All Categories: A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z Welcome Home
Local Folders.. A B C D E F G H I J K L M Mc N O P Q R S T U V W Y Z
-1

"LUT" 2008 Obituary


LUTCHIN  LUTE  LUTES  LUTHER  LUTLEY  LUTMAN  LUTREN  LUTTERMAN  LUTTERMANN  LUTTIKHOF 

LUTCHIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-03 published
LUTCHIN, David
At Chatham Kent Alliance Hospital on Tuesday, April 1, 2008 David LUTCHIN, formerly of Wardsville, in his 83rd year. Beloved husband of the late Margaret LUTCHIN. Beloved son of the late Sonia and Sam LUTCHIN. Survived by 2 sisters Anne MERIN of Chicago and Frances KREIS of Toronto; sisters-in-law Sarah and Frances LUTCHIN, nieces Noreen, Florence, Elaine, Helen and Cathy; nephews Alvin, Allen, Charles and Larry and great nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Jack and Harry; sister Lena SPITZBERG and brothers-in-law Earl MERIN, Alexander SPITZBERG and Max KREIS. Funeral service will be held at Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne) on Friday, April 4, 2008 at 2 p.m. with Rabbi Ammos CHORNY officiating. Interment Or Shalom Cemetery. Friends who wish may make memorial donations to charity of choice. Online condolences www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to David LUTCHIN.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTCHIN - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-05 published
LUTE, Margaret Helen " Peggy"
Peggy passed away peacefully on Christmas Day, in her 92nd year at her residence at True Davidson Acres in Toronto. Predeceased by her beloved husband Ian Hutcheon LUTE. Lovingly remembered by her son Graham and his wife Pat, her two grand_sons, Tim and John and their wives Sue and Jill. Special great-grandmother to little Kara. She will be fondly remembered as a gentle and kind woman who accepted each stage of her life with selfless dignity. The family wishes to thank the staff at True Davidson Acres for their tender care and support. Following Peggy's wishes, there will be a private family service. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-09 published
LUTE, Margaret Helen " Peggy"
Peggy passed away peacefully on Christmas Day, in her 92nd year at her residence at True Davidson Acres in Toronto. Predeceased by her beloved husband Ian Hutcheon LUTE. Lovingly remembered by her son Graham and his wife Pat, her two grand_sons, Tim and John and their wives Sue and Jill. Special great-grandmother to little Kara. She will be fondly remembered as a gentle and kind woman who accepted each stage of her life with selfless dignity. The family wishes to thank the staff at True Davidson Acres for their tender care and support. Following Peggy's wishes, there will be a private family service. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTE - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-08 published
CHASTON, John Greer
(March 5, 1915-February 28, 2008)
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by the love of his family, at Lions Gate Hospital, North Vancouver, British Columbia in his 93rd year, after a brief illness. Predeceased by his parents, Leon Christopher CHASTON and Bessie GREER/GRIER of Calgary, and by his beloved younger brother Len, Royal Canadian Air Force, lost over Germany in 1942. He leaves to mourn his loving wife Helen, children Liz CHASTON, Christy McLEOD, Len CHASTON, and Martha LUTES (Ralph,) Helen's children, Peter CHAUVIN (Shelagh) and Cindy FLEMING/FLEMMING, former wife Jay JESSIMAN, and 11 grandchildren. Born and raised in Calgary, John went to work after high school for the Alberta Pacific Grain Co., and then assisted his father in his grain brokerage business. His career began when, articled to Norman Hindsley, C.A., he completed a five year Queen's University course in four years and in 1939 wrote the first Uniform Final Exam administered by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Alberta. He won the Province of Alberta prize for highest standing. He worked following for the Osoyoos Mines Co. Ltd., then Peat, Marwick, Mitchell Co. in Portland, Oregon. The call to war brought him back to positions in Canada with the Allied War Supply Corporation in Montreal and the Canadian Pacific Railway. Enlisting in the army in 1942, John's military service took him to stations from Montreal, through Ontario, to Prince Rupert, British Columbia and finally to Vancouver. In 1946 he joined Vancouver based Pemberton Securities Ltd. as controller. In 1952 he founded the company's corporate finance department which he headed until 1971 when he was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer. In the following years he guided the company through a difficult time in the North American economy and displayed unwavering confidence in both Pemberton Securities and the capital markets as a whole. In 1975 he was elected Chairman of the Board and was Honourary Chairman when Pemberton was acquired by Dominion Securities in 1989. Not one to retire, John continued an active role in the investment business with Capital West Partners, where he maintained a presence until his final days. John's devotion to the investment business in Western Canada was matched by his passion for the game of golf. He was introduced to the sport on a course made by his father, in the vacant prairie fields adjacent to their home in Calgary. He then played at the Calgary Municipal Course, the Bowness Golf Club, and the Calgary Golf and Country Club. In 1931 he won the Alberta Junior Championship. John joined Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club in 1945 and was Club Champion 1947, 49, 50, 51. In 1953, deciding to permanently establish his home in West Vancouver, he joined Capilano Golf and Country Club. John's devotion to Capilano was expressed not only in his election to President, 1964, but in countless hours of practice and play and solicited and unsolicited advice to members and management with respect to all aspects of the game, the club, and the course itself. Those acquainted with John know that he had a comprehensive knowledge of golf's history, its mechanics, and its evolution. Whether inspired by the immortal Bobby Jones or the revolutionary Tiger Woods, his enduring goal remained the perfect swing. In his latter years he routinely 'shot his age', on one occasion recording a gross 76 at the age of 84. Of many personal highlights in the pursuit of his sport, John took great pride in marshalling three British Opens and in being a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. His memory will be invoked annually at Capilano Golf and Country Club with the awarding of the Chaston Trophy and the Wt. Officer Lionel G. Chaston Royal Canadian Air Force Memorial Cup. It would be remiss to omit that in addition to his primary interests in business and in golf, John was well known for his love of cars. In a number of trades that roughly equaled his final age, he enjoyed ownership of several very special high performance vehicles. His favourite remains known only to him. He will be greatly missed by family, by Friends, and by all who appreciated his considerable achievements, keen sense of fair play, rigorous self discipline, and his devotion to the principle 'to play the ball as it lies'. The family would like to thank Doctor Nancy Crossen, Jim Cormack, M.S.W., and the palliative care team at Lions Gate Hospital for their compassionate care on 7 West. Memorial Service to be held on Tuesday, March 18, 2008, 3 p.m. at St. Stephen's Anglican Church, 885 22nd Street, West Vancouver. Donations may be made in John's memory to the Lions Gate Hospital Foundation, North Shore Hospice, 231 East 15th Street, North Vancouver, British Columbia, V7L 2L7 www.lghfoundation.com

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTES - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTHER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-10 published
CRAWFORD, Basil N.
Peacefully at South Huron Hospital, Exeter on Sunday, March 9, 2008 Basil N. CRAWFORD of Exeter in his 61st year. Beloved husband of Phyllis (MADGE) CRAWFORD. Dear father of Darla and Chris MITTELHOLTZ of London and Dennis and Tania CRAWFORD of Exeter. Dear grandfather of Tori and Josh; and Brent and Chad. Dear brother of Ronald CRAWFORD of Exeter. Predeceased by his parents Oswald and Fern (LUTHER) CRAWFORD, a sister-in-law Patricia CRAWFORD and a niece Susan CRAWFORD. Friends may call at the Haskett Funeral Home, 370 William Street, 1 west of Main, Exeter on Tuesday Evening 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, March 12th at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Paul ROSS officiating. Cremation with interment Exeter Cemetery. Donations to the Multiple Sclerosis Society or the South Huron Hospital Campaign would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTHER - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-17 published
ASHBERRY, Joyce
It is with great sadness that the family of Joyce ASHBERRY announces her sudden but peaceful passing in her 84th year, on the evening of May 14th 2008 at Rouge Valley Health System - Centenary site in Scarborough. She was predeceased by her beloved husband of 56 years, Gordon, in February 2004. Left to mourn her are her loving children David (Ann), Kitchener, Ontario; Bob, Trail, British Columbia; Janet (Clyde) Scarborough, Ontario and Ted (Kim), Stirling, Ontario; her adoring grandchildren Ben, Daniel and Jacob HADLEY, and Connor and Micaila MAHONEY- ASHBERRY; her dear friend and sister-in-law Edna BAMPTON (Cyril, deceased 2007) her cousins Rosalie HARRISON and Roy LUTLEY and their families, as well as her numerous Friends and neighbours.
For several years Joyce was a public school teacher with the Scarborough Board of Education. After her retirement she was a member of the Bell Pioneers and spent many happy hours creating "Heart Pillows" to assist patients' recovery following heart surgery. She was a founding member of the Church of the Master in Scarborough and was an active member of the Women's Auxiliary for many years.
A Memorial Service will be held for her on Saturday, May 24th at 11: 00 a.m. at the Pine Hills Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre(625 Birchmount Rd, north of St. Clair, Scarborough, 416-267-8229). In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, the Rouge Valley Health System - Centenary site or the Friends of Schizophrenics Society, if so desired.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTLEY - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-31 published
LAMONT, Mary Ellen (née LUTMAN)
Of Saint Thomas, passed away peacefully, surrounded by her loving family, on Saturday, March 29th, 2008, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in her 86th year. Dearly loved mother of Gayle and her husband Robert CLOES of Aylmer, Sharon and her husband Ron SIMPSON of Arnstein and Jill and her husband Mike HARVEY of Saint Thomas. Predeceased by a daughter Bonnie LACKEY (1997.) Dear mother-in-law of Clare LACKEY of Saint Thomas. Dear sister of Gerry (Mary Lou) LUTMAN, Connie (Ron) SMITH and Wayne (Rose) LUTMAN, all of London. Predeceased by 2 sisters Muriel DYKES and Ruth READING and by 2 brothers Bill and Ted LUTMAN. Loved grandmother of Billy (Angie) SIMPSON, Susan PATTON, Robert (Sheryl) CLOES, Brenda KOKKO and friend Chris PARE, Gerry (Stacey) KOKKO and Roger SIMPSON and great-grandmother of Matthew, James, Emma, Liam, Blake and Brady. Sadly missed by a number of nieces and nephews. Mary was born in London, Ontario on May 18, 1922, the daughter of the late George and Mabel LUTMAN. She worked at Eaton Yale. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Wednesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment to follow in Elmdale Cemetery. Visitation Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Remembrances may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital (Palliative Care Unit).

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-28 published
READINGS, Stan
Suddenly at London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Hospital on Thursday, June 26th, 2008 Stan READINGS of London in his 81st year. Beloved husband of the late Ruth (LUTMAN) READINGS. Dear father of John and MaryAnn of Lucan and Bob and Sue of London. Predeceased by his grand_son Tommy and his son Gary READINGS. Dear father-in-law of Lesley READINGS of London. Loving grandfather of Ryan and Carrie, Joe and Helen, Chris, David, Eddie and Jen, Duane and Dawn, Scott and Mia, Drew, Ben and Holly and great-grandfather of Alana and Luke. Also survived by his many nieces and nephews. The family will receive Friends from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Sunday at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London. Funeral service will be conducted at Saint Michael and All Angels Anglican Church, 397 Springbank Drive, London, Ontario on Monday, June 30th. at 11: 00 a.m. with Reverend Canon K. Sam THOMAS officiating. Interment in Woodland Cemetery, London. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to Community Living London Foundation, (for the Tommy Readings Scholarship Fund), 190 Adelaide Street South, London, Ontario N5Z 3L1. Online condolences accepted at www.amgfh.com

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTMAN - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTREN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-18 published
BROOKS, Kay (formerly BLOOM)
Beloved wife of the late Jerry BROOKS and the late Joe BLOOM, beloved mother of Lynn (Dave) SHILMAN and Martin. Devoted grandmother and great-grandmother. Treasured sister of Frances FOGLE and Molly Goldenberg LUTREN; in L.A. after a lengthy illness. Shiva in Toronto beginning Wednesday, March 19 at 4 p.m. Daily after 1 p.m. until Tuesday (25th) morning, 59 Admiral Road (north off Lowther, west of Bedford). Prayers 7 p.m.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTREN - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTTERMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-15 published
When it came to achieving free trade, he was the right man for the job
As Canada's tough and pugnacious chief negotiator, he was famous for allegedly flicking cigar ash on the cherished, heirloom desk of U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Doing a trade deal with the Americans in the 1980s was like trying to sign a nuclear arms pact with the Soviets during the Cold War, according to former prime minister Brian Mulroney. Getting them to the table was hard, keeping them there was worse, but inking a treaty before the deadline expired was the real trick. "You have to be very tough," Mr. Mulroney said this week.
That's why, when he got the word from U.S. President Ronald Reagan that approval to negotiate a comprehensive free-trade agreement with Canada had squeaked through the Senate Finance Committee in the fall of 1985, he knew he needed Simon REISMAN to make the case and hold the line. Mr. REISMAN, who had flirted with communism while growing up in the Jewish ghetto of Montreal during the Depression, was a fervent free-trade continentalist, who had gone eyeball to eyeball with the Americans for 40 years and was famous for allegedly having flicked his cigar ash on U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly's heirloom desk, a sacred piece of furniture that had once belonged to founding father Alexander Hamilton.
"He was the only person with the background, the knowledge, the skill and the toughness to do this job," Mr. Mulroney said, pointing out that Mr. REISMAN had been part of the negotiations for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades in 1947, and Canada's chief negotiator for the Auto Pact in 1965, and a long-time senior mandarin in the federal civil service. Even so, Mr. Mulroney believed that the only way that Mr. REISMAN could succeed was if "the Americans knew he had 100-per-cent support from the prime minister on down."
Besides predictable problems with the Americans, Mr. REISMAN had difficulties on this side of the border, including an ongoing conflict with Senator Pat Carney, then the minister of international trade. She took - and expressed - great umbrage that Mr. REISMAN was not keeping her in the loop. "He wasn't a team player. He was abrasive and difficult to work with because he didn't like political direction or involvement," she said in an interview. "Even though I was the minister responsible for the negotiations he would insist he wasn't reporting to me. He was exasperating," she said, while acknowledging that he "did know the file."
A former deputy minister of finance who had taken early retirement in 1975, at least partly because he himself was exasperated with the machinations of his political masters, Mr. REISMAN was not going to kowtow to Ms. Carney, especially since he had the ear of the prime minister. After hearing Mr. REISMAN's complaints that "I'm having serious problems with the minister; she [Ms. Carney] has never negotiated an international deal," Mr. Mulroney made his move. "I installed myself as chairman of that executive cabinet committee with Simon and his team reporting directly to me."
Fuelled by his own sharp tongue and blustery manner, Mr. REISMAN also found a willing adversary in the media, especially the anti-free trade Toronto Star.
"I used to chuckle," Mr. Mulroney said, remembering uproars in the House of Commons when opposition members "would be yelling at me that he had told somebody from the Toronto Star to 'go fly a kite" or that the newspaper 'was a rag,' and they would be after me to reprimand Simon. And I was chuckling away because I was in agreement with what he said."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal the year after end of the First World War. The second of four children of Kolman, a factory worker in the rag trade, and Manya REISMAN, he went to Baron Byng High School. A very smart boy, he made it into McGill University, despite the Jewish quota, and graduated with an honours degree in economics and political science in 1941 and a master's degree (summa cum laude) the following year, all the while holding down a variety of menial jobs.
As a young man from an immigrant family during the Depression and the rise of fascism in Europe, he joined the Young Communist League, according to Stephen Clarkson and Christina McCall in The Heroic Delusion, Vol. 2 of Trudeau and Our Times. They quote a recruit to the Young Communist League who said that she took a compulsory course on The History of the Communist Party, allegedly written by Joseph Stalin, from Mr. REISMAN in 1937 and another source who claimed that he was still attending party meetings in Ottawa after the war.
Mr. REISMAN's widow said this week that her husband never joined the Communist Party, but that "he was, as a young person, left, but he couldn't have become more right wing." Many intellectuals espouse communist ideologies in their youth, but what is significant about Mr. REISMAN's early political credo, according to Prof. Clarkson, is that it "helped explain his later fanatical belief in free trade - another all-encompassing belief system."
While a student at McGill, Mr. REISMAN joined the cadet corps. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery in 1942, right after graduation and went overseas that November, a month after marrying Constance (Connie) CARIN. They had met through Friends.
"I disliked him immediately," she said. "I didn't like his forthright abrupt manner and I thought this was not the man for me, but it turned out I was wrong." She was busy the first several times he asked her out but, undaunted by these rebuffs, he told her to name a date when she would be free. She did, and so she learned about the man beneath the brusque self-confident exterior. "He always said what he thought, and he was not suited for diplomacy. He would have been a terrible failure in external affairs, but he was good where he was."
After landing in England in 1942, he served as a troop commander with the 11th, 15th, and 17th Field Artillery in the Italian campaign and finished out the war in the liberation of Holland. While waiting to be repatriated, he studied for several months at the London School of Economics. After four years overseas, he returned home in 1946 and went to Ottawa. There, he accepted the first job he was offered, in the Department of Labour, and moved later that year to the Department of Finance to work under Mitchell Sharp, in the economic policy division.
Within a few months he was working closely with John Deutsch, director of the international economic relations division, and writing speeches for Finance Minister Douglas Abbott. Mr. Deutsch wanted to take him to Geneva as secretary to a 12-man delegation working on preparations for an international trade conference scheduled for Havana, Cuba in 1947. "Either I go [with you] or we dissolve the marriage," Mrs. REISMAN told her husband, having no desire for another long-distance separation. He acquiesced "and we went on from there, for 65 years."
After a dozen years of marriage, the REISMANs had their first child, John Joseph, in 1954, followed two years later by daughter Anna Lisa. A second daughter, Harriet Frances, was born in 1959.
While Mr. REISMAN was in Havana, where delegates from nearly 60 countries met to establish what would become the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades, he noticed that Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King was especially interested in Article 24, a provision that would permit groups of nations to establish free-trade areas. Canada was facing a foreign-exchange crisis that winter, and Mr. King wanted to secure a secret free-trade deal with the U.S. as a potential solution. As it turned out, the crisis passed, Mr. King lost interest in a free-trade deal and coincidentally the U.S. Congress refused to ratify the Havana Charter. Canada, and Mr. REISMAN, would wait another 40 years to complete a continental free-trade deal.
In 1954, Mr. REISMAN was appointed director of the international economics division in the Department of Finance and was seconded the following year to serve as assistant research director on the Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects under Walter Gordon, where he reportedly had no hesitation in challenging his boss's protectionist views. When Mr. Gordon was named Finance Minister in Liberal Prime Minister Lester Pearson's cabinet in 1963, Mr. REISMAN, by then an assistant deputy minister, was promoted out of Finance and into the newly created Department of Industry. As deputy minister, a post he held with great distinction from 1964 to 1968, he led the negotiations that resulted in the Automotive Products Trade Agreement being signed by Prime Minister Pearson and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson in January, 1965.
The Auto Pact removed tariffs on cars, truck, buses and automotive parts between the two countries, which greatly encouraged trade, bolstered the bottom line of the big American car manufacturers, greatly increased assembly-line jobs in Canada and lowered the cost of purchasing automobiles. By 1968, the number of cars that were manufactured in Canada and sold in the U.S. had risen from seven to 60 per cent, while 40 per cent of cars bought in Canada were made in the U.S. There were downsides: Canada didn't develop an indigenous car industry and it was restricted from negotiating similar trade pacts with other countries, such as Japan. The Auto Pact was abolished after the World Trade Organization declared it illegal in 2001, but by then the Free-Trade Agreement, negotiated by Mr. REISMAN, and the subsequent North American free-trade agreement, which added Mexico to the trading mix, had made it largely irrelevant.
Mr. REISMAN was secretary of the Treasury Board from 1968 to 1970 and deputy minister of Finance from 1970 to 1975, when he chose to take early retirement from the federal civil service at age 55. The timing was good, as the federal government had recently decided to index civil-service pensions to the consumer price index. But that wasn't the only reason Mr. REISMAN was leaving. In an interview with The Globe and Mail in December, 1974, he complained about a diminishing scope for "people of energy and a certain independence of mind" in the public service and said he longed for "another career in which there would be a chance to fly on my own wings."
He and another former deputy minister, James Grandy (obituary April 5, 2006), formed a consulting firm, Reisman and Grandy, and quickly signed up a roster of clients that included Bombardier, Power Corp., and Lockheed. A ruckus erupted in the House of Commons over the firm's dealings with Lockheed, which was in the process of negotiating a huge contract to supply airplanes to the federal government. As former public servants, it was alleged that Mr. REISMAN and Mr. Grandy were violating conflict-of-interest guidelines. We aren't lobbyists, Mr. REISMAN insisted, explaining that there was a difference between peddling influence and peddling knowledge. Or, as he said to The Globe: "Some girls dance and some girls are whores… we just dance."
As a consultant, Mr. REISMAN had a number of high-level assignments, including Royal Commissioner to investigate the auto industry in 1978 and chief negotiator for aboriginal land claims in the Western Arctic in 1983. Mrs. REISMAN says the treaty with the Inuvialuit was a highlight for her husband because it was one of the first pieces of legislation affecting aboriginals under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
But the biggest deal of his life materialized when Mr. Mulroney appointed him ambassador (trade negotiations) and chief negotiator for Canada of the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement in November, 1985. "I felt he was an absolute natural for us," Mr. Mulroney said.
"I called him and said that we were going to get into this comprehensive negotiation and could he draft me a memo detailing the kind of person we would need and the challenges that person would encounter. Then Simon sent me, I think, a 35-page memorandum. As Derek Burney [his chief of staff] said, it was the longest job application he had ever seen. Simon knew I was thinking of him, but he also knew that I wanted to get the benefit of his ideas of how this should be conducted."
The two men knew each other personally from salmon fishing trips in Quebec with the likes of Paul Desmarais and John Rae of Power Corporation. "He had a great sense of humour, he was a completely honest man, he shared his views on everything… he wasn't at all devious, but he was a tough guy," said Mr. Mulroney, adding that Mr. REISMAN was "the indispensable player" in the free-trade talks. "Simon was the star. He was the one who took the free-trade concept from infancy to maturity and made it whole."
The negotiations dragged on for two years with two main stumbling blocks. The Americans were not taking the talks as seriously as the Canadians wanted until Mr. REISMAN stomped away from the negotiating table in September, 1987, in a highly publicized snit (orchestrated with Mr. Mulroney in Ottawa, Allan Gotlieb, the Canadian ambassador to Washington, and other key players). Only hours before the deadline was to lapse for signing the treaty, the Americans balked at the dispute-resolution clause, a key consideration for the Mulroney government. Once again, Mr. Mulroney says he intervened to back up his trade negotiator. He phoned James Baker [U.S. Secretary of the Treasury] and threatened to call President Reagan that night and demand to know why "you can do a deal on nuclear arms reduction with your worst enemies and you can't do a free-trade deal with your best Friends." Mr. Mulroney recalled that "Baker nearly jumped out of his skin, because he knew that Reagan would have raised holy hell on that issue immediately. That's why they came around."
Although Mr. REISMAN had slowed his pace somewhat in the last decade, he was still salmon fishing in white water in July and present at a dinner in Montreal to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the free-trade agreement in October. But the following month he fell at the Rideau Club in Ottawa and then, in January, he collapsed at his condominium in Fort Lauderdale and had to be airlifted home. He was admitted to the Heart Institute in Ottawa, where he had a pacemaker installed.
A week ago today, he was reading The Wall Street Journal and speaking on the phone with his wife before falling to sleep. Very early the next morning he lost consciousness and medical staff were unable to revive him.
"He was a larger-than-life personality," said Mrs. REISMAN, earlier this week. "The house is very quiet without him."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal on June 19, 1919. He died in his sleep of cardiac arrest at the Heart Institute of Ottawa on Sunday, March 9, 2008. He was 88. Survived by his wife Connie, three children John Joseph (Joe), Anna Lisa and Harriet Frances. He also leaves two younger sisters, Gertrude SHAPIRO and Helen LUTTERMAN, and 10 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his older brother, Mark.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTTERMAN - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTTERMANN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-30 published
ZELIN, Samuel
On Saturday, June 28, 2008 at his home surrounded by his family. Sam ZELIN, beloved husband of Marlene. Loving father of Jenni ZELIN and Marcus LUTTERMANN, and Matthew ZELIN and Leah JAHN. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Evelyn and Harry ROSEN, and Ken and Rochelle ZELIN. Devoted grandfather of Noah. Sam will be missed by his many nieces, nephews, and Friends. A graveside service will be held at Bathurst Lawn Memorial Park, U.J.P.O. section on Monday, June 30th at 12: 30 p.m. The family will receive Friends on Monday and Tuesday at 33 Delisle Avenue, Apt. #1104, Toronto. Memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society for Melanoma Research, 1-888-939-3333, or a charity of your choice.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTTERMANN - All Categories in OGSPI

LUTTIKHOF o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-15 published
WELCH, Charles Ivan
In his 82nd year passed away Saturday, April 12th, 2008 after a short illness. Beloved husband of Judith, father of Larry WELCH (Lynn) of Poplar Hill, Brenda MUTTER (Harold) of Wasaga Beach, Vikki SEARLE (Mike) of Komoka, Randy WELCH (Anne) of London, Cheryl RASTIN (Dave) of Mount Brydges, and Chris WELCH (Kim) of Victoria, British Columbia and he was also the beloved grandfather of 17 grandchildren. Sadly missed by his sisters Dolly BOUK (Jack) of London and Marjorie LUTTIKHOF (Bill) of Lambeth and all his nieces and nephews. Many people got to know Charlie through his association with the Little Beaver (Byron) Restaurant. Charlie was also a member of the Arthur Currie Branch of the Royal Canadian Legion in Strathroy and a member of the Strathroy Seniors Centre. A memorial service will be held on Sunday, May 4th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. at the Denning Bros. Funeral Home in Strathroy. Visitation 1 hour prior to service. Sympathy may be expressed through donations to the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Charles.

  L... Names     LU... Names     LUT... Names     Welcome Home

LUTTIKHOF - All Categories in OGSPI