11 grandchildren and a great-grand_son. Special thanks to Bonnie Bon for her special care and love during the past few years. Joyce was a graduate from the College of Household Sciences (1941), University of Saskatchewan and practiced as a hospital dietitian in Ottawa and Fredericton. Cremation. A Celebration of Joyce's Life will be held on Saturday, October 25 at Binkley United Church, 1570 Main Street West, Hamilton at 2 o'clock. Private inurnment White Chapel Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations may be sent to Joyce Collins Bursary c/o University of Saskatchewan, Sasktoon S7N 5C9.
catteleatonandchambers.ca

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITING - All Categories in OGSPI

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-08 published
Donald Arthur CASSIDY
In loving memory of Donald Arthur CASSIDY " Hop" at Manitoulin Health Centre in Little Current on Monday January 6, 2003 in his 75th year.
Beloved husband of Lillian (née FLAHERTY.) Predeceased by parents Ernest and Helen CASSIDY. Brother of Eunice SCOBIE of Dundas and Beatrice WHITE/WHYTE of Columbia, South Carolina. Predeceased by brother Leonard and sister Madeline. Cherished father of Janice BOOKER of Ridgeway, William (Bill) of Port Colborne, Ruth WILSON (Bruce) of Little Current, Beverly CASSIDY (Scott MURRAY) of Welland and Roger of Little Current.
Beloved grandfather of Derek, Tammy, Scott, Gregory, Joshua, Sarah, Valerie, Brett, and Brian. Great grandfather of three. Uncle of many nieces and nephews. Visitation from 2: 00 until Memorial service at 3: 30 p.m. Wednesday January 8, 2003 at Grace Bible Church.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-01-29 published
Mary Jane (GROTHIER) WHITE/WHYTE
On Wednesday, January 22, 2003, at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, at age 71, after a lengthy illness. Loving mother of Scott and his wife Carole of Toronto. Proud grandmother of Maddie and Nickie. Survived by her cousin David and his wife Joanne who were so kind to her over the years. Daughter of the late Wilmer (Bud) and Pauline GROTHIER, formerly of Woodstock, Ontario, and predeceased by her only sister, Margaret CURRAN. Mary Jane was a graduate of the Toronto General Hospital nursing program and a longtime volunteer at the Donwood Institute where she helped countless people cope with the struggles of addiction. She loved her cats, her old dog Misha and all the Friends she met along the way. A Service of Remembrance was held at the Humphrey Funeral Home, A.W. Miles Chapel, Toronto on Tuesday, January 28. For every summer of her life, including the last one, Mary Jane would travel to her favourite place in the world, McGregor Bay. To honour her love for that precious corner of Georgian Bay, donations may be made in her memory to the G.B.A. Foundation, 48 Lesmill Road, Don Mills, Ontario M3B 2T5.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-02-12 published
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS
Alice Lucy WILLIAMS passed away at the Collingwood Nursing Home, on Friday, February 7, 2003 in her 88th year.
Alice (McGIBBON) beloved wife of the late George WILLIAMS. Dear mother of Wilda and her husband Hazen WHITE/WHYTE of Providence Bay, Manitoulin Island and the late Eileen WILLIAMS and Robert Arthur WILLIAMS. Survived by her daughter-in-law Helen BOUTET. Loving grandmother of Bruce and the late Shirley WHITE/WHYTE, Wilma Eileen WHITE/WHYTE, Linda Darlene and her husband Bradford LEIBEL, Robert Bruce WILLIAMS, Julie Marie and her husband Joe STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and the late Douglas Allan WHITE/WHYTE, nine great grandchildren: Matthew WHITE/WHYTE, Marcus WHITE/WHYTE, Sarah HAMILL, Curtis MERRITT, Liana MERRITT, Joshua COX, Kimberly LEIBEL, Neil LEIBEL, Nicole STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and three great great grandchildren, Dominique, Tristan and Brayden. Funeral service was held at the Chatterson-Long Funeral Home, 404 Hurontario Street, Collingwood, on Tuesday, February 11, 2003. Spring Interment Silver Water Cemetery, Manitoulin Island.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-05-14 published
Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE
In loving memory of Lois Irene (MUCKLOW) WHITE/WHYTE who passed away at Mindemoya Hospital on Thursday, May 8, 2003 at the age of 59 years.
Dear wife of Reginald WHITE/WHYTE, of Mindemoya. Predeceased by son Reginald. Predeceased by parents James and Irene MUCKLOW of North Bay. Loving sister to James and Ines MUCKLOW of Kirkland Lake, sister-in-law to Mary and Eric SEARLE of Huntsville, Beulah AYLES of Newfoundland, Doris WILHSHIRE and Weslley of Newfoundland, Millicent WILLIAMS of Denver, Colorado. Predeceased by brothers-in-law, Bill, Jack, Philip and Frank all of Newfoundland. Will be sadly missed by nieces and nephews. Visitation and Funeral Service were held on Saturday, May 10, 2003 at the Mindemoya Missionary Church. Cremation to follow. Arrangements in care of Island Funeral Home.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
WHITE/WHYTE
-In memory of my husband, Lloyd, who passed away September 2, 2001
I often lay awake at night
when the world is fast asleep
and take a walk down memory lane
with tears upon my cheeks.
Remembering you is easy
I do it everyday.
But missing you is a heartache
That never goes away.
-Lovingly remembered, Helen

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-08-27 published
WHITE/WHYTE
-In loving memory of our dad, Lloyd who passed away Sept.2, 2001.
There will always be a heartache,
and many silent tears
always precious memories
of the days when you were here.
We hold you close within our hearts
and there you will remain,
to walk with us throughout our lives
until we meet again.
-Sadly missed by children, Wayne, Judy, Patsy and their families.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2003-12-17 published
Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE
In loving memory Marilyn Joanne (Mandy) BELLEROSE, September 30, 1941 to December 15, 2003.
Mandy BELLEROSE, a resident of Providence Bay, died at the Mindemoya Hospital on Monday, December 15, 2003 at the age of 62 years.
She was born in Carnarvon Township, daughter of the late Albert and Anne (McFARLANE) DAVIS. Mandy had worked with the developmentally handicapped for over 15 years. She enjoyed bingo, going to the casinos, crosswords and knitting. Her greatest love and the most pleasure she had in her life was her family. Although she will be sadly missed, many fond memories will be cherished by her entire family and Friends.
Dearly loved wife of Donald BELLEROSE, loving and loved mother of Kelly SMITH and his wife Marie of Hensall, Debbie WHITE/WHYTE and her husband David of Brampton and Ray SMITH of Providence Bay and step-children Dawn of Sault Ste. Marie, Michael and his wife Terry of Sudbury and Darrin and partner Shawna of Sault Ste Marie. Proud grandmother of Kasaundra, Tiffany, Kristi, Melissa and Bryan. Dear sister of John DAVIS, and his wife Cindy of Spring Bay. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews, and many cousins and Friends. Predeceased by infant daughter Mary Ann HEBERT and brother Joseph Morlyn DAVIS.
Friends may call at the Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya after 7 p.m. on Wednesday, December 17, 2003. The funeral service will be conducted at the church on Thursday, December 18, at 3: 00 p.m. with Father Robert Foliot officiating. Interment in Providence Bay Cemetery. Culgin Funeral Home.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-03-19 published
'His heart was always in the labour movement'
United Auto Workers director and Canadian Labour Congress president, he was one of labour's most influential leaders
By Allison LAWLOR Wednesday, March 19, 2003 - Page R7
He went from the assembly line to the lofty heights of union leadership. Dennis McDERMOTT, who died last month at age 80, was one of Canada's most influential labour leaders throughout the 1970s and 1980s as Canadian director of the United Auto Workers and later president of the Canadian Labour Congress.
Mr. McDERMOTT's life in the labour movement began in 1948 when he started work as an assembler and welder at the Massey Harris (later Massey Ferguson) plant in Toronto. He joined United Auto Workers Local 439 and quickly rose through the ranks.
"He had a lot of pizzazz, said Bob WHITE/WHYTE, former president of the Canadian Auto Workers and the Canadian Labour Congress. "He had a good sense of what was good for working people."
After a 38-year career in the Canadian labour movement, Mr. McDERMOTT was made Canadian ambassador to Ireland in 1986 by Prime Minister Brian MULRONEY. Mr. McDERMOTT received some criticism within the labour movement for the appointment, but he made no apologies.
"I didn't cross the floor and become a Conservative. I am a social democrat and will continue to be a social democrat, " he said at the time. "I will continue to act and speak as a trade unionist, Mr. McDERMOTT said in 1986 after accepting his appointment.
Mr. McDERMOTT was known for his sharp tongue and had a particularly abrasive relationship with former prime minister Pierre TRUDEAU. He fought against the anti-inflation policies of the Trudeau government, in particular wage and price controls.
On November 21, 1981, Mr. McDERMOTT led a massive rally on Parliament Hill, said to be the largest such demonstration in Canadian history. About 100,000 people protested against the oppressive burden of high interest rates that created high unemployment and economic instability.
Behind his combative style, Mr. McDERMOTT had a strong intellect and a talent for building consensus. As Canadian Labour Congress president, he was able to reach out to other groups and build a coalition among various social interests in Canada in pursuit of common goals.
"I am confrontational. When I have to play hardball, I play hardball. But I can be just as conciliatory as anyone else. I can walk with the bat or I can walk with the olive branch. It depends on what's happening, Mr. McDERMOTT once told a reporter.
Dennis McDERMOTT was born on November 3, 1922, in Portsmouth, England. He was the eldest of three children to his Irish parents John and Beatrice McDERMOTT. Growing up poor, Mr. McDERMOTT learned firsthand about some of life's injustices. As a young boy in the church choir, Mr. McDERMOTT remembered being left behind on the bus while the rest of the choir performed at a concert because his family was too poor to buy him a uniform, said his wife, Claire McDERMOTT.
Mr. McDERMOTT left school at age 14 to become a butcher's helper. Two years later, he joined the Royal Navy. During the Second World War, he served on a destroyer escort travelling on convoy duty to different parts of Europe and sometimes to the Russian port of Murmansk. In 1947, he left the navy to work in a Scottish coal mine before coming the Canada.
After landing a job at Massey Harris in Toronto, Mr. McDERMOTT quickly became involved in the United Auto Workers. Small in stature, but with a quick mind and wit, he became a budding leader.
"He was very impressive, said Bromley ARMSTRONG, a civil and human-rights activist who worked with Mr. McDERMOTT at Massey Harris. "He held rapt attention."
During his first year in the union, Mr. McDERMOTT worked on the Joint Labour Committee to Combat Racial Intolerance, which successfully lobbied to help bring about Ontario's first piece of human-rights legislation, the Fair Employment Practices Act of 1948.
His work in human rights continued throughout his career. He later served on the executive of the Toronto Committee for Human Rights and as a member of the Canadian Civil Liberties Association. He was awarded the Order of Ontario for his work in the trade-union and human-rights movements. After serving in several positions in the United Auto Workers Local 439, Mr. McDERMOTT became a full-time organizer for the union in 1954. He was made subregional director of the Toronto area in 1960, a position he held until being elected Canadian director of the United Auto Workers in 1968. During his first year as Canadian director, he moved the union headquarters from Windsor, Ontario, to Toronto.
"He started down the road towards more autonomy for the Canadian union, and he reached out to all points of view inside the union, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said. (In 1985, the Canadian arm of the United Auto Workers broke away to form its own union -- the Canadian Auto Workers,)
"Dennis McDERMOTT raised the profile of the Canadian labour movement to new heights, said Canadian Auto Workers president Buzz HARGROVE. "He was a tough and effective negotiator at the bargaining table, but he also took on the key social and political issues of the day."
Mr. HARGROVE added that his friend and colleague "always had a vision for the movement."
Mr. McDERMOTT was a strong supporter of American Cesar CHAVEZ and the United Farm Workers. He led a contingent of Canadians to California and also organized a march in Toronto to raise money for Mr. CHAVEZ.
Elected Canadian Labour Congress president in 1978, Mr. McDERMOTT served in that position until his retirement in 1986. When asked by a reporter what he considered his prime accomplishment, he pointed to the labour congress. "I think putting the Canadian Labour Congress on the map. Before I came there, it was pretty low profile. You never heard of it. I was kind of proud of that, Mr. McDERMOTT said in a 1989 interview with The Toronto Star.
McDERMOTT also broadened the Canadian Labour Congress's role in international affairs. He was a member of the executive board of the Inter-American Regional Organization of Workers and served as vice-president of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.
"His heart was always in the labour movement, Ms. McDERMOTT said. During his three years as ambassador to Ireland in the late 1980s, Mr. McDERMOTT made headlines when he lashed out at Irish government officials for giving better treatment to singer Michael Jackson's pet chimpanzee than the McDERMOTT's Great Dane, Murphy. Mr. Jackson's chimp was whisked into the country while Murphy had to endure six months of quarantine. The dog died shortly after being freed.
Mr. McDERMOTT enjoyed both writing and painting. While in Ireland, he sold a few of his paintings. One of his short stories, about his war experiences, was published in The Toronto Star as part of the newspaper's short-story contest.
Returning from Ireland, Mr. McDERMOTT retired and spent his time between a home near Peterborough, Ontario, and a place in Florida. He continued to paint and write. His letters to the editor frequently appeared in newspapers.
"He lived an incredible life if you think of where he came from, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said. "He would be the first to say that he was fortunate."
Mr. McDERMOTT died on February 13 in a Peterborough hospital. He had been suffering from a lung disease. He leaves his wife Claire and five children.
A memorial service will be held on March 24 at 1 p.m. at the Toronto Centre for the Arts, 5040 Yonge Street, Toronto.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-03 published
Accidental airline' opened British Columbia coast
Ham-radio operator became salesman, aviator and award-winning author
By Tom HAWTHORN Special to The Globe and Mail Tuesday, June 3, 2003 - Page R5
Jim SPILSBURY was an itinerant radio salesman and founder of what became known as "the accidental airline." His businesses brought the wider world to the isolated canneries, logging camps, steamer camps and native villages along the rugged British Columbia coast.
Mr. SPILSBURY, who has died at 97, took it as his calling to make life easier for his fellow coast dwellers. He later realized to his dismay that he had contributed to ending a way of life, as many of his customers forsook the hardships of isolation for the city.
The coastal hamlets he visited by boat and, later, plane became a roll call of ghost towns and all-but-forgotten ports of call: Surge Narrows, Blind Channel, Grassy Bay, Squirrel Cove, Whaletown.
"Nowadays the world I knew has all but vanished," he wrote in 1990. "As I cruise the bays and inlets I have known so well, the coast for me becomes a haunted place, haunted by all the people and places that gave it life."
The first of two memoirs written with Howard WHITE/WHYTE was released by Mr. WHITE/WHYTE's Harbour Publishing in 1987. SPILSBURY's Coast became a regional bestseller and the winner of a British Columbia Book Prize.
A second volume, The Accidental Airline, published the following year, was also well received by critics and readers. Pastels of Pacific coastal scenes by Mr. SPILSBURY, an accomplished painter, graced the covers of both books.
Mr. SPILSBURY's arrival by boat was a welcome respite from day-to-day labours for many living and working the fiords along the Inside Passage between Vancouver Island and the mainland.
That he was an accomplished storyteller and superb radio technician made him a legendary character long before his books were published.
Ashton James SPILSBURY was born on October 8, 1905, in the same upstairs bedroom as his father at Longlands, the family's ancestral home at Findern, Derbyshire. His parents had returned to the mother country from British Columbia at the urging of the SPILSBURY clan, which did not wish to have a scion born in the colonies.
His father, Ashton Wilmot SPILSBURY, was a Cambridge-educated gentleman whose modest business schemes were fraught with disaster his mother, the former Alice Maud BLIZARD, was a pants-wearing suffragist with little use for convention. Soon after their son's birth, they returned to their 144-hectare homestead at Whonnock on British Columbia's Fraser River.
After a failed business venture cost the family its land, they resettled on Savary Island, a narrow sandbar in Georgia Strait. The SPILSBURYs made their home in a canvas tent erected on an unused road right of way; they were squatters.
Mr. SPILSBURY got his first formal schooling on the island in September, 1914, a month before his ninth birthday. He would attend classes for only four years. By 1919, he began an apprenticeship with a steamship company, an unfortunate choice, as he was seasick for much of the next six months, before quitting.
He worked on Savary as a swamper and knotter on a log float before earning his donkey engineer's steam ticket. When he joined his father in business as Spilsbury and Son, their letterhead included a lengthy list of talents from well-digging to real-estate sales. They also ran a taxi service.
Mr. SPILSBURY had been fascinated with radio as a teenager, building his first crystal set at age 17. The early days of radio involved communication by Morse code. The advent of voice transmission, including a memorable night in 1922 when he tuned in an orchestra performing live from the Fairmont Hotel in San Francisco, turned his interest into an obsession.
In 1926, Mr. SPILSBURY set out as a radio technician on the Mary, a leaky codfish boat rented for $1 a day. He scrambled to make a living by trolling coastal hamlets and work camps, much of what little profit he made coming from sweet-talking lonely housewives into purchasing an inexpensively produced lemon-oil polish at 75 cents a bottle.
The business grew over the years, as Mr. SPILSBURY sold brand-name radios, as well as those of his own construction, to people for whom the instrument was their only daily contact with the rest of the world. In 1936, he bought a new boat, which he christened the Five B. R., after his ham-radio call of VE5BR.
As a ham operator, he once stayed awake 40 consecutive hours as part of a relay of operators from Vancouver through Parksville on Vancouver Island to Mr. SPILSBURY on Savary Island to Vernon in the Okanagan in the Interior of British Columbia, where a passenger train had derailed in an ice storm. Mr. SPILSBURY handled 340 messages in three days on his home-built radio.
The Five B. R. was called "the radio boat" and was a fixture along the coast, where Mr. SPILSBURY heralded his arrival by sounding an ear-splitting police siren.
A wartime restriction on gas for boats led Mr. SPILSBURY to purchase a Waco Standard biplane for $2,500. Service calls that had taken days now lasted only minutes. "I knew I would never be able to look at that coastal world in quite the same way," he wrote in SPILSBURY's Coast. "It had become less mysterious, less forbidding, less grand."
Mr. SPILSBURY soon discovered that those in isolated locales wanted not just radios and repairs, but access to his airplane. He got a charter licence, and bought a pair of twin-engine Stranraer flying boats converted into passenger craft, after getting a contract to serve logging companies on the Queen Charlotte Islands.
The ungainly Strannies gave birth to Queen Charlotte Airlines Limited, which took as its slogan, "In the wake of the war canoes." The airline bought so many second-hand aircraft that a separate company was formed to buy and sell equipment. Some said the initials Q.C.A. actually stood for Queer Collection of Aircraft. By June, 1949, only two other companies -- Trans-Canada Airlines and Canadian Pacific -- were flying more revenue miles than Mr. SPILSBURY's accidental airline, which had grown to 300 employees during the postwar boom.
The company replaced the ugly-duckling Strannies with sleek DC-3s, but the airline struggled as Russ Baker of Central British Columbia Airlines, later Pacific Western, lured passengers away. The upstart bought Queen Charlotte Airlines for $1.4-million in July, 1955, by which time Mr. SPILSBURY was a minority shareholder in the airline he had founded. He was out of the airline business just as suddenly as he had gotten into it.
He continued manufacturing communications equipment at a converted warehouse in Vancouver. Spilsbury and Tindall Ltd. was a name known around the globe; their famous SBX-11 portable radio-telephone was used at the North Pole as well as at the summit of Mount Everest.
One is on display at the Canadian Museum of Civilization in Gatineau, Quebec
Some of Mr. SPILSBURY's business ventures displayed his father's touch. He lost an estimated $65,000 trying to sell the two-seat Isetta, a microcar nicknamed "the rolling egg."
In 1981, he sold his radio-manufacturing company, by then known as SPILSBURY Communications Ltd.
His two memoirs were followed by SPILSBURY's Album in 1990, also published by Harbour, which recycled some of the anecdotes of his memoirs with photographs of the coast.
Mr. SPILSBURY was named to the Order of British Columbia in 1993. He was also inducted into the British Columbia Aviation Hall of Fame. An award bearing his name is presented annually by the Coast Guard Auxiliary and the Western Canada Telecommunications Council (which he founded) to the person who contributes the most to marine safety through the use of radio.
Mr. SPILSBURY died of pneumonia at Lions Gate Hospital in North Vancouver on April 20. He leaves three children from his first marriage, which ended in divorce -- daughter Marie LANGTON and sons Ron and Dave SPILSBURY. He also leaves six grandchildren and one great-grandchild. He was predeceased by his second wife, the former Winnifred HOPE.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-06-28 published
DICKIE, William Hamilton Caldow
Born in Renfrew, Scotland September 29th, 1905 - died in Huntsville, Ontario on June 10th, 2003, after a long, happy and productive life. Predeceased by his devoted wife Anna Elizabeth (WHITE/WHYTE.) Survived by his children, Carol, (Michael MOFFAT,) Billy (Janet LAW) and Susan CHANDELIER, grandchildren, Blake and Gregory O'BRIEN (Sandy FORSYTH,) Jonathan and Kirk\Marshall, Christine and Bobby DICKIE, great-grandchildren, Duncan, Charlotte and Eric O'BRIEN. He will be remembered for his distinguished career in industrial and labour relations, his dry (just add scotch) humour, quick wit and great sense of fairness. A celebration of his life will be held August 9th at his home on Lake of Bays where tales will be told and favourite noontime refreshments served. If desired, donations may be made to the Huntsville Hospital Foundation, 354 Muskoka Road 3 North, Huntsville, P1H 1H7.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-07-02 published
INGHAM, Albert
Ab died suddenly on Sunday, June 29, 2003 in his 86th year, on a fine summer day at the family cottage at Lime Lake, a bright and active man. Beloved husband of Anne (KUZ) and father of Paula BUTTERFIELD and husband David, Dyan JONES and partner Randy MARTIN, Thomas INGHAM and daughter-in-law Janet WHITE/WHYTE. His grandchildren Isaiah WALTERS, Rachel WALTERS, Adam BUTTERFIELD, Jonathan BUTTERFIELD and Samuel INGHAM will always cherish their Friendship with him. Survived by his brother Robert INGHAM and brother-in-law Walter KUZ and dear nieces and nephews.
A fine man of jovial spirit, he embodied so much to be admired. May we all live such a full and loving life. Family and Friends will be received at the Ward Funeral Home, 2035 Weston Rd. (north of Lawrence Ave.) Weston, from 6-9 p.m. Thursday. Funeral Service in the Ward Chapel on Friday, July 4, 2003 at 11 a.m. Interment Prospect Cemetery. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, Breast And Gynecology Research Teams, would be appreciated.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-08-15 published
Professor played a role in defeat of SSAINTURENT government
By M.J. STONE Special to The Globe and Mail Friday, August 15, 2003 - Page R5
Nearly four decades after Louis SSAINTURENT had been Prime Minister of Canada, McGill professor James MALLORY was surprised to discover how influential he had been in the defeat of Mr. SSAINTURENT's Liberals in 1957. The revelation occurred in 1992 when the cabinet papers of the SSAINTURENT government, which had been sealed for 35 years, were made available to the public.
Unknown to Professor MALLORY, a radio interview he gave in the wake of the 1957 election had caught the Prime Minister's ear. The Liberals had been reduced to 105 seats in the House, seven fewer than the Conservatives. But the Grits were still in a position to form a minority government with the aid of the 25 elected members of the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, later to become the New Democratic Party.
Mr. SSAINTURENT found himself at a crossroads. While his party was clearly in decline, the Conservatives were on the rise and many questioned whether the Liberals still had a legal mandate to govern. When Mr. SSAINTURENT arrived in cabinet that morning, Prof. MALLORY's radio interview was still ringing in his ears.
Prof. MALLORY, who died in Montreal on June 24, said in the interview that if the Liberals continued to govern it would result in a constitutional crisis. He believed it was the responsibility of John DIEFENBAKER and the Conservatives to form a government. The cabinet papers clearly reflect Prof. MALLORY's influence over the Prime Minister that morning. Mr. SSAINTURENT demanded a copy of the MALLORY interview and after carefully studying the radio transcripts, he handed the rule of government over to the Tories.
Highly regarded as the foremost expert in Canadian legal and federal structures, Prof. MALLORY was often called on to advise governments about constitutional procedures. McGill professor Charles TAILOR/TAYLOR said another good example occurred in 1979.
"Joe CLARK's Conservatives had just lost a parliamentary vote," Prof. TAILOR/TAYLOR recalled. "The governor-general, Ed SCHREYER, telephoned McGill's political science department, looking for Jim. It caused something of a stir when he couldn't be found immediately. SCHREYER was frantic for MALLORY's advice. The governor-general was unsure how to proceed.
"Jim was eventually found and consulted. His advice was that the Conservatives should call an election -- exactly what Joe CLARK did."
The son of a county sheriff, James Russell MALLORY was born on February 5, 1916. He graduated with a Bachelor of Arts from the University of New Brunswick in 1937 and later studied law at Edinburgh and Dalhousie universities.
He met his American-born wife, Frances KELLER, in Scotland, and the couple married in 1940. They had two sons: James and Charles. Prof. MALLORY joined the faculty of the University of Saskatchewan in 1941. Later, he taught at the University of Toronto and Brandon College before moving to McGill in 1946.
A respected scholar and lawyer, Prof. MALLORY was an "old-school" professor who taught at McGill for 45 years. His reputation as a constitutional expert was solidified in 1954 when he published Social Credit and the Federal Power in Canada. The quintessential text mapped out the constitutional parameters of federal/provincial relations.
"James MALLORY was a discreet and modest man," McGill professor Sam NOUMOFF recalled. "He had a profound understanding of morality and he was incapable of self-promotion. He worked on university committee after committee while holding many teaching responsibilities.
"Jim wasn't the sort of man who sought public approval, he just did things because they were the right thing to do."
His son James, who lives in Britain, summed up his father's idealism: "He had a bloody-minded stubbornness. It would manifest sometimes in allowing discussions to go on and on. Then he would do exactly what he intended to do in the first place. Somehow it never impaired his reputation as a genuine democrat."
Prof. MALLORY was the founder of both the Canadian Studies program at McGill and the Canadian Association of University Professors. After retiring in 1982 he was appointed professor emeritus and continued to teach for another 10 years. In 1964, he was elected to the Royal Society of Canada and was later awarded the Queen's Silver Jubilee Medal in 1977.
In 1995, McGill founded the James R. Mallory lecture series, a one-day event that features a special guest who lectures about Canadian issues. Past guests have included Bob RAE, Peter WHITE/WHYTE and Phyllis LAMBERT. The organizers of the event say that this year's lecture will focus on Prof. MALLORY's legacy.
Prof. MALLORY died 11 weeks after the death of his wife on what would have been their 63rd anniversary.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-05 published
WHITE/WHYTE, Clifford Jackson
Born in Banff on September 30, 1929, died peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia on September 2, 2003. Dearly missed by his wife Ann, sons Cliff (Johanne) and Brad (Donna), daughter Tristan (Damian,) step-children Sarah and Tim EBERTS, brothers Don and Peter, and grandchildren Charles, Peter, Katy, Alexandra, and Ginny. Private cremation. Friends are invited to 223 Denison Road, Victoria at 4: 30 p.m., Saturday, September 6, and the Whyte Museum of the Canadian Rockies in Banff, Alberta at 3: 00 p.m. Saturday, September 13. Instead of flowers, please consider a donation to the Canadian Red Cross Foundation (909 Fairfield Road, Victoria, British Columbia V8V 3A3, 800-661-9055) or the British Columbia Cancer Foundation (2410 Lee Avenue, Victoria, British Columbia V8R 6V5, 250-519-5550).

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-09-30 published
ORR, Rosemary Margaret (STINSON) 75 of Fonthill, Ontario died September 27, 2003 at West Lincoln Memorial Hospital, after a long battle with cancer. She is survived by her husband James Campbell ORR and by her children; Catherine E. ORR of Beamsville, James C. ORR and his wife Diane of Toronto, Susan Orr LYNCH of Salem, Massachusetts, Nancy J. THOMAS and her husband Philip of Fonthill. She was pre-deceased by her daughter Jane Orr CRONIN. She also leaves grandchildren; Carlton CRONIN, Katlyn PECK, Lesley ORR, Michael ORR, Elizabeth THOMAS, and Cameron LYNCH; and a sister Jane WHITE/WHYTE of Peterborough. Cremation has taken place. A burial service will be held at St. Andrews Anglican Churchyard in Grimsby at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 1, 2003.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-10-15 published
Global advocate for workers' rights
His activism in Canada spanned three decades, but labour leader also brought his message of education and social justice to Europe, Russia and Latin America
By Allison LAWLOR, Special to The Globe and Mail, Wednesday, October 15, 2003 - Page R7
When Dan BENEDICT set out to work in the machine shop of an aircraft-engine factory in Lynn, Massachusetts., in the 1930s, his goal was to connect with the workers there. For the fresh university graduate, the move was a political statement and the beginning of what would become a lifetime spent advocating for workers' rights, education and greater social justice both in Canada and around the world.
"He was driven by his commitment to justice," said his son, Stephen BENEDICT, who is a member of Canadian Auto Workers Local 112 and director of the Canadian Labour Congress's international department. "He was almost single-minded about that. It was almost the only thing he cared about."
Last month at a Labour Day event in Ottawa, Daniel BENEDICT, a retired Canadian Auto Workers staff representative, was honoured for his pioneering efforts in the labour movement. That day he continued his advocacy work by giving an impassioned speech about future generations.
Afterward, a group of kids gathered around, eager to teach him the latest cool handshakes, Stephen BENEDICT said. "He was always more interested in talking about the future than the past," he said. "He would want to be remembered as someone who cared about the future."
On September 16, just four days before his 86th birthday, the outspoken advocate died in an Ottawa hospital. He had been diagnosed with both colon and liver cancer.
Mr. BENEDICT's lifelong work was recognized in October, 1998, when he was appointed a Member of the Order of Canada. Part of his citation reads: "He has devoted a lifetime to the labour movement. He has advised prominent international trade-union leaders in Canada, the United States and Europe, and represented labour on various panels and commissions sponsored by the United Nations' International Labour Organization."
But for the Canadian Auto Workers, his crowning achievement was the Paid Education Leave Program, which he developed and implemented in the late 1970s. (The union was then the United Auto Workers-Canada). The program is still considered the largest adult-education program for working people in Canada, according to the Canadian Auto Workers, and one that is admired by trade unions worldwide.
The program, which now offers courses one-to-four weeks in duration and covering topics such as collective bargaining, human rights and workplace reorganization, highlighted Mr. BENEDICT's belief that education is needed to allow workers to build skills that would then help them to create a more just society.
"He had an incredible respect for workers' intellect," said Bob WHITE/WHYTE, former president of the Canadian Auto Workers and the Canadian Labour Congress. "He was a great educationalist."
Born on September 20, 1917, in New York, Daniel BENEDICT was the only child of Blanche BENEDICT and Joseph KAISER, who worked as a salesman. Not long after he was born, his mother died of the Spanish flu and he was left to be raised largely by his grandmother (and he later took his mother's maiden name).
By the age of 14 he had enrolled in university, and later joked that his grandmother had sent him there while he was still in short pants. While in university, Mr. BENEDICT's social activism was awakened, and after graduation he went off to work in a Massachusetts factory that produced military aircraft engines.
On the plant floor, he was vocal and rallied for workers' rights. But when the war broke out, he left the factory and enlisted in the U.S. Air Force. He was sent overseas as a flight engineer and spent much of his four years of military service in Europe. It was on the Mediterranean island of Corsica at a ball held for the liberating troops that Mr. BENEDICT met his future wife, Micheline. In 1947, the couple married in Corsica, despite the pleadings of her father, who didn't want his daughter near any Americans.
Following the war, Mr. BENEDICT returned to Europe after being decommissioned, and spent four years working with Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc., the international humanitarian organization, helping Europeans recover from the devastating effects of the war.
He returned to the United States to work with labour leader Walter REUTHER at the Congress of Industrial Organizations, and then worked in Mexico with the regional organization of the International Confederation of Free Trade Unions.
Mr. BENEDICT's career also took him to Brazil, where he worked for the International Metalworkers Federation, covering Latin America. He took part in worker education in the region and instructed union leaders on industrial relations. During the 1950s and 1960s, he also helped local unions devise strategies to deal with repressive military regimes in their countries.
Mr. White said.
He later became assistant general secretary of the International Metalworkers' Federation, and moved his family to Geneva, where he became a familiar figure as a labour representative on various panels and commissions sponsored by the United Nations' International Labour Organization.
"Dan was an outstanding international trade unionist," who was held in high regard both at home and around the world, Mr. WHITE/WHYTE said.
In the late 1970s, Dan BENEDICT moved to Canada and joined what was then the United Auto Workers-Canada, the forerunner to the Canadian Auto Workers. He soon became a Canadian citizen, and was a passionate defender of the country.
A love of linguistics and a desire to communicate with others translated into Mr. BENEDICT learning nearly a dozen languages, including French, Spanish and German, as well as some Finnish and Hungarian. Most recently, he was learning Russian and Mongolian.
After the fall of the Soviet Union, Mr. BENEDICT travelled to Russia, Belarus and Ukraine to help build independent trade unions. He had also been in Mongolia working with a union representing sheep herders.
A BENEDICT family story traces Mr. BENEDICT's gift for languages back to his childhood bout of jaundice. At the time, he wasn't allowed to read because he was told it would weaken his eyes so instead he was left to entertain himself with a stamp collection. Among his collection were some Russian stamps with which he taught himself the Cyrillic alphabet.
After retiring from the United Auto Workers-Canada in 1982, Mr. BENEDICT continued to travel the world and teach wherever the opportunity arose. Having earned a doctoral degree in economics from France's Grenoble University, he taught for a time in the sociology and political-science departments at York University in Toronto, and was affiliated with the industrial-relations departments at McMaster, Laval and Concordia universities.
As a senior citizen, he advocated for seniors' groups on a wide range of issues, from soaring drug costs to nursing-care cutbacks, and served as chair of the Ontario Coalition of Senior Citizens' Organizations. He frequently spoke at rallies and conferences and could often be found at peace marches or protests.
"He had a tremendous amount of energy," said Morris JESION, the coalition's executive director.
While in his early 80s, Mr. BENEDICT was still working on a history of auto workers in Canada. The endeavour resulted in reams of research material and a 3,000-page manuscript. The wealth of material is tucked away in stacks of boxes in the garage of his Ottawa home.
Mr. BENEDICT leaves his wife, Micheline, their two daughters, Marie-Blanche and Francesca, son Stephen and four grandchildren.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-08 published
'There are too many ruined boys'
By Erin ANDERSSEN, Saturday, November 8, 2003 - Page F6
Parry Sound, Ontario -- Clara WHITE/WHYTE began her voyage into war by losing her purse on the way to the train. It was September 15, 1915. Her diary names it "a bright sunshiny day" and notes the crowd's "rousing send off." The soldiers and nurses, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE among them, left Toronto for a Montreal military ship and a voyage, beyond Wales and icebergs, to a continent of falling bombs and death.
She landed in London first, with time on her hands, as she wrote in her red, leather-bound diary, to shop, sip tea and tour the galleries.
Clara WHITE/WHYTE was not one to sit idly by. At times, her account of the First World War -- enlivened by daily weather reports, notes on the cost of things (60 cents then for a pie) and the "peculiar" fashion of the day -- reads more like a Grand Tour than a Great War. She wanders the Zoological Gardens in London, dines at the Grand Hotel du Louvre in Boulogne and climbs the 1,224 steps of the cathedral in Rouen, making it to the top even when "the other girls gave up the ascent."
Nursing the sick and wounded in camps at Rouen and Solonika, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE surely would have seen the cost of war, but her diary focuses instead on the bits of life she could find in the midst of it.
"There are," she writes in one letter home, "too many ruined boys around now." But she barely details in her diary what has ruined them. She tells in spare sentences of working in the German measles tent or waiting for the typhoid patients to arrive; she makes antiseptic note of bombs overhead. Two stitches in her own cheek merit a single line and no explanation.
Maybe you didn't talk of such things then, her great-niece, Phyllis GERHART, speculated. And perhaps this is what Ms. WHITE/WHYTE wanted to remember: the cherry-strawberry supper in her tent on Dominion Day, "the boys" caroling on Christmas Eve, tea with the other nurses to plan for a "grand masquerade to celebrate the closing of 1915" -- even as bombs fell nearby, injuring some men and killing a shepherd and six sheep.
Her descendants don't know much about her, beyond the small diary. It sat for decades in a dresser drawer in the bedroom of her niece, Laura BAKER, and was eventually passed to her daughter, Ms. GERHART, who lives now in Parry Sound.
Ms. WHITE/WHYTE's mother is believed to have died when she was young, and her father to have been connected to the silk trade. The family lived in Toronto, near the Danforth, and Clara and her sister, Alice, were raised in a proper, middle-class Victorian household.
The sisters were close, but took separate paths: Alice helped at home and eventually married and had a family, while Clara escaped to school and nursing.
On April 7, 1915, she volunteered to go to war. According to military records at the National Archives, she was 41. She was paid $50 a month.
In a faded picture from that time, Ms. WHITE/WHYTE stares back with a half-smile, standing near woods in her nurse's uniform, the belt cinched tight around her thin waist, dark bangs poking out beneath her veil.
The impression left by her diary is of an energetic woman, keen for an adventure. At the masquerade party on New Year's Eve, 1915, she reports that she took first prize, dressed as John Bull (the British version of Uncle Sam). She makes note of having a hearty laugh at the sight of a Frenchman hoisting his wife up on a cart by her backside.
Many of her days were spent walking into the village to do laundry, and writing letters; at home, they received postcards, rose bulbs and a box of soldier's buttons. She took pictures too, touristy shots collected into an old album her relatives still own, of the ship that took her across the ocean, of the camp in France and of the scenery.
In one picture, she is sitting on stone steps, the only woman with a dozen soldiers. One of her wartime possessions was a bullet with a cross carved into its tip. The story behind it has been lost, though Ms. GERHART likes to imagine it was a gift from a grateful patient.
Ms. WHITE/WHYTE's last entry is dated May 8, 1916. But the military records say she was still in Europe in 1918, when she contracted influenza. She didn't sail home until the summer of 1919. A year later, with the war over, she was discharged from service. She never married.
Her fate is the subject of some confusion: Ms. GERHART had always understood that her great aunt died of influenza, after contracting the illness while nursing patients. But a handwritten note on one of the folders in the archives says she passed away in 1930. The diary of an independent woman, spirited in the midst of hardship, is the only trace she left behind.
Erin ANDERSSEN is a reporter in The Globe and Mail's Ottawa bureau.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-11 published
HERGERT, Raymond Henry
Died peacefully in Toronto, on Sunday, November 2, 2003 in his 93rd year. Raymond was the only child of the late L. K. HERGERT and Emily Victoria THOM. He graduated from Upper Canada College and joined his father in business at Hunts Limited. He retired as Vice-President of Canadian Food Products. Raymond and his loving wife, Janet WINNIFRED, enjoyed happy years of retirement at Lake Nipissing. He leaves his treasured daughters, Sally WHITE/WHYTE and Wendy KASTA, and his dear son-in-law, Peter WHITE/WHYTE. His beloved grandchildren, Paul and Tim KASTA, David WHITE/WHYTE and his wife Mary Jane YULE, Nancy WHITE/WHYTE and her husband Mark BADALI, and Steven WHITE/WHYTE, share wonderful memories of Poppa. He was the adored great-grandfather of Amanda WARD, Thomas WHITE/WHYTE, Alex and John Henry BADALI, and Matthew and Carly WHITE/WHYTE. A private family service was held with interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-11-20 published
CADOGAN, Elda Magill (née MAGILL)
of Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home, Miramichi, New Brunswick, a journalist, poet, playwright and short story writer, died Tuesday, November 18, 2003, at 7: 47 a.m. at the age of 86. As a playwright, she was best known for her one-act-play, Rise and Shine, which has the distinction of being one of the most frequently-performed Canadian plays ever written. It has been performed in every province in Canada, in 47 states in the U.S., and in England, Ireland, Australia and South Africa. A German translation was Canada's representation in a worldwide cultural exchange in Bonn, Germay.
In 1992, the University of Guelph added the Elda Magill Cadogan Collection to its extensive theatre archives. The collection included correspondence, manuscripts, printed editions, advertisements, review and programs related to the play. In 1993, the university obtained her voluminous collection of memorabilia on the Stratford Festival She attended the theatre's premier performance in 1953 and took a special interest in the organization after moving to Strfatford in 1985. Born December 17, 1916 at Mount Forest, Ontario, she was the only daughter of Robert, a lay minister at Conn, and Katherine Herron MAGILL. She grew up in Woodstock, where her writing was first published - a story and poem in the Woodstock Sentinel Review - when she was 8. She graduated from Woodstock Collegiate Institute, where she was valedictorian for her class and, after completing a business course, was employed at the Woodstock Sentinel Review. In 1939, she married George CADOGAN, of Woodstock.
The couple later purchased newpapers in Durham, Ontario, Pictou, Nova Scotia and Oromocto and Newcastle, New Brunswick. George CADOGAN died in February, 1996. Mrs CADOGAN won several awards for her newspaper articles and she and her husband were the first husband and wife team to be named honourary life members of both the Atlantic and the Canadian Community Newspaper Associations. While in Stratford, Mrs. CADOGAN was an honourary member of the Writers Club of Stratford and a member of the Canadian Authors Association, the Noon Book Club and the Good Book Club. She was a member of Saint John's United Church, Stratford. She was also a contributor to The Beacon Herald for several years. In September, 1999, she moved to a retirement residence in Frederiction, New Brunswick, where she could be closer to some of her family members, and recently moved again, to Mount Saint Joseph Nursing Home in Miramichi.
An animal lover, Mrs. CADOGAN usually had at least one cat in her life, and once a dog as well.
She is survived by two sons, David (Michelle), of Miramichi, New Brunswick, and Michael, of Scarborough; daughter Katherine HILDER (Stephen,) of Prince George, British Columbia, and Elizabeth Jean MORGAN (Dan,) of Fredericton, New Brunswick. Also surviving are six grandchildren, Joanne (Allen IRVING) and Colin CADOGAN, Craig CADOGAN and Sheryl UDEH (Obi) and Kristin and Leslie HILDER, and one great grandchild, Benjamin UDEH. In addition to her husband, she was predeceased by four brothers, Max, Rex, Weston and Robert, and a daughter-in-law, Susan (YOUNG) CADOGAN. Friends will be received and the Stratford, Ontario W.G. Young Funeral Home for visitation Friday evening November 21st from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and for the funeral service Saturday morning, November 22nd at 11: 00 a.m. Reverend Greg WHITE/WHYTE of Saint John's United Church will officiate.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-10 published
Roger William McCOMBE
By Carole L. WHITE/WHYTE, Gloria McCOMBE Wednesday, December 10, 2003 - Page A28
Husband, father, educator, police chaplain. Born July 12, 1943, in Lindsay, Ontario Died September 15 in Woodstock, Ontario, of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, aged 60.
I first met Roger when he was 29 and I was in his Grade 10 classes at Espanola High. This was years before he would be awarded status of master teacher from the Thames Valley District School Board, but he was already a brilliant teacher. Roger held a degree in classics and one in theology from the University of Toronto and he was born to play the role of Greek philosopher. The classroom was his stage and he liked to remind us often that the Greeks had been there, done that and figured it all out for us. His very first students in Lindsay remember hilarious chariot races, his students in Espanola remember his Greek soldier costume, and his students in Ingersoll remember Roger every year when an award in his name is given to honour the student who best learned to think with both head and heart.
But I remember how he taught his classes. He never lectured, he understood instinctively that a teacher leads and that learning is a process. He most often started his class with a question. In Latin we translated the works of great men and women of antiquity and then we discussed what they thought, even if it meant applying our teenage logic to television reruns. He challenged us to examine our beliefs and to question rigid dogma. He couldn't have chosen a better audience than high-school teenagers -- already so set in their ways -- and he knew it. He pretended to be naive and incredulous to draw out our thoughts and to challenge us to organize these thoughts into a personal philosophy. To be in one of Roger's classes was like sitting at the feet of Plato, Aristotle or Socrates.
Ordained an Anglican minister, Roger was never without a pulpit in any number of churches of all denominations. He was most happy at Central United Church in Woodstock where he was named honorary associate minister. As his reputation in the Woodstock area grew, he was invited to speak to countless (and varied) organizations culminating with hospice and bereavement groups. For many years he reached others in articles he wrote for local newspapers. He had been called to deliver a message and his message was simply to make a masterpiece of each and every day.
At first I laughed when he told me he was also wearing the hat of police chaplain but then I remembered (without his help) that the Greeks had invented laws. He saw a need and cared for (and delivered his famous hugs to) victims, the police and their families through bad times. His favourite aphorism: "I can complain the rosebush has thorns or I can rejoice that the thornbush has roses" might sound simple, but Roger saw life from every perspective.
Roger guided many of his former students and Friends through marriages, births and deaths. I last saw Roger in January when he came to minister at the funeral of a family member. It was good to hear again his profound faith and his belief that we should be happy with "enough" in our lives. Despite fatigue from his illness, Roger was still laughing, his eyes still twinkled and he was still charmed by life no matter how simple or complicated. Privately, he talked of the sacrifices his wife Gloria and sons Warren and Ryan had made in order that he might carry on a very busy and public life. In the obituary he penned for himself, he challenged us to enable others to have great moments so that we would be blessed with great moments of our own. I believe Roger was and is very blessed.
Carole was a student and friend and wrote this with help from Roger's wife, Gloria McCOMBE.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2003-12-23 published
CLARK, George T. B.
Died peacefully with his family by his side at the Cambridge Memorial Hospital on Saturday, December 20, 2003 in his 81st year. George CLARK of Cambridge is the beloved husband of Susanne CLARK; dear father of Graham and his wife Leslie of Oakville loved grandfather of Colin and Kendal. He was predeceased by one brother William and one sister Elsie WHITE/WHYTE. Mr. CLARK was an Engineer at Diamond Canapower where he retired as Vice President. The family will receive Friends at T. Little Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 223 Main St. E., Cambridge (www.funeralscanada.com) on Saturday, December 27, 2003 from 2-4 p.m. The family wish to thank the Doctors and staff of Cambridge Memorial Hospital for their care and compassion. As expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the Cambridge Memorial Hospital Foundation.

  W... Names     WH... Names     WHI... Names     Welcome Home

WHITE/WHYTE - All Categories in OGSPI

WHI surnames continued to 03whi002.htm