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"EST" 2008 Obituary


ESTABROOKS  ESTES  ESTEY  ESTHER  ESTICK  ESTRADA  ESTRIN  ESTWICK 

ESTABROOKS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-02 published
CONCANNON, Russell James
Suddenly in Ingersoll, Ontario on Friday, May 30, 2008 Russell James CONCANNON in his 31st year. Beloved spouse and soul-mate of Brandy. Sadly missed by his mother Yvette ESTABROOKS (nee GAGNIER) (& Dave) of Dorchester and his father Brian CONCANNON of London. Loving grand_son of Ora GAGNIER of Stoney Point. Dear brother of Chris CONCANNON (& Amanda) of Saint Marys and Amber ESTABROOKS of Dorchester. Much loved uncle of Summer, Meadow and Hunter. Also deeply missed by his aunts, uncles and cousins as well as "Abby". Friends will be received at the Bieman Funeral Home, Dorchester on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, June 4, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Dorchester Union Cemetery. Memorial donations to the London Humane Society or Children's Hospital of Western Ontario gratefully acknowledged.

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ESTES o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-23 published
KNIGHT, Gwendolyn Elizabeth (née ESTES)
On Monday January 21, 2008 at Cedarvale Lodge, Keswick in her 91st year. Dear wife of the late Kenneth. Loving mother of David and his wife Leesa and Stephen and his wife Eleanor. Much loved Nana of Craig, Ryan (Jen,) Stephanie, Ruth and Esther (Josh VEENS.) Friends may call on Saturday, January 26, 2008 from 10 a.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Service in the Chapel at 11 a.m. Interment at Greenwood Cemetery, Owen Sound at a later date. Adherent of the Salvation Army, North York Temple. Special thanks to Doctors, Nurses and Staff at Cedarvale Lodge. If desired, donations may be made to Rural Life Mission. Condolences www.rskane.ca. R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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ESTEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-13 published
RALSTON, Donalda Mae (née MacPHEE)
At her residence on Sunday, March 9, 2008. Donalda Mae RALSTON (née MacPHEE) of Canterbury Street, Woodstock in her 105th year. Beloved wife of the late Rev. James Oates RALSTON (1949.) Dear aunt of Samuel MacPHEE and his wife Sandra of Nova Scotia, Jeanne MacMILLAN of New Brunswick, Caroll ESTEY and her husband Bob of Connecticut, Heather ENGLISH and her husband David and JoAnne DEMERCHANT and her husband Garnet, both of New Brunswick. Loved great aunt of Stephen ROBERTSON of England and Andrew ROBERTSON of Guelph. Also survived by several great-grand nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her step-son Keith RALSTON, step-daughters Helen and Doris RALSTON, siblings, Muriel DICKSON/DIXON, Mary MacPHEE, John MacPHEE and Donald MacPHEE. Donalda graduated from Queens University and taught at W.C.I. for several years. She was also a longtime member of Knox Presbyterian Church in Woodstock. Friends may call at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock (519-539-0004) on Friday after 12: 00 p.m. where the complete service will be held in the chapel at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. James GRANT and Marg DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS officiating. Interment later in the Little Lake Cemetery, Peterborough. Contributions to the Canadian Cancer Society or Knox Presbyterian Church would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

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ESTEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-28 published
ESTEY, Felice " Fay" (née BOLTÉ) (1924-2008)
Fay was born on April 14th 1924 in Toronto to Margery BOLTÉ and Auguste A. BOLTÉ Senior. She went to Havergal School College in Toronto. From 1943-1945 she worked as an Anti-submarine Service Personnel Women's Royal Canadian Naval Service (Women's Royal Naval Service). In 1945 she went to the University of Toronto as a Physio-occupational therapist. On September 26th 1953 she married Harold ESTEY. Fay was President of Saint Paul's Hospital Auxiliary from 1974-1976, then again from 1985-1986. Fay will be lovingly remembered by her husband Doctor Harold ESTEY, son Robert (Shelly) of Saskatoon, daughter Barbara of Toronto, son Doug (Nancy) of Victoria; grandchildren Jeremy ESTEY of Wainwright, Alberta, Tyler ESTEY of Calgary, Alberta, and Aisha, Sydney and Jackson ESTEY of Victoria, British Columbia. She is also survived by one brother Auguste BOLTÉ of Toronto and several nieces and nephews. The Funeral Service will be conducted by Rev. Wayne KNOUSE on Monday, June 30th 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. at Knox United Church with interment following at Woodlawn Cemetery. In lieu of flowers the family would appreciate donations to Sunnyside Adventist Care Centre. (2200 Saint Henry Ave. Saskatoon, Saskatchewan S7M 0P5). Email condolences may be sent to mail@saskatoonfuneralhome.c om. Arrangements have been entrusted to Saskatoon Funeral Home.

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ESTHER o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-10-15 published
MABEL ESTHER ROY
In loving memory of Mabel Esther Roy who began her spirit journey at the
Manitoulin Health Centre on Wednesday, October 8, 2008 at the age of 80.
Survived by friend Bill. Beloved daughter of John M. Roy (predeceased
1987) and Catherine Anne Roy (née Flamand) (predeceased 1974). Loving
mother of Michael Joseph Roy (predeceased 2001), Tony Roy (predeceased in
1980), and Larry Roy and friend Caroline of Little Current. Very dear
sister of John Francis Roy (predeceased 1993), and Richard Roy and wife
Mabel of Rudyard, Michigan. Granny of Mark, Michelle, Melissa, Laurie,
Evan, Kaylyn, and great grandmother of Tristan, Tanner, Mason, Brendan,
Britny, Christopher, Paul, Georgia, Cameron, Hunter, Ephie, Mark Junior ,
Joel, Ethan, J.C., and Lexi. Predeceased by great grand_son Bennett-
Chadlen. Family and Friends gathered at Larry's home from 11 am on
Friday. Visitation was from 10 am Saturday at Holy Cross Mission. Funeral
mass was at 11 am on Saturday, October 11, 2008 at Holy Cross Mission,
Wikwemikong. Cremation. Island Funeral Home.
also linked as linked as ROI

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ESTICK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-24 published
ESTICK, Vernon George
Passed away suddenly at his home on Tuesday, July 22, 2008, age 72. Beloved husband of the late D.E. Norma ESTICK (2004.) Loving father of Garrick ESTICK. He will be fondly remembered by many family, Friends and colleagues. Vernon enjoyed a long career as Conservator of Library and Archives at University of Western Ontario. He had a love for theatre, dance, music, and the spoken word. Friends will be received on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James St. at Richmond, where the funeral service will be conducted on Saturday, July 26 at 2 p.m. Memorial contributions to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be gratefully acknowledged.

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ESTRADA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-07 published
Two men arrested in Brampton teen's death
By James RUSK, Page A9
Peel police said yesterday they have arrested two Brampton men in the death of a 19-year-old who was stabbed in a parking lot outside a Mississauga strip club Saturday morning.
Luis ESTRADA- LEMMON of Brampton died shortly after he was taken to hospital.
Michael STRUC, 23, is charged with first-degree murder, while Eric JACOME, 24, is charged with being an accessory after the fact.

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ESTRIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-08 published
ESTRIN, Audrey
On Sunday, July 6, 2008 at Credit Valley Hospital. Audrey ESTRIN, beloved wife of the late Ben ESTRIN. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Carol and Allan JOHNSON, and Beverley ABRAMSON. Dear sister of Phyllis KAY and the late Bernard DAVIS, and Pauline CALLAN. Devoted grandmother of Arthur ABRAMSON, Miki GARBE, Pamela DYKSTRA and Tom BRUMALDI and great-grandmother of Sarah, Alexandra, Jason, and Kai. A graveside service will be held at Holy Blossom Memorial Park (Brimley Road and Eglinton), on Tuesday, July 8th at 11: 00 a.m. Shiva 460A Oriole Parkway. Memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association at 416 363-3373.

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ESTWICK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-02 published
Radar expert fought racism, then the war
Cape Bretoner refused menial jobs and became one of the first black men in the Royal Canadian Air Force
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S9
Ottawa -- When German submarines began attacking Allied ships off the coast of Nova Scotia at the start of the Second World War, Sam ESTWICK decided to do something about it.
His family lived in Cape Breton, and the enemy seemed to be getting a bit too close for comfort. So Mr. ESTWICK got on the train to Halifax in the summer of 1940 and presented himself at a Royal Canadian Air Force recruiting office. He wanted to be a fighter pilot, and with his high-school marks, he thought he had a good chance.
The Royal Canadian Air Force recruiting officer didn't see it that way. In fact, he refused to even speak to Mr. ESTWICK, who was born in Barbados but arrived in Canada at the age of 4.
"I was told that I could not be accepted because of my colour. I tried to point out that I wanted to help fight our common enemy. This made no difference. He told the clerk that he could not trust 'a man of colour,' Mr. ESTWICK wrote decades later.
Many people might have given up, but Mr. ESTWICK, a stubborn and patriotic man who knew he had a right to fight like everyone else, became even more determined to enlist. He was as good a Canadian as anyone else, a loyal subject of King George VI. Wasn't the war about fighting the Nazi views of racial superiority?
Mr. ESTWICK contacted his federal member of Parliament, Clarence Gillis, and the matter was raised in the House of Commons. Royal Canadian Air Force brass and politicians passed the buck.
There were fewer than 20,000 blacks living in Canada then, and the Royal Canadian Air Force was looking for recruits of "pure European descent," a recruiting booklet stated. In the minds of senior officers, black men may have been suitable for manual labour - No. 2 Construction Battalion, which was entirely black besides the officers, had served overseas in the First World War - but Royal Canadian Air Force fliers were to remain lily white.
The brass had obviously never heard of William Hall, a black Nova Scotian who served with Britain's Royal Navy and won the Victoria Cross at Lucknow, India, during the mutiny there in "Orders were put into place to deny blacks enrolment as air crew and to ensure they could be accepted as ground crew only after rigorous screening at the national headquarters level. This internal policy was officially sanctioned at the highest levels of the Royal Canadian Air Force. Leaders, likely reasonable men in other respects, held the incredible belief that blacks were unsuitable for air crew training. Blacks were thought suitable for ground crew, but only if they were adaptable to life in an all-white environment. The racist practices of the Royal Canadian Air Force continued well into the 1950s, although a government policy prohibited it," wrote Dennis and Leslie McLaughlin in For My Country, a 2004 National Defence Department booklet.
The Royal Canadian Air Force wrote Mr. ESTWICK on February 27, 1941, telling him that "there does not appear to be any trade or category for which you would be suited."
Three months later, however, while Mr. ESTWICK was cooling his heels back home in Cape Breton, Charles Gavan Power, minister of national defence for air, wrote Mr. Gillis to say there were "no regulations existing at the present time which will debar any coloured person from service in the Royal Canadian Air Force."
Mr. Gillis seemed fed up with the runaround, too. On June 2, 1941, he wrote in a letter to Mr. ESTWICK that low-ranking officers "will practise discrimination unless the Negro boy is prepared to do what you are doing - assert his rights as a Canadian citizen and to work through those who are prepared to see that democracy functions and is put into practice, rather than talk about it as an abstract principle, as many do today."
Finally, the Royal Canadian Air Force offered Mr. ESTWICK two choices: He could be a waiter, presumably in an officers' mess, or a general dutyman, performing menial jobs. Sticking to his guns, he refused both options. He wanted to be a pilot or radio technician, "for which I had the prerequisite basic qualifications."
In December, 1941, the Royal Canadian Air Force finally cracked. Mr. ESTWICK was offered a place in a school for radio direction finding, later known as radar. The tide had turned in his war against racism - he was one of the first three black men to join the Royal Canadian Air Force, his family believes. Now it was time to start training for the shooting war.
Curiously, weeks later, Mr. ESTWICK was told that if he applied again for air crew, he might make it as a pilot. "Well, this radio direction finding thing was too exciting to give up," he wrote. "Not only was it in a field that I wanted, radio, but also it appeared to be so secret - no one else even talked about it."
Samuel Malcolm ESTWICK grew up down the road from No. 6 mine in Glace Bay, Nova Scotia His father, a miner, died when Sam was 9, making him the man of the family. Excelling in school and the boxing ring, he also loved the drill and discipline of the school's cadet corps. One day, during an important inspection, the reviewing officer told Mr. ESTWICK that he would make a fine officer. Those words proved prophetic.
During the Depression, Mr. ESTWICK did anything he could to help his mother and three sisters. He sold newspapers, worked in the coal mine and drove a truck. He didn't neglect his education, studying radio and electrical engineering at night.
After finishing at the top of his class in the Royal Canadian Air Force radar course, Mr. ESTWICK shipped out for the war, one of 5,000 Canadian radar technicians lent to the British. On his way to India by ship, he found that racism was pervasive. In Durban, South Africa, a bartender refused to serve him, so Mr. ESTWICK, who still had a boxer's fast hands and attitude, figured things were about to get interesting.
Suddenly, a British commando stepped in. " 'Hold on, Canada. That guy's more my size.' And he proceeded to put [him] down. He didn't have to. I could have done it," Mr. ESTWICK told the Ottawa Citizen decades later.
Mr. ESTWICK spent the next three years in India, Libya, Egypt and Britain with Royal Air Force and Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons, making a significant contribution to the Allied victory as a pioneer in both radar and civil rights.
After the war, he decided to remain in the air force's telecommunications branch. That was good for the service, because Corporal ESTWICK was the "only radar mechanic still available in the Royal Canadian Air Force who is thoroughly familiar with the maintenance of radar equipments. [He] is exceptionally well qualified," Group Captain Walmsley wrote on January 28, 1946.
Over the next decade, he instructed at Clinton, Ontario, and worked at various radar sites, besides climbing the promotion ladder to Warrant Officer Class 1 - making him possibly the first black man to achieve the Royal Canadian Air Force's highest non-commissioned rank. In 1955, he was finally commissioned as an officer. He retired in 1963 as a flight lieutenant, the Royal Canadian Air Force equivalent of captain.
After working in the electronics industry, Mr. ESTWICK founded his own company in 1980. He volunteered with many community groups, including the Senior Citizens Council of Ottawa-Carleton.
Despite his struggles against racism, Mr. ESTWICK was not a bitter man, according to his daughter Leslie.
"My dad had a really clear idea of what was right," she said. "He defended his country and family. It was the right thing to do. He was a family man, a really strong Canadian. If he was to describe himself, black would be well down the list after Canadian, family man, military man."
Samuel Malcolm ESTWICK was born October 8, 1915, in Padmore Village, Barbados. He died in Ottawa of natural causes on February 13. He was 92. He is survived by Elizabeth, his wife of 50 years, plus daughter Leslie and son Eric. He was predeceased by his first wife, Evelyn, and son Brett.

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