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"HUD" 2008 Obituary


HUDEC  HUDSON 

HUDEC o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-23 published
TRIMMER, Ruth
Spiritual adventurer, gourmet vegetarian cook, film Connoisseur, beloved partner, cherished friend. Born January 1, 1945, in Buffalo. Died March 1 in Toronto following cardiac arrest, aged 63.
By Carol LATIMER, Cindy MIFSUD, Clara CHAN, Dorothea HUDEC and Liz YEIGH, Page L6
Ruth was born on New Year's Day, and for the rest of her life she embraced new beginnings with enthusiasm.
She and her older brother, David, were preacher's kids, born to Ellen McKay TRIMMER and Rev. Vincent TRIMMER. Growing up in a strict Baptist household had its challenges for Ruth. All her life she was both a spiritual seeker and a rebel.
Ruth once claimed she'd been a member of nearly every major religion on earth, and probably a cult or two, but there was nothing superficial about her search for meaning. She lived as she believed, at one time giving up a comfortable job to become a mother's helper to a single parent with two autistic children.
Her career eventually took her to the Ontario public service, where her work in probation and then policy expressed her belief that people were essentially good and should be helped, not punished. She felt intense empathy for anyone who suffered.
Ruth came home in every sense of the word when she met Jean DEETH. She became an important part of the Deeth family, and also stayed connected to her brother David and his children and grandchildren in the United States.
Ruth and Jean shared 25 years of travel, summers at the cottage on Oak Lake, Ontario, and movie-watching each September at the Toronto International Film Festival. They gave fabulous dinner parties, cooking vegetarian meals that impressed their most carnivorous Friends. Their beloved dogs were their delight, and Ruth defended even their worst behaviour. Maggie wasn't a biter - she had "high prey instincts."
When Ruth was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2003, she responded with her characteristic courage and intelligence. She researched everything and sent around her chemo schedules so Friends would know when she was up for a dinner party and when she wanted someone to go to chemo with her. When she got a clean bill of health in 2004, she and Jean threw a huge party.
Her experience with cancer led her back to school, studying for her master of arts in ministry and spirituality at Regis College at the University of Toronto, and training as a pastoral counsellor and spiritual adviser. An intern at Toronto's Christian Counselling Services, she described counselling clients as the most fulfilling work she had ever known.
Ruth's unexpected death came as a shock. We will miss her infectious grin, her wild taste in shirts and, most of all, her exuberant and contagious excitement and satisfaction with life. We were so lucky to have known her.
Carol LATIMER, Cindy MIFSUD, Clara CHAN, Dorothea HUDEC and Liz YEIGH are Ruth's Friends.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-06-25 published
HUDSON, Bernice
In memory of Bernice HUDSON, July 2, 2001.
if tears could build a staircase
if love could build a lane
We would walk right up to heaven
And bring you back again.
- Deeply missed by husband Lloyd and sons Lonnie and Kenton
Page 3

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HUDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-15 published
WILLIAMS, Dale Stanley
Of Southwold on Wednesday February 13, 2008, peacefully at his late residence surrounded by his loving family in his 53rd year. Beloved husband of Judy WILLIAMS and dear father of Jeffrey DALE (Amber), Jeffery (Krystal), Adam (Keeley), Andrew (Angie), Nicholas (Amber), Amanda (Steve), Jared, Kaitlin, Kristen, Evan, Mitch and Mary. Dear grandfather of Austin, Nash, Haley, Peyton, Carson, Rylan, Hunter, Ella, Wynter and Drydon. Beloved son of Stanley (Debbie) WILLIAMS and Edna WILLOWS (John BENSEN.) Dear brother of Phyliss and John SWITZER, Sandra and Roy HENDERSON, Mark and Teri WILLIAMS, David WILLIAMS, Sarah WILLIAMS and Sean, Kaitlyn WILLIAMS and Andrew. Dear son-in-law of Sue SCHELL and Elmer and Joan SCHELL. Brother-in-law of Randy and Louise FOSTER, Douglas and Audrey SCHELL, Gerry and Donna SCHELL, Howard and Dee SCHELL, Debbie SCHELL and Brian, Gary and Helen SCHELL, Robert and Sharon SCHELL and Ann and Ronnie HUDSON. Sadly missed by a number of nieces and nephews. Dale was born July 12, 1955 in London and was a harness driver and trainer. Resting at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas where funeral service will be held Saturday at 3: 00 p.m. Cremation to follow, with interment of ashes in McArthur Cemetery at a later date. Visitation Friday evening from 7-9 p.m. Donations may be made to the L.H.S.C. Clinical Neurological Sciences Centre.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-19 published
CRANE, Cecil Phillip
Dad's struggles are over and he has peace and rest at last. On Saturday, February 16th, 2008 at Alexandra Hospital, Cecil Phillip CRANE of Ingersoll passed away in his 84th year. Beloved husband of Ilene for 57 years. Loving father of Tom CRANE (Barb,) Bonnie RIBARIC, Harold CRANE (Sandie) of Ingersoll, Dan CRANE (Joanne) of Beachville, Nancy LEONARD, and Pat CATTELL (Dave) of London. Dear grandfather of Darryl (Lisa), Mel, Colleen, Chloe, Karlo, Matt, Josh, Tina, Aidan, Zach, Courtney, Katelynne and his latest joy, great-grand_son Nathan. Dear brother of Molly LANDON, Dorothy HUDSON (John), Bernice MITCHELL (Bill), Mary KNEAVES, Jack CRANE, and the late Albert CRANE (Joyce.) He will be sadly missed and fondly remembered by many nieces, nephews and Friends. Cecil was a member of the Royal Canadian Legion, the Woodstock Navy Club, and the Optimist Club. Cecil was the Canadian five pin singles champion in 1963. He retired from Ingersoll Machine after over 40 years and also served on the Ingersoll Fire Dept. for 25 years. Friends will be received by the#2 hours prior to the funeral service which will be held at Ingersoll's Baptist Church (Thames Street, Ingersoll) on Wednesday, February 20th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment at Oxford Memorial Park Cemetery in Woodstock. In memory of Cecil, contributions to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind or the Ingersoll Fire Dept. would be greatly appreciated.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-19 published
HUDSON, Shirley Margaret (née TURNER)
Peacefully, at Kensington Village Nursing Home on Monday, February 18, 2008, Shirley Margaret (née TURNER) HUDSON of London, formerly of Thorndale. Beloved wife for 37 years of the late Herbert Kenneth HUDSON (1976) and of the late Clinton E. HUDSON (2000.) Loved by her children Margaret and Jim SMITH, London; Rhonda and Wallace McLAY, London; John and Eleanor HUDSON, Thorndale; and Donald HUDSON and Kay AHN, Pickering. She adored her 11 grandchildren Bruce SMITH and Heather McNEELY, Greg and Cathy SMITH, Krista and Glenn GREENFIELD, John and Melinda McLAY, Andrea and Chad MORE, Jennifer and Eric KUBELKA, Steven HUDSON and Jennifer DAYMENT, Mary HUDSON and Mark ADELSON, Sarah and Adam AFFLECK, Adam HUDSON, Ryan and Melissa HUDSON and her 13 great-grandchildren Megan and Kaitlin SMITH, Andrew, Kinsey and Christopher GREENFIELD, Hope, Grace and John McLAY, Kate and April MORE, Josie and Claire KUBELKA and Braydon AFFLECK. She is survived by a daughter-in-law Nancy HUDSON, a sister Joyce ARMITAGE, a sister-in-law Evelyn TURNER and Clint's family Gary and Marsha HUDSON and Sharon and Bob THIBAULT. She leaves many nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends. Shirley was predeceased by her parents Wilbert and Frances TURNER and by siblings Olive ROBERTS, Bruce TURNER, Edna Shoebottom, Grant TURNER, Maxine Parkinson, Una McLeod and sister-in-law Mabelle Risdon. Shirley was born on October 13, 1918 in London Township. In 1939 she married and moved to the first concession of West Nissouri where she lived until her final home at Kensington Village, London. Herbert and Shirley were active in the community and church. Shirley loved to cook, garden, sew, do crafts but her passion was her quilts and art projects. She also enjoyed the outdoors. The family appreciates the care given to Shirley during her stay at Kensington. She will be missed. Friends will be received at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne St.), on Wednesday from 2-4 and 6-9 p.m. Funeral service will be conducted at Siloam United Church, 1240 Fanshawe Park Rd. E., on Thursday, February 21, 2008, at 12: 30 p.m. with Rev. Sheila MacGREGOR officiating. Private family interment in Saint_John's Cemetery, Arva. Donations to the Alzheimer Society, 555 Southdale Rd. E, Suite 100, London, Ontario, N6E 1A2 or Memorial Fund at Siloam United Church would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mrs. Shirley Margaret HUDSON.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-05 published
HUDSON, Carole - Killed April 6, 2005
Three years have come and gone And still the memories linger on The hopes and dreams, that we may All be to-gether some great day. Bill

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HUDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-29 published
HUDSON, Richard Thomas
At the Bobier Villa, Dutton on Tuesday, May 27, 2008 Richard Thomas HUDSON born June 29, 1918 at Bryanston. Survived by a sister Norma SABOURIN of London and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Clifford and Bessie (EDEY) HUDSON, sister Edith McPHERSON, brothers Clinton, Beverly, Kenneth and a niece Kathy GREENE. Richard served his country from 1942 to 1946, for years he operated the general store at Iona Station and served as postmaster. The funeral service will be held from the Bobier Villa on Friday, May 30 at 2 p.m. with visitation 1 hour prior. Interment in Siloam Cemetery. Donations to the Bobier Villa would be appreciated. Arn Funeral Home Dutton entrusted with arrangements.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-26 published
FITZSIMMONS, Agnes (formerly ASHWELL, née HOOD)
In her 91st year, passed away peacefully on July 25, 2008 at Wildwood Care Centre, Saint Marys, Ontario. Predeceased by her husbands Thomas ASHWELL of London and Edward FITZSIMMONS of Thorndale. Agnes is survived by her son Thomas ASHWELL and his wife Dagmar (Fisl) of Kitchener, and step-daughters Eleanor (FITZSIMMONS) HUDSON and husband John of Thorndale, and Joan (FITZSIMMONS) STUBGEN and husband Walter of Kitchener, seven grandchildren and seven great-grandchildren. At Agnes' request, cremation has taken place. Visitation will be held on Monday, July 28, 2008 from 2: 00 p.m.-4:00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m.-9:00 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held on Tuesday, July 29, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. with Rev. Johan OLIVIER officiating. As an expression of sympathy a donation to the Alzheimer Society would be appreciated. Online condolences may be sent to www.ballfc.ca

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HUDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-20 published
HUDSON, Mary Louise - Estate of
Notice To Creditors
All persons having claims against the Estate of Mary Louise HUDSON, late of the City of Toronto, in the Province of Ontario, who died on or about November 15, 2006, are required to file proof of the same with the undersigned on or before March 15, 2008, after which the Estate will be distributed having regard only to the claims of which the undersigned shall then have notice.
Dated at Kingston, Ontario this 12th day of February, 2008.
Cunningham, Swan, Carty, Little and Bonham LLP
Barristers and Solicitors
City Place II
1473 John Counter Blvd.,
Suite 201
Kingston, Ontario
K7M 8Z6
Solicitors for the Estate Trustees
Page B11

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HUDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-01 published
HUDSON, Claire Doreen (née WATSON)
Peacefully passed away, with her family by her side, on Thursday, February 28th in her 84th year. Loving and devoted daughter of the late Fritz and Laura WATSON. Beloved wife of the late Morgan HUDSON and much loved mother of Susanne, John (Dixie,) Anne EDWARDS and predeceased by her youngest son Albert (Penny). Proud grandmother of Julie (Kidup) and Stephanie BEATTIE, Jesse EDWARDS, Jamie, Alex and Andrew HUDSON, Zoe (Lance) and Sam HUDSON. Great-grandmother of Summer and Aalyiah. Survived by her sisters Patricia and Beverley WATSON. Predeceased by her brothers Bob and Jack WATSON and her sister Donna FRANCIS. Remembered by her many nieces and nephews. A private family service will be held. The family wishes to extend their sincere appreciation to the wonderful staff at Christie Gardens, where our mother resided for the last few years.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-27 published
FLEMING/FLEMMING, Ailsa Howden (née BALFOUR)
Peacefully at home in Kingston on March 26, 2008, Ailsa (nee BALFOUR) at the age of 83. The beloved wife of David Paul FLEMING/FLEMMING. She leaves to mourn, her children; Molly HUDSON and her husband Bob, Christine SHIPTON and her husband Tom, Paul FLEMING/FLEMMING and his wife Barbara, and Joyce FLEMING/FLEMMING. Remembered also by her grandchildren; Thomas and Allie (HUDSON,) Alice and Rose (SHIPTON,) and Andrew, Michael and Margot (FLEMING/FLEMMING.) Predeceased by her sister Mary Park BALFOUR. A funeral service will be held at the Cathedral Church of St. George, Kingston (corner King St. East and Johnson St.) on Monday, March 31st at 2: 00 p.m. For those wishing, memorial donations may be made to the Cathedral Church of St. George, P.O. Box 475, Kingston, Ontario, K7L 4W5.

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HUDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-30 published
HUDSON, Roy Gordon
Victoria College Class of '43, University of Toronto. Longtime Member Cataraqui Golf and Country Club. Retired head of Guidance Department KCVI.
Peacefully at the Kingston General Hospital on Thursday, June 26, 2008 in his 88th year. Beloved husband of Olga Teresa HUDSON (née KUSHNIR.) Dear father of David and his wife Karen, Deborah and her partner Dawn DOWNEY and Elaine and her husband Hafez SHUHAIBAR. Lovingly remembered by his grandchildren Benjamin, Andrew (Kathryn), Peter (Gillian), Sydney, Spencer, Mazen and Dahlia and Chester the Magic Cat. Family and Friends will be received at the James Reid Funeral Home (1900 John Counter Blvd.) on Friday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Memorial Service to be held in Sydenham Street United Church (82 Sydenham Street) on Saturday, July 5, 2008 at 11 a.m. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations made to the Kingston Humane Society or the Chalmers United Church would be appreciated by the family.
www.jamesreidfuneralhome.com

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HUDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-22 published
Toronto member of provincial parliament became chairman of the Ontario Science Centre
Popular politician who started out as a locksmith never made it to cabinet at Queen's Park. His mistake was to back the wrong horse in a Progressive Conservative leadership race
By Godfrey HUDSON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Toronto -- Len REILLY was elected four times to Queen's Park as an Ontario member of provincial parliament before losing favour when he voted against eventual premier Bill Davis in a Tory leadership race. He later became chairman of the Ontario Science Centre and helped put the institution front and centre on the world's museum stage. It was a heady career for a man who began his career as a locksmith.
He grew up as the 13th of 16 children of Protestant Irish immigrants who ran a grocery store after settling in Toronto. His mother was an active member of the Orange Order, and every July 12, the entire family would join in a march to celebrate the Protestant victory at the Battle of the Boyne in eastern Ireland in 1690. Later in life, however, he disassociated myself from what he saw as the bigotry that existed between Catholics and Protestants. "I always preferred to do things to bring people together rather than to separate them," he wrote.
Because the Reillys were devout Anglicans, there were many restrictions on the family's Sunday activities. They weren't allowed to play cards or shop. Respect the Sabbath and dress up, the children were told.
When Mr. REILLY was in Grade 10 and attending the Eastern High School of Commerce, he prepared a poster that was displayed at the Canadian National Exhibition. It read: "We never know for what God is preparing us - for what work on Earth - for what work in the hereafter. Our business is to do our work well."
The latter point became one of the themes of his life.
While in high school, he became keenly interested in debating. A friend recalled a debate in 1929 about the future of University Avenue, Toronto's downtown showpiece traffic artery. Matching wits with a pretty girl, Mr. REILLY argued that curves were very appropriate on girls, but not on roads.
Like most teenaged boys, Mr. REILLY was fascinated by cars. He was just 14 when he bought an old Ford with money he had earned from part-time jobs. Driver's licences were not required at that time.
Four years later, he bought his "pride and joy" - a 1927 Chevrolet. He used to look out of his bedroom window and "gaze in admiration at that great big car parked on the street below," he wrote. "Does it really belong to me?" Actually, it didn't. It belonged to him and General Motors Acceptance Corp., which helped him finance the sedan. He later wrecked it when he lost control on a gravel road and plunged down a hillside. Luckily, he was not injured.
Mr. REILLY's conduct as a teenager was by no means flawless. One Halloween, he took a rocking chair from a neighbour's verandah and hoisted it up a telephone pole. The next morning, the neighbour phoned. "Leonard," she said, "will you come over and take down the chair that you put up on the pole?"
After graduating from high school, he learned a trade from an older brother who set up Reilly Lock at the rear of a shoemaker's shop on Yonge Street. "I didn't have any formal training in locksmithing, but it came easily," he said.
At the time, the Depression was under way and he was fortunate to find work. "Jobs were hard to get and those who had jobs held on to them," he once recalled. "Twenty-five dollars weekly was a fair salary on which to support a family."
As business improved, the brothers moved to their own store on Yonge Street and later to an even bigger premises. Eventually, the company had 40 employees, 10 service trucks and - an innovation - motorized delivery scooters.
He used his spare time and earnings to pursue his interest in debating, devoting many hours to improving his communications abilities. He took night courses and went to New York to study.
Dale Carnegie, the famous American author of How to Win Friends and Influence People, asked Mr. REILLY, by then a recognized orator, to start a public-speaking class in Toronto. He declined because he planned to establish his own venture. The Reilly Institute of Public Speaking and Personal Development, created in 1943, was an instant success. It was promoted as "Canada's Only Specialized School in Public Speaking." Based in Toronto, branches were established in Hamilton and Peterborough. Six-week courses cost $50. "The ability to speak well is a priceless asset and the prime requisite of every leader," said one of its ads.
In 1947, Mr. REILLY made his first foray into the political arena. Running as an aldermanic candidate, he used his oratory to win six successive municipal victories - until 1962, when he was persuaded to seek a seat in a provincial by-election. Representing the Tories in Eglinton, he won by a mere 35 votes. A year later, after paying close attention to his constituents, he widened the margin in a general election. Homemakers were presumably pleased at a private member's bill he introduced, and had passed, permitting the sale of coloured margarine. Until then, they had to press open a bulging button laden with colour and mix it into the butter substitute.
In January of 1966, premier John Robarts made him deputy speaker, an appointment praised by Ontario New Democratic Party leader Donald MacDonald and Liberal leader Andrew Thompson, who described him as "a man of independent thought."
In 1967 and 1971, Mr. REILLY was returned to Queen's Park with even greater majorities. When asked for the secret to his electoral landslides, he replied: "My wife, Beulah. She is my best campaigner, my severest critic and my hardest worker."
His performance in the legislature had also earned the loyalty of voters. Again and again, he spoke forcefully about problems facing the small businessman - "the victim of heavier and heavier burdens constantly imposed upon him by governments." He also opposed "compulsory unionism" of closed shops as a form of discrimination.
All things considered, everyone expected Mr. Robarts to appoint him to cabinet. It didn't happen. Nor did it happen in 1971, when Bill Davis succeeded Mr. Robarts as premier. Mr. REILLY had supported someone else for the party leadership.
He hung in until just before the 1975 general provincial election, then decided not to run again. "Without assurance of a cabinet seat after serving the province faithfully and well from 1971, I decided to resign," he said.
He later dealt with the issue in a self-published memoir titled: Living the Life of Reilly: "Some Friends suggested that there were two reasons why Bill Davis didn't want to appoint me to the cabinet. First, I didn't support him for leader of the party. I supported Allan Lawrence." As well, "Roy McMurtry was a long-time close personal friend of Bill Davis. Roy had been unsuccessful contesting a previous election in Rosedale and thought Eglinton would be a safe seat for a Tory."
Nevertheless, he remained loyal to the party and supported Mr. McMurtry as his successor. Mr. McMurtry was later made attorney-general and went on to become one of Canada's top jurists.
By this point, Mr. REILLY had also given up his interest in Reilly Lock. After maintaining close contact with staff through the years, he supported the sale of the company to a U.S. firm, ADT Home Security, in 1972. The offer was just too good, and he said he would be willing to sell anything for a profit except his wife.
In 1978, Beulah died after undergoing a triple bypass operation. Mr. REILLY threw himself with enthusiasm into the chairmanship of the Ontario Science Centre, a position he had been offered by Mr. Davis. It was not simply a figurehead position - he helped raise the museum's international profile for seven years before leaving in 1983.
In 2000, he was diagnosed with cancer in his back. Three operations followed, after which he had to learn how to walk again. A former president of a local Optimist Club, he was confident he could beat it. His condition worsened after his 95th birthday. It became necessary for him to sleep in a chair rather than a bed, but he didn't complain. He adhered to the Optimist creed: "Look at the sunny side of everything."
As he looked back on his life, he was particularly proud of having organized the first Ontario Leadership Prayer Breakfast in 1970. It is now an annual event.

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