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"TIT" 2008 Obituary


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TITCOMBE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-05 published
TITCOMBE, Doctor Emerson P.
(March 29, 1919-July 3, 2008)
After a full life of service to his Lord and his fellowman, Doctor Emerson TITCOMBE of Thornbury, passed away on July 3, 2008. His life was truly a life of serving and self-sacrifice. Upon graduating from Toronto Medical School in 1943, he served as a captain in the Army Medical Corps. He and his beloved wife Elizabeth established his medical practice in Thornbury in 1946 where he served his community until his retirement in 1989. He served as Provincial Coroner in addition to his busy practice. Medicine was not merely a profession for him; it was a calling to a life of service to others. He was a lifelong member and deacon of the Thornbury First Baptist Church. He leaves behind to mourn his passing and celebrate his life his beloved wife Elizabeth, his children Nancy BALL of Uxbridge, Peter TITCOMBE of Burlington, and Margaret VANDERWERF of Ottawa; his grandchildren: Marina BALL, Steven BALL, Dennis TITCOMBE, Paul TITCOMBE, Derrick VANDERWERF, and Phillip VANDERWERF; and great-grandchild Addison TITCOMBE. He will be fondly remembered by his brother Clarence of Beaverton and his sister Edith MARTIN of Vancouver. Funeral services will be conducted at the First Baptist Church, Bruce Street South in Thornbury, on Monday, July 7, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. with interment to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. There will be no public visitation. Family will receive Friends in the fellowship hall of the church following the interment services where they will share in a time of refreshment and further remembrances of Emerson. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford General Hospital Foundation or the Thornbury First Baptist Church would be appreciated and may be made through Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, Box 556, Thornbury, Ontario N0H 2P0 (519-599-2718), to whom arrangements have been entrusted. Gone to a better place!

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TITLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-18 published
NAYLOR, John " Jack"
Suddenly on April 15, 2008. Jack, beloved father and grandfather, passed away, leaving a life of rich devotion and affection. He was the loving father of Leslie and Ted CORMODE, John and Elaine NAYLOR, Lois and Michael TITLE, Jill and John FLECHL. Adoring grandfather of Tim, Sarah, Michael, Margaret, Brad (Adrian), Derek, Laura, Julie, Alexandra, Justin, great-grandfather of Hannah. We will miss our Dad, Pop, Papa, Grampa, "G.G.P.A." He made all of our wordly concerns disappear with his unconditional love, soothing words and support. Jack served Canada overseas in the Royal Canadian Air Force during World War 2, retired from Northern Electric and enjoyed a long and healthy retirement surrounded by his family, following the loss of his beloved wife Lillian in 1987. He was predeceased by his brothers Len, George and Robert, sister May and by his first wife Dorothy HAMILTON in 1946. A memorial celebration will be held at a later date. If desired, donations may be made to World Vision Canada or to a children's charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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TITLEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-08 published
ERWIN, Edith Rose Marie (née GREENWOOD)
Aged 80, passed away May 5, 2008 after losing a brave fight, with her family by her side. Sadly, she leaves behind Bill, her beloved husband of 60 years, and her six children; Susan (Rick), Gary (Carol), Barbra (Dan), Joe, Ted (Anja) and Jack (Denise). She is also survived by 12 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. “The memories and the love we shared through our 60 years will remain in my heart 'til we are together again. Love, Bill” She has gone to join her mother and father Henry GREENWOOD and Rose TITLEY; and her three brothers, Martin, Albert and Stuart. In accordance with Edith's wishes, cremation has taken place through Tannahill Funeral Home and no service will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Edith's memory to The Lung Association, or a charity of your choice.

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TITOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-25 published
TITOW, Irene
Passed away peacefully on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 at the Ukranian Care Centre. Beloved wife of the late Ivan TITOW. Loving mother of Ina ANTHONY and her husband Bill. Dear grandmother of Kira and Natalie. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere Ave., east of Jane subway, from 4: 30-6:30 p.m. on Friday with Panachyda beginning at 5:30 p.m. Visitation will also be held on Sunday, April 27 from 6-8 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Monday, April 28 at 12 noon at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church, 23 Henry Street, Toronto. Interment York Cemetery. For those who wish, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

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TITOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-26 published
TITOW, Irene
Passed away peacefully on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 at the Ukrainian Care Centre. Beloved wife of the late Ivan TITOW. Loving mother of Ina ANTHONY and her husband Bill. Dear grandmother of Kira and Natalie. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., at Windermere Ave., east of Jane subway, from 4: 30-6:30 p.m. on Friday with Panachyda beginning at 5:30 p.m. Visitation will also be held on Sunday, April 27 from 6-8 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Monday, April 28 at 12 noon at Holy Trinity Russian Orthodox Church, 23 Henry Street, Toronto. Interment York Cemetery. For those who wish, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario.

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TITTERINGTON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-12 published
Ambassador a hard-nosed negotiator who paved the way to free trade
A survivor of a torpedoed Royal Canadian Navy frigate during the Second World War, he learned how to exploit differences among trading regions and proved that Canada was capable of digging in its heels
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Jake WARREN was part of that generation of tough Canadians who saw action during the Second World War and went on to become architects of this country's post-war political and economic policies. Alongside such senior mandarins (and old Friends) as Simon Reisman, Gordon Robertson, Ed Ritchie and Saul Rae, Mr. WARREN represented a golden era when Canada came of age and made its mark internationally.
A highly respected diplomat and public servant for 34 years, Mr. WARREN was Canada's high commissioner to Britain and ambassador to the United States. Before and after those appointments, he was this country's top trade negotiator, a hard-nosed horse trader who co-ordinated tariff and trade deals on a global scale, paving the way for the 1988 Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement.
"In my family, we knew him as Uncle Jake," recalled Liberal member of Parliament and former Ontario premier Bob Rae, whose father, Saul, served with Mr. WARREN in post-war London. "He was somebody I always turned to for candid and direct advice. He was never shy about sharing his views."
Mr. WARREN had "a burning love" for Canada, eulogized his friend Thomas D'AQUINO, a former civil servant and now head of the Canadian Council of Chief Executives. He "took a strong interest in virtually every issue that came to define Canada as we passed into the new century: Our trading relationships with the world; our fiscal health; our constitutional debates; relations between English and French speaking people; our partnership with the United States the integrity and accountability of our political leaders."
Like many of his era, Mr. WARREN was fuelled by an intellectual hunger and zest for life that followed the trauma of having his warship blown out from under him. He joined the Royal Canadian Navy in 1941 and by 1944, was a lieutenant and navigation officer aboard the HMCS Valleyfield, a river-class frigate that had been commissioned only the year before.
Just before midnight on May 6, 1944, on the return leg of an escort mission, the Valleyfield was one of three frigates and two corvettes steaming 50 nautical miles south of Cape Race, Newfoundland. With the Valleyfield occupying the distant, astern position in the convoy, the ships were making good time to Saint_John's, when suddenly, a warning was sounded. Just as action stations were called, the German submarine U-548 fired a torpedo that ripped into the Valleyfield's port side. There was a tremendous explosion and the ship broke in two.
"She went down in 90 seconds," recalled Stanley TAPSON of Sidney, British Columbia, who was a stoker aboard the ship. "Jake was off duty that night but he was in the bridge cabin anyway."
The water temperature was barely above freezing. Of a crew of 168, 130 men perished. Because it happened late at night, most were asleep or off watch in the mess. The ship was cut neatly in half and they died trapped below decks, Mr. TAPSON said.
Asked how he survived clad in nothing but a lifejacket and underwear, Mr. TAPSON said, "I was 19." Mr. WARREN, he recalled, wore a thermal suit.
Of the crew who hit the water, only 38 survived. But for them the nightmare was just beginning. It was some time before the other ships in the convoy realized that the Valleyfield was missing. Finally, HMCS Giffard, a flower-class corvette, went about and steamed back to the survivors but could not stop. Under wartime regulations, the Giffard had orders to first try to hunt down the submarine.
Hours later, with all trace of the U-boat gone, the Giffard returned to the scene. But by then some of the men had perished in the water, either from hypothermia or from ingesting fuel oil that had sluiced from the hull. The survivors were finally taken on board and, once safely in port, they waited their turn to ride an ambulance to hospital.
"Jake comes up to me and puts his hand on my shoulder and says, 'You're next, Stan,' recalled Mr. TAPSON, his voice choking. "That's was typical. He was no put-on. He was a man's man and we all loved and respected him."
He was born on Happy Valley Farm, which grew tobacco in Howard Township outside London, Ontario, the only child of Thomas and Olive WARREN. At war's end, he returned to Queen's University to complete a bachelor's degree in politics and economics that he had started earlier.
Mr. WARREN and many his age were snapped up by a war-weary External Affairs Department, which was eager for fresh talent. For a dozen years, he held junior postings at Canadian embassies in London, Washington and Paris, and showed such a flair for trade issues that in 1958 he was appointed assistant deputy minister in the department of trade and commerce.
Two years later, he was named vice-chairman of the Canadian delegation at the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade in Geneva, a posting that lasted four years. Then it was back to the renamed industry, trade and commerce ministry in Ottawa, this time as deputy minister.
At the age of 50, Mr. WARREN was named high commissioner. "He was one the youngest high commissioners ever sent," said his daughter, Hilary NICOLSON. "He relished it and did a phenomenal job of promoting Canada as a young and youthful country, full of prospects."
The three-year posting was replaced by another high-level appointment as Canada's ambassador to the United States, overlapping with the presidencies of Gerald Ford and Jimmy Carter. It was under Mr. Ford's administration that Canada was invited to join the G-6 Group of Nations, making it the G-7. Mr. WARREN was said to have played a large role in that decision, and he also laid plans for the later move of Canada's embassy to Pennsylvania Avenue, just down the street from the White House.
When Mr. Ford died in 2006, Mr. WARREN recalled that the president "understood us, and there didn't seem to be huge, terrible tensions or problems. We didn't have a lumber dispute, and we didn't have water diversion."
Another accomplishment of note on his watch was an agreement reached between the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the National Research Council of Canada for the development and building of a "Space Shuttle Attached Remote Manipulator System," or the Canadarm.
In 1977, rumours surfaced that Mr. WARREN was being pushed out of his job because of conflict with Ivan Head, a top adviser to then-prime minister Pierre Trudeau, over preparations for Mr. Trudeau's trip to Washington that February. Mr. WARREN was also rumoured to be on the short list for governor-general in 1979, but the job went to Edward Schreyer.
In 1977, he returned to Canada as co-ordinator of the Tokyo Round of the Multilateral Trade Negotiations, which were aimed at revamping the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade. To the amazement of many, Mr. WARREN showed that Canada, a relatively small player by international standards, was able to exact concessions from Europe, the U.S. and Japan.
In fact, the way he put it, Canadian officials learned how to exploit differences among the three most powerful trading regions. Mr. WARREN said Canada had proved quite capable of digging in its heels on import restrictions. "Not unreasonable" was a phrase he often used to describe the concessions achieved by Canada.
While it's fair to say many Canadians would find topics such as tariff quotas and countervailing duties less than scintillating, Mr. WARREN truly loved the field. "He actually found the subject fascinating," his daughter noted. "The negotiating skills required, the subject matter. Free trade was something that he believed strongly in. Dry maybe, but for him, the subtleties were extraordinary."
He was recalled as a wonderful wit but a rather formal man who would arch his back at the dinner table to remind his children to sit up straight. However, he mellowed with age, his daughter pointed out.
On retirement in 1979, he was appointed vice-chairman of the Bank of Montreal and made responsible for its growing international network. Three years later, he was named to the Order of Canada. But another major challenge awaited. A month shy of his 65th birthday, the government of Quebec retained him as its free-trade policy adviser during the North American Free Trade Agreement negotiations.
The Globe and Mail called his appointment "intriguing" and an ambiguous move by then premier Robert Bourassa, who "often sends out double messages of this kind, using someone's reputation to suggest that he is heading in one direction, and then moving in a quite different direction.
"On the face of it, it looks as if Quebec went out to get a big-league player; someone whose experience would match that of Simon Reisman," wrote Graham Fraser in 1986.
Mr. WARREN's presence suggested to others that Mr. Bourassa favoured the idea of the trade talks' success. And while there were some who said an independent Quebec's economy would be viable, Mr. WARREN's view was: "Viable means 'not dead.' That's not what I want for Quebec."
He wanted the best for all of Canada. As he warned before the House of Commons committee on the Meech Lake Accords, "If there is a split or some arrangement that is less efficient than what we have at the moment, I think we will lose something. Both Canada and Quebec will lose."
Jack Hamilton WARREN was born in Ridgetown, Ontario, on April 10, 1921. He died April 1, 2008 of natural causes in Ottawa. He was 87. He leaves his wife of 55 years Joan (TITTERINGTON,) children Hilary, Martin, Jennifer, and Ian, and nine grandchildren.
He is also survived by his Valleyfield shipmates, Stanley TAPSON (Sidney, British Columbia); Bill EDWARDS (Vancouver); Don GODWIN (Hamilton, Ontario;) and Ian TAIT/TAITE/TATE (Port Colbourne, Ontario

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TITUS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-14 published
FENWICK, Earl Floyd
At Chelsey Park Nursing Home, London on Monday, May 12, 2008 Earl Floyd FENWICK, C.D., in his 90th year. Dearly beloved husband and soul-mate of Audrey Marie (REDMAN) for 69 years. Much loved and respected father of Ken and Marilyn FENWICK of Zurich, Ontario Teri-Anne and Gary SUTHERLAND of London, Ontario; Bill and Anne FENWICK of St. Catharines, Ontario. Loving grandfather of Kendra (Ryan) WILKINS, Kyle (Christa) FENWICK, Kari-Lyn (Paul) TITUS, Krista (Mark) ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Kelly (Todd) SCHAUS, and Todd, Chad (Sarah,) Reid, Colin, and Katelyn FENWICK. Great-grandfather of Devin and Jalyn FENWICK; Connor and Austin TITUS and Ethan WILKINS. Earl served in the Second World War with the Royal Canadian Service Corps from 1939-1945. He then served with the Royal Canadian Service Corps Reserve Force 4 Column from 1946-1980. Earl was also a member of the London Fire Department for 39 years retiring as Acting Fire Chief in 1981. He was also a life member of the Army, Navy and Air Force Veterans #393 and a member of the Royal Canadian Legion #317. Visitation will be held on Thursday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the funeral service will be conducted on Friday, May 16th, 2008, at 11: 00 a.m. Private interment, Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, those wishing to make a donation in memory of Earl are asked to consider the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association.

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TITUS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-05 published
HUSBAND, Neil
Quiet, gentle man, husband, father, son, brother, adventurer. Born September 6, 1950, in Kapuskasing, Ontario Died July 1, 2007, in a helicopter crash in northern Saskatchewan, aged 56.
By Jo Anne TITUS and Kateryna HUSBAND, Page L6
The telephone call came on Monday, July 2. Neil's helicopter had gone down in a remote lake in northern Saskatchewan.
He was a flying electronic technologist, a prospector of minerals from the air. That morning, military and Royal Canadian Mounted Police search-and-rescue teams fanned out from Points North Landing. The bottom had fallen out of our world.
Neil came into this world on our parents' anniversary. He was the second of four children of George and Corrie HUSBAND. He was blond and cute, and he stayed that way the rest of his life.
Neil left this world on July 1, 2007. He was wearing red. Neil would do that. It was Canada Day.
His high-school interest in Air Cadets led to lifelong Friendships and a love of flying and electronics. After studying engineering at Ryerson Polytechnical Institute, he started doing mineral exploration, spending months in remote camps in Africa, South America and Canada's Far North.
Neil and Kateryna met when he was hired as an engineer at the geophysical research company in Mississauga where she worked. Two years later, they married on March 15, 1980. Neil was paid on the 1st and 15th of every month, so he said he would always have money to buy Kateryna a present. And he'd never forget which anniversary they'd be celebrating.
Eventually, Neil traded the bush plane for a jet plane and a business suit, travelling across North America and the Pacific for computer seminars. He and Kateryna had three children - Kaitlynn, Alexandria and Andrew - with all the teachers' meetings, riding, music lessons and Air Cadet camps that involved.
Neil and Kateryna always told the kids they were gifts. They found out they were going to be parents on their fourth wedding anniversary; they found out about Alex on Kateryna's 30th birthday and three days before moving into a four-bedroom house in Shelburne, Ontario, they found out about Andrew, a housewarming present of sorts.
With the family spreading its wings, Neil recently went back to the wilds of prospecting. He kept in touch by e-mail, and the last photos we have of him are of a healthy, happy man. Neil was known as the Gentle Giant - everyone liked and respected him. He loved the North, the job, the flying and especially the people.
Neil was buried in Kapuskasing, across from the airfield where he had spent so many hours as a teenager helping to rebuild a Mosquito.
We miss him terribly.
Jo Anne TITUS is Neil's sister, and Kateryna HUSBAND is his wife and soulmate.

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