All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1

"SMY" 2008 Obituary


SMYLIE  SMYTH  SMYTHE 

SMYLIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-28 published
JAMIESON, Flora (formerly BOVILLE, née MILNE)
Of Saint Thomas, formerly of Orillia, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Tuesday, February 26, 2008, in her 88th year. Wife of the late David JAMIESON and the late Byron "Barney" BOVILLE. Dearly loved mother of Kevin JAMIESON (Dorothy), Doug JAMIESON (Diana,) all of Saint Thomas, late Fred JAMIESON (Lynne of Newmarket,) and the late Tom JAMIESON (Lydia of Orillia.) Step-mother of Sue SMYLIE (Doug) of Hawkstone, Joanne BOVILLE of Barrie, and the late Byron BOVILLE. Also fondly remembered by a number of grandchildren, great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. She was the last surviving member of her own immediate family, having been predeceased by four sisters and five brothers. Born in Toronto, Ontario, August 28, 1920, the daughter of the late George and Agnes (PHILLIPS) MILNE. Flora enjoyed golfing, curling and bowling, and was an avid outdoors person. Friends and relatives will be received by the family at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Saturday from 3: 30 p.m. until the service time of 4: 30 p.m. Following cremation, interment in St. Andrew's-Saint_James Cemetery, Orillia. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario gratefully acknowledged.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYLIE - All Categories in OGSPI

SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-20 published
MORGENROTH- SMYTH, Edith
After a short, courageous battle with cancer on Tuesday, February 19 in her 61st year. Edie will be sorrowfully missed by her husband Mike, her sister Jean KING (Jim,) her brothers Don MORGENROTH (Donna) and Karl MORGENROTH (Marg,) her sister-in-law Elaine CASE (Dan) and her many nieces and nephews. After receiving her degree from University of Western Ontario, Edith continued to pursue post graduate studies and spent a long and rewarding career at CCI and Wallaceburg District Secondary School. She was proud of all of her students and of the accomplishments they had achieved throughout her career. It gave her great joy to share in their successes and to hear that she had been a major influence in many of their lives. Family Friends and students will deeply miss this dedicated, creative and vital woman who inspired and challenged us all to attain the fullest potential. Friends and relatives may call at the Hinnegan-Peseski Funeral Home, 156 William St. S. Chatham from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday February 21, 2008. There will be a Private Family Service. Interment will follow in St. Anthony's Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Online condolences welcomed at www.peseski.com

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-07 published
THEANDER, Irene (SMYTH)
At South Huron Hospital, Exeter on Monday, May 5, 2008 Irene (SMYTH) THEANDER of Huron Park in her 90th year. Beloved wife of the late Hugo THEANDER (1989.) Dear mother of Douglas THEANDER and his friend Wendy of Leamington, Ingrid and Bill LOYENS of Ilderton and Paul THEANDER and his friend Angie of Huron Park. Dear grandmother of Duane and Noreen, Lynn, Lori and Julian, Lisa and Dennis, Carrie-Lynn, Jamie and great-grandmother of Deanna, Devon, Mark, Katie, Nick and Eric. Dear sister of Borden and Mary SMYTH of Centralia. Friends may call at the Haskett Funeral Home, 223 Main Street, Lucan on Wednesday evening 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Thursday, May 8th at 11 a.m. with Pastor Peter GUMMOW officiating. Interment Saint_James Cemetery, Clandeboye. Donations to the Victorian Order of Nurses-Palliative Care Volunteer Program, South Huron would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-28 published
SEATON, Haylie Rose
Born June 19, 2008, baby daughter of Conrad and Brenda (GILMOUR.) Stayed with us only 5 days before passing away. In our hearts she will stay forever. We will miss you Haylie Rose. Also remembered by brother Kyle; grandparents Sandra and Jim GILMOUR, and Ruby and David SEATON; Taunia and Bill, Eric and Emily SMYTH; Karen and Dave, Grace and Hannah BARROWCLOUGH; and beloved Friends and family who never got to meet our dear daughter.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-04-30 published
SMITH, Kenneth Harold
On Saturday, April 26, 2008 at Royal Victoria Hospital, Barrie. Beloved husband of Dianne for 40 years. Loving father of Paul (Hilary HOMER,) Sheri LEWIS (Scott,) and Tanya SMITH (Denual HOUSTON.) Proud grandfather of Alysia, Cameron, Mya and Jayla. Ken will be sadly missed by his brother-in-law Paul SMYTH (Maria) and sisters-in-law Carol-Anne BANDIERA and Lynda HORNER. Loving Uncle of many nieces and nephews.
Ken served with the Ontario Provincial Police for 14 years in the late sixties and seventies and was an investigator with the Workplace Safety and Insurance Board for 13 years. Friends will be received at the Taylor Funeral Home "Newmarket Chapel", 524 Davis Dr., Newmarket, (905) 898-2100, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday. A mass of Christian Burial will be held at Saint_John Chrysostom Catholic Church (432 Ontario Street, Newmarket) on Friday May 2, 2008 at 11 o'clock. Interment, Saint_John Catholic Cemetery, Newmarket. For those who wish, donations to the Arthritis Society would be appreciated.
Page 15

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-20 published
SANDERS, Marie (formerly McCULLOCH, née WILSON)
By Barbara McCulloch MITCHELL and Alison SMYTH, Page L8
Lawyer, company president, golfer, world traveller, bank director. Born March 24, 1909, in Toronto. Died August 18, 2007, in Toronto of old age, aged 98.
When Marie WILSON married R.J.P. McCULLOCH six decades ago, our family became acquainted with a wonderful and highly educated woman who seemed a combination of fairy princess and liberated modern businesswoman.
Marie was an only child, born in Toronto to Albert Edward WILSON and Marie TROTTER. Her father was founder of A.E. Wilson and Co. Ltd. She was brought up graciously at her parents' home in Rosedale, the same house where she ended her days last year.
In 1912, when she was 3, Marie's father opened her first bank account with Bank of Nova Scotia. She would later sit on the bank's board as a director.
Marie was educated at Bishop Strachan School and went to the University of Toronto. She graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School in 1935.
She practised civil law until her father became sick with Alzheimer's disease, thrusting the governance of his successful insurance company onto her shoulders. She became vice-president and later president upon her father's death in 1959. She rose to the challenge, successfully remaining at the company's helm until she sold it upon her retirement in the early 1980s.
Marie had numerous accomplishments throughout her life, and eventually was made a Queen's Counsel.
In her youth, she excelled in athletics. She was a keen badminton player and an avid golfer, a love that continued throughout her life.
Fluent in French, Marie was a regular visitor at Cap d'Antibes, France, and in later years spent winters in Palm Beach, Florida, at The Breakers hotel.
To our family, Marie was a refined lady who could balance the old world of her parents with the modern world of commerce and the demands of high society. She and Doctor McCULLOCH were married from 1948 until his death in 1954.
In 1977, Marie married Toronto lawyer Richard SANDERS in Palm Beach. Marie and Dick loved to entertain, dance and take long walks through Rosedale holding hands. Every year, they hosted a neighbourhood invitational golf tournament at the nine-hole putting green they had installed on their front lawn. Any visit to their house or an invitation to one of their many private clubs almost always included champagne cocktails - Marie's signature drink.
Dick died in 2001, and Marie continued to live in her childhood home.
She had style and grace, and her loyalty, family contributions, intellect and pioneering spirit will never be forgotten. We raise our glass in honour of Marie and toast her with a champagne cocktail.
Barbara McCulloch MITCHELL and Alison SMYTH are Marie's relatives.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-18 published
SAVAGE, Dorothy Ruth (FROMOW)
Went home to be with the Lord on Thursday, March 13, 2008 in her 87th year after a long journey with Alzheimer's. Beloved wife of the late George SAVAGE (1999.) Loved mother of Ruth (John MILLER), Margaret (David SMYTH), Stephen (Kelly McKAY) and John (Margaret PORTER.) Grandmother of nine. Mom was one whose life sought to demonstrate the love of Christ. The funeral will be in Waterford at the Thompson-Mott Funeral Home on Thursday, March 20, 2008 at 1 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to the service. If desired, donations can be made to Alzheimer Society of Toronto, 2323 Yonge Street, Suite 500, Toronto, Ontario M4P 2C9 or Key Bible Clubs, 980 Adelaide St. South, Suite 34, London, Ontario N6E 1R3. www.thompsonmottfuneral.com

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-28 published
Maggy REEVES, 85: Couturier
Austrian-born designer clothed Canada's rich and famous
By Iris NOWELL, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Toronto -- As a child, fashion designer Maggy REEVES became acquainted with immense wealth and one of its conspicuous spinoffs - beautifully dressed women. It changed her life so that years later she would attain the pinnacle of fashion excellence in Canada.
Born into uncertain times in Austria in 1924, she was christened Margarethe WEISZ. As a nine-year-old growing up in Austria she sensed only faint stirrings of the unrest around her. In 1937, she gained an abrupt understanding when her Jewish father, Robert WEISZ, fled the Nazis and escaped abroad, leaving behind his Catholic wife and daughters Margarethe and Trude.
During the Second World War, the threesome moved to the countryside where they were spared the worst of the conflict. In 1947, Margarethe married Willibald NAGENZAUM, a bookkeeper she had known from her school days. The marriage lasted only two years and she, with son Frederick, left Vienna to join her father in the Dominican Republic. There, she discovered he had bigamously married a niece of Rafael TRUJILLO, the country's infamous dictator. Margarethe and her son moved in with her father and his wife and, in doing so, rubbed shoulders with the elite of society. The women, she discovered, were stunningly dressed.
"I was so jealous," she said years later. "I showed off by making the wildest clothes." This achieved the desired effect: "People looked at me."
By 1949, however, she had grown unhappy living with her father's new wife and ran off and married James COURTNEY, a well-to-do Texan. This proved to be a mistake. After two tumultuous years in Dallas, they divorced and she moved to New York where she became an apprentice pattern maker.
In 1953, she moved to Montreal where she broadened her experience as a junior designer. Two years later, she settled in Toronto. There she got a foothold in couture by custom designing high-fashion clothes. By then known as Maggy, she set up a business in her home on Bayview Avenue in Toronto's Moore Park neighbourhood and hired three women as seamstresses. In her window she hung a sign: "L'elegance - Paris, Toronto, Haute Couture."
"Maggy organized little fashion shows in the living room," said her friend Edith BILEK, a fellow Austrian who served clients tea and sandwiches. "That's how Maggy began."
The business developed quickly but lacked capital to expand. A client named Reva JOSEPH, whose husband was a prosperous car dealer, offered the necessary backing. The new business was named Maggy Reeves, which is derived from their first names - Maggy and Reva. In 1957, the Maggy Reeves salon opened on Cumberland Street in Toronto. Over time, Maggy adopted it as her own name.
The business flourished and in 1962 she married Otto SOMLAI, a Hungarian who had fled the 1956 revolution. At first, he worked in a furniture factory but later quit to work alongside his wife.
By that time her salon enjoyed a staff of European-trained women who painstakingly produced the handwork that was the Maggy Reeves imprimatur -- beading, quilting, hand painting and embroidery. Working with fine silk chiffon, for example, a design might comprise six or eight hem lengths, each hand-rolled and stitched so fine the stitches were scarcely visible. Such filmy chiffon and tiny stitches allowed a dress to "float" as the wearer walked. It was a distinct mark of couture.
Ms. REEVES's workers spent hundreds of hours on handwork she could never afford to charge. Prices of her ball gowns averaged $2,000 to $3,000, which in Paris or New York would be 10 times higher. Her costliest design was $10,000.
Interestingly, the customer was not always right. If Ms. REEVES felt an outfit would not be flattering, she refused to make it and instead devised a glamorous alternative. She steered women away from tight-fitting clothes they thought were sexy. "If you wear something too tight that shows your bumps," she once told a reporter, "you will look like a snake that has swallowed eggs."
In October of 1964, an afternoon tea and fashion show at the Park Plaza Hotel put her salon on the map. Organized by her friend and public-relations whiz, the late Catherine SMYTH, the event was intended to expose Toronto women to haute couture suits, coats and ball gowns that were the equal of Paris, Rome and New York.
"Everybody went ga-ga," recalls Anne CASEY, a client who modelled in the show. "People wanted to buy the clothes right off your back."
Clientele grew quickly and Ms. REEVES often had difficulty obtaining high-quality fabrics in Canada. Twice a year, she travelled to textile mills in France, Italy and Austria in search of the best materials. Frequently, she went to New York for the luxurious ribbons, piping, vintage beads and Swarovski crystal buttons that gave her designs their characteristic touch.
In 1977, a star-studded charity fashion show in Los Angeles earned recognition in the U.S. The show, in support of the Loretta Young Auxiliary of Saint Anne's Maternity Hospital and Home for Unwed Mothers, was organized by Toronto broadcast journalist Edie FRANKEL. The clothes were modelled by the wives of actors and the event attracted celebrities and young starlets.
However, it also produced a big problem.
"Maggy took one look at the models and said, 'I told you, no breasts!' Ms. FRANKEL recalled. All along, Ms. REEVES had been concerned that naturally busty women and breast-implanted women would not fit her fashions. Fortunately, she had brought along a sewing machine, and her assistant Franca RANIERE immediately made alterations.
Ms. REEVES continued as a leader in Canadian haut couture for some years after that but demand diminished in the 1990s as fashion changed to ultra casual wear. Nonetheless, with one part-time worker she continued to make couture in her Toronto apartment for a few loyal clients.
Maggy REEVES was born Margarethe Katharina WEISZ in Vienna, Austria, on October 11, 1924. She died April 9, 2008, in Toronto of heart failure. She was 85. She is survived by her sister, Trude, and her son Fred Courtney. She was predeceased by her husband, Otto, in 1991.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-12 published
DAVENPORT, Anita Louise
Passed away suddenly on Wednesday, July 9th after valiantly fighting a long and difficult illness. Anita is survived by her devoted husband Barry and beloved son Paul. Loving sister to David JONES (Moira,) Diana SMYTH (Brian,) Michael JONES (Inta) and Jennifer LOUNDS (Kevin.) Predeceased by her father Harry and mother, Dorothy (née JOLLEY.) Born in 1948 in Birmingham, England, Anita has lived in Toronto since 1974. She will be greatly missed by her family and many Friends. Our thanks go to the doctors, nurses and care professionals who provided support during her courageous battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. Visitation will be at the Murray Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mount Pleasant Road, Toronto from 7-9 p.m. on Saturday July 12th and Sunday July 13th. The funeral service will be held at St. Clements Anglican Church, 59 Briar Hill Road, Toronto at 11.00 a.m. on Monday, July 14th, followed by cremation. In lieu of flowers, expressions of sympathy for Anita may be made by donation to the ALS Society of Ontario.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTH - All Categories in OGSPI

SMYTHE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-03 published
SCHULZ, Elsie M. (née SMYTHE)
Of Union, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Monday, June 2, 2008, in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Jack J. SCHULZ (July 1, 2001.) Dearly loved mother of Regina RYCROFT and her husband David of R.R.#3, Shedden, and Florian SCHULZ and his wife Florence of R.R.#1, Southwold. Sister of the late T. Elkin SMYTHE. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Born in White's Cove, New Brunswick, September 6, 1919, she was the daughter of the late Thomas and Musetta (ELKIN) SMYTHE. Elsie moved to Union from Ancaster, Ontario in 1973. In keeping with her wishes, there will be no public visitation and a private family funeral service will be held at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street Thomas. Interment in Union Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario gratefully acknowledged.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTHE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-01 published
She entertained Toronto and the troops, carting her organ from stage to stage
Born to a talented family, she became a musical fixture in a growing city and beyond
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- As a classical organist, Dorothy BROMBY's performances were like a soundtrack for a maturing city in the 20th century. From her early days in cinemas, performing during intermission, to troop shows during the Second World War and rounding up prize-winning animals at the Royal Agricultural Winter Fair, her music bellowed in the eclectic corners of Toronto's entertainment industry for more than five decades.
Ms. BROMBY was the first female conductor at the Royal Alexandra Theatre, and at age 20, probably the youngest. She performed, produced and directed shows at the Winter Fair, the Royal Horse Show, the National Home Show, Ontario Place and Yorkdale Mall. With great dedication and care, she carted her Lowery Organ from stage to stage.
She also inspired others to succeed. David Rogers, one of Canada's leading musical theatre talents and former star of the Toronto production of The Phantom of the Opera, said Ms. BROMBY taught him how to be a professional.
"[She said] that it was a business that had to be taken seriously. She always commanded respect."
Dorothy BROMBY was born into a musical and entertaining family. When her father, Harold, was still in his teens, he was personal trumpeter to the Duke of Atholl in Aberdeen, Scotland. Later, in Canada, he served as bandmaster for the 116th Battalion during the First World War. When Dorothy was a child, it was not unusual for her to find veterans camped out on the living room floor, especially during the annual Warriors' Day Parade. She also had an uncle who played the xylophone, drums and zither at the Canadian National Exhibition grandstand for afternoon circus performances.
Dorothy's first public performance was as an elementary student in Toronto's west end. In those days, children were expected to quietly line up in front of the "girl" or "boy" entrance. Once her piano skills became known, she was expected to be at the keys twice a day to herd them through the proper doors. Her uncle, Walter, even wrote a special piece of music for her called the Western Avenue School March. By the time she was in high school, the organ was her favourite instrument. In 1941, she took a job playing at cinemas across Toronto, including the Odeon Carlton, the Humber and the Danforth Music Hall.
Around the same time, she started performing for the troops at Ontario military installations, including Camp Borden, Barryfield and Muskoka's "Little Norway" base.
"She was the youngest member of the musicians' union," said sister Bernice BOYD, "and our parents had to make sure the colonel in charge at each camp would look after her."
She often teamed up with Scottish comedian Billy Meek, who went on to a regular role on Pig and Whistle, the iconic Canadian television variety show. In addition to troop shows, Ms. BROMBY volunteered to play for wounded servicemen who were convalescing in Toronto.
In her teens, Ms. BROMBY summered in the Toronto Islands. (Her mother, Lily, had lived there when she first came to Canada from Belfast in the early 1920s.) The cottage lacked a piano until one day when her parents were bicycling at the Eastern Gap harbour entrance and spied a table grand in the sand. They borrowed a Toronto Transit Commission freight wagon and, with Friends, pulled it home.
"Our parents restored it as best they could," her sister said. "And this was where Dot did all her rehearsing. When we had parties, the piano was closed and used as a buffet table."
During the war, Ms. BROMBY did shows at the Royal York and King Edward hotels, performing with four other women in a group they called The Dorothy Bromby Singers. She wrote the music and played accompaniment on the organ, pressing the 40 stops to emit different sounds, including trumpets, strings and drums.
In 1946, she was hired as the musical conductor for Stop and Go, a variety revue at Toronto's Royal Alexandra Theatre that featured artists from wartime entertainment troupes: the Accordionettes, the Modernettes, Lay Kenny's Teenagers, the Rhythmteens and the Leslie Bell Singers.
John KARASTAMATIS, the theatre's current director of communications, noted how rare it was for women of this era to be allowed to conduct.
"Working in the home and 'slave labour' were pretty well the only jobs for women at that time," he said.
Ms. BROMBY married fellow Ward's Islander Jim SMYTHE in 1948. While overseas during the war, Mr. SMYTHE had fallen in love with a picture of her snapped by a mutual friend. He insisted on meeting her as soon as he was back in Toronto. Her reputation as a musician had also charmed him while he was away.
"I fell in love with Dorothy the moment I saw her," he said. "I married her in '48 and had 59 years of bliss. It was an island romance."
After the war, the Singers hit the road, this time taking four male performers along with them. They were hired by Chrysler and General Motors to do cross-Canada tours, putting on grand spectacles each time a new car was introduced. In 1955, Ms. BROMBY did a two-week run for GM, performing as many as five shows a day. It was an exhausting but manageable schedule, even though she had two children at home under the age of 5. The group also performed on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television during its early years in the 1960s, and Ms. BROMBY later played the organ on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation variety shows and dramas hosted by Monty Hall and Rick Campbell.
She performed as a solo instrumentalist at the Canadian pavilion in Montreal during Expo 67, mingling with other performers, including Maurice Chevalier, Marlene Dietrich and a fresh-faced Luciano Pavarotti. (Ms. BROMBY's son, Ron, also played the clarinet in his high school band at Expo).
Ms. BROMBY began working at the Winter Fair and Flower Show at the Canadian National Exhibition in the late 1960s, and remained there until she retired in 1995. It seemed as though she had found her niche and refused to abandon it. From this point on, she was surrounded by bouquets of flowers. Her dedication to the job was such that she once performed with a broken wrist. "They built a stand for her arm at keyboard height," said her son, "and the furriers covered her cast with a mink muff that matched the mink stole she wore."
After a few years at the flower show, Ms. BROMBY went on to work with the ring committee in the horse arena. Her talent as both performer and director were particularly noted, especially on the closing ceremonies.
Mr. Rogers recalls the early days of his career, following Ms. BROMBY in circles around the ring. "I remember her with her music in a binder, leading the troops with her singers and dancers behind. We'd follow her through the horses and cows [stalls], she in her fancy gown with her hair higher than anyone else's."
The ceremony consisted of a parade in the centre ring, showcasing Ms. BROMBY on the organ. (She also wrote the script.) There were award-winning horses festooned with flowers, colourful bushels of fruits and vegetables, sheep, cows, geese, chickens - for 26 years, she left nothing out.
"She brought the show business pizzazz," daughter Sandy RUTHERFORD said. "They asked her to come back, even up to two or three years ago… because it now lacks that extra flavour."
When the ring was full, the lights would go down - gradually, so as not to spook the animals - and the president of the fair would enter the gate. He'd circle the ring once or twice, sitting with his wife in a three-horse buggy, officially close the event, and exit to great applause.
During her retirement, Ms. BROMBY enjoyed spending time at the family's cottage in Haliburton, Ontario, and turning her musician's hands over to gourmet cooking.
Dorothy Bromby SMYTHE was born December 4, 1925, in Toronto. She died in Toronto on December 24, 2007, from cancer. She was 82. She is survived by husband, Jim, daughters Sandy RUTHERFORD and Pat BUIE and son, Rob BROMBY. She is also survived by her sister, Bernice BOYD, and eight grandchildren.

  S... Names     SM... Names     SMY... Names     Welcome Home

SMYTHE - All Categories in OGSPI