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"MEI" 2008 Obituary


MEIER  MEIERS  MEIGHEN  MEIJA  MEIJER  MEIKELJOHN  MEIKLE  MEINCKE  MEINZINGER  MEISELS  MEISLER  MEISSENHEIMER 

MEIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-05 published
DICKERT, Ida Caroline (MEIER)
Peacefully at Queensway Nursing Home, Hensall, Ida Caroline (MEIER) DICKERT of Hensall, formerly of Kippen, passed away on Friday, April 4, 2008 in her 97th year. Beloved wife of the late Norman Wm. DICKERT (1971.) Dear mother of Merle and the late Ken McLELLAN (1994.) Loving grandmother of Jill and Brian KIPFER/KUEPFER and Robyn and Dan KOEKKOEK and great-grandmother of Maegan KIPFER/KUEPFER, Scott KIPFER/KUEPFER, Stephanie KOEKKOEK and Rachel KOEKKOEK. Sadly missed by her nieces and nephews. Predeceased by 2 brothers Harry and Allan and 2 sisters Via and Ruth. Visitation in the Hensall Visitation Chapel, 79 King St. on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be conducted on Monday, April 7, 2008 at 11 a.m. Rev. Marybeth WILSON officiating. Interment Hensall Union Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Leukemia Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. J.M. McBeath Funeral Home, Zurich. Condolences forwarded through www.jmmcbeathfuneralhome.com A tree will be planted as a living memorial for the late Ida Dickert.

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MEIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-19 published
MAURER- MEIER, Elsa Rosa - Estate of
Opening Of The Will
The following person, with her most recent residence in Zurich, died on 18th August 2007:
Elsa Rosa MAURER- MEIER, widowed, born on 20th August 1921 at Meisterschwanden AG, Swiss citizen of Zollikofen BE, daughter of Heinrich Albert MEIER, born on 27th March 1887, and of Maria née GLOOR, born on 21st September 1892. The members of the parental kinship came into consideration as the intestate heirs.
However, the deceased did dispose of her estate in full, by means of the testamentary disposition, which was opened by the below-mentioned court and which from a formal viewpoint is evidently valid, and the deceased nominated appointed heiresses to the devolution of the estate.
In accordance with the decree of the office of the sole judge in inheritance matters, dated 23rd November 2007, the certificate of inheritance is therefore issued to the appointed heiress in their favour, provided that the intestate heirs do not raise an objection to this - as defined by Art 559 Swiss Civil Code - within one month of this notification being published, evidencing their right of inheritance. The interstate heirs further have the right - against evidence of their right of inheritance - to examine the testamentary disposition at the court office of the named sole judge and to request a copy of it. Any application to the District Court of Zurich should be filed if possible in on of the official Swiss languages (German, French, Italian) or in English.
Zurich, 23rd November 2007
District Court Of Zurich
Office of the Sole Judge
in the Inheritance Matters
P.O. Box CH8026 Zurich
Page B23

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MEIERS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-26 published
GERIS, Harry
Suddenly on Wednesday, April 23, 2008, Mr. Harry GERIS of London at the age of 60. Beloved husband of Jo-Anne K. (Knight) GERIS. Loving father of Jason GERIS and his wife Shannon of California, Shawn GERIS and his wife Lynne of Mississauga, Ryan GERIS and his fiancee Sarah MEIERS of Kitchener. Also loved by his 3 grandchildren, Colby, Hadden and Montana. Dear brother of Bill, Bert, Hank, Jane, Dorothy, Cathy JONES and Jackie McLEAN. Predeceased by his brother Fred. Cherished son-in-law of Margaret Kathleen KNIGHT. Visitation will be held on Monday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the funeral service will be conducted on Tuesday, April 29th, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. In memory of Harry memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Crohn's Colitis Foundation of Canada would be gratefully appreciated. Online condolences may be sent to condolences@westviewfuneralchapel.com

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MEIGHEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-27 published
DILLON, Colonel Richard Maurice, CM, MC, ED, CD, LLD
Soldier, Engineer, Public Servant, Cabinetmaker, Sailor. Colonel Richard Maurice DILLON Born August 4, 1920. Died on April 23, 2008 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, after a long illness, borne with courage and his customary patience and grace. Eldest son of Brigadier M. Murray DILLON and Muriel HICKS of London, Ontario. He is survived by his beloved Elizabeth, his wife of 63 years, and by his loving and grateful children, his daughter Kelly MEIGHEN and son-in-law Michael MEIGHEN of Toronto, his daughter Ann DILLON and son-in-law Edmund CAPE of West Vancouver, and his daughter Katherine DILLON of Toronto. Remembered with great love and admiration by his seven grandchildren, Ted, Hugh and Max MEIGHEN and Tony, David, Katherine and Hugh CAPE whose lives have been shaped by their grandfather's enthusiasm for life's possibilities, his integrity and his wonderful sense of fun. He is also survived by his sister, Shelagh WATTERS and her husband Neil of Cookstown, his sister Diana JOHNSTON of Minden and his brother Michael DILLON of London. He was predeceased by his brother John (1926,) brother-in-law Gerald JOHNSTON and his sister-in-law Maggie DILLON. He joined The Royal Canadian Regiment in 1939, serving overseas in Italy until wounded at Ortona on Christmas Eve, 1943. For bravery in the field he was awarded the Military Cross. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario (B.A. Honours Mathematics, gold medalist) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M.Sc. Engineering), Richard began his career as a civil engineer. In 1960 he was appointed the first Dean of Engineering at the University of Western Ontario and then moved, in 1971, to the Ontario government, serving as deputy minister of a number of different ministries. He found many ways to involve himself in the life of his community and his country. In London he served as Chair of the United Way, as a church warden, political organizer and confidante to John Robarts during his tenure as Premier of Ontario. He contributed as well to more distant communities through work with Canadian International Development Agency in Thailand, as President of Professional Engineers of Ontario, President of the Canadian Corps of Commissionaires and as a founding director of The Schmeelk Canada Foundation. Throughout his life he worked passionately to promote the strengthening of ties between English and French Canada and tried valiantly, though largely unsuccessfully, to learn to speak French. He maintained a lifelong association with the Royal Canadian Regiment, serving as Colonel of the Regiment from 1993 until 1997. Appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 1986, he was a proud Canadian whose record of service through his long and full life has been an inspiring example and source of pride to his family, colleagues and many Friends. Friends will be received at 4 Lamport Avenue, Toronto (valet parking provided) on Sunday, April 27, 2008 between 2: 00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Monday, April 28, 2008 at 11: 30 a.m. at St. Clement's Church, 59 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto. If so desired, memorial donations may be made to the Royal Canadian Regiment Education Fund for Children of Fallen Soldiers (www.thercr.ca) or the University of Western Ontario, c/o Foundation Western, Westminster College, Suite 110, London Ontario, N6A 3K7. We would like to thank all those at Sunnybrook who provided such exemplary care, Fred GABY for his wonderful companionship and Doctor Heather GILLY for her counsel and many kindnesses to Richard and his family.

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MEIGHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-25 published
DILLON, Colonel Richard Maurice, CM, MC, ED, CD, LLD
Soldier, Engineer, Public Servant, Cabinetmaker, Sailor.
Born August 4, 1920. Died on April 23, 2008 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, Toronto, after a long illness, borne with courage and his customary patience and grace. Eldest son of Brigadier M. Murray DILLON and Muriel HICKS of London, Ontario. He is survived by his beloved Elizabeth, his wife of 63 years, and by his loving and grateful children, his daughter Kelly MEIGHEN and son-in-law Michael MEIGHEN of Toronto, his daughter Ann DILLON and son-in-law Edmund CAPE of West Vancouver, and his daughter Katherine DILLON of Toronto. Remembered with great love and admiration by his seven grandchildren, Ted, Hugh and Max MEIGHEN and Tony, David, Katherine and Hugh CAPE whose lives have been shaped by their grandfather's enthusiasm for life's possibilities, his integrity and his wonderful sense of fun. He is also survived by his sister, Shelagh WATTERS and her husband Neil of Cookstown, his sister Diana JOHNSTON of Minden and his brother Michael DILLON of London. He was predeceased by his brother John (1926), brother-in-law Gerald JOHNSTON and his sister-in-law Maggie DILLON. He joined the Royal Canadian Regiment in 1939, serving overseas in Italy until wounded at Ortona on Christmas Eve, 1943. For bravery in the field he was awarded the Military Cross. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario (B.A. Honours Mathematics, gold medallist) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (M. Sc. Engineering), Richard began his career as a civil engineer. In 1960 he was appointed the first Dean of Engineering at the University of Western Ontario and then moved, in 1971, to the Ontario government, serving as deputy minister of a number of different ministries. He found many ways to involve himself in the life of his community and his country. In London he served as Chair of the United Way, as a church warden, political organizer and confidante to John Robarts during his tenure as Premier of Ontario. He contributed as well to more distant communities through work with Canadian International Development Agency in Thailand, as President of Professional Engineers of Ontario, President of the Canadian Corps of Commissionaires and as a founding director of The Schmeelk Canada Foundation. Throughout his life he worked passionately to promote the strengthening of ties between English and French Canada and tried valiantly, though largely unsuccessfully, to learn to speak French. He maintained a lifelong association with the Royal Canadian Regiment, serving as Colonel of the Regiment from 1993 until 1997. Appointed a Member of the Order of Canada in 1986, he was a proud Canadian whose record of service through his long and full life has been an inspiring example and source of pride to his family, colleagues and many Friends. Friends will be received at 4 Lamport Avenue, Toronto (valet parking provided) on Sunday, April 27, 2008 between 2: 00 p.m. and 5:00 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Monday, April 28, 2008 at 11: 30 a.m. at St. Clement's Church, 59 Briar Hill Avenue, Toronto. If so desired, memorial donations may be made to the Royal Canadian Regiment Education Fund for Children of Fallen Soldiers (www.thercr.ca) or the University of Western Ontario, c/o Foundation Western, Westminster College, Suite 110, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7. We would like to thank all those at Sunnybrook who provided such exemplary care, Fred GABY for his wonderful companionship and Dr. Heather GILLY for her counsel and many kindnesses to Richard and his family.

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MEIGHEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
The war hero who returned home to help forge a booming Ontario
As executive director of an Ontario Hydro task force, he drew on all the skills he had accumulated as a soldier, a design engineer, a dean in an academic bureaucracy and a consultant to government
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Although he never held public office, Richard (Dick) DILLON was very much involved in the so-called London mafia that surrounded and supported lawyer and politician John Robarts, who was premier of Ontario from 1961-1971. Mostly they were, like Mr. Robarts, veterans of the Second World War, graduates of the University of Western Ontario, and lawyers, engineers and businessmen who supported the Progressive Conservative Party.
In the late 1960s, there was a feeling in Ontario that government was growing too fast and becoming both too powerful and too cumbersome. There's nothing unusual in that sentiment, of course, or the notion that the solution lies in public-private partnerships and a reorganization of the civil service. What is slightly unusual is that Mr. Robarts, himself, in the dying days of his administration, actually did something about it by establishing Ontario's Committee on Government Productivity. Ontario Hydro was such a powerful entity that it was given its own sub-committee with the mandate to examine ways that it might decentralize some of its operations, based on the Hydro Quebec model.
Mr. Robarts wanted Dick DILLON to run Task Force Hydro. When the appointment came before cabinet, it was questioned by Leslie Rowntree, minister of financial and commercial affairs. "He could be a little bit stuffy," said Darcy McKeough, who was then minister of municipal affairs.
"We are wondering who this Richard M. Dillion is?" Mr. Rowntree asked archly, according to Mr. McKeough. To which Mr. Robarts replied: "He is the dean of engineering at the University of Western Ontario, he is the past president of The London Club, he is a past church warden at Bishop Cronyn Church and he is a past president of the Progressive Conservative Association. Is there anything else you would like to know, Mr. Rowntree?"
Clearly that was enough information for Mr. Rowntree, for the appointment was duly made, but there was much more that Mr. Robarts could have said about Mr. DILLON - holder of the Military Cross for bravery during the war, professional engineer with a gold medal from University of Western Ontario and a graduate degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, among other attributes. What Mr. Robarts couldn't know, back in 1970, was the complex role that Mr. DILLON would later play as a deputy minister, volunteer, and facilitator of bilingual education.
Born in Simcoe, Ontario on August 4, 1920, Richard Maurice DILLON was the eldest of five children of Brigadier Marmaduke Murray DILLON and his wife Muriel (née HICKS.) His father was a soldier and an engineer who won the Military Cross early in 1918 for "conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty" as an officer of the 1st Battalion, Canadian Machine Gun corps.
The DILLONs settled in London, Ontario, where Richard went to local elementary schools and then London South Collegiate Institute. As the son of a military family, he was encouraged to join the army. He became a signaler in the Canadian Fusiliers when he was 15 and received his commission as a second lieutenant in the Canadian Officer's Training Corps in 1938 when he was a first-year student at University of Western Ontario. He withdrew from university a year later to enlist in the Canadian Active Service Force after Canada declared war on Germany in September, 1939.
He joined The Royal Canadian Regiment in England in June, 1941. He was in command of a bren-gun carrier platoon in the Allied invasion of Sicily that began on July 10, 1943, with both amphibious and airborne landings. Essentially, the Italians resisted the invasion by retreating. The Germans would not be so compliant further up the boot.
It was later that same month that Capt. DILLON, like his father before him, earned the Military Cross for distinguished and meritorious service in battle. On July 23, 1943, two companies of The Royal Canadian Regiment were ordered to skirt the town of Assoro, under cover of darkness and attack it from the rear. Nothing went according to plan: The commanding officer was killed, communications broke down and Capt. DILLON, with a section of carriers, was instrumental in re-establishing contact with the beleaguered forward companies, which were in disarray. According to his Military Cross citation, he "led the carriers skillfully across difficult rocky and mountainous country during daylight under constant observed enemy artillery, mortar and machine gun fire, and through enemy patrols, contacted the forward Companies and carried out his mission. The officer displayed leadership and outstanding devotion to duty in carrying out his difficult mission." The citation is signed by, among others, Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, commander of the Eighth Army.
Subsequently, he was given command of "A" Company and was wounded on Christmas Day, 1943 when a grenade exploded beside him during the battle of Ortona, a ferocious close-combat battle between German paratroops and the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. He was evacuated first to England and then to Canada and spent the rest of the war teaching at the Army Staff College in Kingston, Ontario Permanently deaf in his right ear, he would occasionally scratch pieces of shrapnel from his scalp for the rest of his life.
Throughout the war he had been corresponding with Elizabeth DEMPSEY, a young woman he had met at University of Western Ontario in 1938. She was engaged to a friend of his, and the three of them palled around. Both men went overseas, but only Mr. DILLON came back. He and Miss DEMPSEY were married in London, Ontario, on April 21, 1945.
He returned to University of Western Ontario to complete his interrupted undergraduate education and graduated in 1948 with an honours degree in mathematics and the gold medal. He and his wife then moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts., where Kelly, the first of the DILLONs' three daughters, was born and Mr. DILLON acquired a masters of science degree in civil engineering in 1950 at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
They returned to Canada where Mr. DILLON worked briefly for Dominion Bridge in Toronto before settling in London, Ontario That's where daughters Ann and Katherine (Kate) were born and where Mr. DILLON joined M.M. Dillon and Co. (now Dillon Consulting), a firm of consulting engineers that had been founded in January, 1946, by his father and a colleague and fellow veteran, George HUMPHRIES. Besides working in his father's firm as a design engineer, and later as a partner and director, Mr. DILLON also continued his military career as a reservist.
He rejoined the Canadian Fusiliers as a company commander in 1946 and when it affiliated with The Royal Canadian Regiment in November, 1954, he took command of the London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment). Two years later, he retired to the supplementary reserve. Ann DILLON remembered her father's peacetime military career in the eulogy she delivered at his funeral by describing how "he would line up his three girls, shiny fresh from their baths and in their pj's and do his parade inspection," on Monday nights before he headed out, in his uniform, for his weekly commitment to the militia.
"He would prod us here and there with his swagger stick and bark out orders - shoulders back chest out… his final order was usually 'wipe that smile off your face' which produced huge laughter and, which as far as I know, never made it into the military lexicon," she said.
Monday-night drill was very different from the semi-annual Vimy dinners that were always held on Fridays at the Legion because, on Saturday mornings, Ms. DILLON said of her parents "you approached their bedroom at your peril: a toss-up between being overcome with the fumes or deafened by the snoring." As the years passed, the snoring, unimpeded by marital admonitions, probably grew louder, as Mrs. DILLON's hearing began to fail as well.
After nearly a decade working in his father's firm of consulting engineers, including serving on the advisory committee to establish an Engineering Department at University of Western Ontario, Mr. DILLON was asked to become the first dean of the Faculty of Engineering Science. It was 1960 and he was 40. In Western's First Century, by John Gwynne-Timothy, Mr. DILLON was commended for his "energetic direction" as dean in upping the quality of the undergraduate program, developing a graduate and research program and enhancing links with "the wider working world of industry and business."
Those links included serving as a project officer on the Science Research and Development Committee for the Royal Commission on Government Organization (the Glassco Commission), which recommended a decentralized organizational model for the federal government. He also went on a three-month Colombo Plan (a framework for bi-lateral aid and technical assistance that came out of a Commonwealth Conference of Foreign Ministers in Ceylon in 1950) mission in 1963 to Thailand to advise the government on engineering education.
From 1965-67, he was a member of the Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation, which was set up by Premier Robarts to advise the government on issues such as bilingualism and multiculturalism vis-à-vis the other provinces (especially Quebec) and the federal government. After finishing this assignment, Mr. DILLON was seconded in 1970, from his position as engineering dean at University of Western Ontario, to become the executive director of the Task Force Hydro Committee on Government Productivity, a task that required all of the skills he had accumulated as a wartime soldier, a design engineer, an aspirational dean in the academic bureaucracy and a consultant to government.
To help Mr. DILLON penetrate Hydro's monolithic culture, Mr. Robarts arranged for him to attend the meetings of the Hydro Electric Power Commission, "which was highly unusual [for an outsider]," said Mr. McKeough. "George Gathercole, who was the chair, would hold forth at great length and finally say, 'Is there anything anybody else would like to say?' To which one of the other commissioners would dutifully reply, 'No, George, you have said it all.' " And so the meeting would end, but the tale lived on in Mr. DILLON's retelling.
From the task force, Mr. DILLON was appointed deputy in Mr. McKeough's Ministry of Energy in 1973. Mr. McKeough, a younger but stalwart member of the London mafia, knew Mr. DILLON well. "He was a very bright person and an engineer and understood energy and was a fan of Candu [a pressurized heavy-water reactor] and he knew the inside of Hydro because of the task force."
In 1976, Mr. DILLON moved from Energy to Resources Development and then to Municipal Affairs and Housing before leaving the civil service in 1982 to go back into business as a founding partner of Alafin Consultants. Nevertheless, business was only part of his life for the next 15 years, which was largely devoted to volunteer work, to building dubiously road and sea-worthy vehicles with his grandchildren and to serving his regiment. He was appointed Honorary Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th Battalion, the Royal Canadian Regiment, a rank he held from 1986 to 1993 and then promoted to Colonel of the Regiment (of The Royal Canadian Regiment), an honorary position he held from 1993 to 1997.
The Confederation debates of the 1960s and 1970s and the rise of the Parti Québécois, which Rene Levesque led to power in the Quebec provincial election in 1976, created linguistic aspirations and prompted conciliatory gestures in Ontario. One of them involved Mr. DILLON and Richard Schmeelk, a wealthy American banker who had represented Salomon Brothers in Ontario since the mid 1950s. After retiring as a senior executive from Salomon in 1986, Mr. Schmeelk established the Schmeelk Canada Fellowship to create a better understanding between English and French-Canadians. The idea, which percolated at a dinner with Mr. McKeough, John Turner and Mr. Schmeelk, was to have students from University of Western Ontario and Laval University in Quebec City study at each other's institutions. The initial capitalization of $1-million dollars has more than doubled over the years and the program has expanded to include the University of Calgary in Alberta and the University of Montreal in Quebec. Mr. DILLON was executive secretary from 1995 to 2001. "Dick was the guy who handled all the heavy duty [lifting] over the years and made a great contribution to the scholarship," said Mr. Schmeelk. "He went to all the meetings and did a great job and was a great friend over the years."
In the late 1990s, Mr. DILLON began to suffer from memory problems. "My father was a wonderful dancer," said his daughter Kelly MEIGHEN. "He taught the three of us how to dance, and I can remember thinking at my 50th birthday party [in November, 1999], that he no longer knew how to dance."
Mrs. DILLON cared for her husband at home until finally, when he could no longer recognize his loved ones and even a walk in the garden could frighten him, she allowed him to be moved into the veteran's wing at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on November 8, 2006. Eighteen months later, two days after the DILLONs' 63rd wedding anniversary, he died there, surrounded by his family.
About an hour later, the chaplain and some of the nurses on duty came into Mr. DILLON's room at Sunnybrook. "The Chaplain read some passages and said a prayer," said Ms. MEIGHEN. " Then she looked at my mother and said: 'On behalf of the people of Canada I want to thank you and your husband for his service to the country and for the freedom we enjoy today.' And then, they placed the flag over his body," said Ms. MEIGHEN. "It was such a lovely gesture that we were stunned."
Richard Maurice DILLON, CM, MC, was born on August 4, 1920 in Simcoe, Ontario He died of complications from Alzheimer's Disease on April 23, 2008. He was 87. Mr. DILLON is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, his three daughters, and his seven grandchildren. Predeceased by his brother, John, he also leaves sisters Shelagh and Diana and his brother, Michael, and his extended family.

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MEIJA o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-19 published
HAGGINS- LAPP, Phyllis (née HAGGINS) (1936-2008)
Phyllis HAGGINS- LAPP passed away suddenly on February 12th at only 71 years old. Phyllis was best known in the community of Comox Valley, British Columbia as the Welcome Wagon Lady. Phyllis will be deeply missed by her husband, David Henry LAPP of British Columbia and her daughter and friend, Andrea Corae BRACKEN. Phyllis will be lovingly remembered by her sons: Kelly and Kevin CASSIDY and her granddaughter, Christina CASSIDY. Nanny will surely be missed by the grand_sons she was so proud of: Matthew John MEIJA and Jeffery Howard MEIJA. She is also survived by her sisters: Kay CAMPBELL, Barbara GRANT, Roberta McLEAN (née HAGGINS) and her brothers: Neville, Andrew and Wayne HAGGINS, who reside in Ontario and were born in Owen Sound. She was predeceased by her brothers, Howard Jr. HAGGINS and Charles HAGGINS, and her parents, Norma and Howard HAGGINS of Owen Sound, Ontario. Phyllis was born in Owen Sound and resided in Kitchener-Waterloo for many years. Having resided in the Comox Valley on Vancouver Island for the past 15 years, Phyllis loved this beautiful community and bloomed in her position as a Welcome Wagon Representative. In 2006, she was presented with an award for outstanding performance and community service. Phyllis lived her life with confidence and energy. She was a supportive mother and a devoted wife who has left a void in many lives. A celebration of Phyllis' life will be held at Piercy's Mt. Washington Funeral Home in Courtenay, British Columbia on Monday, February 25th at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Piercy's - Mt. Washington Funeral Home in care of arrangements, 250-334-4464.

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MEIJER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-24 published
MEYER, Hugo (né MEIJER)
Having lived a thankful life, Hugo was graciously and peacefully lifted up to Heaven to His Blessed Saviour on Tuesday, April 22, 2008. Born in Ridderkerk, The Netherlands on February 24, 1923 to the late Rutgeradus and Bastiaantje (DEJONG) MEIJER. Beloved husband for 56 years to the late Pearl MEYER (2005.) Loving father of the late Jean MULLER (1998,) Linda and Jerry VANMINNEN of Chatham, George and Carol MEYER of London, Harry MEYER and Dawn McKILLOP of Toronto, and Sylvia RINTJEMA of Chatham. Loving grandfather to 15 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Brother of Gerrit (Rita) MEIJER of The Netherlands. Predeceased by two sisters Plonie GROWNEWEG and Annie VAN'TZELFDE. Brother-in-law of Bas and Rieka BAARS of Saint Thomas, and Marie, Jaan, Teu, and Janna all of The Netherlands. Hugo immigrated to Canada in 1958 and was a Mechanical Contractor in Chatham. He was also a Plumbing Inspector in the Chatham area for a number of years. Hugo was a longtime member of the Free Reformed Church, Chatham. Family will receive Friends at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham on Thursday from 6: 00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Free Reformed Church, Gregory Doctor E., Chatham on Friday, April 25, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with Elder Henry ZUIDEMA and Pastor Henry BARTSCH officiating. Interment in Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham. Donations in Hugo's honour to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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MEIKELJOHN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-23 published
She turned the Gardiner Museum into a glittering, priceless gem
With the help of her wealthy stockbroker husband, she transformed a hobby into a great ceramics collection, and then built a museum to house it all opposite Toronto's Royal Ontario Museum
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Museum founder and philanthropist Helen GARDINER had three lives: before George, during George, and after George. The George was George Ryerson GARDINER, a business integrator, Harvard MBA and stockbroker who founded Gardiner Group Capital, the country's first discount brokerage, and was president of the Toronto Stock Exchange.
Generally considered a business genius, he was a pioneer in the oil-and-gas business, opened the first airport hotel in Canada, was a key player in bringing Kentucky Fried Chicken north of the 49th parallel, established Gardiner Farms, the racing stable and breeding farm, and was one of the original members of the syndicate that owned Northern Dancer. "He didn't start with nothing," a former business associate said, "but he multiplied it many times over."
Ms. GARDINER, by contrast, came from humble circumstances, and was a single parent working as a secretary in Mr. GARDINER's brokerage firm when they met. With Mr. GARDINER's support, she became a mature student at York University and took the decorative arts course at Christie's in London, England. Having acquired professional expertise - her impeccable eye for quality was innate - she and her husband amassed a huge and very valuable collection of porcelain and earthenware, then built a museum to house it.
Nevertheless, he was always the public face and voice of the Gardiner Museum. After Mr. GARDINER died in December, 1997, she emerged as a fundraiser, philanthropist and connoisseur who transformed the Gardiner from a mausoleum for a private collection into a dynamic, innovative and internationally prized museum. She also developed her own interests in the National Ballet School and other art forms such as opera, becoming so fond of Wagner's Ring Cycle that she was known as a "Ring" addict.
"The Gardiner Museum was her No. 1 passion, but the National Ballet School was a close second," said Margaret McCain, former chair of the board of the National Ballet School and former lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick.
"Helen had moral integrity and she also had a lot of fortitude," said Ms. McCain, describing her friend as fun with a wonderful laugh and a complete lack of pretension. "She was grounded and she was able to hold on to her own identity even if she was in George's shadow for a long time. There was a strength there and I used to say, 'You are your own person, kind and gentle, but strong inside.' "
Tony ARRELL, a former Chief Executive Officer of Gardiner Watson and a director of Gardiner Group Capital said: "When you have a tree growing under a big tree, the big tree shades the little tree, but when you take the big tree out, the little tree can grow up - and that is what has been happening with Helen. She has proven to be a stronger character with a greater ability than many people thought," he said. "There has been a lot more to Helen GARDINER in the last 10 years than we ever knew before."
Helen Elizabeth McMINN was born in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, the year before the Second World War began. Her father Charles was a carpenter at one of the gold mines, while her mother Helen was a homemaker. The McMinns moved south to Toronto, where Mr. McMINN worked for General Electric at its Davenport Works until he retired. Their two children, Helen and Bob, went to high school in Toronto, and then Bob joined the military. Helen's daughter Lindy BARROW, who was born in 1958, lived with her grandparents until she was 10 while Ms. McMINN, a single parent, worked at various jobs in advertising and as a legal secretary to support her daughter and save enough money to provide a home for them both.
In the second half of the 1960s, she met George GARDINER when she was hired as a secretary at Gardiner Watson, the stock brokerage that he and a partner had founded just after the Second World War. At the time, she was in her late 20s and Mr. GARDINER (who was known to enjoy, discreetly, the company of beautiful women) was in his early 50s, married and the father of three children. Not long before, in July, 1965, his formidable father Percy, a financier, had died of a heart attack. This death may have liberated Mr. GARDINER, who had had a fractious relationship with his father and had always felt the need to show that he could be even more successful in business.
"He once said that Helen was the first person that he laid eyes on as he was coming out from under this oppression that he had been under for so many years," according to Gretchen ROSS, a long-time friend. Their relationship led to the breakup of Mr. GARDINER's marriage.
In the mid-1970s, they moved into a house on Old Forest Hill Road in Toronto. He bought the property, razed the existing house and built a new one with lead-lined walls - he had acute hearing and didn't want to be disturbed by the neighbours. Mr. GARDINER and his first wife had bought some pre-Colombian earthenware in South America, and he decided that he and Ms. McMINN should "collect something unique to make our house look lived in," she said later. He wanted it to have "quality, individuality and his personal stamp." Naively, as she later admitted, they hit on ceramics.
Two years later, inflation was escalating. Mr. GARDINER, an astute and thrifty businessman, read an article asserting that Chinese and European porcelain were outperforming stocks, bonds and real estate, and he decided it was time to turn their hobby into an investment. Helen, who had been studying as a mature student at York University since 1974, switched tacks and went to London in 1978 to take Christie's Fine Arts Course. A year later, she was both an expert and a qualified dealer who could buy ceramics at wholesale prices.
Their first mature purchase was a hand-painted, highly decorated yellow tea-and-chocolate service made in 1740 by Meissen, the earliest factory in Europe to produce hard-paste porcelain. On the advice of a Sotheby's porcelain expert, Helen had gone to see the 50-piece set, complete with its original leather travelling case, at Winifred Williams Antiques on Bury Street in London. She persuaded Mr. GARDINER to look at the Meissen service and to meet dealer Robert Williams. Without telling her, he bought the service. And so the Gardiners began their long association with Mr. Williams and transformed themselves into serious collectors. As she said later, "Bob taught me how to really look at things. He was generous with his knowledge and showed me how to identify artists and factories by the distinctive characteristics of their work."
From Meissen, the couple began accumulating works made by Du Paquier, the second factory in Europe to produce hard-paste porcelain in the 18th century, and pieces called Hausmaler, a term used to describe ceramics decorated by studio artists who painted or redecorated porcelain produced by factories such as Meissen or Du Paquier. As always, they kept a judicious eye on their passions and their bottom line, collecting Du Paquier because it was undervalued, and Hausmaler for its variety, eccentric charm and the stories about subterfuge, espionage and larceny swirling around the pieces - how artists "acquired" undecorated wares from the studios that employed them and then painted them with their own designs.
During her Christie's course in London, Helen was seduced by the lush sensual colours and painterly decoration of Italian Maiolica. She took Mr. GARDINER to see the Maiolica collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in South Kensington and he too was entranced. Encouraged by a lull in the market for Maiolica, Mr. GARDINER began buying at auction or through their retinue of international dealers.
By the early 1980s, the Gardiners - they had married on July 11, 1981, at least a dozen years after they first met - were running out of display and storage room in their home. With the help of entertainment lawyer and ceramics collector Aaron MILRAD, the determined and persuasive Mr. GARDINER set about acquiring the land and the political approvals to establish his own museum. In 1981, the Ontario government, led by premier Bill Davis, unanimously passed Bill 183 to create The George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art as an independent, public institution. Doctor Murray Ross helped the Gardiners acquire a tennis court on the east side of Queen's Park, directly opposite the Royal Ontario Museum, from the University of Toronto. Mr. GARDINER paid $500,000 to lease the land for 99 years.
Three years later, architect Keith WAGLAND and designer Robert MEIKELJOHN's $6-million building was ready. The George R. Gardiner Museum, showcasing some 3,000 objets valued at between $16-million and $25-million from the Gardiners' personal collection, officially opened on Saturday, March 3, 1984, with an additional $2.5-million operating grant from its benefactors to celebrate the occasion.
Initially, the Gardiners were as naive about operating a museum as they had been about ceramics. They didn't have nearly enough staff, went through three directors in their first year and underestimated their operating and exhibition costs. After unsuccessfully petitioning the Liberal provincial government for more money, the museum was advised by premier David Peterson to merge with the Royal Ontario Museum in 1987. "I have learned it is very, very difficult to compete with other museums," Mr. GARDINER, a man known for his independence, said at an emotional press conference called to announce the merger.
"The government decided we needed the Royal Ontario Museum's management expertise," Ms. GARDINER told The Globe in 2006. But it wasn't always a comfortable relationship. For an independent museum to be put under the control of another much larger one was akin to an adult daughter moving back into her parents' house with her children after a messy divorce.
The Royal Ontario Museum saw the Gardiner as an adjunct, housing yet another of its many collections, but the Gardiner longed to flex its curatorial wings. Mr. GARDINER, who was succeeded as chair of the board by his wife in 1994, bought back the museum's independence with a $15-million endowment (raising his investment in his own museum to about $50-million). It was announced in January, 1997, just 11 months before Mr. GARDINER died of complications from arthritis and heart disease.
The strain of caring for her husband in his last years when he was ill and "difficult" and dealing with his estate after his death made her so nervous that her throat muscles tightened up and she had trouble speaking above a whisper, Ms. Ross said. It was only recently that doctors found a solution - periodic shots of Botox and a regime of throat exercises - that enabled Ms. GARDINER to speak normally again.
In the decade of her widowhood, Ms. GARDINER threw herself into the museum and into the National Ballet School, where she had sat on the board since 1990. "She invested a lot more than money - she invested herself in the life of the school and the lives of the students," said Ms. McCain. "She took on a student and stayed with that student and became a mentor and a guide and a friend."
Under Ms. GARDINER's direction, the museum built up its membership lists again and stretched beyond the personal vision of its founders. The Gardiner began accepting other collections, such as Doctor Hans Syz's German porcelain and Murray and Ann Bell's trove of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain. It expanded its mandate to include modern and contemporary pieces from collectors, such as Mr. MILRAD, and began organizing exhibitions of work by living artists.
Ms. GARDINER was chair until 1999 and vice-chair for the next two years, during which time the museum received a Lieutenant-Governor's Award for the Arts for building private sector and community support, showing fiscal responsibility and expanding its audience (from 20,000 to 60,000 visitors annually), using pottery classes for children and exhibitions such as Maya Universe, Miro: Playing with Fire and Harlequin Unmasked. In 2002, she accepted the position of honorary chair and led the museum's fundraising and expansion campaign to raise $12.8-million from the private sector, in addition to $6-million in grants from the Ontario and Canadian governments.
The museum closed from 2004 to 2006 for a nearly $20-million renovation undertaken by Kuwabara, Payne, McKenna and Blumberg Architects. The renovation added a glass-encased third floor, restaurant and roof terraces, increased exhibition space by 50 per cent, added a research library and expanded the museum shop and the basement studio to accommodate artists in residence and more pottery classes.
"In the last 10 years, she started to develop her own interests and her own ability to reach out for things that she would never have looked at before. And then she got sick," said Mr. MILRAD, vice-chair of the board. "She had an integrity that was recognized and it is going to be extremely difficult for us to raise the kind of money that she was able to raise through her contacts and her own strength of character."
Falling terminally ill was a shock to Ms. GARDINER, who had always planned to live well into her 90s, just as her mother has done. In the first week of May, she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. After seeking treatment at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Ms. GARDINER began a rigorous course of chemotherapy. But she soon decided to suspend treatment, since it wasn't working and it was making her feel very ill. Instead, she let "nature take its course," as she told her Friends and family.
Helen Elizabeth GARDINER, C.M., was born in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, on July 18, 1938. She died of pancreatic cancer at the family farm in Caledon East on July 22, 2008. She was 70. Predeceased by husband George GARDINER, she is survived by daughter Lindy BARROW, mother Helen McMINN, brother Bob McMINN and extended family.
The funeral will take place on Monday, July 28, at 11 a.m. in Toronto's Saint_James Cathedral.

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MEIKLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-11 published
MEIKLE, Helen Patricia (née MULCAIR)
It is with great sadness that the children and sisters of Pat MEIKLE announce her death, on March 10th, 2008 in Toronto after a year-long illness. Pat was born in Montreal on February 14th, 1924 and grew up in Westmount, Québec. She graduated from Saint Paul's Academy in 1941, and from the Mother House Secretarial College in 1942. Following graduation, she took a position as legal secretary at the Montreal firm of Montgomery McMichael (now Ogilvy Renault), where she worked until her marriage to the late James Edward MEIKLE on September 18th, 1952. Pat pursued her chosen career as wife, mother and grandmother, with kindness, common sense, humour and great deal of devotion, for 56 years. She was much loved, and will be greatly missed, by her sisters Barbara MULCAIR and Sister Anne-Marie MULCAIR, CND; her children Victoria, Susan and Ross COYLES, Jamie, Heather and Adrian JOHNSON, Thomas and Melanie ROCKLIFF, Gregory and Rachel JEWELL; and her grandchildren Jamie, Gillian, Kieran, Devon, Natasha, Dunham and Jackson; and by her Friends. Friends may call on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 from 5-8 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Thursday, March 13, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. at Blessed Trinity Roman Catholic Church (3220 Bayview Avenue). A reception will follow at the home of Heather MEIKLE and Adrian JOHNSON. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society.
Condolences www.rskane.ca R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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MEIKLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-11 published
MEIKLE, Helen Patricia (née MULCAIR)
It is with great sadness that the children and sisters of Pat MEIKLE announce her death, on March 10th, 2008 in Toronto after a year-long illness. Pat was born in Montreal on February 14th, 1924 and grew up in Westmount, Québec. She graduated from Saint Paul's Academy in 1941, and from the Mother House Secretarial College in 1942. Following graduation, she took a position as legal secretary at the Montreal firm of Montgomery McMichael (now Ogilvy Renault), where she worked until her marriage to the late James Edward MEIKLE on September 18th, 1952. Pat pursued her chosen career as wife, mother and grandmother, with kindness, common sense, humour and a great deal of devotion, for 56 years. She was much loved, and will be greatly missed, by her sisters Barbara MULCAIR and Sister Anne-Marie MULCAIR, CND; her children Victoria, Susan and Ross COYLES, Jamie, Heather and Adrian JOHNSON, Thomas and Melanie ROCKLIFF, Gregory and Rachel JEWELL; and her grandchildren Jamie, Gillian, Kieran, Devon, Natasha, Dunham and Jackson; and by her Friends. Friends may call on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 from 5-8 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). A Funeral Mass will be celebrated on Thursday, March 13, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. at Blessed Trinity Roman Catholic Church (3220 Bayview Avenue). A reception will follow at the home of Heather MEIKLE and Adrian JOHNSON. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Alzheimer Society. Condolences www.rskane.ca

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MEINCKE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-16 published
MEINCKE, Lois Emma (née McQUIGGAN)
Surrounded by her loving family, passed away peacefully, on Saturday, July 12, 2008 at Trinity Village, at the age of 74. Beloved wife and soulmate of Paul for 49 years. Cherished mother of Debra Lynn, Gregory Paul, and Jeffrey Mark. Grandmother of Ryan, Tara, Hunter, Madison, and Sean Gregory. Stepsister of Ray, Bev, Roy and Jack KENNEDY. Niece of Irene MARCUS. Predeceased by her parents Morley and Edna McQUIGGAN, stepfather Robert KENNEDY, and brother Fred McQUIGGAN. Lois' family will receive relatives and Friends on Saturday, July 26, 2008 from 11-11: 45 a.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener, 519-749-8467, followed by a memorial service in the chapel at 12 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated by the family (cards available at the funeral home). Visit www.henrywalser.com for Lois' memorial.

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MEINZINGER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-23 published
PINCHES, Russell " Russ" John
Of London in his 80th year, passed away at London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital on Thursday February 21, 2008. Dear husband of the late Pauline PINCHES (2004.) Loving father of Melodie LUMLEY and her husband Shawn of London and Arthur PINCHES and his wife Linda of Toronto. Also survived by his sisters Francis Grace MEINZINGER of Toronto, Helen Mary WURSTER of Winnipeg and Jean Ruth MEINZINGER of Grand Rapids, Michigan and Brothers Charles Robert PINCHES and his wife Mona of Exeter and Tom Samuel PINCHES and his wife Joyce of Belmont. Predeceased by his brother Arthur William PINCHES, The family will receive Friends from 6: 00 p.m. to 7: 00 p.m. on Tuesday February 26, 2008 at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where a Legion Service will be conducted in the chapel under the auspices of the Royal Canadian Legion, Duchess of Kent, Branch 263, Colour Guard, followed by a Funeral Service officiated by Archdeacon Ken ANDERSON. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Arthritis Society, 400 York Street, Suite 204, London, N6B 3N2. Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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MEINZINGER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-25 published
PINCHES, Russell " Russ" John
Of London in his 80th year, passed away at London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital on Thursday February 21, 2008. Dear husband of the late Pauline PINCHES (2004.) Loving father of Melodie LUMLEY and her husband Shawn of London and Arthur PINCHES and his wife Linda of Toronto. Also survived by his sisters Francis Grace MEINZINGER of Toronto, Helen Mary WURSTER of Winnipeg and Jean Ruth MEINZINGER of Grand Rapids, Michigan and Brothers Charles Robert PINCHES and his wife Mona of Exeter and Tom Samuel PINCHES and his wife Joyce of Belmont. Predeceased by his brother Arthur William PINCHES, The family will receive Friends from 6: 00 p.m. to 7: 00 p.m. on Tuesday February 26, 2008 at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where a Legion Service, under the auspices of the Royal Canadian Legion, Duchess of Kent, Branch 263, Colour Guard, will be held in the chapel, at 7: 00 p.m. followed by a complete Funeral Service at 7: 15 p.m. officiated by Archdeacon Ken ANDERSON. Interment at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Arthritis Society, 400 York Street, Suite 204, London, N6B 3N2. Online condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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MEISELS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-26 published
SCHWARTZ- SCHAFFEL, Gigi
On Thursday, April 24, 2008. Devoted daughter of Samuel and Sally. Beloved partner of Michael HABERMAN. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Jason SCHWARTZ and Shirley MEISELS, and Carrie and Jeremy WREFORD. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Bonnie and Hank KOCH, Michael and Moira SCHAFFEL, and Robert and Esther SCHAFFEL. Devoted Bubbie of Lili. Service was held at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, on Friday, April 25, 2008. Interment Community section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 15 Topham Crescent, Richmond Hill. Memorial donations may be made to the Gigi Schwartz-Schaffel Memorial Fund c/o the Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, or www.benjamins.ca

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MEISLER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-11 published
DAVIDSON, Raymond Giacomo
It is with profound sorrow that we announce the passing of Ray DAVIDSON on February 8, 2008, after a brave encounter with cancer. Beloved husband and dearest friend of Judith POE. Loving father of Raymond Jr. and his wife Carla of Oakville, Celia MARGISON and her husband Ted of Los Angeles, and Lisa DAVIDSON and her husband Dan Bell of San Diego. Devoted grandfather of Troy DAVIDSON, Cynthia DAVIDSON, Tyler MARGISON and Dylan BELL. Brother of James DAVIDSON and his wife Vici of Duncan, British Columbia and the late Norman and Better DAVIDSON of Calgary. Brother-in-law to Penny MEISLER and the late David MEISLER of Chicago. Ray will also be sadly missed by his beloved aunt, Audrey FORZANI of Calgary, his dear Friends Kelly Akers and Bill Hall and their daughter Alex and his many cousins, nieces and nephews. Born in Calgary, the son of the late James and Julietta DAVIDSON, Ray studied voice and piano at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto and at Gonzaga University in Washington. Winner of the Simpson's 'Red Feather Revue', and the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's 'Opportunity Knocks', and 'Singing Stars of Tomorrow' in the 1950's, Ray went on to sing with the Canadian Opera Company and later as a solo entertainer throughout Canada and Europe. He brought joy to all with whom he shared his music and, through his music and our memories, he will always be in our hearts and lives. Our thanks to Ivy LUNT and Rohit TAMHANE for their kindness to Ray and his family. Donations to the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation would be appreciated by the family as your expression of sympathy. Friends may visit at the Rosar-Morrison Funeral Home and Chapel, 467 Sherbourne Street (south of Wellesley) on Wednesday, February 13, 2008 from 7-9 p.m. Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated on Thursday at Saint Michael's Cathedral (Bond and Shuter) at 10 a.m. Interment to follow at Mt. Hope Cemetery.

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MEISSENHEIMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-20 published
YOUNG, Jack J.
On Wednesday, June 18, 2008 at North York General Hospital. Jack YOUNG, beloved husband of Estelle. Loving father and father-in-law of Arthur YOUNG and Linda MEISSENHEIMER, Errol and Lorna, Karen and Gerald GALL of Edmonton, and David and Ellen. Dear brother and brother-in-law of John and Helen, Jennie and Bernat GOLDBERGER, Dora BROMSTEIN, Gail WISE, Shirley and the late Sam YOUNG and the late Frimit YASHINSKY, Fanny HOLTZMAN, Sadie MYERS, and Libby (Waese) REIS. Devoted grandfather of Aaron, Evan YOUNG and Amrit BAINS; Melanie, Wendy and Andrew GALL; Sara, Cory, and Alycia YOUNG. Devoted great-grandfather of Owen Jacob. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, June 20th at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Beth David B'nai Israel Synagogue section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 126 Laurelcrest Avenue. Memorial donations may be made to the Jack Young Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324 or at www.benjamins.ca

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