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"VAL" 2008 Obituary


VALED  VALENTA  VALENTI  VALENTIC  VALENTICH  VALENTIN  VALENTINUZZI  VALERIOTE  VALILA  VALIQUETTE  VALLANCE  VALLBACKA  VALLEAU  VALLEE  VALLELY  VALLERY  VALLIERES  VALMORK  VALPY 

VALED o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-16 published
IRVINE, Mary Elizabeth (CAMPBELL) (formerly ANDERSON)
Of Fingal passed away on Saturday, June 14, 2008 at the Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Clifford ANDERSON (1957) and the late Wray IRVINE (1994.) Dearly loved mother of Doreen and Ray C. LUNN of Fingal, Ellen and Brad LUELO of Kitchener. Also fondly remembered by her grandchildren Michelle (David), John (Teresa), Scott (Jen), Jacque (Dan), Jeff, Lisa (Paul), Tara (Mark), Troy and her 11 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of David and the late Charlotte CAMPBELL of London and the late Bill and Muriel CAMPBELL. Also survived by her sisters-in-law Grace OKE, Margaret VALED and Muriel IRVINE and by several nieces and nephews and their families. Mary was born August 1, 1919 in Dunwich Township, she was a session elder and member of the church Womens Missionary Society at Knox Presbyterian Church, Fingal and a charter member of Golden Acres #305 O.E.S., Fingal. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Arn Funeral Home, 193 Shackleton St. Dutton on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, June 18 at 11: 00 a.m. Rev. Jim REDPATH officiating. Interment in Cowal-McBride Cemetery. Donations to Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated. Golden Acres #305 O.E.S. will hold a memorial service on Tuesday at 6: 45 p.m. E-mail condolences arnfuneralhome2@bellnet.ca

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VALENTA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-23 published
VALENTA, Irene Dorothy
Of London, passed away on Wednesday, May 21, 2008, at her late residence, in her 83rd year. Wife of Frank VALENTA and mother of the late John Charles VALENTA. Loved grandmother of Randy Natasa VALENTA. Dear sister of Gordon McMILLAN of London. Predeceased by a sister Isibelle SEAGRIST. Irene worked at Toronto Sick Children's Hospital. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Monday at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow, with interment of ashes in Woodstock Cemetery with her son John. Visitation Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to Children's Hospital of Western Ontario (Neo-Natal Unit).

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VALENTA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-26 published
COLLETT, Madelyn Mave
February 10-April 23, 2008
Beloved and cherished daughter of Eva VALENTA and John COLLETT in her parents' arms. Remembered with great love by grandparents Eva and Jiri VALENTA, Blaire Swanson COLLETT and Ronald William COLLETT, great-grandmother Hilda COLLETT, Eva's sister, Andrea VALENTA, John's sister, Christie Collett DARVILLE (George,) great-aunt, Barbara Collett SHUMELEY (Avi,) great-uncle Kenneth SWANSON (Bev,) cousins, family here and in the Czech Republic and importantly, John and Eva's legion of devoted Friends. Profound admiration and appreciation is expressed by John and Eva to the Nurses, Doctors and support staff in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at The Montreal Children's Hospital. In lieu of flowers, for those who wish, contributions may be made to the Madelyn Mave Collett Fund at the Montreal Children's Hospital Foundation, 1 Place Alexis Nihon, 1420-3400 de Maisonneuve Blvd. West, Montreal, Québec H3Z 3B8 (514) 934-4846. Service celebrating the brief but inspiring life of Madelyn Mave to be held Saturday, April 26 at 11: 00 a.m. at Mount Royal Funeral Complex 1297, chemin de la Forêt, Outremont, Quebec, 514-279-6540.

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VALENTI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-10 published
ALVARO, Donald
Peacefully at London Health Sciences Centre, University Hospital on Wednesday, April 9, 2008, Donald ALVARO in his 94th year. Dear husband of the late Dena (VALENTI) ALVARO. Loving father of Diane CAMERON and Don Jr. and his wife Sue. Proud grandfather of Frank CAMERON and Jackie BOWES, Amanda ALVARO and Tony LACAVERA, B.J. ALVARO and Lindsay ALVARO. Dear brother of Sam (Marie,) Jimmy (Piovena), Carm McNEA, Rose BRADEN, Polly FRANK, Pat (Jack) DECANDIDO and Bill and brother-in-law of Emma Schults. Predeceased by his four sisters Mary Dolphin, Catherine 'Grace' SPRUCE, Margarite ALVARO and Angelina 'Ann' BARFETT. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass at Saint_Justin's Church, 855 Jalna Blvd. on Friday morning at 11: 30 o'clock. Entombment in Holy Family Mausoleum, Saint Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Thursday evening at 8: 30 o'clock. In lieu of flowers donations to a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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VALENTIC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-12 published
DROZDIBOB, Mary (née Mara VALENTIC)
Wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, inspiring person. Born May 8, 1906, in Slunjska Selnica, Croatia. Died March 24 in Oshawa, Ontario, of old age, aged 101.
By Mary VALENTICH, Page L10
Mary was an enterprising person. She was also a friend, adviser and critic. Made of stern stuff, she didn't rest until a job was done. She spoke her mind with clarity and wry humour.
She was born Mara VALENTIC near Karlovac, Croatia. In 1924, she married Louis DROZDIBOB, and the next year gave birth to Joseph.
Louis left for Canada in 1928. After five years of hard times, Mara lost the family home. She lived with her husband's family as a semi-abandoned wife for another 7½ years, earning her keep by doing the chores.
She explored enrolling her son in the priesthood so he could have a profession. With a cousin she travelled barefoot over the fields to Zagreb, 40 kilometres away, but the priest treated them badly, and that was enough for Mara.
The long-awaited letter of invitation from Louis finally came. In 1940, Mara and her son reached Hamilton. On the train platform Mara saw an older man whom she did not recognize. It was not an easy transition, but Mary, as she became known in Canada, could "give as good as she got."
Renting and taking in boarders, Mary discovered life in Canada was mostly a hell of slavery in the early years, involving washing men's dirty working clothes by hand, pressing them with irons heated on stoves, cleaning rooms and spittoons, and preparing lunchboxes and meals.
Mary and Louis purchased their first house for $2,500 and sold it for $3,700. Their next house had rooms upstairs for boarders and a small business out front where Mary could sell food and cigarettes.
Their son, Walter, was born in 1941. By 1946, sleeping about four to five hours a night, Mary was worn out. The next year, Louis bought a resort on Rice Lake, Ontario For four years they lived a "crazy life," isolated in winter and in summer sometimes playing host to 20 guests at once.
In 1951, Louis got a job in Oshawa, where Mary operated a store and then a restaurant. There were also driving holidays through the United States to visit their son Joe and other relatives. Mary shrugged off their success: "Just work and don't give up." After eight years of serving food, they finally retired. Regrettably, Louis died in 1987.
In the 1990s, Mary lived in an apartment, walking up and down flights of stairs for exercise. Later, when wheelchair-bound, she insisted on pulling herself in and out of bed. At 100, she was participating in the mayor's town hall meeting.
She's gone but may still be watching over things. She used to stand guard beside her old washing machine that she admitted using until the 1990s. Like her reliable old wringer, Mary just kept going.
Mary VALENTICH is Mary's cousin.

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VALENTICH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-12 published
DROZDIBOB, Mary (née Mara VALENTIC)
Wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, inspiring person. Born May 8, 1906, in Slunjska Selnica, Croatia. Died March 24 in Oshawa, Ontario, of old age, aged 101.
By Mary VALENTICH, Page L10
Mary was an enterprising person. She was also a friend, adviser and critic. Made of stern stuff, she didn't rest until a job was done. She spoke her mind with clarity and wry humour.
She was born Mara VALENTIC near Karlovac, Croatia. In 1924, she married Louis DROZDIBOB, and the next year gave birth to Joseph.
Louis left for Canada in 1928. After five years of hard times, Mara lost the family home. She lived with her husband's family as a semi-abandoned wife for another 7½ years, earning her keep by doing the chores.
She explored enrolling her son in the priesthood so he could have a profession. With a cousin she travelled barefoot over the fields to Zagreb, 40 kilometres away, but the priest treated them badly, and that was enough for Mara.
The long-awaited letter of invitation from Louis finally came. In 1940, Mara and her son reached Hamilton. On the train platform Mara saw an older man whom she did not recognize. It was not an easy transition, but Mary, as she became known in Canada, could "give as good as she got."
Renting and taking in boarders, Mary discovered life in Canada was mostly a hell of slavery in the early years, involving washing men's dirty working clothes by hand, pressing them with irons heated on stoves, cleaning rooms and spittoons, and preparing lunchboxes and meals.
Mary and Louis purchased their first house for $2,500 and sold it for $3,700. Their next house had rooms upstairs for boarders and a small business out front where Mary could sell food and cigarettes.
Their son, Walter, was born in 1941. By 1946, sleeping about four to five hours a night, Mary was worn out. The next year, Louis bought a resort on Rice Lake, Ontario For four years they lived a "crazy life," isolated in winter and in summer sometimes playing host to 20 guests at once.
In 1951, Louis got a job in Oshawa, where Mary operated a store and then a restaurant. There were also driving holidays through the United States to visit their son Joe and other relatives. Mary shrugged off their success: "Just work and don't give up." After eight years of serving food, they finally retired. Regrettably, Louis died in 1987.
In the 1990s, Mary lived in an apartment, walking up and down flights of stairs for exercise. Later, when wheelchair-bound, she insisted on pulling herself in and out of bed. At 100, she was participating in the mayor's town hall meeting.
She's gone but may still be watching over things. She used to stand guard beside her old washing machine that she admitted using until the 1990s. Like her reliable old wringer, Mary just kept going.
Mary VALENTICH is Mary's cousin.

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VALENTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-23 published
MEDEIROS, Dinis Cabral
Peacefully, at home, Dinis Cabral MEDEIROS at the age of 69 years, surrounded by his beloved wife of 39 years, Natalia, and his children: Luis MEDEIROS (Catherine,) Fatima DI VALENTIN (Robert,) Paul MEDEIROS (Michelle,) Belinha JAMIESON (Jeremy) and John MEDEIROS (Mandy.) Also greatly loved by his 14 grandchildren: Desire MEDEIROS, Alissa MEDEIROS, Chelsey MEDEIROS, Caleb MEDEIROS, Samuel MEDEIROS, Gabriella DI VALENTIN, Jackson MEDEIROS, Xavier JAMIESON, Matthew DI VALENTIN, Faith JAMIESON, Jordan MEDEIROS, Alex MEDEIROS, Isaac MEDEIROS and baby MEDEIROS. Predeceased by his parents Manuel and Gloria MEDEIROS and his brother Manuel MEDEIROS. Visitors will be received in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William Street on Wednesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated in Holy Cross Church (Elm Street at Hamilton Road) on Thursday at 11: 00 a.m. Entombment Saint Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Wednesday at 7: 30 p.m.

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VALENTINUZZI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-10 published
VALENTINUZZI, Adela Christina
Peacefully surrounded by her family at her daughter's home in Brantford on Thursday, March 6, 2008. Beloved wife of Celio for 49 years; cherished mother of Delizia TAILOR/TAYLOR, Dean, Celina VALENTINUZZI (Reg;) loved grandma of Joel (Heather) and Alycia TAILOR/TAYLOR and great-granddaughter Nicole Kristine Careswell TAILOR/TAYLOR; dear sister of Janice COX; loving aunt of Jason (Heather,) Mark (Jill) and great-aunt to Beatrix and Matthew. Friends will be received at the Dennis Toll Funeral Home, 55 Charing Cross Street, Brantford on Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service in the chapel on Tuesday at 1 p.m. Interment Holy Cross Cemetery. Donations to the ALS Society of Ontario appreciated. www.dennistoll.ca

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VALERIOTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-23 published
ELLIS, Doctor William Bateman
Passed away peacefully at his home in Elora, with his family at his side, on February 22, 2008 in his 70th year. Bill will be greatly missed by the family he treasured, his devoted wife Patricia Marie (VALERIOTE,) his daughter Sarah and his son Benjamin (Erin). Fondly remembered by his brothers Roger (Margaret) of Burlington, David (Mel) of Moonstone and his extended family and Friends. "We will always love you to heaven and beyond". Memorial Service will be celebrated at Saint_John the Evangelist Anglican Church, at the corner of Smith and Henderson Streets in Elora, on Tuesday, February 26th 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Reception to follow. Memorial donations can be directed to the Saint_John's Church Choir Fund, cards available at the Church on the day of the Service.
www.grahamgiddyfh.com

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VALERIOTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-12 published
CARERE, Delina (née SCARFONE)
Passed away on July 10, 2008 after a brief illness in her 96th year. She was the loving spouse of the late Carl CARERE, retired Belle River High School teacher. Delina was a beloved mother and grandmother, and accomplished artist and seamstress. She received her Honours Degree in Fine Arts and Italian at the University of Windsor, graduating with distinction. Delina was endlessly nurturing and totally dedicated to her family. She will be profoundly missed by her children, Annemarie, George (Gianna) and Vincent (Susan) and her adored grandchildren Jaime and Carli McCLELLAN, Michael, Nicholas (Julie) Joseph, Alison, Angela and Amy CARERE She is survived by her siblings Delia AREL, Joseph, Frank, and Santo SCARFONE and her sisters-in-law, Margaret, Sally, Ann and Patricia. She has been welcomed into the afterlife by her dearest Carl, her parents Vincenza and Rocco SCARFONE, her siblings Mela and Tony and her in-laws; Mary and Mico VALERIOTE, Annie CREMASCO, Nino GERACE, Orville AREL and Joan SCARFONE. Visitation will be at Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick St. Kitchener, Ontario. Saturday July 12th from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. and Sunday July 13th from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m., with prayers at 8 p.m. on Sunday. The Funeral Mass will take place at St. Louis Catholic Church Monday July 14th at 1 p.m. The family asks that any donations in memory of Delina be made to the Canadian Cancer Society and Saint Mary's Cardiac Care Unit. Visit www.henrywalser.com for Delina's memorial and details on charitable donations.

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VALILA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-06 published
CHANTLER, Sinikka (VALILA)
Of Port Stanley, passed away on Monday, May 5th, 2008, at the London Health Sciences Centre (Victoria Campus), peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, in her 60th year. Dearly loved wife of Robert Law CHANTLER and loved mother of Michael Valila WHITE/WHYTE of Port Stanley. Loved daughter of Siiri VALILA of Thunder Bay and the late Eino VALILA. Dear step-mother of Sarah (CHANTLER) and her husband Mark BAUGHMAN and Ian and his wife Jennifer CHANTLER, all of Saint Thomas. Dear sister of Kenneth VALILA and Sharon VALILA, both of Thunder Bay. Loved grandmother of Andrew, Ryan and Bradley. Dear aunt of Tammy and her husband Al HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, Scott VALILA, Troy HARRIS and Kyle HARRIS, all of Thunder Bay. Fondly remembered step-mother of Tim and his wife Anne WHITE/WHYTE of Strathroy, Andrew and his wife Simone WHITE/WHYTE of Scarborough, Karen WHITE/WHYTE of Port Stanley, Barb and her husband Scott HOSKINS of Port Stanley and their father David WHITE/WHYTE. Sinikka was born in Finland on June 1st, 1948. She was a retired teacher with the Thames Valley District School Board. She was a member of the Teacher Federation. Sinikka taught Yoga at the Family "Y" until she took ill. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where a service to celebrate Sinikka's life will by held Friday at 1: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow. Visitation Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Flowers gratefully declined. Remembrances would be appreciated to the L.H.S.C. (Cancer Program for Ovarian Cancer Research). The Canadian Liver Foundation or the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital Foundation.

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VALIQUETTE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-07 published
McLAY, Peter
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Thursday, March 06, 2008. Peter McLAY of Aylmer in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of Carol (BOUGHNER) McLAY. Step-father of Lynne PACHOLOK and husband Bohdan of Port Moody, British Columbia, Dick WHITE/WHYTE and wife Lynne of Iroquois Falls, Sally HARE and husband Tom of Burlington and Geoff WHITE/WHYTE and wife Jennifer of Maple Ridge, British Columbia. Grandfather of Conner, Logan, Zachary, Andrew, Anastasia, Josh and Mackenzie. Brother of Ian McLAY and his wife Susan of Bracebridge. Uncle of Tom McLAY and wife Irene, David McLAY and wife Andrea, and Kathleen McLAY. Brother-in-law of Barb VALIQUETTE and husband Paul and Marilyn SWEETMAN and husband Roger. Born in Aylmer, Ontario on July 3, 1925 son of the late Doctor Homer and Kathleen (LASHBROOK) McLAY. Peter was a lifelong resident of Aylmer. He operated McLay's Jewellery Store and sold real estate. He was a member of the Historic Automobile Society. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Saturday 7-9 p.m. and Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Monday March 10, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Aylmer Cemetery. Rev. Adele MILES, officiating. Donations to the Aylmer Museum or Trinity Anglican Church would be appreciated. Personal condolences can be made at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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VALLANCE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-03-07 published
CHALMERS, Donavon Miller
(February 4, 1921-March 5, 2008)
World War II Veteran
Don CHALMERS, husband for over 64 years of P. Jill CHALMERS (nee STINTON,) his war-bride from London, England. Father of Stephen Reagh CHALMERS and his wife Judy of Owen Sound, Margo BLANCHE and her husband Peter NEUWELT of Barrie and Lesley Anne CHALMERS and her partner Colleen ANDERSON of Toronto. Very beloved Grandpa of Mark BAZANT and his wife Angie of Australia, the parents of his first Great-grandchild Liam, and of Michael BAZANT and his partner Genvieve of Ottawa. Predeceased by his parents David and Eva (REAGH) CHALMERS, sisters Vivien McMINN, Vera VALLANCE and brother Dave of Grand Coulee, Saskatchewan. He also lives on through his niece and nephew and their families Patsy Ann Reagh McMINN of Saint Thomas and Clarence VALLANCE of Ottawa. Don was born and raised in Grand Coulee, Saskatchewan, where his predecessors were among the first settlers of Saskatchewan, and also the founders of Confederation with his maternal great uncle - Sir Charles Tupper. He signed up for World War 2 in 1939 and was shipped overseas to England where he was promoted to Sandhurst College for Officer Training. After serving in England, Holland and Italy in World War 2 with the Canadian Army Medical Corp. and then the Armoured Tank Corp., Dad brought his war bride back home and settled in London, Ontario where he completed his Batchelor's Degree at the University of Western Ontario. He went on to a long and successful career with Wyeth Canada, where he set records for sales in Southwestern Ontario. His friendly nature and humour brought him many life long Friends and acquaintances throughout the Southwestern Ontario region. In the early fifties, Don and Jill settled in Owen Sound, where they raised their 3 children. He was proud of his long relationship with the Grey and Simcoe Foresters, Knox United Church, and the infamous Friday Night Bridge Club. We shall miss his western humor and his true love of people. Thanks you to Knox United Church, the Toronto Dominion Bank and especially Summit Place where he received exceptional care and compassion. We'd also like to make known our special appreciation to Big Boots Barry, his bridge partner and Border Collie when he needed it the most. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Saturday March 8, 2008 from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. A funeral service will be held at the funeral home on Saturday at 5 p.m. Members of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 6 are requested to attend a memorial Service at the funeral home on Saturday March 8 at 2: 45 p.m. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. Rev. Ralph SCHMIDT officiating. Memorial donations may be directed to the Alzheimer's Society of Grey Bruce, charity of your choice, or simply plant a rose in his honour. He loved his roses. Rest easy Dad. And in your famous words - Ya done good kid!

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VALLANCE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-21 published
JONES, Lavern Louis
At Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre, Owen Sound, on Friday April 18, 2008. Lavern Louis JONES of Southampton in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Mary Watson (Molly) JONES (née VALLANCE.) Dear father of Kenneth Watson JONES and his fiancée Susan TOLTON and Mary Annette SPAHR, both of Southampton. Sadly missed by his grandchildren, Mary Ellen and her husband Billy STRICKLAND of Texas, Carol Ann JONES of Wilberforce, David and his wife Catherine of Whitby, Matthew CASLER of Stratford, Angela CASLER and her fiancé Jason LAW of Hamilton, Jake SPAHR of Southampton and by his great-grandchildren, Crystal Ann Marie JONES, Garret Watson JONES, and Hunter STRICKLAND. At Lavern's request there will be no Visitation nor Funeral Services. Cremation. A Service for the Interment of Ashes will be conducted at Southampton Cemetery on May 10th 2008 at 11 a.m. Expressions of Remembrance to the Saugeen Memorial Hospital Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to the Eagleson Funeral Home Southampton. Condolences may be forwarded to the Family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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VALLANCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-07 published
CHALMERS, Donavon Miller
Peacefully at Summit Place Nursing Home in Owen Sound on Wednesday March 5, 2008. In his 88th year, Donavon Miller CHALMERS the loving husband of P. Jill CHALMERS (STINTON.) Loving father of Stephen and his wife Judy of Owen Sound, Margo BLANCHE and her husband Peter NEUWELT, of Barrie and Lesley and her partner Colleen ANDERSON of Toronto. Proud grandfather of Mark BAZANT and his wife Angie of Australia, Michael BAZANT and his partner Genvieve of Ottawa. Great-grandfather of Liam. He will be fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents David and his late wife Eva (née REAGH) and by his sisters Vivien McMINN, Vera VALLANCE and by his brother Dave. Friends may call at Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home in Owen Sound (519) 376-2326 on Saturday March 8, 2008 from 3: 00 p.m. -5:00 p.m. A funeral service will be held at the funeral home on Saturday evening at 5: 00 p.m. Members of the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #6 Owen Sound are requested to attend a memorial service at the funeral home on Saturday March 8 afternoon at 2: 45 p.m. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. Rev. Ralph SCHMIDT officiating. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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VALLANCE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-15 published
VARGA, Nelson Alexander, P.Eng.
Royal Canadian Navy, Royal Canadian Navy Anglers Association Passed away peacefully Wednesday, March 12, 2008 at the McCall Centre, Etobicoke. Nelson was in his 81st year. Beloved husband of 56 years to the late Letitia Jean (née VALLANCE) VARGA. son of the late Nelson Alexander and Beatrice (née CAMPBELL) of Windsor. Loving father of his only child, Susan LETITIA and her husband Kypros Stylianou PISSAS of Mississauga. Brother to June, Jo-anne and the late Velma, and Beverley. As a Professional Electrical Engineer, Nelson was passionate about his work. He received a B.Sc. (Elect) degree from RNTC (U.K.) in 1950, and received a diploma in advanced mathematics from Cambridge Institute of Science and Technology (Toronto) in 1974. Dad was afforded the opportunity to work extensively throughout Canada and the United States - including Chrysler Corporation (1951-56); Giffels and Vallet (1956-60); Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (1960-64) Smith, Hinchman and Gryils (1964-71); Pearson International Airport (1971-79); York University (1979-91) and after retirement, Gosse and Gilewicz Engineering Inc. (1992-2007). Throughout his early career, Nelson was hired as a Consultant on many interesting projects - including the Apollo Moonshot program (NASA). Proud member of the Professional Engineers of Ontario and the Naval Veterans Association. Hobbies included reading (mostly engineering journals!) and biomedical technical research. This resulted in two invention disclosures (Commissioner of Patents, Washington, D.C.). In his later years, Nelson put 'technical pencil to graph paper' to write poetry. His sister June and daughter Susan were the recipients of weekly prose over the last two years of Nelson's life. Nelson's family will receive family and close Friends at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) from 1-4 p.m. on Sunday, March 30, 2008. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Little bird sitting in a tree Wishing I were you and you were me But that can never be So fly away little bird and be free And maybe someday we will meet in eternity And I'll be you and you will be me. ~ N. VARGA, 07.22.06

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VALLBACKA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-07-25 published
WARK, Sarah Clare Vallbacka
(February 13, 2004-July 21, 2008)
Peacefully in our arms, after a courageous battle. Beloved daughter of Jennifer VALLBACKA and Michael WARK. Adored big sister of Benjamin. Sadly missed by grandparents David and Mary-Jane VALLBACKA and Ross and Margaret WARK, great-grandmother Clara GARNER, Uncle Craig, Aunt Trina, cousins Vayga and Kail, Auntie Amy and many special family members and Friends. Thank you to everyone for the exceptional care that Sarah received over the last four months at McMaster Children's Hospital. Visitation at Bay Gardens Funeral Home, 1010 Botanical Drive (across from the Royal Botanical Gardens), Burlington (905-527-0405) Monday, July 28, 2008 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the McMaster Children's Hospital or the Pediatric Oncology Group of Ontario would be appreciated. Please sign the online Book of Condolence at www.baygardens.ca Sare Bear, Rah Rah We love you to the moon and back Forever and ever and always

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VALLEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-03 published
BRUCE, Deborah (née FORCE)
Suddenly at University Hospital, London on Thursday, May 1, 2008. Deborah BRUCE (née FORCE) of Highland Drive, Woodstock in her 54th year. Beloved wife of Gord BRUCE. Dear mother of Jennifer ARTHUR and her husband Steven, Angela BRUCE and her husband John VALLEAU, Rebecca BRUCE and her partner Adam STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Loved grandmother of Dominic ARTHUR and Michael VALLEAU. Beloved daughter of Carl and Leona FORCE and daughter-in-law of Mary NEAVE. Dear sister of Doug FORCE and his wife Karen, Donna GARDINER and her husband Al. Also survived by several aunts, uncles, cousins, nieces and nephews. Deb was a longtime member of Chalmers United Church, Woodstock and was actively involved with the Girl Guides of Canada for many years. Friends may call at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock (519-539-0004) Monday, May 5, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held in the chapel Tuesday, May 6, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in the Baptist Cemetery. Contributions to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the Canadian Cancer Society (Ovarian Cancer Research) would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

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VALLEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-05 published
McLUHAN, Corinne (born LEWIS)
(April 11, 1912-April 4, 2008)
Died peacefully of natural causes at her home in Wychwood Park surrounded by her family. She was the beloved and loving wife and confidante of the late Marshall McLUHAN (1980;) dear sister of the late Carolyn Lewis WEINMAN (1996;) devoted and loving mother of Eric (Sabina ELLIS), Mary, Teri, Stephanie (Niels ORTVED), Elizabeth (Don MYERS,) and Michael (Danuta VALLEAU;) proud grandmother of Jennifer Colton THEUT, Emily McLuhan BOMS, Anna and Andrew McLUHAN, Claire and Madeleine McLuhan MYERS, Arthur, Mark, and Gwendolyn McLUHAN; and great-grandmother of Olivia, Charlotte, and Gillian.
Corinne was known for her beauty, grace, intelligence, wit, and Southern charm. She embraced life fully and enjoyed many rich experiences and wonderful Friendships along the way. Born in Fort Worth, Texas, Corinne proudly remained an American all her life. She graduated from Texas Christian University and went on to do graduate work in theatre at the leading drama school of the day, Pasadena Playhouse in Pasadena, California. It was there that she met her future husband, Marshall McLUHAN, a graduate student at Cambridge University in England, who had travelled to Pasadena to visit his mother, a drama coach at the Playhouse.
The family wishes to extend its heartfelt thanks to Doctor Wendy BROWN, for her years of unflagging and tender care, and to special caregivers Sally, Bona, Tasie, Amy, and particularly Cynthia, who has stayed at Corinne's side day and night for the last four years.
There will be a funeral mass at Holy Rosary Church, 354 St. Clair Avenue West on Monday April 7 at 1: 30 p.m.

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VALLEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-17 published
Journalist roared through life 'like a movie star with charisma'
Globe-trotting reporter, who for three decades rubbed shoulders with the rich and famous, lived a life that was the antithesis of his United Church, strait-laced Toronto upbringing
By Brian VALLEE, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Toronto -- Paul KING was a swashbuckling Canadian journalist, author, artist and consummate raconteur who roared through life with an unquenchable curiosity and joy of the moment.
"He was like a movie star - brimming with charisma; trailing cigarette smoke as he lunged ever forward; talking out of the corner of his mouth in a raspy commanding drawl - right out of a 1930s newspaper movie," said Ron BASE, his long-time friend, fellow author and screenwriter. "He was unique, wonderful, irreplaceable and a helluva fine writer."
The life he led was the antithesis of the strait-laced religious family (his father was a United Church minister) in which he was brought up. After graduating from Toronto's Central Tech high school, his first job was as a window dresser at Simpson's department store. Soon bored, he went with a couple of Friends to Miami and then to Nassau in the Bahamas where in 1955 he began working as a lifeguard at the British Colonial Hotel. It was his "softest job ever."
Most guests simply basked in the sun. Very few swam. Only one guest concerned him - a water skier who went out only when there were monstrous breakers which he attacked like a halfback. "It's fantastic exercise," he told Mr. KING with broad grin.
"He's mad," complained Mr. KING to another guest, who laughed.
"No, he's not," the guest said, "he's Britain's top race-car driver, Sterling Moss."
One morning, Mr. KING was on lifeguard duty when his boss told him the beach had been privately reserved by honeymooners, actress Debbie Reynolds and crooner Eddie Fisher. "Debbie was sunning on a lounge chair and some guy was combing Eddie's hair," Mr. KING said. "I dozed off until I heard Debbie screaming hysterically. She was pointing frantically at Eddie, arms flailing, a few yards out in the water. I reached him in seconds. He panicked, pushed me down and kicked my ear. I was gulping water, so I grabbed him by the groin and squeezed. Then I felt the sandy bottom and dragged him out. They left later that day without a word of thanks."
Mr. KING returned to Toronto and began studying journalism at Ryerson Polytechnic, now a university. In the summer of 1958, he worked as an intern at The Vancouver Sun. His high-school sweetheart, Ivi RIIVES, followed him there and they were married before he returned to Ryerson and graduated with honours in 1959.
The Vancouver paper had liked what it saw and hired him as its entertainment editor and columnist. In his new job, he was enjoying the first half hour of the musical Oklahoma at Stanley Park's Theatre Under the Stars when a noticeably bald man sat down beside him and started humming along. When he began to sing the words, Mr. KING complained.
"Oh God, I'm sorry," the man murmured.
"I finally snapped when I heard 'Poooor Jud is daid,' coming both from the stage and the seat beside me," Mr. KING would write years later.
"Would you please shut up," he hissed.
After that, the man remained silent until the end of the performance. "I apologize," he said putting on his cap.
Mr. KING stared at him. He knew the voice and, with the cap on, he knew the face. He'd been sitting beside Bing Crosby without a toupee.
"I feel like I just told Fred Astaire to get off a dance floor," he offered by way of an apology. Mr. Crosby whooped with glee.
Perhaps his biggest scoop for The Sun was the death of Errol Flynn. The famed Hollywood actor had arrived in Vancouver in October of 1959 to sell his yacht to a local stock promoter. Mr. KING met them at a nightclub known for its ties to the mob. Mr. Flynn, then 50 and notorious for three statutory rape trials, was with his 16-year-old girlfriend. "Booze had bloated his once-handsome face, but the radiant smile remained," Mr. KING wrote.
When the actor said he felt ill, Mr. KING steered him through a side exit and into an alley. "He gagged up his booze and then groaned, 'Christ mate, I'm getting old.' "
They parted ways and agreed to meet the next day. Later, the stock promoter called to say they had stopped somewhere for a nightcap and that he should rejoin them. He dutifully arrived only to see an ambulance. Mr. Flynn was dead, felled by heart and liver disease.
In 1960, Paul and Ivi KING decided to leave Canada for Japan. "We just went," Ms. KING said. "We didn't have jobs. We wanted to see Japan before it changed too much." They would stay for almost four years. Mr. KING worked, simultaneously, as a film critic and columnist for the Mainichi Daily News; chief English-language copywriter for an advertising agency; and as co-producer of a popular television show.
Tall, charming and Hollywood-handsome, Mr. KING often attracted women. He and Ms. KING were soon having marital problems and she left Japan to work in Hong Kong. Mr. KING followed soon after. It was there in Kowloon's bars and nightclubs that he would meet and drink many nights away with a cast of characters that included crooks, cops, musicians, exotic dancers and actors such as William Holden, Albert Finney and Peter O'Toole.
"I stayed in Hong Kong and worked there and Paul went on to Switzerland where we had Friends," Ms. KING said. "He was going there to write but, of course, he did not publish a book. He had more fun than anything else."
It was 1964, and he found himself reporting from the set of the movie Doctor Zhivago on the outskirts of Madrid. It was there under a full moon in a deserted massive plaza created for the movie that he interviewed Alec Guinness. Dressed in a commissar's uniform and fur hat, the actor had been enjoying the solitude and seemed unhappy with the intrusion.
"Why aren't you starring in movies any more?"
"What?" a startled Mr. Guinness asked.
Mr. KING told him how he had loved the old British comedies in which the actor had starred, citing The Ladykillers, The Lavender Hill Mob and The Man in the White Suit. Since then, he said, Mr. Guinness had played superb character roles in Bridge on the River Kwai, A Passage to India, Lawrence of Arabia and then Zhivago, but they weren't starring roles.
Mr. Guinness laughed when he realized the later movies were all directed by David Lean. "He gave me my first big role in Great Expectations and I've taken every part he's offered ever since. It's all his fault."
After that, the actor chatted happily for the next hour.
The next day a frazzled publicist cornered Mr. KING and told him he had been banned from the set for telling Mr. Guinness that he was no longer a star. Attending a party a day or two later, Mr. KING fled to the balcony when Mr. Lean entered the apartment. He found Mr. Guinness on the balcony admiring the moon.
"Beautiful isn't it," he said.
"I'm not speaking to you," Mr. KING said. "You twisted my words."
Mr. Guinness chuckled. "Yes I did. I wanted to get David's goat."
"Well you succeeded. He banned me from the set."
"Oh my, my. We must do something about that."
Taking him by the arm, Mr. Guinness led him back to the party. Mr. Lean glowered at them. "David," Mr. Guinness said, "I have a confession."
Hearing what had actually been said, Mr. Lean agreed to allow Mr. KING back on the set provided he stay out of his line of sight.
By 1965, Mr. KING was in London where he worked for a time for the Daily Mail. There was a reconciliation of sorts with his wife and she followed him to Rome when he took a job with a talent agency. "It ended up being a lot of night life," she said. "So I left him there."
His job was to look after movie stars such as Clint Eastwood, Eva Marie Saint, James Garner, Yves Montand and Rita Hayworth. "There are a lot of stories about Clint Eastwood that I can probably never tell," he once said.
For his part, he was romantically involved with Ms. Hayworth who was in Rome filming The Rover with Anthony Quinn.
The actor lived in a villa an hour outside Rome and when he invited Ms. Hayworth to a party, she asked Mr. KING to go along. When they arrived, Mr. Quinn, dressed in a red sweatsuit and sneakers, met them at the door. The other guests included eight dapper lawyers and businessmen and their wives or girlfriends. "This is bizarre," Ms. Hayworth whispered.
Mr. KING said it got really weird when Mr. Quinn clapped his hands and ordered everyone inside to play bingo around an enormous dining table. Each guest had to give the host $20 in lira for a bingo card and corn markers. "We played bingo for 60 excruciating minutes," Mr. KING said. "Only Quinn enjoyed himself - barking out numbers and handing cash to winners."
When one of the guests finally had enough, the host looked crestfallen. "You don't like bingo?"
That was enough for Ms. Hayworth. "Oh, for God's sake, Tony," she said throwing her cache of corn across the table. "This is stupid."
Mr. Quinn's wife rushed in smiling and said dinner was ready. "Superb tenderloin was served," Mr. KING said. "During dessert, Quinn circled the table with a wicker basket filled with semi-precious stones. Each guest chose one. It was a lovely gesture. I carried mine in my pocket for years."
As they left the villa, Ms. Hayworth kissed her co-star on the cheek. "I'll give you a tip, old buddy," she said. "Next time, play Parcheesi."
In 1967, Mr. KING returned to Canada and worked on the television series Under Attack with Pierre Burton.
The following year, he worked for a time as an entertainment writer for The Globe and Mail and then became a feature writer for the magazine The Canadian where he was to stay for seven years. His and Ms. KING's only child, Michelle, was born in 1971. However, the couple separated for good in 1974, but remained Friends.
In 1975, he became a reporter and columnist for the Toronto Star and remained there for a decade.
In the late seventies, he met Barbara FULTON who would be his lover and companion for the next 30 years. "I loved his zest for life and living in the moment," she said. "He had an amazing wit and sense of humour. We laughed and laughed and it never went away."
In 1985, they packed up and moved to a small Spanish mountain village. They were gone for more than a year. He had time for watercolour painting and together they wrote magazine and newspaper travel stories to survive. "It was idyllic," she said. "Absolutely fabulous."
They would later travel extensively through Mexico, writing articles as they went. Later, after returning to Toronto, Mr. KING wrote several books for Key Porter, including Cottage Country (1991) and Mountains of America (1992). He also was ghost writer for two autobiographies by Ed Mirvish of Honest Ed's department store.
In 1995, he had a brush with cancer. A carcinoid tumour was removed from his small bowel and doctors at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto discovered it had spread to his liver.
He thought it was a death sentence, but he underwent treatment and continued to travel. Each summer, he escaped to the cottage. "We both loved it," Ms. FULTON said. "Paul called it his oasis and last summer was just blissful."
He knew a lot about pain, but on Sunday, May 4, it was excruciatingly different. They had been eating a quiet dinner in their Toronto apartment when he began to choke and cough. "A bully has moved in," he announced through gritted teeth.
When first diagnosed with cancer in 1995, Mr. KING went to a doctor for advice about how to die. Afterward, he and Ms. FULTON met a friend for a drink in a bar. She was drying her tears he was stoic. "The doctor said to forget chemo," he said. "All it does is give you a couple of extra months of sheer misery. Instead, he said to travel where you want to travel; do the things you want to do; see the people you want to see; and when the pain is too much, take morphine until you're done. And that's what I'm going to do."
And so he did.
He was dead five days after being admitted to Mount Sinai Hospital.
Paul KING was born on December 14, 1935, on Manitoulin Island in northern Ontario. He died of cancer in Toronto's Mount Sinai Hospital on May 9, 2008. He was 72. He is survived by his companion, Barbara Fulton; brother, John; and daughter Michelle. He also leaves his former wife, Ivi KING, and granddaughters Finnoula, Sinead and Bronach.

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VALLELY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-05 published
FURFARO, Paul
The family of Paul FURFARO wishes to express its heartfelt appreciation to all those who acknowledged the passing of our loved one. We were strengthened by the generous outpouring of love and support from family, Friends, colleagues of the London District Catholic School Board, as well as the students of Holy Cross Catholic Secondary School and Regina Mundi Catholic College. Your kind expressions of sympathy in the form of memorial donations, mass offerings, cards of condolence, online tributes, floral arrangements, and gifts of food brought comfort during a time of great sorrow. We were especially moved by the overwhelming presence of those who joined us in honouring Paul's memory at the visitation and funeral. We are deeply grateful to those who made Paul's funeral Mass a beautiful celebration of his life; namely Fr. Jim MOCKLER and co-celebrants Fr. J. DABROWSKI, Fr. J. REDMOND, Fr. W. THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, and Deacon J. VALLELY; musicians and vocalists Lucia CERVONI, Gary McAULEY, Mark McAULEY, and Michael ROSS. The professionalism and guidance provided by the staff at the Westview Funeral Chapel, Holy Family Chapel Mausoleum, and the Marconi Club were also greatly appreciated. We were truly blessed with the gift of Paul's life. Thank you for honouring him and for keeping him in your thoughts and prayers. Julie, Tony, Betty, Valerie, Dan, Angela and Ugo.

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VALLERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-02 published
VALLERY, Hugh
In his 89th year, passed away peacefully on December 29th. He is survived by his beloved wife of 65 years, Marjorie, his daughter Linda and husband Ralph EDWARDS of Belwood, and his son Douglas VALLERY and wife Lauree of Toronto. He will be missed by grandchildren Pam, Debbie and Mark EDWARDS, and Braden, Robert, Jacqueline and Ellen VALLERY. Hugh is the brother-in-law of Doris (HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON) VALLERY of Peterborough, Jean (O'NEILL) EMERY of Ingersoll and Doris (EMERY) RICHARDSON of Anthony, Florida. He is also survived by a number of beloved nieces and nephews.
Hugh was born May 3, 1919 in Peterborough and graduated from Queen's University in 1942 with a Master's Degree in History and an officer's appointment out of the Canadian Officer Training Corps. As a Lieutenant with the Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, Hugh saw action with the Canadian First Infantry Division, Allied Eighth Army in Italy. He was captured in the fierce fighting south of Ortona in December 1943, and was held as a Prisoner of War at OFLAG VIIIF (Mährisch-Trübau, Czech Republic) and OFLAG 79 (Brunswick, Germany) until 1945. After the War, Hugh served in the Canadian Reserve Militia through the mid-'50, in which he attained the rank of Major.
An active and successful career in public education with the Toronto and Metro School Boards following graduation from Ontario College of Education in 1946, included: teaching at Harbord Collegiate Institute (46-58); head of History at North Toronto Collegiate Institute (58-61); Vice Principal at Parkdale Collegiate (61-63) founding Principal at Monarch Park Secondary School (63-66) Academic Director of Study in Educational Facilities; 66-69. A member of Phi Delta Kappa, Hugh was an Associate Teacher with the Ontario College of Education ('51-'60) also lectured at Ontario Institute for Studies in Education on educational administration. He co-authored two text books: The British Epic (Ontario Grade 9, 1960), and The British Heritage (Manitoba, 1965). Hugh completed his career by serving as Superintendant and Assistant Director of Education for the Metropolitan Toronto School Board from 1970 until his retirement in February, 1977.
Leading up to his retirement, Hugh received recognition and awards for his longstanding contribution to education in Ontario. Hugh was active with the East Toronto Rotary Club through the 60's and 70's. Through active enquiry and contributions, Hugh has played a role in the betterment of several communities including Lake of Bays, Ontario where the extended families enjoyed many wonderful summers together. In retirement, Hugh and Marj also spent winters in Ocala, Fort Myers and Clearwater, Florida. Hugh was an active contributor to Islington United Church through the 50's and 60's and to many worthy charities and causes.
Hugh was a compassionate, private person, a voracious reader until late in life, and an inquisitive student of the rushing events of our times. He was a gentleman, a man of integrity, and a generous, trusted advisor and friend to those close to him.
A celebration of Hugh's life will be held at the York Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre, 160 Beecroft Road (north of Sheppard Avenue, first street west of Yonge Street), Toronto, 416-221-3404 on Saturday, January 5, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. Visitation one hour prior with a lunch reception to follow the service. For more information and to place online condolences please go to www.etouch.ca

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VALLERY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-27 published
Hugh VALLERY, 88: Soldier And Educator
His few days of combat led to 16 months in a PoW camp
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S8
Ottawa -- Hugh VALLERY's shooting war lasted just four days before he was taken prisoner by the German army in one of the bloodiest campaigns fought by Canadian soldiers during the Second World War.
Fighting as a platoon commander with the 1st Battalion, Hastings and Prince Edward Regiment, Mr. VALLERY first saw combat on December 9, 1943, when the "Hasty P's" were waging a desperate battle in winter along the Moro River in Italy. Running south of Ortona through eastern central Italy, the Moro River was a centrepiece of the German army's Gustav Line, which blocked the Allies from moving on Rome.
Ordered to capture a farmhouse located at a strategic crossroads, Mr. VALLERY and his platoon did their best, but were repulsed. The promised artillery support never materialized. Mr. VALLERY and his men were on their own.
Decades after the war, Mr. VALLERY wrote an account, in the third person, of the final moments of his four days in combat. The climax occurred when he and his few remaining men "ran, crawled and wormed" their way through a scrubby vineyard, reaching the edge of a clearing. The farmhouse was 200 metres away and "suspiciously silent and ominous," he wrote.
"In the gathering dusk, they dodged from hollow to hallow, until only fifty yards remained as a final obstacle. Suddenly a loud shout, unmistakably a German command, warned all seven [Canadians] to hit the ground and to roll for cover. Four of the luckless soldiers met bullets and lay where they fell. One Bren gun, one Tommy gun, a rifle and a few grenades were scanty protection against a well-prepared German position," wrote Mr. VALLERY.
An hour later, their ammunition was gone and the nearest friendly troops were more than a kilometre away. All hope seemed lost. In swift succession, "fear, desperation and panic filled his whole being as the Germans came ever closer."
Mr. VALLERY knew that to lie perfectly still might give him a chance to remain undetected but "to run would be suicide. Suddenly the Germans loomed out of the darkness and demanded surrender. He and his companions stood up with their arms held overhead - alive, but sick at heart."
Taken prisoner, his war devolved into a conflict of tedium, frustration and scanty rations that would go on for 16 months.
Hugh VALLERY grew up in Peterborough, Ontario, during the Depression. While times were hard for most families, luckily his father was a foreman at the local General Electric plant and the VALLERYs got by. After Canada declared war on September 10, 1939, Mr. VALLERY, a history student at Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, joined the Canadian Officers Training Corps. He went active in 1942 and landed in the United Kingdom the following year.
It took 11 weeks for Mr. VALLERY's family to learn that he was alive. The first information they received was a telegram, dated December 27, 1943: "Regret deeply Lieutenant Hubert James VALLERY officially reported missing in action thirteenth December 1943 Stop further information follows when received."
He was sent first to a PoW camp in Czechoslovakia. To fight boredom and raise morale, the prisoners read books, played sports and took correspondence courses to further their education.
At the beginning of 1945, Mr. VALLERY and his fellow prisoners were moved to another camp in Brunswick, Germany. The Allies and the Russians were fast approaching. Preferring to be captured by the Allies, the camp commandant decided to disobey an order to move his prisoners toward Berlin and into the path of the Russians. "Instead, he realistically negotiated with the prisoners, and one lightly armoured jeep liberated the camp in a very peaceful handover - not a shot was fired," said Mr. VALLERY's son, Douglas.
Mr. VALLERY, his weight reduced from 175 pounds to a shocking 118, was free. A few months later, he returned to Canada and a happy reunion with his family. After graduating from the Ontario College of Education in 1946, he taught at various Toronto public schools, finishing his career in 1970 as superintendent and assistant director of education for the Metropolitan Toronto School Board. He also served in the army reserve, retiring as a major in the mid-1950s.
A voracious reader and strong family man, Mr. VALLERY never forgot his wartime service. For him, war was absurd, yet paradoxical. "The losses inflicted are tragic and unbearable. It brings out the best and worst in humanity. It was a defining moment, and an opportunity of a lifetime to be involved in a challenging global movement."
Hubert James VALLERY was born on May 3, 1919, in Peterborough, Ontario He died there of complications relating to pneumonia on December 29, 2007. He was 88. He is survived by Marjorie, his wife of 65 years, son Douglas, daughter Linda and seven grandchildren.

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VALLIERES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-15 published
BROWN, Robert L.
Peacefully, surrounded by family, at University Hospital on Saturday, July 12, 2008, Robert L. BROWN of London (formerly of Windsor) in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Irene BROWN (2003) for 52 years. Loving mother of Brenda CAMPBELL of London, Janice (Ron) VALLIERES of Glencoe and Marci OSWALD of London. Cherished Papa of Roger, Taylor, Chelsea, Jennifer and Jaimie. Friends will be received at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Rd. North, for a memorial service on Sunday, July 20, 2008 at 3: 00 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. In lieu of flowers, donations made to the London Health Sciences Foundation-Cancer Centre or the charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated. Online condolences accepted at condolences@westviewfuneralchapel.com

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VALMORK o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-14 published
ARNSPERGER, Ruth
Of Wiarton passed away on Friday, January 11, 2008 in her 86th year. Cherished friend of Ross CALVERT, of Wiarton and dear sister of Rigmor BERG and Karin Marie VALMORK both of Oslo, Norway. She will be sadly missed by her nieces and nephews in Norway as well as her many Friends of the Bruce Peninsula. Ruth was predeceased by her husband Orlo, parents and two brothers. Ruth was a well known artist and a lifetime member of the Tom Thomson Memorial Gallery. Her design of the cairn that now sits in Tobermory at the northern most point of the Bruce Trail is a true testament to her talent. She was also a lifetime member of the Pottawotomi Spinners and Weavers Guild. Ruth was very instrumental in introducing cross county skiing to the residents and children of the peninsula. Along with her husband Orlo, Ruth operated the Cliffside Resort for many years and hosted guests from around the world. She also organized many skiing tours from Canada to her native Norway. There will be no funeral home visitation or service at this time. Cremation has taken place. Arrangements entrusted to the George Funeral Home, Wiarton. Donations made to the Tom Thomson Memorial Gallery would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

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VALPY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-03 published
His landmark commission on drugs urged legalizing marijuana in Already a respected legal scholar, he became an improbable counterculture icon at the height of the hippy era by recommending leniency and the decriminalization of recreational drugs
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S6
Toronto -- Gerald LE DAIN's respect for civil liberties went so far as to rouse John Lennon and Yoko Ono from their bed. It was 1969, the year of the couple's "bed-in for peace" at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, and the year Judge LE DAIN began chairing the much-referenced but largely ignored Commission of Inquiry into the Non-Medical Use of Drugs.
The Le Dain commission's final report was one of the most politically explosive documents ever put before the federal government. The commission held 46 days of public hearings, received 365 submissions and heard from 12,000 people in about 30 cities and at more than 20 university campuses across the country. In its final report, in 1973, the commission recommended decriminalizing marijuana possession because the law-enforcement costs of prohibition were too great, and suggested that Canada focus on frank education rather than harsh penalization. It also recommended treatment for heroin addiction and sharp warnings about nicotine and alcohol. This was delivered at a time when hysteria about the evils of pot was on everyone's lips and many parents wanted the law to save their drug-addled teenagers.
The report also made Judge LE DAIN something of an unlikely counterculture icon and helped win him a place on the Supreme Court of Canada during the formative years of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Gerald LE DAIN was born in Montreal to Eric LE DAIN and Antoinette WHITHARD. His younger brother, Bruce, went on to become one of Canada's foremost impressionist landscape painters in the style of A.Y. Jackson and Tom Thomson. Gerry graduated from West Hill High School in 1942 and a year later, at 18, he joined the army and became a gunner with the 7th Medium Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, a unit that was in the thick of the fighting from D-Day until the surrender of Germany in May of 1945.
Immediately after the war, he attended the military's ad hoc Khaki University in England. One day, the school arranged a debate with students of Westfield College, then a women-only college associated with the University of London. During the event (debate topic: a woman's place in the home,) he met Cynthia Emily ROY and, two weeks later, they became engaged. After being demobilized from the army, she joined him in Montreal, where they married and he set about finishing his education.
In 1949, he obtained a law degree from McGill University and was called to the Quebec bar. He spent the following year at a university in Lyons, where he gained his doctorate. On his return from France, he joined the Montreal law firm of Walker, Martineau, Chauvin, Walker and Allison and stayed three years until he returned to McGill as a professor of constitutional and administrative law. He also worked as counsel to Quebec's attorney-general on constitutional cases.
In 1967, he left Montreal to become dean of Osgoode Hall Law School, where, said colleague Harry Arthurs, he presided over a revolution in Canadian legal education. "It was his responsibility to persuade York University, the Law Society of Upper Canada, and the world at large, that what we were doing was not only the legitimate - not only the sensible - but the inevitable way forward." It was during this time that Pierre Trudeau asked Judge LE DAIN to chair the commission. He was, at 44, perfectly suited to the job in many ways. By then, many young Canadians were indulging in marijuana and other recreational drugs; as a university professor, he was surrounded by many students who had at least given it a try. And as the father of a large family, he was adept at bridging the generation gap and responding empathetically. During the time he chaired the commission, there were four full-fledged teenagers, and one on the cusp, living in the LE DAIN home.
The commissioners were asked to study the non-medical use of sedative, stimulant, tranquillizing, hallucinogenic and other psychotropic drugs or substances, including the experience of users. At his first news conference in 1969, he announced that, in the interest of research, he might experiment with the stuff himself.
"We made it possible to talk about drugs openly," he later said in an interview with The Globe and Mail. "In some of our early hearings, especially in smaller communities, you could feel the guilt that had been stored up around drugs. We also made it possible for people to criticize their institutions, to challenge their doctors, their school boards, their churches."
The Le Dain commission broke new ground in terms of taking the show on the road, said Mel GREEN, who worked as a sociologist with Judge LE DAIN at the time. Judge LE DAIN redefined the nature of a public inquiry by asking the public to directly participate, he said. "The commission found little traction in terms of changes in the law itself. … There was a cultural divide between conventional attitudes and youth culture and I think the Le Dain commission helped bridge that gap." Inspired by Judge LE DAIN, Mr. GREEN decided to switch careers and went to law school. He is now an Ontario provincial court judge.
By early 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono had created a stir with their public "bed-in" at a hotel in Amsterdam. On May 26, the couple booked into Room 1742 at the Queen Elizabeth in Montreal. To Judge LE DAIN, they seemed to be just the kind of advocates for youth the commission should hear from. A meeting was arranged aboard a C.N. train in Montreal and, for 90 minutes, the couple shared their views on the drug culture and the generation gap. "This is the opportunity for Canada to lead the world," said Mr. Lennon, referring to the Le Dain commission. "Canada's image is just about getting groovy, you know." When it was over, Mr. Lennon gave his phone number to members of the commission.
It was not always such clear sailing. Commissioners also had to contend with a kind of "live bait" issue, where police were arresting young people who braved the generational divide to attend these public gatherings and tell their stories. In 1969, the 16-year-old son of communications theorist Marshall McLUHAN was arrested as he was leaving a coffee shop in Yorkville, Toronto's then-hippy neighbourhood, where the commission was meeting. Michael McLUHAN was convicted of criminal possession of a small amount of hashish and sentenced to 60 days in jail; he ended up serving 30 days and was eventually pardoned.
Marie-Andrée Bertrand, one of the Le Dain commissioners, remembers those days and the difficulties in protecting witnesses. "Some of us went to [then-solicitor-general Pierre] Goyer and we said, 'Call off your gendarmes, monsieur!' and went to Trudeau, and it was slightly more calm after that," she told the Ottawa Citizen in 2003. "Imagine if Monsieur Lennon had been arrested or harassed. What a humiliation that would have been for all of us."
Although the commission's recommendations were never followed, there were significant changes in the public attitude toward drugs and in lighter sentences being handed down to offenders.
At a time when the generation gap was described as a gulf, Judge LE DAIN had gained the respect of both sides of the drug-use argument. In a 1988 Globe and Mail column, Michael VALPY described him as a quiet, intellectual, spiritually minded academic who earned the praise of young people, the social agencies and the scientific community. "His commission acquired the reputation of being the most hard-working, open-minded and widely respected ever to tackle a major national problem."
In 1975, Judge LE DAIN was appointed to the Federal Court of Appeal and the Court Martial Appeal Court. He remained there until May of 1984, when Mr. Trudeau appointed him to the Supreme Court.
His tenure at the court during the early years of the Charter proved to be, in some ways, a trial by fire not only for him but for the other eight justices as well. A 1988 Globe and Mail article described a series of crises that nearly exhausted the court as a result of a backlog of Charter cases. At the time, it was referred to by political scientist Peter Russell as "A terrible rash of injuries" similar to the kind experienced by beleaguered players on a hockey team.
Not surprisingly, Judge LE DAIN was one of the members of the court who struggled most during this time. As a result, he stayed only five years before an emotional breakdown brought about his retirement in 1988. Even so, he left his mark on Charter decisions.
One example was the case of R. v. Therens (1985). The issue was whether a drunk driver could evade conviction on the grounds that police had violated his Charter rights by not informing him of his right to call a lawyer before compelling him to take a breathalyzer test. Judge LE DAIN's former law clerk, Bruce RYDER, recalls that he struggled painfully over the case - partly because it recalled the death of his daughter Jacqueline a decade earlier from an automobile accident.
"As he spoke, he was pounding himself so hard in the chest I thought he might knock himself over. He took a deep breath, and we returned to our work." In the end, Judge LE DAIN crafted an opinion that did right by the victims of highway accidents and by the Charter. In memorable language, he affirmed that the enactment of the Charter signalled a new era in the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms.
"Out of complexity and nuance, he produced masterfully succinct statements of the law," said Mr. RYDER.
In his retirement, Judge LE DAIN worked on a range of projects, including preparing his papers for the national archives and meticulously crafting his memoirs. But his early retirement continued to be plagued by personal tragedy: first with his wife Cynthia's death in 1995 of cancer, then his daughter Catherine's death of pneumonia in 1998.
In 1990, the U.S. Drug Policy Alliance instituted an award in Gerald LE DAIN's name, to be given to individuals involved in law who have worked within official institutions "when extremist pressures dominate government policies." The influential organization includes law-enforcement officials, academics, professionals, health-care workers, drug users and former users. "We sought to name the awards after our heroes," said founder Arnold Trebach. "Gerald LE DAIN was certainly one of them. Few people realize the level of hate directed at drug users and drug policy reformers decades ago."
Judge LE DAIN, the first Canadian to be so honoured, had earlier been made a companion of the Order of Canada.
Gerald Eric LE DAIN was born on November 27, 1924, in Montreal. He died in his sleep at home on December 18, 2007. He was 83. He is survived by his son Eric and daughters Barbara, Jennifer and Caroline. He was predeceased by his wife, Cynthia, and by daughters Jacqueline and Catherine.
Correction - Friday, January 4, 2007
The majority of the Le Dain Commission on the non-medical use of drugs recommended in 1973 that possession of cannabis should cease to be a criminal offence but that sale and distribution of cannabis should remain a crime. Incorrect information appeared in a headline in yesterday's paper.

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