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"SAA" 2008 Obituary


SAABY  SAARLOOS  SAAVEDRA 

SAABY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-09 published
LAMER, Doctor Laurent (1931-2008)
Dr. Laurent LAMER passed away peacefully at Notre-Dame Hospital in Montreal after a lengthy illness. Doctor Laurent LAMER dedicated over 40 years of his life to Notre-Dame Hospital's Ophtalmology Department and to the Medicine Faculty of Université de Montréal. Beyond the many patients he has had the privilege of treating, Dr. LAMER was a pioneer of the use of lasers in the treatment of retinal disease and in the use of ocular ultra sound as a diagnostic tool. In recognition of his many contributions to the advancement of medicine, Doctor LAMER was honored and granted a career medal (Médaille de carrière) in 2004 by the Ophtalmology Department and the faculty of medicine of the Université de Montréal. He leaves behind his spouse Jocelyne GAUTHIER, his sons Francis and Olivier, their spouses Bena STOCK and Malene SAABY, his granddaughters Madeleine and Michelle, his grand_sons Sébastien and Simon, Tamarha and Jessie PIERCE (daughters of Jocelyne,) his brothers and sisters Hubert, Jean-Louis, Claudette and Jocelyne, his brothers and sisters in law Fernande LAMER, Rachelle LAMER, Jules JOBIN, Yvon MATTE, Pierrette LUSIGNAN, Jacqueline APRIL, Françoise and Médéric DESROCHERS, Monique APRIL, Hélène APRIL, Luc APRIL et Lois HESS and numerous nephews, nieces, Friends and colleagues. The family will receive condolences on Monday and Tuesday June 9 and 10, 2008 from 6 p.m. to 9 p.m. at Urgel Bourgie Funeral Home, 1255 Beaumont, Town of Mount Royal. A funeral service will be held on Wednesday June 11, 2008 at 11 a.m. at St-Joseph Catholic Church, corner Thornton and Laird, in Town of Mount Royal. The family, in honor of his achievements, would appreciate donations to the Fondation de l'Hôpital Notre-Dame (Ophtalmology Department) instead of flowers. The family wishes to thank the personnel of the 7th floor, of the intensive Care Unit and of the Palliative Care Unit of the Notre Dame Hospital for their devotion and the respect and dignity of the care given to him during his lengthy illness.

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SAARLOOS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-04 published
VANGURP, Jacob Abraham
In His appointed time, Sunday March 2, 2008, and with eternal peace, Jacob Abraham VANGURP, by grace went to be with his Lord and Saviour, in his 66th year. Surrounded and ever loved by his family, Wilma (née DIELEMAN,) and Children: David and Charlene VANGURP (Jordan, Aaron, Josiah); Lois and Bob FORSYTH (Cherish, Emalie); Jana and Richard HAMSTRA (Ben, Jeffrey, Janelle, Sarah) Carol and Johan TANGELDER (Ethan, Cayla, Julia); Susan and Eric KNIGHT (Joshua, Rachel); Nancy and James ELISEN (Calvin, Craig); Ellyn and Keith SINKE (Lily, Phoebe); Joel and Amy VANGURP (Grace). Youngest brother of Jack VANGURP; Nellie; Gerrie SAARLOOS; Harry and Jane Ida and George JANSSEN; Casper and Gretha; Neil and Theresa; Predeceased by, Parents Casper and Ida VANGURP; Floor SAARLOOS; Marie VANGURP Margaret and Jack KAASTRA. Visitation Wednesday, March 5, 1-3 and 7-9 at Tillsonburg Christian Reformed Church, Concession St. W. and a Celebration of Life, Worship Service, Thursday March 6 at 2: 00 p.m. Memorial donations to the Immanuel Christian School or the Canadian Cancer Society may be arranged by contacting Ostrander's Funeral Home, Tillsonburg (842-5221).

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SAAVEDRA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-25 published
DERSTINE, Clayton Kolb
Our friend, husband and father died on Good Friday at Toronto Western Hospital. Clay would have liked to have been remembered both as a writer and as a pioneer in establishing French public schools in Toronto. Clay wrote throughout his life (including book reviews for The Globe and Mail) but his magnum opus is his book Treegodspace. Clay believed in multi-culturalism and in Canadians speaking both official languages, and was active in left-wing politics. He devoted his considerable talent and energy to working to establish a French public school system in Toronto, and the success that system is now enjoying is due in no small part to his efforts.
Clay was born in 1928 to Mary Elizabeth Kolb DERSTINE and Bishop C.F. DERSTINE of First Mennonite Church, Kitchener. Clay grew up in Kitchener and was a football star at Kitchener Collegiate Institute and Waterloo Lutheran. He came to Toronto to do graduate studies, but fled to Paris, where he sought to come to terms with the divergence between many of society's values and his own. He taught himself French from Friends, books and the street, and worked at United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. He returned to Canada in 1958, met and married Joyce CARTER, his love and companion for the next 50 years. Their son is Dirk DERSTINE of Toronto. Clay was also blessed with a daughter, Julie SAAVEDRA, born in France. He also leaves his daughter-in-law Jennifer PENMAN, his son-in-law Téo SAAVEDRA and his grandchildren Madeleine, Benjamin, Lou and Atina. His brother John and sisters Ruth, Yvonne and Grace will all miss him as will their families and the rest of his large family.
Clay was a believer in wonder, joy and close observation triumphing over order-mongering and those who define interest, profit and riches in money. We loved him and we are all blessed by his memory and example, while poorer for his absence. A celebration of his life will be held Sunday, April 6 at the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse, 106 Trinity Street, Toronto, at 5 p.m. until whenever.

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SAAVEDRA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-28 published
DERSTINE, Clayton Kolb
Our friend, husband and father died on Good Friday at Toronto Western Hospital. Clay would have liked to have been remembered both as a writer and as a pioneer in establishing French public schools in Toronto. Clay wrote throughout his life (including book reviews for The Globe and Mail) but his magnum opus is his book Treegodspace. Clay believed in multi-culturalism and in Canadians speaking both official languages, and was active in left-wing politics. He devoted his considerable talent and energy to working to establish a French public school system in Toronto, and the success that system is now enjoying is due in no small part to his efforts.
Clay was born in 1928 to Mary Elizabeth Kolb DERSTINE and Bishop C.F. DERSTINE of First Mennonite Church, Kitchener. Clay grew up in Kitchener and was a football star at Kitchener Collegiate Institute and Waterloo Lutheran. He came to Toronto to do graduate studies, but fled to Paris, where he sought to come to terms with the divergence between many of society's values and his own. He taught himself French from Friends, books and the street, and worked at United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization. He returned to Canada in 1958, met and married Joyce CARTER, his love and companion for the next 50 years. Their son is Dirk DERSTINE of Toronto. Clay was also blessed with a daughter, Julie SAAVEDRA, born in France. He also leaves his daughter-in-law Jennifer PENMAN, his son-in-law Téo SAAVEDRA and his grandchildren Madeleine, Benjamin, Lou and Atina. His brother John and sisters Ruth, Yvonne and Grace will all miss him as will their families and the rest of his large family.
Clay was a believer in wonder, joy and close observation triumphing over order-mongering and those who define interest, profit and riches in money. We loved him and we are all blessed by his memory and example, while poorer for his absence. A celebration of his life will be held Sunday, April 6 at the Enoch Turner Schoolhouse, 106 Trinity Street, Toronto, at 5 p.m. until whenever.

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SAAVEDRA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-30 published
Rebellious writer returned from Paris and helped install French in Toronto schools
Raised on the Sawdust Trail, he learned oratory from his bishop father but strayed far from his religious roots
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Toronto -- When Clayton DERSTINE was 9, he joined his father on the Sawdust Trail, a trek across the Deep South made by Christian evangelists during the Depression. C.F. DERSTINE, a Mennonite bishop from Kitchener, Ontario, headlined for Billy Graham while his son ran errands inside the crowded tents. Clay listened to his father preach to hardbitten farmers, sometimes for up to five hours at a time, and learned some of his oratory skills.
Years later, Mr. DERSTINE put those skills to work in a campaign of his own - an effort to have French-language education taught in Toronto's public schools. In the process, he discovered a style of proselytizing much more to his liking.
Mr. DERSTINE helped create the first French public school in Toronto. He also chaired the Toronto Board of Education's French language advisory committee, was instrumental in creating the Francophone Educational Planning Council for the Toronto Region, and co-ordinated the Ontario Coalition for Language Rights. The impact of his vision and the breadth of his labour is still felt in several Toronto communities.
Clayton DERSTINE was the oldest child born to Bishop DERSTINE's Canadian family and Mary Elizabeth KOLB. It was his father's second family - he had previously had three children with a first wife in Pennsylvania. His mother kept strictly to her tasks at the church but later in life was sometimes seen loosening her kerchief and cruising down the streets of Kitchener in a black car. Clayton was a bright boy but couldn't keep his mind on his lessons. He slid into all kinds of mischief - a rough beginning for a boy whose father had penned well-thumbed sermons with the titles "The path to noble manhood" and "Hell's playground: theatres and movies."
During Bishop DERSTINE's revival meetings, one of Clay's jobs was to lean across a five-foot wooden scroll and wind it along, displaying the images as his father told the Mennonite history of the world. After the meetings, devout women who had stood in the hot sun all day prepared supper for them, sometimes dripping sweat into the mashed potatoes. Clay didn't like that too much - he politely asked for a couple of boiled eggs and peeled the shells himself. A rebel from the start, he continued on this path and later exhibited some particularly curious eccentricities, drawing him far from his rural, religious roots.
He was a football hero during high school, a force to be feared on the field. But he was a bookish jock, preferring Dickens and Descartes over retelling stories from the game. His yearbook included comments about his tackling and running, as well as how he tended to "sling around a mean vocabulary."
In 1949, after graduating from Waterloo Lutheran University (later Wilfred Laurier) with a degree in English literature, he went to graduate school at the University of Toronto, studying under Northrop Frye and Marshall McLuhan. He spent hours at the Royal York Hotel's King Cole Room, discussing great shifts in intellectual thought with his mentors and fellow protégés. These conversations became a launching pad for him as a thinker and a writer. His problem was that his intellect and ambition never quite met up with a solid body of discipline. As a writer, he was often mired in esoteric dreaming. He dropped out of school in 1951 and looked for the cheapest route to Paris.
For the next seven years, he lived in a tiny top-floor garret with a view of Notre Dame, no doubt aware of the cliché but succumbing to its charms regardless. He surrounded himself with Scotch, cigarettes and a steady supply of black notebooks, in which he inked his impressions of the city. If he wasn't in his room writing, he was in cafés discovering the particular flavours of French society, and sometimes sponging work off his new Friends. He was an office boy for United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization for a few years, then hired to do translations. If the French words didn't come easily enough, he'd pop into Café de Flore on Boulevard Saint-Germain to swallow un petit jaune (pastis) and ask someone to help fill in the blanks.
During this period, he dated Mariel CLARMONT, a Parisian he met in one of the cafés. She gave birth to their daughter, Julie, just before he returned to Canada in 1958. Mr. DERSTINE held Julie at birth but then did not see her again until she turned 21, by agreement with Mariel.
In the meantime, Mr. DERSTINE returned home to life in the basement of his parents' Kitchener home. It wasn't long before he met and fell in love with Joyce CARTER, a young reporter at the Record newspaper. The couple moved to Toronto, where Ms. CARTER went to work for The Globe and Mail. After they had lived together for a few years, they were married by Bishop DERSTINE in their living room, his hands shaking so much from Parkinson's disease that he could hardly hold the Bible. His son reached out and took his father's hand to steady it.
In 1965, their son Dirk was born and Mr. DERSTINE became a stay-at-home father, a rarity then. He also worked as a freelancer, consulting with the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation on a series about Mennonite history and writing book reviews for The Globe. He also kept busy working on Treegodspace, a memoir loosely based on his Paris notebooks.
"This book is written mostly either from a sofa just inside the window, or from a canvas chaise, shuffled regularly to follow the sun's patches across the lawn. If it's 3 p.m. I'm beside the lilies," he wrote. In this dense, impressionistic book, Mr. DERSTINE embarked on a journey to see where he would wind up - as he put it, "To see the macrocosm in the microcosm."
He was deeply committed to his writing project and continued, season after season, pumping out the words, certain that he'd eventually find an appreciative audience. He once left the manuscript on Dennis Lee's doorstep, hoping the Toronto writer would find it a good home. But after repeated rejections from publishers, Mr. DERSTINE mourned for a while, then bounced back with a new vigour for an old passion: the French language.
Inspired by Pierre Trudeau's move toward bilingualism and multiculturalism, Mr. DERSTINE also believed strongly in Canadians speaking both official languages. But during the late 1970s, Toronto students could immerse themselves in French only at expensive private schools or through the separate school system.
Mr. DERSTINE set about finding a more inclusive solution. In 1972, he helped create the first French public school in Toronto, École Gabrielle-Roy, named after the Manitoba writer. Five years later, Mr. DERSTINE was involved in forming a French secondary-school module at Jarvis Collegiate. Beginning in 1977, he served for eight years as vice-chair and then chair of the French Language Advisory Committee at the Toronto School Board.
"Clay was one of those unique individuals," said Tony SILIPO, a trustee on the Toronto School Board in the early 1990s and another member of the committee. "As an anglophone parent, he was one of the most fervent proponents of French-language education in the city. He lived it. He believed in it so strongly."
According to Pat Case, who also served on the board, Mr. DERSTINE was a strong proponent of multiculturalism who threw in his lot with the other minority communities seeking recognition to "come in from the margins." French wasn't just for Quebeckers, he understood, but for immigrants from countries such as Haiti, Senegal and the Ivory Coast.
In the late 1980s, the paradigm shifted. French school boards replaced the advisory board; Mr. DERSTINE served on the new body until he was defeated at the polls in 1992. From that point on, his world mostly consisted of life in a West Toronto neighbourhood, where neighbours would spot him reading the morning paper on his front porch or walking his dog with a crusty baguette tucked under his arm.
Clayton DERSTINE was born July 1, 1928, in Kitchener, Ontario He died March 21, 2008, in Toronto after a stroke. He was 79. He is survived by wife, Joyce CARTER, and children Dirk DERSTINE, of Toronto, and Julie SAAVEDRA, of Paris.

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