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"SOU" 2008 Obituary


SOUCH  SOUCHE  SOUCHEREAU  SOUCIE  SOUDACK  SOUL  SOULES  SOUSA  SOUTH  SOUTHALL  SOUTHAM  SOUTHAMPTON  SOUTHERN  SOUTHWORTH  SOUZA 

SOUCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-14 published
DANIELS, Murray
Age 89. Went home to be with the Lord on March 8, 2008 after a brief illness. Murray is survived by his son, Sid DANIELS, his daughter Marie SOUCH and her husband Ross, four grandchildren, Greg, Susan, Grant and Paul, and ten great-grandchildren, Ben, Victoria, Drew, Ryan, Jaden, Michelle, Madison, Samantha, Riley and Jacob. Murray was much loved by all of his family members and Friends. Visitation for family and Friends Monday, March 17th from 7-9 p.m. at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mount Pleasant Rd., Toronto, Ontario, 416-489-8811. A Funeral Service will be held on Tuesday, March 18th at 11: 00 a.m. in the Chapel. Special thanks to Sheila Hunter for her faithful support of Murray.

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SOUCHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-30 published
NEALON, Frances Pauline (CUTHBERT)
At Lakeview Manor, Beaverton, on Sunday, January 27, 2008. Pauline (CUTHBERT) NEALON was the beloved wife of the late Nick NEALON. Dear mother of Marie McKENNA (Kevin) of Toronto, Cathy NEALON of Markham, Paul NEALON (Alla) of Beaverton, Patrick NEALON of Port Perry and predeceased by Judi MacDONALD. Grandmother of Jodi, Anne Marie and Kelly McKENNA, James and Caitlin MacDONALD, Brendan and Danielle SOUCHE. Sister-in-law of Maryanne (Molly) NEALON. The family received Friends at the Mangan Funeral Home, Beaverton (705-426-5777) on Tuesday. Funeral mass was held at Saint_Joseph's Catholic Church, Beaverton, on Tuesday at 2 p.m. Interment St. Malachay's Catholic Cemetery, Sunderland. The family would appreciate memorial donations to the Community Living Durham North or the Alzheimer Society. Online condolences are welcomed at: www.manganfuneralhome.com

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SOUCHEREAU o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-09 published
CAZA, Sister Alice " Sister Mary Victor"
Of the community of the Sisters of Saint_Joseph of the Diocese of London Ontario died peacefully on July 4th, 2008 at Cross Cancer Institute in Edmonton. At the age of 83 years Sr. Alice was in her 59th year of religious life. Lovingly remembered by her sister Isabelle EBY of Kitchener and brother-in-law Larry ZAHARA of Brighton, Ontario nieces, nephews, devoted friend Barbara MARQUIS and the Sisters of her religious community. Predeceased by her parents Victor CAZA and Agnes (SOUCHEREAU) and her sister, Agnes ZAHARA. Alice spent over 38 years as an educator in Windsor, London and Sarnia. Following her retirement from teaching, she volunteered in Various outreach ministries. Since 1990, Alice ministered to women at Elizabeth Place in Edmonton Alberta. She gently and humbly lived her vows as was demonstrated by her life of grace and strength of faith. Her Sisters in community remember her for her prayerfulness and her gift to communicate with others. Funeral Mass at St. Alphonsus Church in Edmonton on 11th day, July at 10: 00 a.m. with interment to follow in Holy Cross Cemetery, Edmonton. Memorial Service to be held at the Sisters of Saint_Joseph Residence 485 Windermere Road, London, Ontario. July 24th

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SOUCIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-26 published
He was trying to sober up. He never got the chance
By Erin ANDERSSEN, Page F8
'I'm home!" - that was how Mitchell ANDERSON liked to announce his arrival on the many late nights he staggered into the overnight shelter at the Shepherds Of Good Hope in Ottawa, looking for a place to sleep off a drinking binge. He had a regular panhandling spot outside Elgin Street where, his Friends say, his smiling compliments to passing woman helped him raise change for a bottle of sherry faster than just about anyone else. Drunk, he couldn't walk away from a fight; his face carried the scars of angry fists. But sober, he'd offer up his last cigarette if asked.
They told some of these stories this week at his funeral, held in a crowded chapel at the Shepherds, attended by staff who knew Mr. ANDERSON, his family and his Friends from the street. They spoke, in particular, to his teenaged daughter, Christine, hunched over in tears in the second row, who had just been growing close to her father again. They know who she is, because Mr. ANDERSON talked about her all the time. She was the reason he stopped wandering and returned to Ottawa. Why, at 38, he wanted to deal with his alcohol addiction and go straight.
"He was really trying to kick it," says Ryan CURRAN, a frontline worker at the shelter. "I honestly believed he was one of the guys who was going to sober up."
He never got the chance.
Close to midnight on July 13, he was struck by a red Mazda sports car while he was crossing Sussex Drive, several blocks from the shelter. He died in hospital two days later, kept on life support so his mother and brother, travelling from his hometown of Kenora, Ontario, could say good-bye.
The driver, believed to be in his late twenties or early thirties, didn't stop. Neither he nor his blonde female passenger has come forward. As of Thursday, police had narrowed their investigation to a handful of possible cars.
His Friends worry that his life is seen to matter less because he spent it on the streets and his story is too much of a cliché to draw the sympathy it deserves. Abandoned by his father, raised by a mother who tried her best with limited resources, he struggled in school, left home at 18, started drinking and couldn't stop. He travelled from city to city, carrying everything he owned in a bag. He drank cheap wine if he had the money, and rubbing alcohol if he didn't. He went to jail repeatedly, mostly for minor offences - disturbing the peace, failing to pay fines - but after sobering up behind bars, he inevitably began the cycle again when he fell back into the streets.
Lately, those streets, he told his older brother, Dave, were getting meaner and, as he was getting older, his body was less able to handle a night passed out in a park. He spoke more often lately about getting away from them for good.
But where was he to go, shelter staff wonder, to solve all his problems? They could take him in for a night or two, put him on a waiting list for treatment. But those solutions aren't enough, or they happen too slowly. As Paul SOUCIE, executive director at the Shepherds, points out in frustration, they can't send alcoholics or addicts, many of whom suffer from mental illness, into supportive housing - they're not able break the habit on their own. The city's detox unit is almost always full, and by the time there's a bed, Mr. SOUCIE says, the person waiting for it has been lost once more to the streets.
Over and over, the shelter staff see men and women like Mitchell ANDERSON, seeking a cure for their disease, and they have to tell them: "There's nowhere for you to go."
For the last three years, he stayed in Ottawa, to be near his daughter, who lives in an apartment in Vanier, a neighbourhood close to downtown, with her mother, Fatima DACOSTA. She and Mr. ANDERSON had lived together when Christine was young, then split up. But as long as he was sober, Ms. DACOSTA didn't turn him away when he showed up at the door. "He was trying," she said at the funeral, "to make amends."
He didn't need to be reminded to hide his addiction from Christine: He could be a rough, sloppy drunk, and he never wanted her to see that. Whenever he planned to visit, he went cold turkey, his Friends say, even if they had a bottle to share.
One afternoon, Mr. ANDERSON's daughter bumped into him on the street, called his name, and he was too drunk to recognize her. "He came and he was in tears," Mr. CURRAN recalls. "After that, he was sober for a couple of days, and then he would slip." He kept trying. "I can't be a true father," he'd say sadly. "I have too many problems."
Mr. ANDERSON spent his last afternoon with Christine. That night, Mr. CURRAN suspects he was making his way back to the shelter. It was his practice to show up early in the morning, though not always in good spirits. "You wouldn't want to approach him then," says Mr. CURRAN. " Most average citizens would walk away." But he'd sleep it off, and, later, they might catch up over a sandwich. They weren't so different, Mr. CURRAN observes: They each had a daughter and wanted to be the best fathers possible.
At his funeral, when Friends rose to speak, Wayne BOUCHER described how he met Mr. ANDERSON when they were both living on the streets of Toronto in 1995. In Ottawa, they often drank together.
"He was never a lost soul," Mr. BOUCHER said, standing at the foot of his friend's coffin. "He always knew the direction he wanted to go. Unfortunately, we all got our addictions."
Erin ANDERSSEN is a senior feature writer for The Globe and Mail. This is one of a series on individuals and families across Canada who are dealing with mental-health issues.

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SOUDACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-07 published
SOUDACK, Moish " Morris"
Passed away on April 5, 2008 in Tel Aviv, Israel, following a stroke. Born in Winnipeg in 1925, he attended University of Manitoba and served in the Canadian infantry. He and his wife Geety (nee AKST) pursued a lifelong passion for Zionism, helping to found Kibbutz Gesher Haziv in 1948. Returning to Winnipeg he had a successful career in the fur business while actively contributing to the civic and Jewish communities. He was a loyal and affectionate husband, an enthusiastic and loving parent, and an unfailing support to his extended family. His humour and good spirit enriched the lives of those who knew him for a moment or a lifetime. Remembered with the utmost love by his wife Geety, his children Michal and Avi and their spouses, his grandchildren Nitzan, Guy, Noam and Ridley, and the Soudack, Mozersky, Chernick, Goldberg and Akst families. He told a good story.

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SOUDACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-28 published
HULL, Marian " Murphy"
Marian 'Murphy' HULL was born in Poland in 1924 and immigrated to Canada at the age of 9 during the Great Depression. He left school after only finishing grade 7 to help support his family. He joined the Canadian Navy during World War 2 and after the war became a plasterer. This early experience was an important stepping stone for Murphy in becoming one of the foremost builder/developers in Toronto. He married the love of his life Helen, in 1948. A nomination for the Order of Canada was accepted by Rideau Hall this year and was in process at the time of his death. Murphy's intelligence, integrity and work ethic created a truly remarkable life for himself and his family. In more recent years a partnership with Tridel Corporation led to many high quality condominium developments throughout Greater Toronto. His legacy, Hullmark Centre, which is to be built at the corner of Yonge and Sheppard, will be the centre piece of downtown North York. Murphy was committed to giving back to his community. He always said that Canada had been so good to him but he was also so good to Canada. He was a founding member of York Finch General Hospital, now Humber River Regional Hospital, a director for 30 years and chair of the board for 3. He was instrumental in locating the hospital at 400 and Finch. In 1968 he assisted the Director of Education in the acquisition of a building site for Seneca College. In 1975 he was a founding member of Copernicus Lodge, a Polish non-profit long term and senior self care facility. He has been a director since then, chaired the building committee and in 1993 became chair of the board. He oversaw all phases of this long term care facility with vision, leadership and superb attention to detail. He attended weekly meetings and took part in every social function that they had. He was extremely proud of the work that he and everyone involved had created. In 2002 he received the Queen Elizabeth Golden Jubilee medal. He did not allow his busy business and volunteer life to consume all of his time and was deeply committed to his family. He taught his children to ski and spent every summer with them in Georgian Bay, the 2nd love of his life. He assisted all of his children in their business endeavors. These traditions continued with his 7 grandchildren whom he and Helen took skiing every year. For years, he regularly 'tied' 7 pairs of ski boots. As a result of their grandparent's loving time and care, the grandchildren feel more like brothers and sisters. He has been generous to all of us and taught us the value of hard work and fr ugality. We will all miss him and will love him dearly forever. To all who knew him, Murphy was a force of nature. Diagnosed with cancer over a year ago, Murphy lived the last year of his life to its fullest. He passed bravely into death in his home on June 27th, 2008. He was so deeply loved by his wife Helen, son Richard (predeceased), daughters Barb and Cindy, son-in-laws David and Brian, grandchildren, Ben and his wife Stephanie, Hannah and her husband Mike, Brian and his wife Anna, Jeff and his partner Christie, Brennan, Lily, and Wilf, great-grandchildren Quinn and Oleh, sisters Adele and Bernice and her husband Morrie. The family would like to thank Doctor Ted PTAK and Doctor Sam BERGER and the staff at Humber River Regional Hospital, the staff of St. Elizabeth Home Care and Allan Hernandes-Cisne for their attentive care and support. Most importantly we would like to thank Carol and Angelo DELZOTTO for their daily devotion and love and Harvey FRUITMAN and Linda SOUDACK for their Friendship and concern. Friends may call on Sunday, June 29, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). A Funeral Mass will be held on Monday, June 30, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. at Blessed Sacrament Roman Catholic Church (24 Cheritan Avenue). Interment to follow at York Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to the Copernicus Lodge or Humber River Regional Hospital-Finch Site. Condolences www.rskane.ca. R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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SOUL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-02-13 published
FOX--In loving memory of Joseph Irving Fox Junior "Sonny Boy." Waasaanese
Nbiish. October 1, 1969 - February 19, 2007
He fought so hard to stay with us
He knew we'd miss him so
But God knew he was hurting
And said, "It's time to go."
He suffered long without complaint
Oh yes, he paid his dues
He never once said "pity me"
Just smiled and saw it through.
His pain has stopped, the hurting done,
How we miss his dear sweet face.
God took his hand and led him home
He's in a better place.
One year ago he left us
With fond memories ever more
We all know he will be waiting
On the other shore.
CANCER IS SO LIMITED
It cannot cripple LOVE
It cannot shatter HOPE
It cannot corrode FAITH
It cannot eat away PEACE
It cannot destroy CONFIDENCE
It cannot kill FRIENDSHIP
It cannot shut out MEMORIES
It cannot silence COURAGE
It cannot invade the SOUL
It cannot reduce ETERNAL LIFE
It cannot quench the SPIRIT
It cannot lessen THE POWER OFTHE RESURRECTION OF
JESUS CHRIST OUR LORD.
Lovingly remembered by Mom and Dad and Family.

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SOULES o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-04-30 published
HOWES, Mildred Middleton " Snookie" (née JONES)
On Wednesday, the 23rd of April 2008 at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood. Surrounded by love, she passed quietly away. Mildred of Stayner, loving wife of the late Henry Desmond HOWES, mother of William (Fikret,) Wendy (the late Frank JEFFRIES,) Judy (Jim ROBBINSON,) Patricia HOWES, Richard (Sylvie) and David. Proud Grandmother to James, Tammy, Stephen, Kevin, Miranda, Olivier, Aurelie, Corrine, Colin and Henry. Beaming "G.G." to Kate, Emma, Andrew and Finlay. Loved and faithful sister to the late Mary HYLAND and Patricia SOULES. Beloved sister-in-law to the late William, Maureen MARTELLO, Terrence and the late Brian. Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews and a kind and lovely soul to any that crossed her threshold. We are grateful for the care that has been provided to Mom by Doctor Scott HOUSTON, the staff of Blue Mountain Manor and Collingwood General and Marine Hospital. Friends were received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main Street), Stayner Thursday April 24, 2008 from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service was held at Jubilee Presbyterian Church, 7320 Highway 26, Stayner Friday April 25, 2008 at 1 o'clock. Interment Stayner Union Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to World Vision, Sleeping Children Around the World, Collingwood General and Marine Hospital Foundation or the charity of your choice. For further information and to sign the online guest book, log on to: www.carruthersdavidson.com
"God sees the little sparrow fall it marks His tender view…"
Page 15

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SOULES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-31 published
SOULES, Ruth Carolyn (née DOLSON)
(November 27, 1917-January 29, 2008)
Passed away peacefully, with her family at her side, at Sunrise Senior Living, Burlington. Loving mother of Judy SMITH (deceased) and her husband Peter, David and his wife Helene, and Elaine BAUER and her husband Bob. Dear grandmother of Ian (Lydia,) Elaine (Thomas), Gary (Nathalie), Steven (Martine), Melanie (Scott), Jeffrey (Melissa) and Jennifer (Luke). Proud great-grandmother of 12 great-grandchildren. Sadly missed by her sister Louise McBEAN and her nieces and nephews. Ruth was a longtime resident of Port Credit and a Past Regent of Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire Port Credit Chapter. She enjoyed a successful career in local real estate and loved travelling to all parts of the world. A Service of Remembrance will be held at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10 N of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Saturday, February 2, 2008 at 3 p.m. with visitation beginning at 2 p.m. Cremation has taken place. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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SOUSA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-11 published
AMARAL, Fernando de Sousa
At Victoria Hospital on Sunday, March 9, 2008, Fernando de Sousa AMARAL in his 60th year. Beloved husband of Lubelia AMARAL. Loving father of John AMARAL (Lidia) and Nelson AMARAL. Brother of Palmira SOUSA of Portugal. Predeceased by his brothers Manuel (1999) and Jose (2002) and his sister Sofia (1995). Also survived by many nieces and nephews in Canada and Portugal. Visitors will be received on Tuesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William Street (between King and York) where the Funeral Service will be conducted in the Chapel on Wednesday at 10: 00 a.m. with Pastor Joao DASILVA officiating. Interment Saint Peter's Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Kidney Foundation.

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SOUSA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-11 published
BRIGGS, Winnifred Florence " Flo" (née HANSON)
Passed away peacefully at Cawthra Gardens on Sunday, March 9, 2008 at the age of 95. Beloved wife of the late Herb BRIGGS. Much loved mother of Dorinne and her husband Bill McCUNE and Ross and his wife Mary. Loving grandmother of Linda and Mark DAVIES, Steven and Lan COLE, David and Anne COLE, Anthony BRIGGS, Heather and Jorge SOUSA. Proud great-grandmother of Jaclyn, Jonathan and Kaitlyn. Special thanks to the staff at Cawthra Gardens for their wonderful care and support. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10 North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 from 12: 00 noon until time of service in the chapel at 1:30 p.m. Interment will follow at Mount Peace Cemetery. For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice.

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SOUTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-28 published
SOUTH, Gloria Annabelle (née HUEHN)
It is with saddened hearts that we announce the passing of our mother Gloria Annabelle SOUTH (née HUEHN) of Woodstock, in her 74th year at the Woodstock General Hospital on Tuesday, February 26, 2008. Gloria was predeceased by her husband Ernest (2001), son David (1993), daughter Betty (2007), grand_son Jarret (1984), and brother Ross (2004). She will be dearly missed by her sons Edward and his spouse Cheryl of London, Rick and his wife Devon of Ingersoll, Norman and his wife Sheri of Woodstock and daughters, Cheryl BAER and her spouse Rick of New Hamburg and Patricia SOUTH of Woodstock. Dear sister of Burton HUEHN and his wife Ruth of Kitchener, Helen GARNER of London, Joan SHARROW of Wallaceburg, Marjorie HEATHERS and her husband Don of Ailsa Craig and sister-in-law Florence HUEHN of Toronto. Also survived by several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Friends may call at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock, (519-539-0004) on Friday, February 29, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, March 1, 2008 at 11 a.m. with Rev. David SNIHUR officiating. Interment in the Anglican Cemetery following cremation. Contributions to the Lung Association would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

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SOUTHALL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-27 published
SANDERS, Ada (née SOUTHALL)
Formerly of Saint Thomas, passed away at Extendicare, Port Stanley on Monday, February 25, 2008, in her 85th year. Beloved wife of the late Clifford L. SANDERS (2005.) Dearly loved mother of Donald SANDERS and his wife Cheryl of Frankford, Robert SANDERS and his partner Louise GOUR of Carleton Place, and the late Patricia "Patti" MONTGOMERY (2007) (her husband Gerald of Saint Thomas.) Cherished grandmother of Jacob "Jay" and Adam MONTGOMERY, Larissa, Matthew, Danielle, Brett, Erin, Megan, and Gregory SANDERS. Dear sister of Ruby GUMBERT of Dundas. Also remembered by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a sister, Lily BARNETT and four brothers, Ted, John, Joe and Tom SOUTHALL. Born in Dundas, Ontario, April 17, 1923, Ada came to Saint Thomas in the late 1940's. She was the daughter of the late John and Ada Mary (CARTER) SOUTHALL. Ada formerly attended St. Hilda's-St. Luke's Anglican Church as well as Saint_John's Anglican Church, Saint Thomas, where she was an active choir member. She loved to cook and share recipes. Friends will be received by the family at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Friday evening from 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held Saturday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Elmdale Memorial Park. Memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society gratefully acknowledged.

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SOUTHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-06 published
SOUTHALL, George Arthur
After a very full life, George SOUTHALL died peacefully at the age of 77 on May 4th, 2008, in Kingston, Ontario. He will be missed by six children, eight grandchildren and close Friends. A memorial service will be held at 2 p.m. on May 9th at Zion United Church (106 Pine Street, Kingston). In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Aboriginal Healing Fund of the United Church of Canada.

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SOUTHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-03 published
Champion of culture in Canada 'epitomized the values of the NAC'
Third-generation member of famous newspaper family grew up in a lifestyle of privilege and chose the diplomatic corps over journalism. Later, he helped launch the National Arts Centre and the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
Passionate, romantic, a lover of culture, the high arts and beautiful women, Hamilton SOUTHAM was in many ways an 18th-century gentleman, given to quoting poetry, rereading the classic works of literature and history, attending opera, ballet and theatrical performances, and collecting paintings by modern masters. Until the end of his days, he expressed his faith in the ultimate meaning of life by quoting these lines from Milton's Samson Agonistes: "All is best, though we oft doubt, /What th' unsearchable dispose/Of highest wisdom brings about, / and ever best found in the close."/
Born into the third generation of the Southam newspaper dynasty, he grew up in a gilded world of wealth and privilege, in which winters were spent in Florida and summers in Europe and the family enclave at Big Rideau Lake near Ottawa. Fighting for his country for six years in the Second World War stiffened the public-service component of his complicated character. After working in journalism, he turned his back on the family business and opted for diplomacy in its Pearsonian heyday, serving as ambassador to Poland, among other postings. But it was his lengthy tenure in the trenches of the cultural, linguistic and nationalistic battlefields that forged his legacy as the builder and founding general director of the National Arts Centre, a visionary fundraiser and force behind the Canadian War Museum, the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation and the Valiants Memorial and an active contributor to many other cultural institutions.
How fitting that such a Canadian giant should die on Canada Day, said Peter Herrndorf, president of the National Arts Centre, describing Mr. SOUTHAM as a man of exquisite taste with a single-minded devotion to the arts and an incredible capacity for Friendship. "He had been for many years, well before I came here, one of my heroes and he stayed a hero though my professional life. Never did I imagine that I would not only build on Hamilton's legacy at the National Arts Centre, but also become his friend," said Mr. Herrndorf. "He became like a second dad to me, both in personal terms and very much in professional terms - and in typical dad terms, he was both wonderful in his support and tough when I wasn't living up to what he expected. It's a big loss because he epitomized the values of the National Arts Centre."
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in December, 1916, and named after an uncle who had been killed two months earlier at the Battle of the Somme. His family called him Hamilton because he had an older cousin, Gordon, who lived next door, in what amounted to a family enclave in the elite Rockliffe Park area of Ottawa. His parents' house, called Lindenelm, later became the Spanish embassy.
Hamilton's father, Wilson SOUTHAM, the oldest of six sons of William SOUTHAM (1843-1932,) the proprietor of The Hamilton Spectator and founder of the Southam newspaper empire, was the publisher of the Ottawa Citizen. Hamilton's mother, Henrietta CARGILL, was the daughter of Conservative politician Henry CARGILL, who died after collapsing on the floor of the House of Commons.
The youngest of his parents' six children, Hamilton went to Elmwood School and then Ashbury College, the private boy's school in Ottawa. In those days, French was taught as though it were a dead language, so it was years before he became bilingual. But the school did nurture his love for Latin, the classics, and poetry, which he delighted in declaiming until the end of his life. He also played Gratiano in The Merchant of Venice, "lightly with exactly the right touch of flippancy," according to drama critic Ted Devlin.
After doing summer-school classes at Glebe and Lisgar Collegiates, he entered Trinity College at the University of Toronto in 1934. He graduated with a degree in history in 1939, having taken a year out, halfway through, recovering from a serious car crash that left him with a crooked smile - a rugged distinction in a classically handsome face. After U of T, he sailed to England intending to do a master's degree in modern history at Christ Church College, Oxford. Almost as soon as he arrived, Britain declared war on Germany and he enlisted in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery.
Simultaneously, he renewed his Friendship with Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID, the daughter of a sculptor from a land-owning French family. They had met in Canada that summer through family Friends. When the hostilities commenced, she managed to make her way back to London by ship from New York because the United States was still neutral. They married in London on April 15, 1940, while he was in training. (They eventually had four children and were divorced in the late 1960s; she died in 1998.) A month after the wedding, he received his commission as a lieutenant.
Meanwhile, the 40th battery of the Canadian Field Artillery (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon SOUTHAM, had served) had mobilized for active service under Frank Keen, assistant editor of the Hamilton Spectator, as the 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton. As soon as the battalion arrived in England, Lt. SOUTHAM applied for a transfer from the British Army so that he could serve with the Canadian Forces. By the autumn of 1943, the 1st Canadian Infantry Division, which was heavily engaged in Italy, urgently needed replacements. He volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. He fought in the battle of Ortona in December, 1943, and the final battle of Monte Cassino from April to May, 1944, and was part of the advance of the Canadian Army up through Italy and later from Marseilles northward in France. He was mentioned in dispatches for "gallant and distinguished services" and demobilized with the rank of captain.
After the war, he worked briefly for The Times of London before returning to Canada and an uneasy job as an editorial writer for the Citizen in 1946. "I couldn't write quickly enough," he said in an interview at his home in Rockliffe in 2004. "My editor would give me a subject - 500 words on such and such a subject by 3 o'clock. My instinct was to go to the parliamentary library for a week and then come back with the 500 words," he said. "I was wretched." He went to his uncle Harry SOUTHAM, then publisher of the Citizen, and said, "I can't manage to do this, so I am going to External Affairs."
He wrote the examinations and joined the department in 1948 under Lester Pearson at a time when Canada "had a role to play" and when being part of the foreign service was "riding the crest of a wave, as far as I was concerned." It was "a wonderful time," Mr. SOUTHAM said, his eyes flashing under his expressive beetle brows. "Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very heaven!" he said, quoting Wordsworth.
In 1949, Mr. SOUTHAM (and his family, which now included a second son, Christopher, who is now called Abdul) was posted to Stockholm as third secretary under ambassador Tommy Stone. After nearly four years, they returned to Ottawa before being posted to Warsaw as chargé d'affaires in March, 1959. By then, the Southams had two more children, Jennifer and Michael. This posting was one of the highlights of Mr. SOUTHAM's diplomatic career because he solved the "Polish Treasures" problem.
After Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, the curator of Krakow removed a number of treasures from Wawel Castle, including tapestries and the sword of state. Following a circuitous route, they ended up in museum warehouses in Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec City. After the war, Poland, then behind the Iron Curtain, requested the return of its state treasures. That was fine with the Canadian federal government, but not with Maurice Duplessis, then premier of Quebec. He refused to hand anything over to a Communist government. Amid the diplomatic fracas, "we never sent an ambassador there and they never sent an ambassador here," Mr. SOUTHAM explained.
Mr. Duplessis died in office in September, 1959, and was succeeded by Paul Sauvé, "a more rational man" who agreed to ship the treasures back, causing Poland and Canada "to unfreeze their governments and to exchange ambassadors." And so, Mr. SOUTHAM's grateful government promoted him "sur place" to the rank of ambassador in April, 1960.
In 1962, the Southams returned to Ottawa, where he was appointed head of the information division at External Affairs. He was at work one day when he received a visit from Faye Loeb of the IGA grocery chain. She wanted him to help spearhead a citizens' move to build a performing arts centre in Ottawa. Rashly, he promised to find an appropriate candidate and, if necessary, to take charge himself.
"Time ran out and Faye came back," is the way he described his assumption of the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance in 1963. At its height, the alliance included about 60 arts organizations in Ottawa. They raised enough money (about $7,000) to commission a feasibility study, which recommended both the building of a performing arts centre and the holding of an annual national festival in Ottawa. In 1964, Mr. SOUTHAM took the completed study (with its projected costs of $9-million) to his old boss Mr. Pearson, by this point prime minister, and persuaded him that the proposed building would be an ideal centennial project for the federal government.
"He thought about it for a month and then came back and said, 'We'll do it,' Mr. SOUTHAM said. "After that, it was his project and he never gave up on it." The prime minister arranged for Mr. SOUTHAM to be lent from External Affairs to Secretary of State, which appointed him co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre in February, 1964.
The decision about the architect for the new facility was left up to Mr. SOUTHAM. He recommended Fred LEBENSOLD, who had already built the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver, had won the competition for Confederation Centre in Charlottetown, and would later build Place des Arts in Montreal. Mr. LEBENSOLD did a quick estimate of $16-million and signed on as architect. Mr. SOUTHAM was appointed inaugural director of the National Arts Centre in 1967 and oversaw the construction of Mr. LEBENSOLD's hexagonal buildings on 2.6 hectares on the banks of the Rideau River, defending vociferous criticism along the way as the costs spiralled to a final tally of more than $46-million. (By this time, Mr. SOUTHAM's first marriage had disintegrated. He married Gro MORTENSON of Oslo in 1968, with whom he had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. He and his second wife were divorced in the late 1970s, but as with all of Mr. SOUTHAM's wives, she remained on affectionate terms with him.)
The multifaceted performance centre, with three halls including the country's first professional opera house, two restaurants, two theatre companies and its own touring symphony orchestra, opened in June of 1969 with the National Ballet of Canada performing two commissioned ballets - The Queen by Grant Strate to music by Louis Applebaum, and Kraanerg by Roland Petit to music by Iannis Xenakis. The following night, when the ballet danced John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, something went wrong with the technology in the orchestra pit. Conductor George Crum and some of his musicians slowly ascended above stage level, leading Mr. Crum to say later that it was "the only time I ever looked down on Celia Franca," who was performing as Lady Capulet. After two terms as director-general, Mr. SOUTHAM stepped down in March of 1977.
Less than a year later, after a short respite spent sailing his yacht, Mr. SOUTHAM was persuaded by secretary of state John Roberts to become chair of Festival Canada and take charge of the national celebrations on Canada Day. He was paid a dollar a year and required to appear before a Commons committee to answer questions about his mandate and budget. When some members criticized the fluently bilingual Mr. SOUTHAM for preparing a report in English - he said later that he hadn't had time to have it translated - he sent a letter resigning from his post in French to the minister. It was rejected and Mr. SOUTHAM oversaw celebrations in hundreds of communities across the country and a blow-out televised extravaganza on Parliament Hill on the theme "You and Me - Le Canada, C'est Toi et Moi." In the 1980s, Mr. SOUTHAM was a partner in Lively Arts Market Builders, a scheme to create a television channel devoted to producing and broadcasting plays, concerts, films and programs on the arts. The group received a cable television licence and launched the pay-television C Channel in January, 1983. But it failed to attract subscribers and went into receivership six months later. Rogers Cablesystems Inc. bought its pay-television licence that December for $12,500.
(The following year, Mr. SOUTHAM married for the third and final time. Marion TANTON, a French woman he had known and loved for many years, was the wife of the late Pierre CHARPENTIER, a former Canadian ambassador, and the mother of his three children. She died of cancer in May, 2005.)
In January, 1985, prime minister Brian Mulroney appointed Mr. SOUTHAM chair of the Official Residences Council, a civilian oversight group he had established amidst mounting criticism of the cost of maintaining official residences. Mr. SOUTHAM's tenure was not an easy one; there were political brawls about work done on the speaker's house in Kingsmere; on Stornoway, the residence of the opposition leader; and on both official prime ministerial residences.
His beloved National Arts Centre went through a long period of turmoil beginning in the mid-1980s, involving funding crises, a revolving series of chairs and artistic directors and a strike by the National Arts Centre orchestra, before it began to stabilize more than a decade later with the appointment in the late 1990s of David Leighton as chair of the board and Mr. Herrndorf as president and chief executive - thanks in no small part to Mr. SOUTHAM's behind-the-scenes lobbying. Early in 2000, during Mr. Herrndorf's tenure, a grateful National Arts Centre renamed its opera auditorium Southam Hall in his honour and threw a lavish party for him on his 90th birthday.
After attending the rededication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on September 17, 1999, Mr. SOUTHAM met some Friends for lunch at the Rideau Club. He had been "moved" by the ceremony and by governor-general Adrienne Clarkson's "wonderful" speech, and he began thinking that the fallen soldier "should have some company on Confederation Square," rather like the "great cloud of witnesses," described by St. Paul in his epistles. Those lunchtime musings led to his final public campaign, which was realized seven years later when Governor-General Michaëlle Jean unveiled the $1.1-million Valiants Memorial. He considered the Valiants his second great project after the National Arts Centre. "Parliament Hill is full of statues of prime ministers and politicians, some of them good, some of them not good. But in Ottawa, there shouldn't just be statues of politicians," he said. "It is the capital of the country and there should be statues of the men and women who have made this country."
Aside from building monuments to others, Mr. SOUTHAM enjoyed sitting in the study of his Ottawa home, a well-proportioned, light-filled room lined with bookcases, rereading the complete works of Anthony Trollope and "contemplating three generations of reading." He had his grandfather's books on the top shelf, his father's Everyman editions on the second and his own books on the third shelf. As well, he was examining his own soul. "I have lived my life, and that which I have done may God himself make pure," he said. "I meditate and I don't compare today with yesterday. I have more important comparisons, concerning my inner life, and I have much to think about." He was an Anglican, but he "was thinking the same thoughts" as a Catholic or a Jew or a Muslim. The soul is a more important part of our being than character," he said. "It is essential."
And so he spent his last years in contemplation and in visiting with close Friends and family, enjoying life and engaged with the world around him.
On Canada Day, he was about to go for a drive with his valet when he suddenly felt tired. He lay down for a rest and quietly died.
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in Ottawa on December 19, 1916. He died July 1, 2008, at home in Ottawa of complications from cancer. He was 91. He is survived by his second wife, Gro MORTENSON, his six children and his extended family. A private family funeral is planned followed by a memorial service at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, Ottawa, later in July.

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SOUTHAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-07 published
SOUTHAM, Gordon Hamilton
Hamilton SOUTHAM died peacefully at home on Tuesday July 1st at the age of 91. He was born in Ottawa on December 19th, 1916, the youngest child of Wilson Mills SOUTHAM and Henrietta Alberta CARGILL. After graduating from the University of Toronto with a degree in history in 1939, he abandoned his graduate studies at Christ Church College, Oxford in order to join the war effort and enrolled in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery winning his commission in 1940. That same year, when the Canadian Army reached Britain, he transferred to the Canadian 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon Hamilton, had served until he was killed in action at the battle of the Somme in 1916). In 1943, responding to an urgent call for replacements at the front, he volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery in Italy. He saw action at the battle of Ortona as well as the final battle of Monte Cassino and was mentioned in dispatches.
After the war he worked at the Times of London and the Ottawa Citizen before joining the Department of External Affairs in 1948. He was posted to Sweden from 1949 to 1953, and in 1959, was posted to Poland, where he served first as chargé d'affaires and later as ambassador. On his return to Ottawa in 1962 he was appointed head of the information division of External Affairs. In 1963 he assumed the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance, a grouping of some 60 arts organizations in Ottawa pressing for the building of a national performing arts centre. A feasibility study was commissioned and the Pearson government was persuaded to adopt the project in celebration of Canada's centennial. He was appointed co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre, in February, 1964 with the task of overseeing the construction and planning the programmes and activities of the new institution. After the National Arts Centre's opening, in 1969, he served two terms as director-general before stepping down in 1977.
Of particular note among his many activities since his retirement from the National Arts Centre are his founding and presidency of the Canadian Mediterranean Institute from 1980 to 1986 and a variety of initiatives aimed at raising public consciousness of the importance of the military in Canadian history. He was a founder of the Battle of Normandy Foundation, 1992, one of the main initiators of the new War Museum, inaugurated in 2005 and the founder and president of the Valiants Foundation, responsible for the erection of the Valiants Memorial on Confederation square, in Ottawa, inaugurated by Governor-General Michaëlle Jean in He married Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID in 1940 and they had four children, Peter, Abdul, Jennifer and Michael. In 1969, he married Gro MORTENSEN, and they had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. In 1981 he married Marion TANTOT, mother of Frederic, Manon and Virginie. He shared with Marion his retirement years in Grignan, France, and Ottawa. Marion died in 2005. He will be sadly missed by Gro Mortensen SOUTHAM, his children, his ten grandchildren, and his extended family and Friends. A private family funeral was held on Friday and a memorial service will be held at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church 125 Mackay Street, Ottawa, on Sunday July 20th at 1 p.m.
If desired, donations can be made in his memory to the National Youth and Education Trust at the National Arts Center P.O. Box 1534, Stn B, Ottawa Ontario K1P 5W1.

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SOUTHAMPTON o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-07 published
HOWLETT, Hugh
Passed away peacefully, in Southampton, on Saturday February 2, 2008, in his 69th year. Loving husband and best friend of April. Loving father of Jamie and his wife Lilian of Brampton, Tim and his wife Suzanne of Cambridge, and Heather SPENCER and her husband Bob of Ottawa. Hugh will be sadly missed and remembered by his grandchildren, Ben, Russell, Raisa, Mikayla, and Spencer. Hugh is survived by his brothers Fred, Doug, and his sisters Aileen, Nancy, and Sue. Predeceased by his sister Ann. The family of Hugh would like to give a special thanks to Doctor MARRIOTT, Laurie, Roberta, and the staff of the palliative care unit of Grey Bruce Health Services - Southampton. A Memorial Service to Celebrate the Life of Hugh HOWLETT will be held in the Chapel of the Eagleson Funeral Home, SOUTHAMPTON, on Saturday February 9, 2008 at 11 a.m. A Time of Fellowship will follow in the family centre of the funeral home. Expressions of Remembrance may be made to the Saugeen Memorial Hospital Foundation. Condolences maybe forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com

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SOUTHERN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-25 published
TUNKS, Loraine (née TURNER)
Peacefully, with her family by her side at Four Counties Health Services, Newbury on Sunday, February 24th, 2008. Loraine TUNKS (née TURNER) formerly of West Lorne in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving friend and husband Lloyd A. TUNKS (1987,) her mother Sarah Mae MONROE (née TURNER,) her step-father William E. MONROE and her brother Kinsly MONROE. Dearly loved and sadly missed by Carol JEWELL and family and Floyd TUNKS and family, granddaughters Myah NORRIS (JEWELL) and Hugh, Carla JEWELL, Erika SOUTHERN (JEWELL) and Mark, Chad TUNKS and Kelly of Ft. Saint_John, British Columbia, Rhonda McCAFFREY (TUNKS) and Sean of Grand Prairie, Alberta, Bambi TUNKS and David SCHELTEMA of Woodstock and six great-grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Loraine was a life long member of West Lorne United Church, a member and past Noble Grand of Lorna Rebekah Lodge #217, West Lorne and a recipient of the Degree of Chivalry member of T.O.P.S. Friend may call at the West Lorne Chapel, 202 Main St. on Tuesday, February 26th, 2008 from 3-4 p.m. where a funeral service will be conducted at 4 p.m. Rev. J. WHITE/WHYTE officiating. Interment Evergreen cemetery. If desired, memorial contributions to Four Counties Health Services, Palliative Care would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes (519 785-0810). Online condolences may be left at www.padfieldfuneralhome.com

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SOUTHERN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-26 published
TUNKS, Loraine (née TURNER)
Peacefully, with her family by her side at Four Counties Health Services, Newbury on Sunday, February 24th, 2008. Loraine TUNKS (née TURNER) formerly of West Lorne in her 84th year. Predeceased by her loving friend and husband Lloyd A. TUNKS (1987,) her mother Sarah Mae MUNROE (née TURNER,) her step-father William E. MUNROE and her brother Kinsley MUNROE. Dearly loved and sadly missed by daughter Carol JEWELL (Don) and son Floyd TUNKS, granddaughters Myah NORRIS (Hugh), Carla JEWELL, Erika SOUTHERN (Mark), Chad TUNKS (Kelly), Rhonda McCAFFREY (Sean), Bambi TUNKS (David SCHELTEMA) and six great-grandchildren. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Loraine was a life long member of West Lorne United Church and TOPS. Member of Lorna Rebekah Lodge #247, Past Noble Grand and the recipient of Degree of Chivalry. Friend may call at the West Lorne Chapel, 202 Main St. on Tuesday, February 26th, 2008 from 3-4 p.m. where a funeral service will be conducted at 4 p.m. Rev. J. White officiating. Interment Evergreen cemetery. If desired, memorial contributions to Four Counties Health Services, Palliative Care would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Arrangements entrusted to Padfield Funeral Homes (519 785-0810). Online condolences may be left at www.padfieldfuneralhome.com

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SOUTHWORTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-07 published
SOUTHWORTH, Ethel Jean
Died on Friday, May 23, 2008, in Ottawa, Ontario. Jean SOUTHWORTH was born on January 9, 1923 at Omemee, Ontario, the only child of Leonard A. SOUTHWORTH and Ethel DAWSON. Having gained a B.A. (History) from the University of Toronto (Victoria College) in 1944, she joined the news staff of The Ottawa Journal in 1948 from 1953 to 1975 she was the Music and Drama Editor, and from 1975 to 1980 the Arts Writer. After The Ottawa Journal closed in 1980, she was a freelance arts writer for other Ottawa publications (such as a weekly music column in The Ottawa Sun). She studied the organ with Godfrey HEWITT, C.D., D.Mus. (Cantuar,) F.R.C.O., and for many years was his assistant at Christ Church Cathedral from 1972 to 1974 she was the Chairman of the Ottawa Centre, Royal Canadian College of Organists, and was an Honorary Life Member of the Centre. She was an active member of the Rideau Lawn and Tennis Club from which she received a Life Achievement Award; the National Capital Tennis Association, the Women's National Press Club, the Association of Professional Business Women of Canada, the Women's University Club, the Historical Society of Ottawa, the National Capital Opera Association, the English-Speaking Union of Canada, the Royal Commonwealth Society, the Monarchist League of Canada, Heritage Ottawa, and many other groups. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Sunday, June 8 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Christ Church Cathedral, 420 Sparks Street, Ottawa on Monday, June 9 at 2: 00 p.m. Reception to follow in Cathedral Hall. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Royal Canadian College of Organists, P.O. Box 2270, Station D, Ottawa, Ontario K1P 5W4, would be greatly appreciated.
Condolences/Donations at www.mcgarryfamily.ca 613-233-1143

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SOUZA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-07 published
de SOUZA, Thomas Philip
(Ex-Zanzibar/Dar es Salaam, Tanzania / Vancouver)
Husband of Yvonne. Father of Gerard and Bosco (Australia), Michelle, Jacqueline and Caroline (Canada), Elaine (Goa) and Savio (Tanzania). Grandfather of Lycette, Bernadette, Victoria, James, Nolan, Calvin, Derrek, Chelsea, Zeenita, Kevin, Rebecca, and Steve. Brother of late Joseph DE SOUZA (ex-Zanzibar, United Kingdom,) late Eugene DE SOUZA (ex-Zanzibar, Canada,) and sister of Dina (ex- Zanzibar, United Kingdom). Passed away peacefully on December 31, 2007 in Dar es Salaam. Funeral to be held in Goa. Date to be announced. Relatives and Friends kindly accept this as the only intimation.

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