All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1

"MAZ" 2008 Obituary


MAZENIC  MAZEPA  MAZER  MAZIK  MAZMANIAN  MAZUR  MAZUREK 

MAZENIC o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-23 published
IRVINE, Deborah May (MELVILLE)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Monday, July 21st, 2008, at the age of 54 years, the former Debbie (MELVILLE) IRVINE of Port Elgin. Cherished wife for 36 years of David IRVINE. Loving mother of Cheryl-Ann and her husband Andy BARNARD, Dawn IRVINE, Kathy and her husband Matthew WILLSON, Sarah IRVINE, all of Port Elgin. Amanda IRVINE of Owen Sound, David J. IRVINE and his fiancée Shelly WHALEN of Stoney Creek, and Kelly-Lynn and her husband Mark ABRAHAM of Windsor. Loving Nana of J.D., Hunter, Amelia and Kaleb. Beloved daughter of Betty MELVILLE of Toronto. Dear sister of Myrna MAZENIC of Mississauga, and Sherry IRVING of Oshawa. Debby will be missed by her sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law of the IRVINE family. She is also survived by twenty-one nieces and nephews, and by eleven great-nieces and great-nephews. She is predeceased by her father Fred Roger AYOTTE, her brother Alfred MELVILLE and her stepfather John Henry MELVILLE, Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin (Town of Saugeen Shores) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, July 24th, 2008. Funeral mass will be celebrated in Saint_Joseph's Church, 920 Wellington Street, on Friday at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter MEYER as celebrant. Interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Parish prayers will be held in the funeral home on Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZENIC o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-24 published
IRVINE, Deborah May (MELVILLE)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Monday, July 21st, 2008, at the age of 54 years, the former Debbie (MELVILLE) IRVINE of Port Elgin. Cherished wife for 36 years of David IRVINE. Loving mother of Cheryl-Ann and her husband Andy BARNARD, Dawn IRVINE, Kathy and her husband Matthew WILLSON, Sarah IRVINE, all of Port Elgin. Amanda IRVINE of Owen Sound, David J. IRVINE and his fiancée Shelly WHALEN of Stoney Creek, and Kelly-Lynn and her husband Mark ABRAHAM of Windsor. Loving Nana of J.D., Hunter, Amelia and Kaleb. Beloved daughter of Betty MELVILLE of Toronto. Dear sister of Myrna MAZENIC of Mississauga, and Sherry IRVING of Oshawa. Debbie will be missed by her sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law of the IRVINE family. She is also survived by twenty-one nieces and nephews, and by eleven great-nieces and great-nephews. She is predeceased by her father Fred Roger AYOTTE, her brother Alfred MELVILLE and her stepfather John Henry MELVILLE. Friends may call at the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel, 510 Mill Street, Port Elgin (Town of Saugeen Shores) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Thursday, July 24th, 2008. Funeral mass will be celebrated in Saint_Joseph's Church, 920 Wellington Street, on Friday at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Peter MEYER as celebrant. Interment Sanctuary Park Cemetery. Memorial contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Parish prayers will be held in the funeral home on Thursday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZENIC - All Categories in OGSPI

MAZEPA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-07-25 published
VAUGHAN, Betty Marie (formerly NORTHFIELD)
Suddenly on Wednesday, July 23, 2008 in her 62nd year. Dearly loved wife of Keith VAUGHAN of Keswick. Predeceased by her first husband Fred NORTHFIELD. Loving mother of Tammy (Brad HAYWARD) of Keswick and Curt (Tina) NORTHFIELD of Sudbury. Cherished grandmother of Adam, Tyler and Kaelyn NORTHFIELD, Sean MAZEPA and Ryan and Ashton HAYWARD. Great-grandmother of Dakota and Taylor. Betty will be greatly missed by her brothers and sisters and their families, the NORTHFIELD family and her many Friends. Visitation from the M.W. Becker Funeral Home, 490 The Queensway S., Keswick 1-888-884-4486 on Saturday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service from the chapel on Sunday, July 27, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZEPA - All Categories in OGSPI

MAZER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-19 published
SANDERS, Bella
Peacefully, at the age of 95, on Sunday, May 18, 2008, at Forest Hill Place. Bella SANDERS beloved wife of the late Charles SANDERS and Harry MAZER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Judy and Bob LESTER, Michael and Karen SANDERS, Art and Enid SANDERS, and Ellie KENT. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Marion and Ed ADELBERG, and the late Louis and Frances SANDERS. Dear sister-in-law of Shirley and the late Harry SANDERS, the late Sara and Harry PACHTER, and the late Anne and Lou SHERWIN. Devoted grandmother of Janice and Richard ALBERT, Steven and Dana LESTER, Karen and David ECANOW, Jon and Lisa SANDERS, Julie SANDERS, Caley SANDERS, Bryan and Alison SANDERS, Deborah and Howard SZALAVETZ, Joel and Borka GRANATSTEIN, Bryan and Annel GRANATSTEIN. Great-grandmother of 15. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, May 19, 2008, at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Holy Blossom Memorial Park. Shiva, 3 Bachelor Place. Memorial donations may be made to Canadian Friends of the Hebrew University, Charles and Bella Sanders Scholarship Fund, 416-485-8000, 1-888-432-7398.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZER - All Categories in OGSPI

MAZIK o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-02-20 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, Frances
It is with deep appreciation that we extend our thanks to the Friends and relatives of Frances STEWARD/STEWART/STUART at the time of her passing. We appreciated your calls, the floral tributes and donations and the many stories told over the past several weeks honouring her memory. Thank you to Reverend Willis HUNKING and also thank you for the special participation of his grand-niece Reverend Denise MAZIK. Thank you also to Norman JACK, who once again provided great care to our family. Many thanks to the pallbearers, honourary pallbearers and flower bearer and to the women of Erskine Presbyterian Church who provided an excellent lunch.
- Don and Linda BERRY.
Page 3

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZIK - All Categories in OGSPI

MAZMANIAN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-14 published
HIGGINS, Hazel Nazig (née MAZMANIAN)
At Hannah Walker Place, Owen Sound, on Thursday, January 10, 2007. Hazel HIGGINS (née MAZMANIAN) of Southampton in her 82nd year. Beloved wife of John HIGGINS of Southampton. Dear mother of John Armen HIGGINS of Southampton and Banff and Jane Elizabeth and her husband Jeffrey FLEAR of Fergus. Also survived by her sister Margaret and her husband Norman SHAW of London, Harry and his wife Esther of Cambridge, William and his wife Ann of Kitchener, John and his partner Gisilla of Fort Erie and Charles, also of Fort Erie. Proud and loving grandmother of Rebecca and Victoria FLEAR. Predeceased by her parents, Sarkis and Satanig MAZMANIAN. At Hazel's request there will be no visitation. Cremation. A Community Mass to honour Hazel will be held at Saint Paul's Anglican Church, Southampton, on Friday January 18, 2008 at 2 p.m. A further Time to Celebrate the Life of Hazel HIGGINS will be announced at a later date. Expressions of Remembrance to Saint Paul's Anglican Church or to the Saugeen Memorial Hospital Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to the Eagleson Funeral Home Southampton. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZMANIAN - All Categories in OGSPI

MAZUR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-23 published
Economist was 'great warrior of peace' and sworn enemy of Third World debt
A consultant to three levels of Canadian government, he put out financial fires for the United Nations and the World Bank, and went all over 'a world that is obscenely unequal, unfair and immoral'
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
Toronto -- 'Greed is good," cooed the go-for-the-jugular capitalist Gordon Gekko in the 1987 movie Wall Street. Just three years later, a more sobering motto was sounded by Morris MILLER, who was a bit better grounded in the real world: "Anxiety can be good for you."
We have nothing to fear but lack of fear itself, Mr. MILLER wrote in Peace Magazine in 1990, and self-deceiving illusions can be dangerous. "When surgery is needed, Aspirin is no cure," he warned. "We are living an illusion and must act to counter the global malaise that now afflicts us."
Long before U2 singer Bono's crusade, Mr. MILLER recognized that malaise as foreign debt, which was crushing not only developing nations' treasuries, but their hope.
That the rich are getting richer and the poor poorer was hardly news, but Mr. MILLER, ever the economist, cited depressing evidence. The average income in the developing world was a little less than $400 (U.S.) per capita, he found at one point. In the industrialized world, it was about $24,000, a ratio of 1 to 60. Two decades earlier, the ratio had been 1 to 30. "It has doubled in one generation!"
An even more revealing comparison was between the world's richest fifth and the world's poorest fifth: The ratio was 1 to 140. And one out of five people earns less than $1 per day.
He minced no words: "We have a world that is obscenely unequal, unfair and immoral. We live in a period when poverty is not only tolerated, but is exacerbated." Part of the rationale for the tolerance is a sense of futility: Poverty, he said, is thought to be too wide and deep to be seriously alleviated, let alone eradicated.
The global condition is "deplorable and getting worse." Between a third and half of humankind is not getting enough to eat or clothe itself, "or live in pride, hope, or human dignity. In fact, their conditions are worsening… Not since the conquistadors plundered Latin America has the world experienced a [financial] flow in the direction we see today."
It was a depressing scenario to be sure, but Mr. MILLER believed there was a way out. Industrialized countries had to do more and needed to regroup in a way that the United States, Japan and Western Europe would work together to re-establish some degree of global financial stability. In other words, co-operation.
Put another way, he felt that the days of American economic dominance had to end, to be replaced by a new type of international management that takes into account the economic slippage of the U.S. and the stronger position of its two main capitalist rivals.
As for already poor countries which must service ballooning foreign debts, "they are cannibalizing their economy to survive at a level that can hardly be called living. Is it any surprise that these nations are tinderboxes, ready to explode into rioting and civil breakdown?"
An economist and development expert who worked for three levels of government - provincial, federal and international - Mr. MILLER was known by his family as a "great warrior of peace."
The son of immigrant Jewish parents, he grew up in Montreal. His mother had come from Poland, while his father, Louis MAZUR, was from Ukraine. He was raised not in the storied St. Urbain Street neighbourhood, but in more uptown Outremont, graduating from Strathcona Academy and going on to study first political science and then commerce at McGill University.
He then headed to the London School of Economics, where he befriended another Outremont intellectual, Pierre Trudeau. The two bummed around Europe one summer, and they remained Friends for the rest of Mr. Trudeau's life.
Following completion of a master's degree in 1949, Mr. MILLER travelled the world, witnessing wrenching poverty and inequality. Back in Montreal, he wrote a play, The Flame Within, that was staged at the Canadian Drama Festival.
Following PhD studies at Harvard University, where he completed everything but his dissertation, he began teaching economics at McGill. One of his students was future Star Trek star William Shatner. Family lore has it that one day, Mr. Shatner informed his professor that he would not be making a future for himself in finance, to which Mr. MILLER said something like, "Maybe that's a good thing."
Mr. MILLER teamed up with Mr. Trudeau again in the early 1950s to attend an economic conference in Moscow, where Mr. MILLER was extended a very rare invitation to visit China. Can my friend Pierre come too? he asked. No, he was informed, Mr. Trudeau was not invited. Mr. MILLER went anyway as part of a Western delegation that helped Mao Zedong celebrate the anniversary of the revolution that had brought him to power in 1949.
Only decades later did Mr. MILLER discover why Mr. Trudeau had been unwelcome in China. In Moscow, Mr. MILLER had worn a tweed jacket, and Mr. Trudeau his customary sandals and shirt. The Chinese wanted only respectably attired Westerners.
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police, however, did not take kindly to Mr. MILLER's travels in the communist world, and they pressured McGill to relieve him of his teaching post. So in the mid-1950s, he and his new wife headed to Regina, where he took a job as director of research and planning at Saskatchewan's natural resources ministry.
In Ottawa for two years, Mr. MILLER helped guide a federal conference called Resources for Tomorrow, which examined policies related to economic development and the environment at two levels of government.
After a brief stint as an economist with the United Nations in New York, he spent four hectic but fruitful ears in Rome working for the Food and Agriculture Organization, a United Nations agency. He travelled throughout Africa and Asia, developing self-aid programs on water, food, infrastructure, health, education and the plight of women.
Continuing with the United Nations years later, he worked for the agency's Resources Development Group and was deputy secretary-general of a conference in Nairobi on new and renewable energy resources. He tangled with the Saudis and Americans on the rising cost of propane, which millions of poor had to use to cook their food.
Where did his passion for economic justice come from? "He must have been born with those views," offered Claire, his wife of 55 years. "The big thing for him wasn't so much the politics as the human being involved. His attitude was that we need to help people not exploit people, and it was very clear for him that there were choices to be made."
In 1968, Mr. MILLER went to Washington to work for the World Bank, which kindled his later view that the bank and its sister organization, the International Monetary Fund, were still operating on the outdated rules of the 1944 Bretton Woods Agreement, which put the U.S. dollar at the centre of the global financial system. To him, that made no sense, but he felt the United States couldn't admit that its influence had waned, nor could it cede any more of its power.
Back in Ottawa in 1975, he worked for the Treasury Board and the Department of Energy, Mines and Resources, and directed a task force on federalism for the Privy Council.
But the World Bank again beckoned, and he returned from 1981 to 1984 as an executive director representing Canada, Ireland and 10 Caribbean countries. The experience provided fodder for his 1986 book, Coping is Not Enough, described in The Globe's Report on Business as "a cry of frustration at the way the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank are short-changed by the United States, which is responsible for about a fifth of their finances but has been the biggest brake on the agencies' expansion."
Mr. MILLER warned that urgent work needed to be done to avert a major crisis in the world economy. For one thing, since its initial payment to the World Bank of $635-million in 1947, Washington had contributed only $479-million more, an amount "that is less than the misplaced or stolen weaponry the Pentagon reports each year, or less than the cost of one destroyer." The price of oil was also a factor in global economic instability: "Both in 1973 and 1978, Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries pushed on the accelerator," Mr. MILLER wrote. "The United States in 1979 slammed on the brakes and the rest of the world, like unbuckled passengers, went through the windshield."
He did not let Canada off the hook, accusing it of a sycophantic approach when it came to Third World debt reduction: "There's always pressure to placate the Americans," he stated. "I don't think the Canadian government gave a damn when it supported structural adjustment. They just wanted to support the U.S., who only wanted to help the banks get their debts serviced."
As for asking international bankers to exercise social responsibility, "you might as well ask cats to bark. Banks are not in the business of providing charity."
Between 1986 and 1995, Mr. MILLER led or took part in some 20 overseas missions for United Nations agencies, the World Bank and the governments of Canada, Poland and Mexico to examine fiscal and development issues and the alleviation of poverty.
He spent the final 20 or so years of his life as a consultant on development issues and a professor at the University of Ottawa. He found a haven at his cottage in the Laurentians, where he loved to fish with his grandchildren. To the best of his family's knowledge, he never caught anything.
With current economic arrangements unsustainable, the key question for Mr. MILLER was whether new policies to redirect capital to help poor countries would be adopted voluntarily or whether circumstances will force changes. Under that second option, he warned, "we will reap the whirlwind."
Morris MILLER was born on June 15, 1924, in Montreal. He died of cancer in Ottawa on February 17, 2008. He was 83. He leaves his wife, Claire, his children Riel, Shereen and Leona, and eight grandchildren.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZUR - All Categories in OGSPI

MAZUREK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-26 published
FAUST Frank H.
Born in Newark, New Jersey, on March 14, 1911, died in Oakville, Ontario on April 24, 2008. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, with a B.Sc. Degree in Chemistry, Frank's professional life was with his father's Company Yokum Faust Chemicals in London. After the sale of Yokum Faust Chemicals to a national firm, Frank and his family relocated to Montreal, Quebec for several years and then to Oakville, Ontario. Predeceased by his wife of nearly 60 years, Mildred C. FAUST, he is survived by his three children: Francia STEVENS (John) in Naples, Florida, Tom FAUST (Judy) in Oakville, Ontario, Mari-Ellen MARTIN (Joe) in Vancouver, British Columbia; his grandchildren: Derek JOHANNSON (Anne) in Baltimore, Maryland; Leslie SIMMONS (Scott) in Wilmington, North Carolina Stephen FAUST (Julia) in Uxbridge, Ontario; Heather FAUST- MAZUREK (Robert) in Santa Cruz, California; and Joseph, Jason and Jeremy MARTIN in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is survived by nine great-grandchildren and four step grandchildren. He is survived by his brother Tom FAUST (Julia) of Oakville, Ontario and Freeport, Bahamas and sister Erdyne KILLINGSWORTH in London, Ontario. Funeral Service will be held on Monday, April 28th, 2008 at The Oakview Funeral Home Chapel at 56 Lakeshore Road West (one block East of Kerr Street) Oakville 905-842-2252 at 10 a.m. A parishioner of Saint Michael's in London, St. Malachy's in Montreal and St. Andrew's in Oakville. Frank will be interred at Saint Peter's Cemetery in London, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZUREK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-26 published
FAUST, Frank H.
Frank H. FAUST, born in Newark, New Jersey on March 14, 1911, died in Oakville, Ontario on April 24, 2008.
A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, with a B. Sc. Degree in Chemistry, Frank's professional life was with his father's Company Yokum Faust Chemicals in London.
After the sale of Yokum Faust Chemicals to a national firm, Frank and his family relocated to Montreal, Quebec for several years and then to Oakville, Ontario.
Predeceased by his wife of nearly 60 years, Mildred C. FAUST, he is survived by his three children: Francia STEVENS (John) in Naples, Florida, Tom FAUST (Judy) in Oakville, Ontario, Mari-Ellen MARTIN (Joe) in Vancouver, British Columbia; his grandchildren: Derek JOHANNSON (Anne) in Baltimore, Maryland; Leslie SIMMONS (Scott) in Wilmington, North Carolina; Stephen FAUST (Julia) in Uxbridge, Ontario; Heather FAUST- MAZUREK (Robert) in Santa Cruz, California; and Joseph, Jason and Jeremy MARTIN in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is survived by nine great-grandchildren and four step-grandchildren. He is survived by his brother Tom FAUST (Julia) of Oakville, Ontario and Freeport, Bahamas and sister Erdyne KILLINGSWORTH in London, Ontario.
Funeral Service will be held on Monday, April 28th, 2008 at The Oakview Funeral Home Chapel at 56 Lakeshore Road West (one block East of Kerr Street), Oakville 905-842-2252 at 10 a.m.
A parishioner of Saint Michael's in London, St. Malachy's in Montreal and St. Andrew's in Oakville. Frank will be interred at Saint Peter's Cemetery in London, Ontario.
In lieu of flowers, donations to The Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

  M... Names     MA... Names     MAZ... Names     Welcome Home

MAZUREK - All Categories in OGSPI