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"SEL" 2008 Obituary


SELASSIE  SELDEN  SELKE  SELKIRK  SELLARS  SELLERS  SELLWOOD  SELTZER  SELVES  SELVIN  SELWA 

SELASSIE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-19 published
PARK, Margaret-Anne Marie
Anxiously awaited and lovingly anticipated infant daughter of Shawn and Rebecca PARK born February 17, 2008. Beloved granddaughter of Tegegne and Margaret SELASSIE of Sarnia and Steve and Bonnie PARK of Harrisburg, North Carolina; and great-granddaughter of Edith and the late Emerson TURNER. Margaret-Anne is also mourned by her aunts and uncles, Marta SELASSIE and her partner Mark DAUPHINEE of Dawson City, Yukon Territory, Sheryl PARK, Steve and Yanina PARK and their daughter Valeria, all of Concord, North Carolina. Her extended Mansell, Turner and Clement families are grieving her loss as well. A funeral service will be held at Central United Church (220 George St. at Brock) on Wednesday, February 20th at 11 a.m. and will be officiated by the Rev. Gary CARRUTHERS. Following the service, a visitation and reception will be held for family and Friends at the church. A private family interment will take place at Resurrection Cemetery. Arrangements by the McKenzie and Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 519-344-3131. As an expression of sympathy, Friends who wish may send memorial donations to the Kids Alive International (Christian Care Centre for Children at Risk) 2507 Cumberland Drive, Valparaiso, Indiana 46383-2503 or the Women's Interval Home of Sarnia-Lambton, Box 652, Sarnia N7T 7J7. Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com. A tree will be planted in memory of Margaret-Anne PARK in the McKenzie and Blundy Memorial Forest. Dedication service Sunday, September 21st, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Wawanosh Wetlands Conservation Area.

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SELDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-09 published
SELDEN, Patricia
Died Sunday, May 4, 2008 from a reoccurrence of breast cancer. She is survived and missed by her husband, Richard IRVING; her son, Alex IRVING; her mother, Clair SELDEN- SMITH, her sister, Stacey SELDEN, her brother, Reid SELDEN and her uncle Lee CASSLER. There will be no public service; however donations to the Canadian Cancer Society in her name are appreciated.

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SELKE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-24 published
McCORMACK, June Nellie
passed away peacefully in the early hours of Tuesday, May 20, 2008 at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital, in her 84th year. June was the loving wife of Roy, mother of Gail (Ben BENNETT) and Jim (Kelly), grandmother of Chelsea and Kyle and sister of Ruth HUGHES, Barbara NEWBY, Red SELKE, Marjorie BURTON and Harry LETTS, predeceased by Tom LETTS. An informal reception will be held at the Blue Mountain Golf and Country Club, Monday, May 26 from 2-4 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital Foundation or to a charity of your choice.
Friends may visit June's online book of memories at www.fawcettfuneralhomes.com

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SELKIRK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-21 published
BODDINGTON, William "Bill" George David
It is with great sorrow the family announces the sudden passing of Bill at his home on February 19, 2008. Devoted father of Kate and Martha (Mike McLELLAN) and adoring grandfather to Jack, Alexa and Charlie. Loving brother to Barbara SELKIRK, George BODDINGTON and their families. Bill's wonderful sense of humour and caring concern will be missed by the many people whose lives he touched. Service at Saint Mark's Anglican Church, 51 King Street, Port Hope on Saturday, February 23 at 1 p.m. Reception following. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Saint Mark's Anglican Church.

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SELLARS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-07 published
SELLARS, Roberta H.
Departed this life with quiet dignity in Ottawa, April 5th, 2008, leaving behind a treasury of precious memories for her husband Walter (Paddy,) daughters Sandra KUELZ (with Bernd,) and Nancy MARCOTTE (with Brian,) five grandchildren, Ron (with his Nancy,) Evan (with Stephanie), Leslie, Chenoa (with Jon) and Kyle. There are five great-grandchildren, the joy of her last years. Roberta met Walter (Paddy to her) when he was a senior staff Officer at No. 3 Wireless School (Royal Canadian Air Force) in Winnipeg in 1943. They married in 1946 and she loyally encouraged him through nine years of post-War University in Winnipeg and New York. Throughout their ministries to United Church congregations, from Manitoba through Ontario to Labrador, she was Walter's wise and patient partner. A devoted homemaker and gracious hostess she often had places at her table for new immigrants and unfortunate street people, as well as for Friends and dignitaries. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa, on Friday, April 11, from 10: 30 a.m. until Service time in the Chapel at 11:30 a.m. No flowers please, but Friends wishing to do so may make a donation to any chosen charity, thereby honouring the love and compassion that marked Roberta's dedicated life.
Condolences/donations/tributes at mcgarryfamily.ca

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SELLERS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-12 published
Ottawa's 'dean of deputy ministers' cherished the ideals of good governance
In serving governments of all stripes, he set a standard among all upper-echelon bureaucrats. His greatest achievement was likely helping save Canada's railways by reforming the 'Crow rate'
By Gay ABBATE, Page S12
Toronto -- The period between 1975 and 1992 saw great change in Canada's political landscape. There were more federal elections than most people cared to think about, and a revolving door of political figures that set the minds of voters spinning. Yet during this period of turbulent transition, Arthur KROEGER remained a key player in the Ottawa bureaucracy, a testament to his trustworthiness and his uncanny ability to be parachuted into any ministry and set it to rights.
Known as the "dean of deputy ministers," Mr. KROEGER set the standard for public servants during his 34 years working for the federal government, one of his greatest legacies being a reformed Crow's Nest Pass freight rate that allowed Canada's railways to survive.
For all that, Mr. KROEGER never gave thought to running for public office himself, in part because he was a very private person. In a speech entitled "In Praise of the Politician," which he gave in 1990 to the Empire Club of Canada, he spoke of the public scrutiny of politicians and their private lives. He complained that "public bitchiness" about those in public life "has gone well beyond any bounds of reasonableness in recent years, to the point where the good governance of the country stands to be affected."
He admired most of the politicians he met and for whom he worked, praising them for their long hours and for their sacrifices. The public impression that politicians are simply freeloaders on the public purse and that their sole interest is ego gratification is an erroneous one, he said.
Mr. KROEGER was happy to carve out his own niche, one in which he best served the Canadian public by helping to shape the policies that elected officials would enact as legislation. His role, he maintained, was to offer choices to the politicians whose job it was to choose. He was never a "Yes, Minister" type of civil servant unless he truly agreed with his bosses, said Ned FRANKS, Professor Emeritus of political studies at Queen's University. "He would not have been a good politician but he was a great public servant," Mr. FRANKS said.
Born east of Drumheller, Alberta., near the Saskatchewan border, Arthur KROEGER was the youngest of seven children of Heinrich and Helen KROEGER, a Mennonite couple who immigrated from what is now Ukraine in 1926. The KROEGERs were among 20,000 Mennonites who fled to Canada during the 1920s from the Soviet Union to avoid persecution by the Communists. The KROEGER family arrived with little to their name except for a set of carpentry tools, a wooden box full of family diaries and documents, and the family clock. They settled in the southeastern Alberta community of Naco on arid land others had abandoned as untenable. So, too, did the KROEGERs. They left what is now a ghost town to try their luck in what is known as Palliser's Triangle, an area of low rainfall that straddles three Prairie provinces.
Those early days were difficult for the KROEGERs and often there was little to eat. Meals were boiled wheat, beet peelings or lard sandwiches. Mr. KROEGER frequently went hungry as a child, said his daughter, Alix KROEGER. Helen KROEGER supplemented the family's finances by taking in washing. All the children helped out with the chores, with the milking of the cows falling to the youngest child. Often, as he went about his task, a barn cat arrived in hopes of a handout. As a young boy, Mr. KROEGER loved cats and would squirt milk directly into the cat's mouth, his daughter said.
The KROEGERs spoke Low German and Mr. KROEGER did not learn English until he started school. That deficiency never held him back. Upon graduating from Consort High School, he obtained a degree in English Literature from the University of Alberta in 1955. However, he had not arrived at university with a distinguished academic record. In 2004, he admitted as such in a convocation speech to graduates of the university. "I had shot pool, played hockey and hung around with my Friends," he recounted. As a result, he ended Grade 12 two courses short and had to make good in summer school.
After graduation, he spent a year teaching, only to discover that he did not enjoy the job and junked the idea. A former professor urged him to apply for a Rhodes Scholarship. He was successful, and soon he set off for Pembroke College at Oxford University to pursue studies in English literature. Two weeks into the term he switched to politics, philosophy and economics. He received his master's in 1958 and always remained grateful to his old professor. Mr. KROEGER framed the professor's note and hung it on the wall of his study.
From Oxford, he joined what was then the Department of External Affairs and served in Geneva, New Delhi, Washington and Ottawa. Over the years, he built up a reputation for hard work, clear thinking and astute management. Then, a few days before Christmas in 1974, he was suddenly launched into Ottawa's upper stratosphere.
Then prime minister Pierre Trudeau personally selected Mr. KROEGER and three other senior servants and appointed them to key positions in various departments. From Mr. Trudeau's point of view, he was just what he had in mind - "younger men with more flexibility," who could function in top government jobs. After struggling under the limitations of a minority government, Mr. Trudeau had that summer been returned to power with a majority and he wished to put into effect some lasting changes.
Then 42, Mr. KROEGER became one of Mr. Trudeau's bright new stars. He was moved from assistant secretary on the Treasury Board to deputy minister in the Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development. While not entirely new to the department (in his Treasury capacity, he had supervised its spending programs), it was the first time he had any personal experience with the North since 1958, when he had set off for England. Unlike most transatlantic travellers who at that time took a ship from Montreal or Halifax, he had boarded a wheat-carrying freighter in Churchill, Manitoba, and had gone to Britain via Hudson Bay. Until he became a deputy minister, that had been his first and only trip to the North.
His spell at Oxford was significant in matters of the heart, too. While there, he met a fellow Canadian student, Gabrielle SELLERS, who was studying history on a scholarship. The two became Friends and both would join External Affairs at the same time she went to the United Nations in New York. They met again in Washington and married in 1966. They were to remain together until her death in 1979.
After leaving Indian Affairs, he went on to other appointments as deputy minister: Transport Canada (1979-83), Regional Industrial Expansion (1985-86), Energy, Mines and Resources (1986-88) and Employment and Immigration (1988-92). In the short period when he was not a deputy minister he took on other positions, including special adviser to the Clerk of the Privy Council.
It was at the Department of Transport in 1979 that Mr. KROEGER truly made his mark. The portfolio had just been handed to Jean-Luc Pepin and together they rolled up their sleeves and set about reforming the historic Crow's Nest Pass freight rate. The process was to take four years of debate, revision and much slinging of political mud.
To Mr. KROEGER, however, the reform was more a matter of good governance than of good politics. His analysis was that the railways could not go on losing millions of dollars carrying grain at Crow rates, but the farmers needed the railways to get their grain to market, so the government had to bite the bullet of change.
To settle differences, the department proposed to split the Crow rate subsidy of $650-million a year evenly between farmers and the railways. For a while, it looked as if the measure would go through without difficulty. Then Quebec raised its voice to denounce the changes as giving western livestock farmers an unfair advantage. The attack spooked the Quebec Liberal caucus and Mr. Pepin, already under fire from the powerful wheat pools in the West, retreated. That invited attacks by many Tory members of Parliament and their grain-growing constituents. Meanwhile, for reasons of its own, the New Democratic Party also weighed in and the row raged on for months.
For Mr. KROEGER, the whole thing began to appear very expensive. "Unfortunately, neither producers nor railways nor the federal Government can pay much more than at present," he told The Globe and Mail in September, 1982. "We have to acknowledge we may have a grain transportation system no one can afford."
Interestingly, one of his allies was his brother, Henry KROEGER, then Minister of Transport in Alberta. Many wheat producers in the province looked kindly on the reform and Henry KROEGER threw in his support. After his brother died in 1987, Mr. KROEGER forever kept above his desk a photo of the Canadian flag flying at half-mast at the Alberta Legislature.
In the end, the bill passed in November, 1983, after undergoing more than 80 amendments. As it happened, Mr. Pepin was not there to welcome it. By August that year, he had suffered too many black eyes and Mr. Trudeau replaced him with Lloyd Axworthy. His departure was a sad moment for Mr. KROEGER, who had developed a deep respect for his boss.
As things turned out, it would all go out the window anyway. The new rate was upheld by successive Tory governments but eventually it was eliminated after Jean Chrétien came to power in 1993.
Mr. KROEGER, however, never forgot. The Crow issue and the fight in the trenches alongside his friend Mr. Pepin left a lasting impression and he wrote a so-far untitled book on the subject. It will be published next year by University of Alberta Press.
In 1989, Mr. KROEGER was awarded the Public Service Outstanding Achievement Award and therein lies his legacy, say his numerous fans. Former prime minister Paul Martin, a long-time friend, said Mr. KROEGER had a huge influence on many politicians in terms of public policy and what was best for the future of Canada.
Mr. Martin was one of those who turned to him for advice. It was 1993, the Liberals had just won the federal election and Mr. Martin wanted to join the cabinet as minister of industry. A big mistake, Mr. KROEGER told him, and urged him instead to become the finance minister because that was where the power lies. "I resisted at first, but eventually gave in to his superior knowledge," said Mr. Martin. "He was right."
When Mr. Martin later became prime minister, he turned to Mr. KROEGER for his "great reservoir of knowledge" and asked him to serve on a transition team.
Mr. KROEGER never lost touch with his western roots or lost his western perspective, said Donald Savoie, professor of Public Administration at the University of Moncton.
Part of the task of the transition team was to shape how the new government would handle its dealings with the West. "You can't do one thing that's going to please the West, because there is no such West," he said. "There are many Wests."
Mr. KROEGER retired from the public service in 1992 but was not idle for long. The following year, he became Chancellor of Carleton University and served until 2002.
He was also visiting professor at the University of Toronto from 1993 to 1994, and a visiting fellow at Queen's University from 1993 to 1999.
A humble man, he never spoke of his accomplishments, said Huguette LABELLE, his long-time partner. The two met several years after Gabrielle KROEGER's death and became Friends. At the time, they were both deputy ministers. "We had a lot of the same views and values," said Ms. LABELLE, Chancellor of the University of Ottawa since 1994.
After his retirement, Mr. KROEGER began to delve into the diaries and family documents stored in that wooden box that survived the KROEGER family's trip across the ocean. From those, he pieced together the history of his family dating back several generations, highlighting its survival through revolution, drought and persecution.
His book Hard Passage: A Mennonite Family's Long Journey from Russia to Canada was published last year.
In 2000, Mr. KROEGER was named a Companion of the Order of Canada. The year before, Carleton University created the Arthur Kroeger College of Public Affairs to administer its new undergraduate program in public affairs and policy management.
Unpretentious to the end, it left him tongue-tied.
Arthur KROEGER was born September 7, 1932, in Naco, Alberta. He died of kidney cancer on May 9, 2008, at the Centre Élisabeth-Bruyère in Ottawa. He was 75. He leaves his daughters, Alix and Kate, brothers Nick, George and Peter, and sister Anne. He also leaves his partner, Huguette LABELLE, step-son Pierre LABELLE and step-daughter Chantal LABELLE.

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SELLWOOD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-02 published
WIGGINS, Austin Clarence
After a courageous battle with cancer, at Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale on Saturday, May 31st 2008. Austin Clarence WIGGINS of Markdale in his 77th year. Beloved husband of Marjorie (nee SELLWOOD.) Dear father of Julie McCAULEY (Merle) of Berkeley, Jo-Anne IRETON (Allan) of Holland Centre, Kim HARTLEY (Bill Jr.) of Berkeley. Loving grandpa of Trevor IRETON (friend Lynne) and Stacey IRETON; Krista HARTLEY (fiancé Adam) and Tyler HARTLEY. Sadly missed by sisters Marion McCANN and Donna McCUTCHEON (Barry) and mother-in-law Mary SELLWOOD, and sister-in-law Florence SELLWOOD, brothers-in-law Alex BAKER and John McCANN, and nieces and nephews. Predeceased by parents Clarence and Emma WIGGINS, sisters Velma RUTLEDGE and Norma BAKER. Friends may call at the May Funeral Home, Markdale on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9p.m., where a funeral service will be held on Thursday June 5, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation followed by interment in Markdale Cemetery at a later date. If desired, memorial donations to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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SELTZER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-17 published
SELTZER, Frederick Adam (January 10th, 1928-May 15th, 2008)
Survived by loving wife Doreen, daughter Cathy and son Drew.

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SELTZER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-16 published
SELTZER, Mark and CHAN, Marilyn
In memory of Mark SELTZER, Medal of Bravery, 1957-1998 and Marilyn CHAN 1955-1998
Sadly missed, lovingly remembered by family and Friends

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SELVES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-04 published
LOVIE, E. Clayton
Peacefully, at Kensington Village Nursing Home, London, Tuesday, April 1, 2008, surrounded by his family and invited by God, E. Clayton LOVIE, in his 98th year, formerly of Grand Bend, went to join his beloved wife of 52 years, Hazel Lorena (WAGHORN) LOVIE (1917-1992.) Loved father and father-in-law of Eileen and James MacINTYRE and Bradley LOVIE, all of London, Gary and Mary LOVIE of Wellesly. Loving grandpa of Tim MacINTYRE and his wife Lori, Jodie McKEON, Fran LOVIE, Tom LOVIE and wife Dawn and great-grandpa of Travis McKEON, Kayla McKEON, Shannon MacINTYRE, Kate BARDWELL, Emma BARDWELL and Victoria LOVIE. Dear brother-in-law of Shirley LOVIE, Betty WAGHORN, Orloe WATSON and Jack WATSON. Remembered by his nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by his son Alan James LOVIE (1951-1973,) sister Lillian MELLIN (2007,) brother Gordon LOVIE (2000,) brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Orval MELLIN, Ray and Dorothy WAGHORN, Harry WAGHORN, Olive and Wallace SELVES, Merle and Julis BAUER. Resting at the T. Harry Hoffman and Sons Funeral Home, Dashwood, with visitation Monday 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. where the Funeral and Committal Service will be held Tuesday, April 8, 2008 at 11 a.m. The Rev. Harry DISHER officiating. Interment Robin's Hill Cemetery, Thorndale. If desired, memorial donations to the Alzheimer Society, Diabetes Association or charity of choice would be appreciated. Condolences at www.hoffmanfuneralhome.com

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SELVIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-07 published
DRAKE, Florence (née SELVIN)
Unexpectedly but peacefully on February 27th at Saint Michael's Hospital in her 93rd year. The Selvins emigrated from Russia to Utah where Florence was born. Her studies took her to Mills College in California where she studied to become a social worker. She remained a proud and engaged alumnus. Marriage to Stillman DRAKE and his subsequent professorship at the University of Toronto brought Florence to Canada. The University of Toronto community was always dear to Florence's heart. Her compassion as a social worker benefited many of Toronto's disadvantaged as she generously supported numerous charities throughout the city. Florence's interest in the arts led her to the Art Gallery of Ontario where she was a volunteer for many years, arranging and leading excursions to Italy, a country both she and Stillman both loved. Family and Friends in California were never far from Florence's thoughts and she visited beautiful Berkeley and San Francisco often. Florence treated everyone she met with gentleness, kindness, and generosity. We will miss her lively conversation, her delight in exploring the culinary treasures of Toronto, and her infectious love of life. Those fortunate enough to have known Florence will miss the interest and sincerity she showed not only to her Friends but also to their families. Pre-deceased by her husband Stillman DRAKE and daughter Judy CASAROLI. Survived by stepsons Mark and Dan DRAKE and their families; nephews Steven, Michael, and Joel SELVIN and their families. She will be missed by her many Friends in the United States and Canada. A memorial service will be held on Wednesday March 26 (Florence's birthday) at 10: 00 a.m. at the Victoria College Chapel, University of Toronto.

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SELWA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
PRITCHARD, Elizabeth Margaret Grace (née MacLEAN)
Peacefully at Bluewater Health-Norman St. Site, Sarnia on Tuesday, April 29, 2008. Elizabeth Margaret Grace PRITCHARD. Beloved wife of the late Dr. Robert W. PRITCHARD (2004.) Loving mother of Fred (Lynn) of Raleigh, North Carolina Mary of Kentville, Nova Scotia, Susan of Guelph and Rob (Bogusia SELWA) of Walbrzych, Poland. Much loved by her six granddaughters; Katie ROLLWAGEN (Darrell HARVEY) of Ottawa, Heather ROLLWAGEN (Adam BARNARD) of Calgary, Edey HOBSON (Matt TWIDDY) of Kingston, Ali ROLLWAGEN (Ryan Quinlan KEECH) of Toronto, Jane HOBSON of Hamilton, and Elizabeth HOBSON of Kentville, Nova Scotia. Also survived by numerous nieces, nephews and their families. Predeceased by her sister Molly ARMER (2006.) Betty was born May 5, 1920. She was the daughter of Captain James MacLEAN and his wife Mary FISHER. She graduated from the Toronto General Hospital School of Nursing and she proudly served in the Canadian Army Medical Corp in Europe from 1943-1946. Upon returning to Canada she earned her diploma in Public Health from the University of Toronto and worked in Public Health in Sarnia with the Lambton County Health Unit and the Rotary Children's Centre while raising her family. Betty was a devoted and active member of Laurel-Lea St. Matthew's Church, whose congregational support and encouragement were a source of much comfort. Friends will be received at the Knight Funeral Home, 588 St. Clair Parkway. Corunna on Thursday, May 8th, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will then be held at Laurel-Lea St. Matthew's Church, (Corner of Exmouth and Melrose), Sarnia on Friday at 1: 00 p.m. Cremation has taken place and interment will follow later in Norway Bay United Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, sympathy may be expressed through memorial donations to the Laurel-Lea St. Matthew's Church, Bluewater Health Foundation or to the charity of one's choice. Knight 519-862-2845.

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