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"MAK" 2008 Obituary


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MAK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-01 published
BARTHA, Oscar
Passed away peacefully on Sunday, March 30, 2008, with his loving wife and family by his side. Oscar BARTHA of Tillsonburg, at the age of 86 years. Born in Szarvasko, Heves Megye, Hungary, August 9, 1921, son of the late Stephen BARTHA and the late former Barbara KISS. Oscar was an active and dedicated member of the St. Ladislaus Hungarian Community Roman Catholic Church, Courtland, serving as the respected and devoted organist and Kantor for over 30 years. Oscar was a Life and former Executive Member of the Delhi Hungarian Home and a Life Member of the Saint Mary's Knights of Columbus #3212, Tillsonburg. Oscar also proudly served and promoted his Hungarian Heritage and Community as the announcer for the Hungarian Hour on the C.K.O.T. Radio Programme (for seven years.) Beloved husband and best friend of Anna (TENKI) BARTHA. Oscar was predeceased by his first wife Helen (KISH) BARTHA. Much loved father of Leslie BARTHA of Alberta; Barbara and her husband Mike BOLLE and Martin BARTHA and his wife Connie, all of Tillsonburg and Ilona BARTHA of Columbia, South Carolina, U.S.A. Proud and loving grandpa of five grandchildren. Survived by a sister Irene KISS in Hungary (and the late Frank KISS) and several surviving cousins in Hungary. Friends, relatives and former neighbours on Trottier Drive are welcome to meet with the BARTHA family and share favourite memories on Tuesday from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 9 p.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg (519-842-4238). Knights of Columbus Prayers are Tuesday at 6: 15 p.m. Parish Prayers are Tuesday at 7 p.m. Funeral Mass of Christian Burial to be said on Wednesday at 11 a.m. at the St. Ladislaus R.C. Hungarian Community Church, Talbot Rd., Courtland by Rev. Fr. Ferenc MAK. Interment to follow in the St. Ladislaus Cemetery, Courtland. Memorial donations (payable by cheque only) to the "Sakura House - Victorian Order of Nurses Oxford" would be sincerely appreciated by the family and can be arranged through the Verhoeve Funeral Home, Tillsonburg.

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MAK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-28 published
AUKEMA, Gail H. (née VAN TIL)
'Well done good and faithful servant Come and share your Master's happiness.' Matthew 25: 21
A resident of Chatham and formerly of Ridgetown, Gail AUKEMA died on Saturday, April 26, 2008, at the Chatham Kent Health Alliance, Chatham Campus, at the age of 81. Born in Holland to the late Hendrik and Trinjtje (WOLTERS) VAN TIL. Beloved wife of the late Evert AUKEMA (1989.) Loving mother of Henry and Alyce AUKEMA, Teresa and Dan HEATH, John and the late Tina AUKEMA, Harold and Joyce AUKEMA, Brenda and Ron MAK, and Rob and Brenda AUKEMA. Gail will be missed by her 26 grandchildren and her 6 great-grandchildren. Sister of Gerrit and Janny VAN TIL, Harry and Bea VAN TIL, Jenny and the late Wiebe POSTMA, Marten and Stien VAN TIL. Sister in-law of the late Jan-Evert and Blijke AUKEMA, Beits and the late Hank KROON, Jim and the late Roelie AUKEMA, Jan and Zwannie AUKEMA, Evelyn and the late Harry RIEPMA, Wob and Joke AUKEMA, Cecil and Freida AUKEMA. Gail is predeceased by sister in-law Ali AUKEMA. She is survived by many nieces and nephews. Family will receive Friends from 2: 00-4:30 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 459 St. Clair Street, Chatham. Family and Friends are invited to meet at Greenwood Cemetery, Ridgetown, at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday for an interment service. A Memorial service and reception will follow, on Wednesday Afternoon at 2: 00 p.m. at Grace Christian Reformed Church, 255 Tweedsmuir Ave. E., Chatham, with Rev. William KOOPMANS officiating. Memorial donations made to the Foundation of the Chatham Kent Health Alliance or Chatham Christian Schools are welcomed. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com.

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MAKA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-06 published
McNAMARA, Mary Hazeline (ROHRER)
Peacefully, at Victoria Hospital, London Health Sciences Centre, on Friday, May 2, 2008, Mary Hazeline McNAMARA, of London, in her 78th year. Dear loving mother of James McNAMARA, Pamela FLEMING/FLEMMING (Robert,) Heather MAKA, Bill ROHRER Jr. (Christine) and Bobby ROHRER. Also survived by many grandchildren, great-grandchildren, brothers and sisters. Predeceased by her brother William McNAMARA, sister Rita BOWSER and longtime partner Jimmy. A Celebration of Mary's Life will be held at A.N.A.F. Unit #229, Imperial Veterans, 797 York St. (South West corner at Rectory St.), London, on Friday, May 9, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. with a service to be held at 2:00 p.m. Interment of Mary's ashes will take place in Nova Scotia. Donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca Evans Funeral Home, London, (519) 451-9350, entrusted with arrangements. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mary.

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MAKEDOS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-07 published
LEIS, Edmund
Peacefully went to be with his Lord on Saturday January 5, 2008 at KW Health Centre of Grand River Hospital. He resided in Wellesley and was formerly of Millbank. Ed was born 74 years ago in Wellesley Township, a son of the late Clayton and Magdalena (GERBER) LEIS. He was a member of Poole Mennonite Church where he served as Elder, Sunday School Superintendent and teacher. Ed blessed his church family with his musical talent as song leader and musician. Beloved husband of Lydiann (ZEHR) LEIS whom he married in 1956. Loving father of Doug and Cheryl of Wiarton, Judy and Tim JANTZI/YANTZI of R.R.#2 Tavistock, Rob and Brenda of R.R.#1 Newton, Val and Robert BENDER of R.R.#2 Wellesley, Don and Julie of Wellesley, Sherry and Metaxas MAKEDOS of R.R.#2 Tavistock. Special grandpa of 21 grandchildren. Brother of Marjorie and Doug BOWLES of Woodstock, Helen and Howard KROPF of Tavistock, Albert and friend Pat of Stratford, Laurene and Bruce WILHELM of New Hamburg and brother-in-law of Allan and Marg ZEHR of R.R.#1 Newton. Also remembered by his aunt Lavina KRAFT of Waterloo and many nieces, nephews and cousins. Predeceased by one brother in infancy and sister-in-law Sandra LEIS. Ed's family invites relatives and Friends to share their memories at the Crosshill Mennonite Church on Monday January 7 (tonight) from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday January 8 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Poole Mennonite Church on Wednesday January 9, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Paul DYCK officiating. Interment to follow in the adjoining church cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations to Mennonite Central Committee or 100 Huntley Street would be appreciated by the family and can be arranged by calling Brenneman Funeral Home, Atwood at 519-356-2382 or www.brennemanfuneralhome.ca

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MAKELA o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-02-13 published
Todd Joseph SMITH
In Loving Memory of Todd Joseph SMITH, January 15th, 1969 - February 2nd, 2008.
Beloved son of Clifford and Miriam (MAKELA) SMITH of Manitoulin Island. Loving brother of Steven (wife Carol) of Lively and Larry of Saint Charles, Illinois. Cherished uncle of Jessica and Calvin. Sadly missed by uncles, aunts and cousins. Todd will be greatly missed, he was well loved by his family. Rest in Peace. A graveside service will be held at Mountainview Cemetery in the Spring of 2008. Cremation. Donations to the Canadian Mental Health would be appreciated. Arrangements entrusted to the Lougheed Funeral Home, Sudbury, Ontario.

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MAKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-19 published
Windsor Spitfires captain RENAUD dies
Calgary Flames' draft choice was 19
By Allan MAKI, Page S1
Family Day was supposed to be fun and relaxing for the Windsor Spitfires. Instead of practising, the players were scheduled to appear at the Windsor Arena throughout the afternoon and skate leisurely with Friends and fans of the Ontario Hockey League team.
Spitfires captain Mickey RENAUD, 19, had decided to have a few teammates over to his family home in Tecumseh, Ontario, for breakfast before heading to the arena known affectionately as the Barn.
But in the midst of an enjoyable morning, something went horribly wrong. RENAUD began convulsing, then passed out. An ambulance was called while efforts were made to revive the stricken teen.
By the time he was taken to the Windsor Regional Hospital, it was too late. The 6-foot-3, 220-pound centre was gone and a family, a team and corners of the hockey world were thrust into mourning.
"We're in a state of shock," said Tom WEBSTER, a family friend who twice coached the Spitfires and was responsible for getting the National Hockey League's Calgary Flames to draft RENAUD in the fifth round in 2007. "I don't know how to describe it. Just seeing the guys at the rink, the staff, everyone in the organization, it's really difficult to deal with. I feel just like I lost a son."
Spitfires team physician Roy DIKLICH outlined yesterday's medical efforts in a statement that said RENAUD was "absent of vital signs" when the player reached hospital. "All attempts were made at resuscitations and were unsuccessful at the emergency room."
According to a family contact, an autopsy was planned for last night to try to learn what happened to the seemingly healthy young man renowned for his character as much as his ability to play hockey.
RENAUD was in his third season with the Spitfires and beginning to assert himself as a leader. It was that trait that had the Flames looking fondly to the future.
"He was a guy who gave you a little of everything - penalty killing, he could play on the power play, he could hit," Flames scout Todd Button said. "The thing that struck me was his leadership, especially with a young team. He got the job done."
Moe MANTHA, who signed RENAUD to play for the Spitfires, recalled RENAUD's smarts, how good he was with and without the puck. MANTHA said he could tell RENAUD came from a hockey family.
"He was a very good athlete in very good shape and we were looking for that to help turn things around," MANTHA said. "I met with his mom and dad before training camp. The apple didn't fall far from the tree. They're a first-class, genuine family. I feel so badly for them."
Mark RENAUD played 152 games in the National Hockey League, most of them with the Hartford Whalers, as a solid defenceman. Mark's brother, Chris, played in the American Hockey League and was coached by Webster.
"I can't say enough good things about this young man," Webster said of Mickey. "I compare him to Adam Graves. In '88, we went to the Memorial Cup with Adam. Mickey could have been that way next year or maybe this year. He always came to the rink with a smile on his face."
RENAUD's death was felt in Uniondale, where New York Islanders head coach Ted Nolan, whose son, Jordan, plays for the Spitfires, wasn't behind the bench for the first period when his team played the San Jose Sharks. Nolan needed time to talk to his son and compose himself.
"He was my son's teammate and good friend, and it was tragic," Nolan said. "Sometimes there are a lot more important things than a hockey game."
The Spitfires are supposed to play host to the Plymouth Whalers on Thursday. There was no news yesterday whether the game will be played and when a memorial service for RENAUD will be held.
"I'd like to go pay my respects," said former teammate Mitch MAUNU, who now plays for Lakehead University. "To hear about him passing, it's heartbreaking. He was such a great guy, so full of life and energy. He had so much in front of him.
"It's incomprehensible [that he's gone], that's the best word to describe it."
RENAUD had attended the Flames' training camp last September and had scored 21 goals and 20 assists in 56 games this Ontario Hockey League season. He was in the lineup on Sunday when Windsor defeated Owen Sound 4-1.

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MAKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-20 published
RENAUD is a local hero
By Allan MAKI, Page S3
Mickey RENAUD touched the hearts of many people in his short life, none more so than Akim ALIU.
The two were Ontario Hockey League rookies with the Windsor Spitfires in 2005 when ALIU was attacked in practice by teammate Steve DOWNIE, who cross-checked ALIU in the mouth and knocked out three teeth.
Though just 16, RENAUD reached out to ALIU, who was shunned by several Spitfires to the point where he eventually had to be traded. Little wonder news of RENAUD's sudden death on Monday shook ALIU, who now plays for the London Knights.
"He was unbelievable to me," ALIU said. "I had all my pregame meals at his house. I knew his family, his brother and sister. He helped me so much. It's such a tragic thing."
ALIU described RENAUD as "one of the nicest kids I know" and recalled how the two would talk to one another even during games.
"We talked about how we were doing, if we were playing well, that kind of stuff," said ALIU, who also chatted with RENAUD during last year's National Hockey League draft when ALIU was selected by the Chicago Blackhawks and RENAUD by the Calgary Flames.
An autopsy was conducted yesterday on the 6-foot-3, 220-pound Spitfires captain, who collapsed at his home and died en route to the Windsor Regional Hospital. The preliminary results were passed along to the RENAUD family, but medical officials said they may need months to determine the cause of death.
The Spitfires announced they were cancelling tomorrow night's home game against the Plymouth Whalers and that RENAUD's funeral service is scheduled for Friday at Saint Anne's Church in Tecumseh near Windsor, Ontario
Windsor head coach Bob BOUGHNER, a former Flames defenceman, said the players have been spending time together and with members of the local victim services.
"We spent a night at a billet's home with a dinner," BOUGHNER said. "We had a chapel service at the local high school. The kids have spent every moment together. They're going to dedicate the season to Mickey RENAUD."
While BOUGHNER was not with the Spitfires during the nasty DOWNIE / ALIU clash, he was aware of how RENAUD did all he could to pull together a fractured team.
"There were a lot of issues," BOUGHNER said. "Mickey was one of the players instrumental in befriending Akim and settling the whole thing. He was a guy who was always in the coaches' room, never about himself, always about a teammate. He made sure everyone was taken care of. He was a local hero."
The Spitfires will not appoint a captain to replace RENAUD. Every player in the league will wear a commemorative 18 sticker (RENAUD's number) on his helmet.

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MAKIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-09 published
Fierce and forthright judge made practicality and principle his mark
When it came to standing up for precept over ideological fashion, the Ontario Court of Appeal judge had no peer. He could not abide sham or mediocrity, and that attracted a legion of admirers
By Kirk MAKIN, Page S10
Toronto -- There couldn't have been more than a handful of appellate lawyers in Ontario who were unaware that Mr. Justice George FINLAYSON had a low tolerance level for unprepared or long-winded lawyers. Unfortunately, one of them was arguing a complicated commercial case several years ago before the Ontario Court of Appeal's crustiest member.
As the hapless counsel droned on through a hit-and-miss series of legal points, the courtroom began to feel like a village built on the edge of Mount Etna. Finally, Judge FINLAYSON could take no more: "What I'd like to find out is: What should I be doing with my mind while you are talking?" he exploded.
Recounting the scene, a former colleague - Mr. Justice Sydney ROBINS - said it was a classic FINLAYSON moment: "George had a low boiling point. He had little patience with incompetence and unprepared counsel."
Gruff, prickly, impatient - all are words that applied to George FINLAYSON. His testy nature, however, was the product of a man who could not abide sham or mediocrity. When it came to standing up for principle over the ideological fashions of the day, he had no peer - and it built him a legion of admirers during his 12 years on the bench.
Raised in Ottawa, Mr. FINLAYSON graduated from the University of Toronto's law school in 1951 and joined a Toronto powerhouse known as McCarthy and McCarthy. He soon joined the ranks of a handful of legendary litigators who dominated the city's legal scene - men whose names are still uttered with reverence: J.J. Robinette, Walter Williston, John Brooke, Charles Dubin and Douglas Laidlaw. His clients ranged from fraudsters and hockey players to the government of Quebec, which he helped to win a mammoth lawsuit against Newfoundland involving power from Churchill Falls.
"He was noted for his unvarnished advice and fearless advocacy," Mr. ROBINS said.
Appointed to the Court of Appeal in 1990, Judge FINLAYSON brought a keen awareness of the practical effects of court rulings on the practice of law, a remarkable work ethic, and a writing style that was clear and focused.
"A lot of judges might reach the same conclusions but would couch them in more circuitous terms," said Tom HEINTZMAN, a lawyer at Mr. FINLAYSON's former firm. "George had the courage of his convictions, and he was prepared to set them down in an unvarnished way. When there was something he disagreed with, he would stand there like Horatio on the bridge."
A slight and slender man, Mr. FINLAYSON also embraced new technology, had an enormous appetite for work, and appreciated law clerks who were not afraid to edit his writing.
Practicality and principle were the hallmark of his rulings. In one case, he overturned a decision that had found a car-parts company responsible for a highway accident caused by an employee who was secretly drinking on the job. "The notion that an employer&hellip has a duty to monitor its employees to determine if it is safe for them to drive home is novel in the extreme," he said.
He maintained a particularly wary eye for social injustice, excessive damage awards, and judges who imposed unfairly harsh sentences on individuals in the hope of deterring other, would-be criminals.
"My father was a very black-and-white person," said his son, Blair. "Something might not be good law, but it was the law - so don't whine about it. He made up his mind quickly, but he wasn't stubborn. If you gave him a good argument, he had no problem admitting that he had been wrong."
A champion of criminal rights, Judge FINLAYSON was sufficiently pragmatic to allow police to seize hairs from suspects for DNA testing. In a similar realistic vein, he reduced excessive damage awards and spoke out against legal-aid funding being given indiscriminately to the children of wealthy or middle-class parents.
Most notably, however, he helped launch a wave of skepticism about the role of soft science and expert witnesses: from marginal fields.
In a 1997 ruling, he declared that jurors were quite capable of reaching conclusions without the aid of a psychologist, and castigated his fellow judges for abdicating their responsibility to reach conclusions without being propped up by purported experts.
He was particularly irked by the evidence in historical sexual assaults, some of it drawn out by therapists who employed dream theories. "The criminal courts need a new gatekeeper," he railed in one such case. "Parliament and the judiciary have radically eroded the traditional protection available to the accused in sexual assault cases."
Frank ADDARIO, president of the Criminal Lawyers Association, said these sentiments showed Mr. FINLAYSON to be "a judge with strong attachment to the bedrock principles of the criminal law. He liked the adversary system and its closed set of rules, and he continually reminded lawyers about the basic rules of evidence, proof and cross-examination in criminal cases."
But these rulings annoyed prosecutors, whose job it is to deal with victims and assemble evidence. They were equally put off by Judge FINLAYSON's regular declarations that prosecutors must be less keen to secure convictions.
He was equally caustic about lawyers attaching themselves to causes. In 1980, as treasurer of the Law Society of Upper Canada, he urged new lawyers to represent nothing but their client's interest - and to turn no prospective client away.
"You are not obliged, and indeed, you must not, act as a mouthpiece for an individual or his cause," he said. He also scoffed at the idea that some lawyers specialize in "civil rights," calling it a pompous, pious notion that infers that other lawyers are unconcerned about freedom and liberty.
He was from the old school of mentoring, Mr. HEINTZMAN said. "He wasn't about to mollycoddle anyone. We might be chewed out, but those who stuck it out learned lessons we never forgot."
In his life outside the courtroom, Mr. FINLAYSON loved spending time at the family cottage near Peterborough, Ontario Clad in eccentric recreational outfits, he was widely known to be far from expert at the helm of his sizable motorboat. "Stories are legion of him crashing it into docks," Mr. HEINTZMAN said. Indeed, there were few takers whenever he offered rides, and several neighbours had implored Mr. FINLAYSON never to approach their dock.
Mr. FINLAYSON also had a passion for the Toronto Blue Jays, the Ottawa Rough Riders, his dogs, and the company of a select group of male Friends with whom he exchanged legal gossip and spirited debate.
He was a decided family man, albeit not an overly demonstrative one. "If you did a great job on something, my father's way of showing love and affection was to give you a firm handshake and a pat on the back," said Blair, who went on to take up electrical engineering and to run his own company.
A watershed point in Mr. FINLAYSON's career occurred in 1989, when an article in Canadian Lawyer magazine ranked him among the worst judges in the country on account of his temper, irascibility and a tendency to prejudge matters.
Based on a handful of anonymous critics, the ranking was far from scientific. Still, some Friends detected a change. The judge tried to curb his in-court sniping. A moderate drinker, he quit cold turkey.
Another important personal event occurred in 2004 when he published John J. Robinette, Peerless Mentor: An Appreciation, an unusual hybrid that was part memoir and part biography.
He believed fervently that the best decisions are written almost immediately, when legal arguments are fresh in a judge's mind and his reactions to them crackle with energy. He would invariably return to his chambers from the courtroom and set about writing his ruling, often polishing off the bulk of it in two or three hours.
His son said this technique had the added virtue of giving him a jump on everyone else: "He could get his slant in on it."
Mr. FINLAYSON, who retired in 2002, probably summed up his philosophy best in an interview several years ago: "My whole approach is to be a problem solver. I don't have an agenda. I don't favour the Charter or adopt a conservative approach. I don't favour the Crown or the defence. I just look at every case as something that has to be dealt with properly."
George Duncan FINLAYSON was born in Winnipeg on November 4, 1927. He died in Toronto of a heart attack on March 23, 2008, while out walking his dog. He was 80. He is survived by his wife, Joan, and by his children Margot, Blair and Sheelah. He also leaves his grandchildren Cameron, Ben, Riley, Josh, Fraser and Geordie.

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MAKOSKY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-08 published
SCHMIDT, Theodore " Ted"
Passed away suddenly on July 5, 2008 in Sauble Beach at the age of 78. Reunited with his beloved wife Madeleine Marie (2006). He was an exceptional and caring father who helped raise six beautiful children, 5 sons and 1 daughter. Phil SCHMIDT and wife Norma of London, Larry SCHMIDT and Brenda SCHMIDT of London, Cathy SCHMIDT and companion David MINARD of Tecumseh, Bill SCHMIDT and wife Mary of Emeryville, John SCHMIDT of Windsor, and Rob SCHMIDT and wife Catherine of Georgetown. Cherished Grandpa of 13 Grandchildren: Josh, Sarah, Michael, Andrew, Katelyn, Jaclyn, David, Matthew, Nathan, Erin, Adam, Madison, and Kiersten. Great-Grandpa of William and Nicholas DIMITROPOULOS. Predeceased by his loving parents Leopold and Antonie SCHMIDT. Loving brother of Frank SCHMIDT and Maxine of Orangeville, Hilda PARKER of Windsor, Violet QUICK of Windsor, Adeline TORRIE and Malcolm of Windsor, the late Margaret HARTMAN, Mary KELSCH of Alberta, Anna SCHEIDL, Walter SCHMIDT (Died in World War 2,) Elsie MAKOSKY and Mike of Windsor, and Dolores REIVE of Windsor. Brother-in-law of Ann LANGLOIS and late Lucien, Lucille BONDY, Alphonse LANGLOIS and Josephine, Evangeline FORTIN and late Leon, Paul LANGLOIS and wife Doreen, Bernadette REAUME and Jack. He leaves behind many neices, nephews, cousins, and close personal Friends. Ted was retired from Bell Canada after 37 and a half years of dedicated service. He enjoyed singing in the Our Lady Of Guadalupe Church choir and most recently at Saint Mary's Anglican Church choir in Walkerville. Ted was a member of the Windsor Coin Club, and the Seekers Club. Ted volunteered with Canadian Blood Services, and also a member and one time Chapter President of the Telephone Pioneers of America (Chapter 91). He also was an avid golfer and bowler. Visiting at the Windsor Chapel Funeral Home, 1700 Tecumseh Rd. E. on Tuesday, July 8, 2008 from 7-9 and on Wednesday, July 9, 2008 from 2-4 and from 6-9 p.m. with prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Family and Friends are invited to meet at Our Lady Of Guadalupe on Thursday, July 10, 2008 (834 Raymo Rd.) for visiting at 10 a.m. until time of Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. Interment Heavenly Rest Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy the family has requested in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Hiatus House or to Canadian Blood Services. Online condolences and cherished memories may be sent to the family at www.windsorchapel.com

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MAKSYMYK o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-25 published
KIRKLAND, Shirley (UNDERWOOD)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound with her family by her side Wednesday evening July 23, 2008. The former Shirley UNDERWOOD of Sauble Beach at the age of 69. Loving wife and best friend of Raymond KIRKLAND. Loved mother of Jim and his wife Barb, Jay and his wife Beckie and Jeff and his wife Becky all of Sauble Beach. Lovingly remembered by her six grandchildren Kathleen, Kyle, Joe, Clasey, Jayleen and Darby. Dear sister of Bill UNDERWOOD and his partner Marg of Owen Sound, Ruth Ann CLEMENT and her husband Ron of Elmira, Ron UNDERWOOD and his wife Marilyn, Cathy TRELFORD and her husband Max all of Port Elgin and Connie MAKSYMYK and her husband Andrew of Southampton. Dear sister-in-law of Watt RODGERS of Southampton and Jean KIRKLAND of R.R.#1, Hepworth. Predeceased by one sister Leola WARK, brother-in-law Ralph KIRKLAND and his wife Marie, two sisters-in-law Jean RODGERS and Pat UNDERWOOD and brother-in-law Don KIRKLAND. Ray, Shirley and their boys have owned Kirkland Super Market in Sauble Beach for over 40 years. Friends may call at the Zion Amabel United Church, Sauble Beach Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from Zion Amabel United Church, Sauble Beach Monday morning at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Gerry HOFSTETTER officiating. Interment Zion Cemetery. Memorial contributions to Zion Amabel United Church, Cancer Society or the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Shirley by the Downs and son Funeral Home, Hepworth 519-935-2754.

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MAKUCH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-09 published
MAKUCH, Mieczyslawa " Miecia" (ZOCHNIAK)
Peacefully, on Monday, April 7, 2008 at the Oakville- Trafalgar Memorial Hospital. Miecia (ZOCHNIAK) beloved mother of Donna NEWMAN, Ted (Mary-Ann,) Henry (Lorraine) and Wanda YANCHUS (Jim.) Lovingly remembered by her 9 grandchildren and 7 great-grandchildren. Visitation will be held at the Kopriva Taylor Community Funeral Home, 64 Lakeshore Rd. West, Oakville, (one block east of Kerr, 905-844-2600) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Thursday. A Service to Celebrate the Life of Miecia will be held 1: 00 p.m. on Friday, April 11, 2008 in the Kopriva Chapel. In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be made to the Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital. The family would like to thank the staff of the Oakville- Trafalgar Memorial Hospital for their outstanding care. Condolences may be made through www.koprivataylor.com

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