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"NOS" 2008 Obituary


NOSEWORTHY  NOSTRAND 

NOSEWORTHY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-14 published
NOSEWORTHY, Ralph
Of Wallaceburg, passed away, on Tuesday, February 12, 2008, at the age of 87 years. He was born in Saint_John's, Newfoundland and was a son of the late Joseph and Gertrude (CHURCHHILL) NOSEWORTHY. Beloved husband of Maude (Penney) NOSEWORTHY. Dear father of Shirley LALONDE of Wallaceburg. Dear grandfather of Dan LALONDE of Sombra and Paul LALONDE of Wallaceburg. Loving great-grandfather of Josh and Andrea. Kind brother of Rose and Ed, Vera and Bill and brother-in-law of Joan and Jean. Predeceased by a sister Phyllis and his brothers Cecil, Hubert and Gordon. Friends will be received at the Eric F. Nicholls Funeral Home, 639 Elgin Street, Wallaceburg, on Thursday, February 14, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held on Friday, February 15, 2008 from Nicholls Funeral Home at 2 p.m. Interment in Riverview Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation may be left at the funeral home.

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NOSEWORTHY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-08 published
SNELGROVE, Donald Roger
Suddenly on Friday, February 29, 2008, in his 80th year. Beloved husband of Shirley (HOLLIDAY.) Loving father of Dan (Susan,) Val (Jim MacINTOSH), Julie (Tim KING), and Shelley (Vincent NOSEWORTHY). He will be missed by his grandchildren, Melanie and Thomas SNELGROVE, and the late Nicholas MacINTOSH (1985.) Dear brother of the late Dorothy SNELGROVE. A Funeral Service was held at Gilbert MacIntyre and son Funeral Home, Hart Chapel, 1099 Gordon Street, Guelph, on Monday, March 3, 2008 at 2 p.m. Interment at Woodlawn Memorial Park, Guelph. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family (Cards are available at the funeral home 519-821-5077 or send condolences at www.gilbertmacintyreandson.com)

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NOSTRAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-02 published
Toronto modernist's projects married pragmatism, poetic sensibility
Award-winning university collaboration conjures an architecture both sustainable and beautiful
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
An architect who was ahead of the curve in thinking how sustainable design can be integrated in elegant architectural solutions, Adrian DICASTRI brought his love of music and culture along with his analytical skills to the art and practice of his profession.
"What a lot of people didn't realize about Adrian was his poetic sensibility," said his friend Dereck REVINGTON, another architect who described Mr. DICASTRI's major buildings as "full of colour and light and a subtle dancing rhythm."
Pragmatism had to be satisfied first, but what characterized Mr. DICASTRI's work was a luminous and lyrical modernism, Mr. REVINGTON said. "His definition of sustainability was much more complex than simply creating ecologically friendly buildings. He spoke continuously about the importance of cultural, environmental and aesthetic sustainability."
Adrian John DICASTRI was born in Victoria, the second of five sons and one daughter of architect John DICASTRI (obituary September 22, 2005) and his wife Florence Margaret (GREENWOOD,) who was always called Paddy. The family lived first in the Rockland area of Victoria - in a house his father had designed - and then in a rambling former seniors' residence close to the ocean in Oak Bay that the senior Mr. DICASTRI renovated to accommodate his large and rambunctious family.
As a boy, Adrian was the only child who showed any ability at sketching and drawing, according to his younger brother Julian. He also swam "like a porpoise" and loved being in the water, a passion he would later sustain in "landlocked Toronto" by designing and building a family cottage on Georgian Bay.
He attended St. Patrick's Elementary School and then Oak Bay junior and senior high schools, graduating in 1969. He worked in his father's architectural office for a couple of years and then, at 19, went travelling in Europe for six months.
After returning, he resumed his Friendship with Susan McDONALD, who had been a year or so behind him in high school, and entered the University of Victoria, where he studied English literature in a general arts program. A ferocious reader, he was torn in those early years between teaching and architecture. He left after two years and went travelling again, this time to Mexico and Central America. By the time he returned, he had affirmed his decision on a career in architecture. He won a place in the University of Waterloo's co-op degree program in January, 1976.
After completing nearly three years of his degree, he and Ms. McDONALD (by then his wife) moved to Toronto, where he enrolled in the architecture program at the University of Toronto. Larry RICHARDS, former dean of the faculty of architecture, remembers him as "an outstanding, leading student" who was also a very nice guy. Mr. DICASTRI graduated with a bachelor of architecture degree in 1982. son Nicholas was born in 1983 and daughter Julia in As a young architect, Mr. DICASTRI worked at Diamond and Schmitt architects in Toronto. "He was an extraordinarily focused and smart guy who was a really great critic on projects in development," said Don SCHMITT, a principal in the firm. "He was a real modernist, and rigorous in his focus on rational solutions and elegant but spare design." Mr. SCHMITT also remembered him as being relaxed and possessing a dry sense of humour, qualities that "are very important in the culture of an office."
Architect John VAN NOSTRAND hired Mr. DICASTRI in 1984. "He was interested in working in a smaller firm where he could have more direct influence," Mr. VAN NOSTRAND said. The two eventually became partners, working on some major social housing projects until government support for that market dried up in the early 1990s. They also did a number of university projects, including the revitalization of St. George Street on the University of Toronto campus.
"He was a brilliant designer and he got brilliant buildings done, but he did it in a very pragmatic way," said Mr. VAN NOSTRAND. "He had real stamina for sticking with long projects and making sure that they were finished off as well as they were started. And he was a good leader. People who worked for him respected him and wanted to make good buildings for him."
In the mid 1990s, their firm went after the contract for the Computer Science and Engineering Building at York University. Mr. DICASTRI, fascinated by the idea of creating sustainable buildings, was superb at forging connections and put together a collaboration that included Vancouver architect Peter Busby, a noted green designer.
"That building is really a reflection of Peter Busby and his West Coast thinking and Adrian DICASTRI and his practical, plain thinking and his understanding of the complexity of York University and where it could go," said architect Peter CLEWES.
The building, which has operable windows, uses "passive strategies" to maximize natural light and ventilation and decrease the need for air-conditioning. It won several awards, including the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Governor-General's Medal in Architecture. Mr. CLEWES said it demonstrates that "it is not only the spaces within buildings that are important, but the spaces they create outside of themselves." A complex and seminal building in Mr. DICASTRI's career, it speaks to how he was beginning to think about collaboration with others and about the practicalities of creating buildings that are both sustainable and yet beautiful to live and work in. "That was a turning point for him."
Mr. CLEWES and Mr. DICASTRI, who had known each other since the 1980s, often commiserated about the capriciousness of a career in architecture - which is known as a fine vocation and a horrible profession, especially during economic downturns. They were both partners in architectural firms that were struggling to sustain themselves when Mr. DICASTRI called Mr. CLEWES in 1998 and proposed they merge practices. He cited the computer sciences building at York as an example of the kinds of things they could do together.
"It came out of the blue," Mr. CLEWES said this week - but the more he thought about it, the more he realized that "for the first time in about eight or nine years, [I felt] I could stick my head up above water and look around and say, 'This could mean something more than simply surviving.' "
The following year, Van Nostrand Dicastri and Wallman Clewes Bergman merged to form Architects Alliance. Mr. DICASTRI's strength as a strategic thinker and team builder came into play on one of the firm's significant projects, the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research at the U of T, which they did in collaboration with Stefan Behnisch Architekten in Germany. The completed building - elegant, intriguingly situated, ecologically green, technologically but subtly complicated - has won popular accolades and several design prizes, including the International Award from the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Design Excellence Award from the Ontario Association of Architects.
It was poignant that Mr. DICASTRI, at the point when his professional and family lives were happily and productively established, was diagnosed with bladder cancer in 2006. The next 15 months were a relentless struggle with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation as he fought against what proved to be an unconquerable illness. A week ago, he received a specially designed box containing individually written letters, poems and messages of esteem and affection from his colleagues at Architects Alliance. He was still well enough to read and share them with his family.
Adrian John DICASTRI was born in Victoria on September 5, 1952. He died at home in Toronto on January 29, 2008, of metastasized bladder cancer. He was 55. He is survived by wife Susan McDONALD, children Nicholas and Julia, five siblings and extended family. There will be a celebration of his life Tuesday in the Great Hall, Hart House, University of Toronto.

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NOSTRAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-03 published
WARD, Anna Marsh (formerly NORRIS, née VAN NOSTRAND)
Nan was born May 14, 1923. She was the sixth of seven children to bless the van Nostrand home at 91 Delaware Ave., Toronto. Her passing was very peacefully on February 21, 2008, under the gentle care of Humber River Regional Hospital. Nan was a wonderfully colourful lady and will be dearly missed by many Friends and family members. She is survived by her daughter Elizabeth Frances (Keary) LINDSAY and her partner Richard Hugh YOUNG and her much loved granddaughter, Teanna Jayne LINDSAY. Nan was the beloved wife of the late Doctor Stanley NORRIS and will be remembered fondly by his son Peter Newton, his wife Elizabeth (Hilton) WARD and their sons Benjamen Norris and Charles Gordon WARD. Nan was predeceased by her loving parents John and Eleanor (WEDD) VAN NOSTRAND, sisters, Katherine STOCKWELL, Gretchen BOOTH, Ruth LILLICO, Helen WRIGHT, Mary KNOWLES and her brother John VAN NOSTRAND. A service will be held at Saint_John's York Mills Anglican Church, (416-225-6611) 19 Don Ridge Drive, Toronto at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday, March 18, 2008. Join us and bring a smile in remembrance of a wonderful soul. Please, as expressions of sympathy all donations may be made to your hospital of choice. At this time her daughter and family would like to express their deepest appreciation to all the devoted and caring nurses, doctors and staff of St. Hilda's Towers retirement residence.

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