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"THI" 2008 Obituary


THIBAUDEAU  THIBAULT  THIBEAULT  THICKE  THIEL  THIELENS  THIERLING  THIERS  THISTLE 

THIBAUDEAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-13 published
REANEY, James Crerar
Peacefully at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre, London, on Wednesday, June 11, 2008, in his 82nd year. Survived by his wife Colleen THIBAUDEAU; his son James Stewart REANEY and his wife Susan WALLACE of London and their daughter Elizabeth Wallace REANEY in Seoul, Korea; his daughter Susan REANEY and her husband Ian CHUNN and their daughter Edie Elizabeth Reaney CHUNN of Vancouver; his sister Wilma McCAIG and brother Ron COOKE. Predeceased by his son John Andrew REANEY (1966) and his parents James N. REANEY and Elizabeth CRERAR. Our thanks to the kind and caring staff and fellow residents of Marian Villa, to the many Friends who visited Jamie, and to all who have been involved in his care. A Celebration of Jamie's life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church, 1061 Richmond Street at Sherwood Avenue, London, on Saturday, June 14 at 2: 00 p.m. A day of remembrance will take place this summer. Cremation will be followed by a private interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, London. In lieu of flowers, please consider an act of kindness to someone in need or make a contribution to a charity of your choice. (www.HarrisFuneralHome.ca)

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THIBAUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
REANEY, James Crerar
Peacefully at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre, London, on Wednesday, June 11, 2008, in his 82nd year. Survived by his wife Colleen THIBAUDEAU; his son James Stewart REANEY and his wife Susan WALLACE of London and their daughter Elizabeth Wallace REANEY in Seoul, Korea; his daughter Susan REANEY and her husband Ian CHUNN and their daughter Edie Elizabeth Reaney CHUNN of Vancouver; his sister Wilma McCAIG and brother Ron COOKE. Predeceased by his son John Andrew REANEY (1966) and his parents James N. REANEY and Elizabeth CRERAR. Our thanks to the kind and caring staff and fellow residents of Marian Villa, to the many Friends who visited Jamie, and to all who have been involved in his care. A Celebration of Jamie's life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church, 1061 Richmond Street at Sherwood Avenue, London, on Saturday, June 14 at 2: 00 p.m. A day of remembrance will take place this summer. Cremation will be followed by a private interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, London. In lieu of flowers, please consider an act of kindness to someone in need or make a contribution to a charity of your choice. (www.HarrisFuneralHome.ca)

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THIBAUDEAU o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
Author was 'one of the finest writers Canada has produced'
Long-time University of Western Ontario professor played with form, voice and space on the page, the airwaves and the stage. He rarely strayed from his regional roots
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
Imagine a totally creative person - poet, playwright, short-story writer, painter, pianist. That was James REANEY, one of our most diverse and prolific artists, a man whose virtuosity extended from theatrical workshops with children to literary scholarship in the academy. He played with form, voice and space on the page, the airwaves and the stage. Like Alice Munro, he rarely strayed from his physical roots in Southwestern Ontario, the source of his inspiration.
"James REANEY did not fit any of the usual Canadian literary moulds, which was one of the best things about him. He was a mould-maker," said literary scholar Germaine Warkentin, the editor of several critical volumes of his poetry and prose. Praising him as "one of the finest writers Canada has produced," Prof. Warkentin said: "He had an immense range - poetry both highly literary and very simple, plays that any company could put on, whether professional or community, opera librettos, and (early on) dazzling short stories that upset a literary applecart that needed upsetting."
Margaret Atwood says he "was a true original," who was very "playful, inventive, musical and theatrical." She still remembers seeing him perform his early work, One Man Masque, when she was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto in the late 1950s. "It was never to be forgotten by anybody who saw it," she said. "The first half was life and the second half death and, in order to make the transition, he climbed into a coffin and came out wearing goggles, furry driver's gloves and carrying a blue flashlight. It was one of the strange, surreal moments of theatre," she added - perhaps unnecessarily.
"In the late 19th century and through our own time, poetry got lost in a march toward realism and prose," said Don Rubin, founding editor of the Canadian Theatre Review and Director of York University's Graduate Program in Theatre Studies. "James REANEY was one of those few Western artists of the modern period - T.S. Eliot was another - who sought to bring poetry back into the theatre. Neither he nor Eliot succeeded, but what a glorious war REANEY fought for the art in Canada.
"His Donnellys trilogy is a mammoth achievement and one of the major building blocks of the post-Centennial theatre in this country," said Prof. Rubin. "It proved that poetry really did have a place on our stages and it proved to REANEY himself that he actually had a place on our stages as well."
James (Jamie) Crerar REANEY was born on a farm in South Easthope near Stratford, Ontario, in the middle 1920s. He was the only son of James Nesbitt REANEY and Elizabeth (née CRERAR) REANEY. An imaginative and solitary child who believed that "metaphor is reality," he absorbed the landscape, history and social networks of Southwestern Ontario and made them central to his work. As a child, he attended Elmhurst School, a country school near his home, and studied piano with Cora B. Ahrens, one of first music teachers to travel around Perth County giving lessons.
His parents separated and his mother remarried and had two other children. It may have been his step-father who first told him, when he was 10, the legend of the Black Donnellys, the Irish immigrants who were massacred in their farmhouse near Lucan in 1880. This reimagined story inspired his famous trilogy of plays in the 1970s.
For high school, he went to Stratford Vocational Institute in nearby Stratford, entering in the year that the Second World War began and graduating the same month the Allies invaded Normandy. When asked why he began to write drama, Prof. REANEY responded that the impetus could have been "anything from a neurotic compulsion to bore my community, to a healthy desire to do something that my town could focus on, to things hidden deep in childhood like toys, cardboard cut-out theatres in popcorn boxes and Christmas stockings, and so on." In fact, he wrote his first play in high school because it was expected of him - "they had a tradition of producing plays."
He moved to Toronto in September, 1944, to study English literature at the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1948 and a master's degree the following year. At university, he became involved in performance and writing and Friendships with other literary and artistic types, including the anthologist Robert Weaver, the poet Colleen THIBAUDEAU, and the musician and composer John Beckwith, a lifelong friend and frequent collaborator. They later wrote four operas together, and many other works in which Prof. Beckwith set Prof. REANEY's words to music.
"What I found working with him was that he always understood musically what I was talking about, whereas a lot of writers don't," said Prof. Beckwith. "He had a musical approach and was very interested in opera literature, so it wasn't like starting from square one."
The poet Earle Birney met him in the late 1940s at a party and was enough taken by the experience that he noted: "He was still a varsity sophomore, but a very unusual one. I've never forgotten the impression he made on me that evening - a small packet of firecrackers set alight, he went sizzling and leaping mischievously from one guest to another, an excited child popping adult questions, bounding into the kitchen and back to the hall, and continually exploding with ideas, images and emotions. I thought him a marvellously inventive Ariel, and still do."
At U of T, he was strongly influenced by Northrop Frye and Fearful Symmetry, his book on the poetry of William Blake, which was published in 1947. Even as an undergraduate, he was already writing poetry and short stories. The first brought him acclaim, the second notoriety. He was only 23 when he won the Governor-General's Award in 1949 for his first collection of poems, The Red Heart. A collage in which a young man tries to reconcile his childhood memories with the harsh and often incomprehensible world of experience, the volume contains 42 poems, written during his university days, including The School Globe, in which the poet pictures himself holding the "wrecked blue cardboard pumpkin" with its lines of latitude and longitude, and laments the loss of the "fair fields and lands" of his childhood. Here is how it ends: "If I raise my hand/ No tall teacher will demand/ What I want./ But if someone in authority/ Were here, I'd say/ Give me this old world back/ Whose husk I clasp/ And I'll give you in exchange/ The great sad real one/ That's filled/ Not with a child's remembered and pleasant skies/ But with blood, pus, death, stepmothers, and lies./"
The year before, he had published a short story, The Box Social in the Undergrad, the student magazine at University College. The story, which is told from the point of view of Sylvia, a young woman from a small community who has been impregnated and abandoned by a local hero, has a surprising and disturbing payback ending. When The Box Social, with its bold (for the times) messages about illegitimate stillborn babies, was republished in New Liberty, it ignited a firestorm of protest, including inflammatory letters from 800 subscribers. The furor doused his prospects of becoming editor of Undergrad.
The Bully, another short story he wrote about this time (contrasting the etiquette rituals in high school with the pecking order in a chicken coop), was included in an anthology edited by his friend Robert Weaver in the late 1950s. Margaret Atwood read it as an undergraduate at the University of Toronto and later included it in The New Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories, which she edited with Mr. Weaver in 1987. In her introduction, Ms. Atwood suggested that Prof. REANEY anticipated what came to be called Southern Ontario Gothic, a group of writers including Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Timothy Findley, Jane Urquhart and Barbara Gowdy, who inhabit a literary landscape whose "main features were defined earlier by James REANEY." As for Prof. REANEY's influence on her own work, she said simply: "Without The Bully, my fiction would have followed other paths. If there are such things as 'key' reading experiences, The Bully was certainly one of mine."
After university, he travelled in France and then accepted at job teaching at the University of Manitoba, a position he held for a decade, from 1950-1960. He married his classmate Colleen THIBAUDEAU on her birthday, December 29, 1951. They had three children, James (1952), John (born in 1954; died of meningitis in 1966) and Susan (1959), and combined family life and artistic enterprise. As a poet she has published several volumes including The Martha Landscapes, The Artemesia Book and The Patricia Album.
In the late 1950s, Prof. REANEY took a two-year sabbatical to return to the University of Toronto to complete his doctoral dissertation on The Influence of Spenser on Yeats under Northrop Frye, receiving his degree in 1958, the same year that he published his second volume of poetry, A Suit of Nettles. That book, which earned his second Governor-General's Award, drew upon his academic work and echoed Spenser's The Shepheardes Calendar. Being himself, however, he set his dozen pastoral ecologues, one for each calendar month, in Southwestern Ontario and wrote from the perspective of barnyard geese living through their life cycle from birth to slaughter at Christmas time. The poems, which combine a variety of poetic forms from allegorical to graphic, show him at his quirky, inventive best.
The REANEYs returned to his creative heartland in 1960 when he accepted an academic position at the University of Western Ontario in London. The following decade was a kaleidoscope of literary activity. In 1962, he published Twelve Letters to a Small Town, a collection of a dozen lyric poems in which the poet recreates the geography and social psychology of his home town of Stratford, Ontario, in the era of the 1930s and 1940s in a mythological form.
Living in London, teaching at the university, married to a poet, surrounded by his own children, he began writing plays and books for young people, creating and printing his own literary magazine, Alphabet, on the iconography of the imagination, writing operas and collaborating on setting his poems to music with his friend, composer John Beckwith. He also began working in the theatre with Prof. Beckwith's then wife, Pamela Terry. She organized a public reading of A Suit of Nettles, and persuaded him to write The Killdeer, which she then directed at Toronto's Coach House Theatre. Reviews were mixed after the opening on January 13, 1960. Mavor Moore lauded it in The Telegram as a turning point in Canadian dramatic history, while Nathan Cohen dismissed it as "a desperately bad play" in The Star. Nevertheless, it won a prize at the Dominion Drama Festival.
Prof. REANEY was experimenting with music, form, dialogue and myth and creating his own way of expressing them. Night-blooming Cereus and One-man Masque, which showed both the gentle pastoral side of Prof. REANEY and the sardonic darker side of his sensibility, ran as a double bill in 1960 and were published in The Killdeer and Other Plays in 1963. The plays and his book of poetry Twelve Letters to a Small Town combined to earn him his third Governor-General's award that year. Other plays followed: The Easter Egg; The Sun and the Moon; three marionette plays (Apple Butter, Little Red-Riding Hood and Aladdin and the Magic Lamp); Listen to the Wind, which he also directed; and Colours in the Dark, which premiered at the Avon Theatre at the Stratford Festival. He also developed the Listener's Workshop and began working with child and adult actors.
Having escaped from this swirl of creative activity to spend a sabbatical year with his family in Victoria, about as far from his creative landscape as he could go in Canada, Prof. REANEY began writing The Donnelly Trilogy. The three plays, Sticks and Stones, The St. Nicholas Hotel, Wm. Donnelly, Prop., and Handcuffs, form the pinnacle of Prof. REANEY's work for the theatre. They went through an extensive workshop process before they were premiered at Tarragon Theatre in Toronto between 1973 and 1975 in productions directed by Keith Turnbull. They revolve around a feud which began in Tipperary in Ireland, was transplanted to Canada and culminated in the murders of James Donnelly and five members of his family near Lucan, Ontario. The material, which incorporated kin, revenge, rural Ontario, myth, and the possibility of reworking established views of innocence and guilt, was rich ore for Prof. REANEY. The middle play, St. Nicholas Hotel, won the Chalmers Award for best Canadian Play in 1974, while the trilogy is listed by the Oxford Dictionary of Plays as among the 1,000 most significant plays of all time.
He never stopped writing, painting and creating. His final books of poetry were Performance Poems (1990) and Souwesto Home (2005). The Champlain Society published The Donnelly Documents: An Ontario Vendetta, edited and with an introduction by Prof. REANEY in 2004. Only this spring, the McMichael Gallery in Kleinberg, Ontario, mounted The Iconography of the Imagination, more than 50 landscapes, sketches and drawings that he had made between the 1940s and the mid-1990s.
About five years ago, he was diagnosed with kidney disease. He began having dialysis and eventually needed more medical care than he could receive at home. Nevertheless, he kept on writing, painting and editing, often with the help of Friends and colleagues. Even in his last months, he was able "to make sounds and try to shape them" on an electric keyboard, according to his son James. And while the doctors said he had dementia, Prof. REANEY was able to communicate with his family, even in his final days - making a scowl, for example, when asked to create an image in response to the name Nathan Cohen.
James REANEY, O.C. PhD, F.R.S.C., was born near Stratford, Ontario, on September 1, 1926. He died at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre in London, Ontario, on June 11, 2008. He was 81, and had been suffering from kidney disease and dementia. He is survived by Colleen THIBAUDEAU, his wife of more than 50 years, his children James and Susan, two granddaughters, his two step-siblings and his extended family. A celebration of his life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church in London on Sat. June 14.

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THIBAULT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-19 published
HUDSON, Shirley Margaret (née TURNER)
Peacefully, at Kensington Village Nursing Home on Monday, February 18, 2008, Shirley Margaret (née TURNER) HUDSON of London, formerly of Thorndale. Beloved wife for 37 years of the late Herbert Kenneth HUDSON (1976) and of the late Clinton E. HUDSON (2000.) Loved by her children Margaret and Jim SMITH, London; Rhonda and Wallace McLAY, London; John and Eleanor HUDSON, Thorndale; and Donald HUDSON and Kay AHN, Pickering. She adored her 11 grandchildren Bruce SMITH and Heather McNEELY, Greg and Cathy SMITH, Krista and Glenn GREENFIELD, John and Melinda McLAY, Andrea and Chad MORE, Jennifer and Eric KUBELKA, Steven HUDSON and Jennifer DAYMENT, Mary HUDSON and Mark ADELSON, Sarah and Adam AFFLECK, Adam HUDSON, Ryan and Melissa HUDSON and her 13 great-grandchildren Megan and Kaitlin SMITH, Andrew, Kinsey and Christopher GREENFIELD, Hope, Grace and John McLAY, Kate and April MORE, Josie and Claire KUBELKA and Braydon AFFLECK. She is survived by a daughter-in-law Nancy HUDSON, a sister Joyce ARMITAGE, a sister-in-law Evelyn TURNER and Clint's family Gary and Marsha HUDSON and Sharon and Bob THIBAULT. She leaves many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends. Shirley was predeceased by her parents Wilbert and Frances TURNER and by siblings Olive ROBERTS, Bruce TURNER, Edna Shoebottom, Grant TURNER, Maxine Parkinson, Una McLeod and sister-in-law Mabelle Risdon. Shirley was born on October 13, 1918 in London Township. In 1939 she married and moved to the first concession of West Nissouri where she lived until her final home at Kensington Village, London. Herbert and Shirley were active in the community and church. Shirley loved to cook, garden, sew, do crafts but her passion was her quilts and art projects. She also enjoyed the outdoors. The family appreciates the care given to Shirley during her stay at Kensington. She will be missed. Friends will be received at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne St.), on Wednesday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted at Siloam United Church, 1240 Fanshawe Park Rd. E., on Thursday, February 21, 2008, at 12: 30 p.m. with Rev. Sheila MacGREGOR officiating. Private family interment in Saint_John's Cemetery, Arva. Donations to the Alzheimer Society, 555 Southdale Rd. E, Suite 100, London, Ontario, N6E 1A2 or Memorial Fund at Siloam United Church would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. Shirley Margaret HUDSON.

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THIBAULT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-28 published
DOUCETTE, Joseph Edward
Peacefully at Parkwood Hospital, on Tuesday, February 26, 2008, Joseph Edward DOUCETTE, at the age of 83 years, surrounded by his loving family. He will be greatly missed by his wife Jeanne, his four children, Pierrette AGEN, Michelle JACKSON (Bradley) of Panama City Beach, Florida; Richard of San Diego, California and the late Suzanne WHITE/WHYTE (James;) and one grand_son Anthony MacFARLANE and his life partner Martin McGRENERE. Also survived by his brothers and sisters, Gerry of Rochester, Alberta; Tommy (Patsy); Rodolphe (Madeleine); and Hubert, all of Toronto; Delima NADON (late Albert) of Alban, Ontario; and Elizabeth "Betty" SEGUIN (late Arthur) of Sudbury. Predeceased by his brothers and sisters, Roseanna HAMEL (late George GAUTHIER and the late Eddie HAMEL;) Leone THIBAULT (Rene) of Cobourg, Ontario; Euclide, Fabiola; Georges (late Marie); Andre and Marie. Joseph was an avid outdoorsman. He enjoyed fishing, hunting, walking and woodworking. He was a highly skilled tradesperson, having worked on numerous Toronto landmarks. He was always proud of and steadfastly dedicated to his family. The family wishes to extend their heartfelt thanks to the staff of Parkwood Hospital-Palliative Care Unit for their compassionate care and support. Visitation will be held on Thursday, February 28, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, London, with prayers at 7 p.m. and a legion service at 7: 30 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Peter's Basilica (Lady Chapel), 196 Dufferin Ave, London on Friday, February 29, 2008, at 10: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Parkwood Hospital - Palliative Care Unit or to the Canadian Cancer Society. Online condolences may be sent to condolences@westviewfuneralchapel.com

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THIBEAULT o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-06-04 published
Joseph Dominic Gerald BELLAND
In Loving Memory of Joseph Dominic Gerald BELLAND, September 27, 1936 - June 1, 2008, who died peacefully at the Mindemoya Hospital on Sunday at the age of 71 years.
Gerald worked as a warehouse supervisor for Falconbridge. Predeceased by parents
Dominic and Marcia (née BARNES) BELLAND. Beloved husband of Claire of Billings Township,+ Manitoulin Is.
Loved father of Gerry (wife Denise) of Temiscaming, Robert (wife Krystine) of Barrie. Cherished grandfather of James, Samantha and Robyn. Dear brother of Jeannette DUBOIS,+ Theresa Currie (predeceased,) Alphonse
of Armstrong Lake, Rene-Aime DADEY (husband Lawrence predeceased) of Sandy Lake, Man., Yvonne CROTEAU (husband Frank) of Val Therese, Vera (friend Art RIVERS) and Ronald both of Sudbury. Remembered by Claire's family, John Junior LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Dorina CHIZDA (predeceased) (Mike,) Doris ALLAIN, Marg FLESCH (predeceased,) Leonard LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (wife Raymone,) Shirley THIBEAULT (husband Tony,) Rhea HALL (husband Tom,) Eddie (wife Janet,) Henry LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (wife Noella,) Danny LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (wife Kathy,) Linda DAOUST (husband Willie,) Mary LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Patsy LAFRAMBOISE (husband Pat,) Beverly LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Micheal LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (wife Pauly,) Peter LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, and sister-in-law Lillian LOW/LOWE/LOUGH (predeceased.) Will be missed by many nieces and nephews. Family and Friends gathered from 10 am until the Funeral Mass at 3: 00 pm at Our Lady of Canada Catholic Church, Mindemoya on Tuesday, June 3, 2008. On Wednesday, June 4, 2008 family and Friends will gather from 10 am until Funeral Mass at 1: 00 pm at Holy Redeemer Church, Bancroft Drive, Sudbury. Cremation. Donations to Manitoulin Lodge, Alzheimers, or the Mindemoya Hospital Aux would be greatly appreciated in Gerald's memory. Arrangements with Island Funeral Home, Little Current

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THICKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-06 published
BRIDGES, Sister Jo-Anne (Frances) I.B.V.M.
Died peacefully at Sunnybrook Hospital, Toronto, on Tuesday, March 4, 2008. Sr. BRIDGES was in her 45th year as a member of the Institute of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Loretto Sisters). Daughter of the late Eric BRIDGES and Iris Anna May GAHAN. Sr. BRIDGES is survived by her sister Diane Bridges THICKE, (Brian THICKE, M.D.,) brother John (Linda) BRIDGES, nephew James BRIDGES, aunt Joyce CONRY and many cousins and dear Friends. Sr. Jo-Anne taught at Loretto College School and Loretto Abbey for some years, then assisted in the High School Library and served as Regional Archivist for the I.B.V.M. Community. Friends may call at Loretto Abbey, 101 Mason Blvd. on Friday, March 7th from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Prayers will be at 7: 00 p.m. on Friday evening. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at Loretto Abbey Chapel, on Saturday, March 8th at 10: 00 a.m. Interment at Mount Hope Cemetery.

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THIEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-21 published
WALKER- THIEL, Mary Avis Ann (formerly WALKER, née SIMMONS)
Suddenly as a result of a motor vehicle collision on Tuesday, February 19, 2008, Mary Avis Ann (SIMMONS) WALKER- THIEL of R.R.#3, Zurich in her 54th year. Loved daughter of Gordon and Georgina SIMMONS and daughter-in-law of Stewart and the late Alice THIEL. Beloved wife of Hubert THIEL and the late Richard WALKER (1989.) Dear mother of Jennette WALKER of Zurich, Sarah WALKER of London, Michael and Meaghan THIEL of Orono, Janet and Damion Willert of R.R.3 Zurich, Matthew THIEL and Katherine THIEL at home. Loving grandmother of Ashton, Olivia and Ethan WILLERT. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Gordon SIMMONS, Michael and Heather SIMMONS, Patrick and Cathy SIMMONS, Brian and Bev SIMMONS, Eunice and Doug TAILOR/TAYLOR, Gerry and Diane THIEL, Ken and Donna THIEL and Sue and Andy MARKSON. Sadly missed by many nieces, nephews, great-nieces and great-nephews. Predeceased by sons John and Evan (1989), daughter Charlotte in infancy, sister-in-law Beth SIMMONS, brother-in-law Michael WALKER and Richard's parents Neil and Helen WALKER. Visitation in the J.M. McBeath Funeral Home, 49 Goshen Street North, Zurich on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be conducted in Saint Peter's Lutheran Church, Zurich on Monday, February 25, 2008 at 11 a.m. Pastor Ann KRUEGER officiating. Interment Saint Peter's Lutheran Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to The Alzheimer Society, Saint Peter's Lutheran Church or a charity of ones choice. Condolences forwarded through jmmcbeathfuneralhome.com A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mary WALKER- THIEL

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THIEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-26 published
SIMMONS, Gordon P.
At the Woodstock General Hospital on Saturday, February 23, 2008. Gordon P. SIMMONS of Woodstock in his 89th year. Beloved husband of Georgina "Ina" E. (née COLLINS) SIMMONS for nearly 65 years. Dear father of Archdeacon Gordon SIMMONS of Sarnia, Patrick SIMMONS and his wife Kathryn of Ingersoll, Michael SIMMONS and his wife Heather, Brian SIMMONS and his wife Beverly all of Woodstock and father-in-law of Hubert THIEL of Zurich. Loved grandfather of thirteen grandchildren and nine great-grandchildren. Predeceased by his daughter Mary WALKER- THIEL (2008,) daughter-in-law Beth SIMMONS (1994,) son-in-law Richard WALKER (1989,) grandchildren John, Charlotte, and Evan, brothers Cecil and Douglas SIMMONS and sisters Florence OLMSTEAD and Edith WEIR. Gordon was a Past Grand Noble of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, past member of the Ancient Mystic Order of Samaritans, Past President of the Canadian Autoworkers Union Local 636 Retirees, served overseas during World War 2 and a longtime member of the Royal Canadian Legion Br. #55, Woodstock. Friends may call at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Avenue, Woodstock 519-539-0004 on Wednesday February 27, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service to celebrate Gordon's Life will be held at the Christ Church Anglican Oxford Centre on Thursday at 1: 30 p.m. with Rev. Bruce GENGE officiating. Interment later in the Anglican Cemetery. Contribution to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario, Alzheimer Society, Canadian Cancer Society or the Christ Church Anglican Oxford Centre would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com An Odd Fellow service under the auspice of the Independent Order of Odd Fellow #269 will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday evening at 6: 15 p.m. A legion service under the auspices of Royal Canadian Legion Br. #55, Woodstock will be held at the funeral home on Wednesday evening at 6: 30 p.m.

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THIEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-12 published
KOYLE, Elizabeth (THIEL)
At Extendicare Nursing Home, London, on Sunday March 9, 2008. Elizabeth (THIEL) KOYLE of London in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Ellison F. KOYLE (1975.) Loving mother of Judy (Norm,) Doug (Betty), Pat (late Mike) and David (Arlene). Proud grandmother of Kristina, Jim, Steve, Dan, Kellie, Terry, Chris and Kevin. Also loved by her great-grandchildren J.D., Darren, Beth, Samantha, Broden, Nichole, Brenden, Kaitlyn, Aiden, Aurora and Kyle. Will be missed by daughter-in-law Diana. Friends will be received by the family from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Friday, at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday March 15th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment in Woodland Cemetery, London. Donations may be made to the London Regional Cancer Program, 747 Baseline Road East, London, Ontario N6C 2R6. Online condolences accepted at www.amgfh.com

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THIEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-12 published
VINCENT, Ira " Jake"
Peacefully, at South Huron Hospital, Exeter, Monday, March 10, 2008, one day after celebrating his 90th birthday, Ira "Jake" VINCENT of Grand Bend. Loved "Unc" of Joe and Kathy DUMIGAN, Marg MILLER and Dan STANLAKE, Gayle and Scott MacGREGOR, Karen and Randy THIEL, Eldon and Fran BULLOCK, Donna and Russ THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, John and Sharon BULLOCK, Betty GILL, Shirley and Gord GOTELAER, Georgina and Ron DESJARDINE, Fredricka and Ed HUNTER, Gordon and Louise TEETZEL. Remembered by his many great-nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by his parents Norman and Mabel (DUNCAN) VINCENT, sisters Dorothy BULLOCK, Viola TEETZEL, Minerva PRANCE and Evelyn DUMIGAN. Resting at the T. Harry Hoffman and Sons Funeral Home, Dashwood, with visitation Thursday 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held at the Church of God, Grand Bend, Friday, March 14, 2008 at 11 a.m. The Rev. Art KRUEGER officiating. Interment Grand Bend Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to the Church of God, Blue Water Rest Home or charity of choice would be appreciated. Condolences at www.hoffmanfuneralhome.com

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THIEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-29 published
WALKER- THIEL, Mary
The family of the late Mary WALKER- THIEL would like to express a sincere thank-you to all who have helped us during our time of tragedy. Thank-you to all who were at the scene of the accident, to the ambulance attendants, to the Exeter Firefighters and to the Ontario Provincial Police, especially Pat ARMSTRONG. Thank-you to the staff at South Huron Hospital for your caring and empathetic kindness, especially to Doctor FARRELL, Nancy HODGERT, Marg WILLIAMSON, and Sherri LEIS. Thank-you to the Victim Service Response Teams in Huron and Oxford Counties for all of your support. Thank-you to the staff at London Health Sciences Centre Trauma Unit for your compassionate care, especially Karen PIERRE, Lisa HARKNESS, Deb, Ashley and Macy. Thank-you to all who sent flowers, food, cards, or made donations. The support from the community has been incredible. Thank-you to everyone who assisted with the beautiful service, especially Mark HEIMRICH and Bob KREUGER for the sound system and to the First Zurich Scouts and Guiders for the Honor Guard. Thank-you to Joyce McBETH and staff, the Zurich Arena staff, and to the Evangelical Lutheran Women ladies group for the luncheon. Also a special thank-you to Hay Mutual Insurance Company and to our family's employers. Thank-you most of all to Pastor Ann KREUGER for your dedication and words of compassion, we would not be getting through this without you. Thank-you to those we may have forgotten to name. May the Lord bless you all. Hub and the Simmons- WALKER- THIEL families.

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THIELENS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-27 published
BLAKE, Gladys Eileen
A resident of Wallaceburg, passed away peacefully on Thursday, June 26, 2008 in her 91st year. Gladys is the daughter of the late Clayton and Charlotte (DRUER) BROWN and John EVANS. Beloved wife of the late Michael C. BLAKE (January 2000.) Loving mother and mother-in-law of Michael BLAKE of McGregor, Gary and Donna of Bayfield, Fred and Myrna BLAKE of Wallaceburg and Judy BLAKE and William THIELENS of Wallaceburg. Dear grandmother of Michael BLAKE Jr. and Laurie CAMPBELL, Mary and Tony PICCININ, Christopher and Siobhan BLAKE, Kari Lynn BLAKE and Ron KIRKORIAN, Mark BLAKE and Nancy, Cindy and Paul CONTE, Ryan and Denise BLAKE and Dawn and Dan TOMS and 12 great-grandchildren. Grandmother-in-law of Bonny BUTLER. Sister-in-law of Bella BROWN and brother of the late Fred BROWN. Friends may call at the Haycock-Cavanagh Funeral Home, 409 Nelson Street in Wallaceburg from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Friday. Parish Prayers will be at 7 p.m. The Funeral Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated by Fr. Phillip JOSEPH at Our Lady Help of Christians Church on Saturday, June 28 at 11 a.m. The interment will follow at Riverview Cemetery. If desired, remembrances to the Magnetic Resonance Imager Campaign or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind may be left at the funeral home. 519.627.3231. E-mail condolences may be sent to gblake@cavanaghfuneralhome.ca

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THIERLING o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-11 published
THIERLING, Ursula Margarete Klara
Ursula THIERLING of Meaford passed away at Central Place Retirement Community in Owen Sound on Saturday February 9, 2008 at the age of 86. Predeceased by her beloved husband Albert Gerhard THIERLING of Meaford on February 23, 2006 and by their daughter Bärbel Renate Hanna in infancy. Dear sister of Inge HANKEL of Germany and sister-in-law of Lin of Myrtle Beach, and Renate and Ruth, both of Germany. Fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews and their families. Cremation has taken place and a memorial service, officiated by Reverend Judith OLIVER, will be conducted at the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher St. E., in Meaford on Friday, February 29, 2008 at 1 p.m. Interment of Ursula's cremated remains will be conducted at Lakeview Cemetery in Meaford at a later date in the spring. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford Hospital Foundation or a charity of choice would be appreciated.

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THIERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-19 published
CAMPBELL, Jim
Anarchist, prison activist, hippie, partner, friend, son, brother, uncle. Born November 20, 1949, in Shelburne, Ontario Died September 17, 2007, in Maynooth, Ontario, of a heart attack, aged 57.
By Richard SWIFT and Julie THIERS, Page L6
Jim was born the fourth of six children on a family farm near Orangeville, Ontario He always loved hard work - he used to wake up early to feed the animals before heading off to a one-room schoolhouse.
Jim was the first in his family to attend university, studying math at the University of Waterloo. Although a bright student, he was drawn to the idealism of the Sixties. He became a hippie, organizing food co-ops, student housing co-ops and countless other projects. In 1978, 11 students bought a 250-acre farm in eastern Ontario and started one of several hippie communes in the Bancroft area, Dragonfly farm, which still operates.
Jim eventually moved to Toronto. His primary passion was prison work. He wrote regularly to inmates and developed magazines written by prisoners seeking a voice from inside institutions in Canada and the United States.
Jim was also involved in the anarchist movement, always busy doing mailings, organizing events and writing. His tiny, one-bedroom apartment in a downtown Toronto housing co-op was the site of many of his vegetarian meals and meetings of left-wing activists.
Jim returned to regular contact with his family a decade ago. He often teased (or was teased by) his four sisters, and loved to visit his 90-year-old mother Ivadell, whose sharp wit and memory no offspring can rival.
Jim was proud that his mother led five generations of family, and always showed the photos of all five generations to visiting Friends.
Although a hippie and an anarchist, Jim moved seamlessly between divergent worlds. Occasionally he could be spotted in his City of Toronto uniform, surprising his political Friends.
He worked for 25 years as a garbage collector, bridge maintenance worker, water meter reader and finally supervisor. His Friends and colleagues speak of his humour, clumsiness, ability to see problems from many perspectives, and fairness to workers.
After 25 years of activism, Jim decided to settle down. He found the love of his life, Julie, and they planned for retirement in their log house on 40 acres of bush near Algonquin Park. Jim loved his vegetable garden, chopping firewood, hiking, snowshoeing and cutting new walking trails.
One day, while cycling with Julie, he suddenly fell off his bicycle. His heart could not be revived. Perhaps it had done enough work already.
Jim will be remembered for his keen intelligence, big laugh and gummy smile, his long, lanky body, ability to find humour in any situation, kindness to anyone on the outside and dedication to social justice.
Richard SWIFT is Jim's friend and neighbour and Julie THIERS is Jim's partner.

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THISTLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-19 published
PARKER, Ann (née ROGERS)
Passed away at the Hastings Manor Nursing Home, Belleville, on Friday April 18th, 2008. Ann PARKER of Belleville, formerly of Woodstock, at the age of 83. Daughter of the late Frank and Beatrix ROGERS. Beloved wife of the late Maurice PARKER. Loving mother of Anne THISTLE (Bruce Alexander) of Belleville, Phyrne PARKER of Toronto and Dave PARKER (Ann) of Woodstock. Dear grandmother of Allen, Frank (Donna), Paul, David (Jenn), Joanna (Garry) and Bryan and great-grandmother of 8. A Memorial Service will be held at the John R. Bush Funeral Home, 80 Highland Ave, Belleville (613-968-5588) on Tuesday, April 22nd, 2008 at 12 p.m. Visitation will be from 11-12 p.m. Cremation. Donations to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences www.quintefuneralcentres.com

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