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"DAI" 2008 Obituary


DAIGLE  DAIGNEAULT  DAILEY  DAIN  DAINARD  DAIR  DAISY 

DAIGLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-14 published
HORNELL, Jane Henrietta
Peacefully, at Leisure World - Scarborough on Thursday, April 10th, 2008. Jane HORNELL in her 86th year. Predeceased by her parents William and Katherine HORNELL. Beloved cousin of Florence (McCARTHY) AHEARN. Fondly remembered by Florence's children. Life long friend of Sister Eileen FORAN and Sister Mary Cornelius FORAN of the Sisters of Saint_Joseph in London, Ontario. Dear friend of Jeff, Rose and Paulette DAIGLE. Jane was a graduate of Saint_Joseph's College in Toronto and received her B.A. in Library Science at the University of Toronto. Jane was also a member of the Third Order of St. Francis of the St. Francis and St. Clare Fraternity. Friends will be received at the Newediuk Funeral Home, A. Roy Miller Chapel 1695 St. Clair Ave. West (between Keele and Lansdowne) on Tuesday, April 15th from 9: 30 a.m. Service to be held at St. Matthews Roman Catholic Church at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Mount Hope Cemetery.

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DAIGNEAULT o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-10 published
CLINGERSMITH, John Wesley
A resident of Chatham passed away while surrounded by his loving family Wednesday April 9, 2008 at the Chatham Health Alliance Public General in his 87th year. Beloved husband of the late Margaret FRANCES for 64 years. Father of Charlene PROUDY (Ken,) Robert CLINGERSMITH (Brenda,) Raymond CLINGERSMITH (Christine) and Glen CLINGERSMITH (Pam.) Loving grandfather of Chris LAIDLAW (Jeff,) Marcia DAIGNEAULT (Charles,) Adam and Nathan CLINGERSMITH, Kevin CLINGERSMITH (Jen), Kim KRAEMAR (Eric) and Jay SCOTT (Tracy). Great-grandfather of Chloe, Quintin, Jaxon, Laila and Ella. Also survived by many nephews and nieces. Predeceased by brothers Orval and Manley and sister Mildred. John served in the Royal Canadian Navy during World War 2 and retired after 37 years of service at International Harvester. The family will receive guests for visitation Friday April 11, 2008 from 6-9 p.m. at the Bowman Funeral Home, 4 Victoria Avenue, Chatham (519-352-2390). A funeral service will be held Saturday April 12, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. in the funeral home. Interment to follow in Maple Leaf Leaf Cemetery. Those wishing to make a memorial contribution are asked to consider Heart and Stroke Foundation. Online condolences are welcome at www.bowmanfh.ca

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DAILEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-20 published
DAILEY, Hazel Mary (formerly SCARROW, née McCAW)
Peacefully at Kelso Pines Retirement Lodge, Owen Sound on Wednesday, February 13, 2008. Hazel Scarrow DAILEY (née McCAW) of Owen Sound in her 93rd year. Beloved wife of the late Lloyd Alban SCARROW and the late Cecil Thomas DAILEY. Dear mother of Donald SCARROW and his wife Nancy of Oakville and Glenn SCARROW and his wife Joanne of Port Sydney. Sadly missed by two grandchildren Jenifer SCARROW and David SCARROW and his wife Lili and a great-granddaughter Tiana Lee SCARROW all of Calgary. Also survived by her sister Laura RINGHAM of Owen Sound. Predeceased by a sister Gertrude PFOHL and a brother Roy McCAW. Friends are invited to the Tannahill Funeral Home for visiting on Friday from 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday morning at 11 o'clock with Rev. David SHEARMAN officiating. Interment, Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial donations to the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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DAILEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-23 published
DAILEY, Marion Alice (PATCHELL)
Peacefully at Lee Manor in Owen Sound Thursday afternoon February 21, 2008. The former Marion PATCHELL of R.R.#1, Kemble in her 88th year. Beloved wife of the late Earl DAILEY. Loving mother of Tom and his wife Gloria of R.R.#1, Kemble, Doug of R.R.#1, Wiarton, Don and his wife Wanda of R.R.#1 Kemble and Dave and his wife Brenda of R.R.#1, Wiarton. Lovingly remembered by her grandchildren Joanne BEATTIE (Chris), Raymond DAILEY (Dee), Andrea KESSLER (Jeremy,) Jennifer WILSON (Paul,) Ryan DAILEY (Amanda Gowan) and Denise THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Brandon) and step-grandmother of Linda MONK, Kathy BALLS, Jamie PORTER and Mike PORTER and her thirteen great-grandchildren and one great-great-grand_son. Dear sister-in-law of Orval DAILEY of St. Catherines. Predeceased by her daughter-in-law Sharon DAILEY, two brothers Bill and Verral PATCHELL and two sisters Edna CURRIE and Mabel HERRON. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home, Hepworth Sunday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Funeral Home Monday morning at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Deborah MURRAY officiating. Spring interment Boyd Cemetery, Shallow Lake. Memorial contributions to the Kemble United Church or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Marion by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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DAILEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
SIFTON, Nancy
Peacefully after a lengthy illness, on Saturday, April 12, 2008, at the Grace Hospital, Winnipeg.
Nancy is survived by her son Graeme, grandchildren Micah and Trevor of Winnipeg, and her brother Tom DAILEY of Brockville, Ontario. She was predeceased by her sister Betty Alexander.
Nancy was born and raised in Brockville, Ontario, moving to Winnipeg with her husband John in 1952.
Many thanks to the staff of the Grace for making Nancy's final days as comfortable as possible.
Special thanks must go to Nancy's caregivers for the last many years, Mila, Marie-Ann, Angela, Imedla, Solly and Lani. Their devotion 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, enabled Nancy to remain at home where she was most comfortable.
Nancy enjoyed various activities during her life and her Friends will look back with fond memories of those.
Private arrangements. Cremation has taken place. Interment will be in Brockville, Ontario at a later date.
The family will gratefully acknowledge donations to the Winnipeg Humane Society, 45 Hurst Way, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 0R3 or the Leeds and Grenville Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals, 163 Ormond Street, Suite 138, Brockville, Ontario K6V 7E6.

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DAIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-03 published
His landmark commission on drugs urged legalizing marijuana in Already a respected legal scholar, he became an improbable counterculture icon at the height of the hippy era by recommending leniency and the decriminalization of recreational drugs
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S6
Toronto -- Gerald LE DAIN's respect for civil liberties went so far as to rouse John Lennon and Yoko Ono from their bed. It was 1969, the year of the couple's "bed-in for peace" at the Queen Elizabeth Hotel in Montreal, and the year Judge LE DAIN began chairing the much-referenced but largely ignored Commission of Inquiry into the Non-Medical Use of Drugs.
The Le Dain commission's final report was one of the most politically explosive documents ever put before the federal government. The commission held 46 days of public hearings, received 365 submissions and heard from 12,000 people in about 30 cities and at more than 20 university campuses across the country. In its final report, in 1973, the commission recommended decriminalizing marijuana possession because the law-enforcement costs of prohibition were too great, and suggested that Canada focus on frank education rather than harsh penalization. It also recommended treatment for heroin addiction and sharp warnings about nicotine and alcohol. This was delivered at a time when hysteria about the evils of pot was on everyone's lips and many parents wanted the law to save their drug-addled teenagers.
The report also made Judge LE DAIN something of an unlikely counterculture icon and helped win him a place on the Supreme Court of Canada during the formative years of the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
Gerald LE DAIN was born in Montreal to Eric LE DAIN and Antoinette WHITHARD. His younger brother, Bruce, went on to become one of Canada's foremost impressionist landscape painters in the style of A.Y. Jackson and Tom Thomson. Gerry graduated from West Hill High School in 1942 and a year later, at 18, he joined the army and became a gunner with the 7th Medium Regiment, Royal Canadian Artillery, a unit that was in the thick of the fighting from D-Day until the surrender of Germany in May of 1945.
Immediately after the war, he attended the military's ad hoc Khaki University in England. One day, the school arranged a debate with students of Westfield College, then a women-only college associated with the University of London. During the event (debate topic: a woman's place in the home,) he met Cynthia Emily ROY and, two weeks later, they became engaged. After being demobilized from the army, she joined him in Montreal, where they married and he set about finishing his education.
In 1949, he obtained a law degree from McGill University and was called to the Quebec bar. He spent the following year at a university in Lyons, where he gained his doctorate. On his return from France, he joined the Montreal law firm of Walker, Martineau, Chauvin, Walker and Allison and stayed three years until he returned to McGill as a professor of constitutional and administrative law. He also worked as counsel to Quebec's attorney-general on constitutional cases.
In 1967, he left Montreal to become dean of Osgoode Hall Law School, where, said colleague Harry Arthurs, he presided over a revolution in Canadian legal education. "It was his responsibility to persuade York University, the Law Society of Upper Canada, and the world at large, that what we were doing was not only the legitimate - not only the sensible - but the inevitable way forward." It was during this time that Pierre Trudeau asked Judge LE DAIN to chair the commission. He was, at 44, perfectly suited to the job in many ways. By then, many young Canadians were indulging in marijuana and other recreational drugs; as a university professor, he was surrounded by many students who had at least given it a try. And as the father of a large family, he was adept at bridging the generation gap and responding empathetically. During the time he chaired the commission, there were four full-fledged teenagers, and one on the cusp, living in the LE DAIN home.
The commissioners were asked to study the non-medical use of sedative, stimulant, tranquillizing, hallucinogenic and other psychotropic drugs or substances, including the experience of users. At his first news conference in 1969, he announced that, in the interest of research, he might experiment with the stuff himself.
"We made it possible to talk about drugs openly," he later said in an interview with The Globe and Mail. "In some of our early hearings, especially in smaller communities, you could feel the guilt that had been stored up around drugs. We also made it possible for people to criticize their institutions, to challenge their doctors, their school boards, their churches."
The Le Dain commission broke new ground in terms of taking the show on the road, said Mel GREEN, who worked as a sociologist with Judge LE DAIN at the time. Judge LE DAIN redefined the nature of a public inquiry by asking the public to directly participate, he said. "The commission found little traction in terms of changes in the law itself. … There was a cultural divide between conventional attitudes and youth culture and I think the Le Dain commission helped bridge that gap." Inspired by Judge LE DAIN, Mr. GREEN decided to switch careers and went to law school. He is now an Ontario provincial court judge.
By early 1969, John Lennon and Yoko Ono had created a stir with their public "bed-in" at a hotel in Amsterdam. On May 26, the couple booked into Room 1742 at the Queen Elizabeth in Montreal. To Judge LE DAIN, they seemed to be just the kind of advocates for youth the commission should hear from. A meeting was arranged aboard a C.N. train in Montreal and, for 90 minutes, the couple shared their views on the drug culture and the generation gap. "This is the opportunity for Canada to lead the world," said Mr. Lennon, referring to the Le Dain commission. "Canada's image is just about getting groovy, you know." When it was over, Mr. Lennon gave his phone number to members of the commission.
It was not always such clear sailing. Commissioners also had to contend with a kind of "live bait" issue, where police were arresting young people who braved the generational divide to attend these public gatherings and tell their stories. In 1969, the 16-year-old son of communications theorist Marshall McLUHAN was arrested as he was leaving a coffee shop in Yorkville, Toronto's then-hippy neighbourhood, where the commission was meeting. Michael McLUHAN was convicted of criminal possession of a small amount of hashish and sentenced to 60 days in jail; he ended up serving 30 days and was eventually pardoned.
Marie-Andrée Bertrand, one of the Le Dain commissioners, remembers those days and the difficulties in protecting witnesses. "Some of us went to [then-solicitor-general Pierre] Goyer and we said, 'Call off your gendarmes, monsieur!' and went to Trudeau, and it was slightly more calm after that," she told the Ottawa Citizen in 2003. "Imagine if Monsieur Lennon had been arrested or harassed. What a humiliation that would have been for all of us."
Although the commission's recommendations were never followed, there were significant changes in the public attitude toward drugs and in lighter sentences being handed down to offenders.
At a time when the generation gap was described as a gulf, Judge LE DAIN had gained the respect of both sides of the drug-use argument. In a 1988 Globe and Mail column, Michael VALPY described him as a quiet, intellectual, spiritually minded academic who earned the praise of young people, the social agencies and the scientific community. "His commission acquired the reputation of being the most hard-working, open-minded and widely respected ever to tackle a major national problem."
In 1975, Judge LE DAIN was appointed to the Federal Court of Appeal and the Court Martial Appeal Court. He remained there until May of 1984, when Mr. Trudeau appointed him to the Supreme Court.
His tenure at the court during the early years of the Charter proved to be, in some ways, a trial by fire not only for him but for the other eight justices as well. A 1988 Globe and Mail article described a series of crises that nearly exhausted the court as a result of a backlog of Charter cases. At the time, it was referred to by political scientist Peter Russell as "A terrible rash of injuries" similar to the kind experienced by beleaguered players on a hockey team.
Not surprisingly, Judge LE DAIN was one of the members of the court who struggled most during this time. As a result, he stayed only five years before an emotional breakdown brought about his retirement in 1988. Even so, he left his mark on Charter decisions.
One example was the case of R. v. Therens (1985). The issue was whether a drunk driver could evade conviction on the grounds that police had violated his Charter rights by not informing him of his right to call a lawyer before compelling him to take a breathalyzer test. Judge LE DAIN's former law clerk, Bruce RYDER, recalls that he struggled painfully over the case - partly because it recalled the death of his daughter Jacqueline a decade earlier from an automobile accident.
"As he spoke, he was pounding himself so hard in the chest I thought he might knock himself over. He took a deep breath, and we returned to our work." In the end, Judge LE DAIN crafted an opinion that did right by the victims of highway accidents and by the Charter. In memorable language, he affirmed that the enactment of the Charter signalled a new era in the protection of fundamental rights and freedoms.
"Out of complexity and nuance, he produced masterfully succinct statements of the law," said Mr. RYDER.
In his retirement, Judge LE DAIN worked on a range of projects, including preparing his papers for the national archives and meticulously crafting his memoirs. But his early retirement continued to be plagued by personal tragedy: first with his wife Cynthia's death in 1995 of cancer, then his daughter Catherine's death of pneumonia in 1998.
In 1990, the U.S. Drug Policy Alliance instituted an award in Gerald LE DAIN's name, to be given to individuals involved in law who have worked within official institutions "when extremist pressures dominate government policies." The influential organization includes law-enforcement officials, academics, professionals, health-care workers, drug users and former users. "We sought to name the awards after our heroes," said founder Arnold Trebach. "Gerald LE DAIN was certainly one of them. Few people realize the level of hate directed at drug users and drug policy reformers decades ago."
Judge LE DAIN, the first Canadian to be so honoured, had earlier been made a companion of the Order of Canada.
Gerald Eric LE DAIN was born on November 27, 1924, in Montreal. He died in his sleep at home on December 18, 2007. He was 83. He is survived by his son Eric and daughters Barbara, Jennifer and Caroline. He was predeceased by his wife, Cynthia, and by daughters Jacqueline and Catherine.
Correction - Friday, January 4, 2007
The majority of the Le Dain Commission on the non-medical use of drugs recommended in 1973 that possession of cannabis should cease to be a criminal offence but that sale and distribution of cannabis should remain a crime. Incorrect information appeared in a headline in yesterday's paper.

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DAINARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-01-28 published
MOORE, Louis
(World War 2 Veteran Royal Canadian Air Force)
Peacefully at Ross Memorial Hospital in Lindsay on January 26, 2008, at the age of 96. Beloved husband of Louise (BAYLISS.) Brother of Jean MARCH and predeceased by Gertie, Ernest, John, Harold, Ray and Earl. Dear father of Mary Anne (Davey WHITE/WHYTE) and John. Grandfather of Mary Lou (Ben DAINARD,) Christine SMITH, Elizabeth (Bill LEE) and Robert HENDY. Great-grandfather of Paul and Katherine DAINARD, Courtney, Danielle and Carly SMITH and Andrew and Jennifer LEE. Especially remembered by niece Linda MARCH. Friends may call at Marshall Funeral Home, 10366 Yonge Street (4th traffic light north of Major Mackenzie) for visitation on Tuesday, January 29, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Wednesday, January 30, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment, King City Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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DAIR o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-09 published
DAIR, Bessie Victoria
Shortly after her 88th birthday on May 01, Bessie Victoria DAIR, surrounded by her loving family, passed away peacefully at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Sunday, June 08, 2008 in her 89th year. Predeceased by her loving husband James Russell (2007). Kind, gentle and loving mother to her daughter Barbara SHERMAN and her husband Darwin of LaSalette. Generous, caring and loving grandmother to Leslie WILSON and her husband Steve of Woodstock, Sherrie JOHNSON and her husband Jim of Pinegrove, Darwin James SHERMAN and his wife Nancy of LaSalette. Great-grandmother to Lynette and Justin WILSON; Matthew, Meghan and Joshua JOHNSON Ashley, Leanna and Alisha SHERMAN. Survived by her sister Alice HOWE and her husband George, brothers Rolph ADLINGTON, Ross ADLINGTON and his wife Betty, Bruce ADLINGTON and his wife Mary, several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her sisters Annie SCHNEIDER, Mary Irene ADLINGTON, brother Earl ADLINGTON, sister-in-law Martha ADLINGTON. Bessie was very committed in her faith to the Lord. She had a smile for everyone while serving in her community and the United Church of Straffordville. The family will receive Friends and neighbours at Ostrander's Funeral Home 43 Bidwell St. Tillsonburg (519) 842-5221 on Tuesday, June 10, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral service for Bessie will be held in Ostrander's Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, June 11, 2008 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment at the Tillsonburg Cemetery. At the family's request memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to the Guillain-Barre Syndrome Foundation, Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital, Community Care Access Centre-Norfolk or Straffordville United Church. Personal condolences may be made at www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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DAISY o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-04-23 published
DAISY ILENE ELLIOT/ELLIOTT
In loving memory of Daisy Ilene Elliott, July 18, 1933 – April 19, 2008.
Daughter of Peter and Sade Bell (both predeceased). Beloved wife of
Freddie Elliott (predeceased). Loving mother to Garry (Manuela), Rick
(Sharon), Shelley (Mitchell) and Laurie. Cherished grandmother to
Jeffery, Michael, Peter, Christopher, Aaron, Dyllan and Larissa. Loving
great grandmother to Paige and Bryce. Special grandmother to Shawn
(Karen) and Paul. Special great grandmother to Anna. Sister to Ervin Bell
(Helen), both predeceased, Floyd Bell (predeceased) (Jessie), Terry Bell,
Roger Bell (Marjorie). Sister-in-law to Gerald Elliott (Audrey), Freda
Farquhar (John, predeceased), Marlene Pringle (Glen, predeceased), Marie
McIntyre (Don, predeceased), Connie Pinaud (Charles) and Judy Hyatt (Rod,
predeceased). Will be remembered by many nieces and nephews and many
Friends.

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DAISY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-15 published
LAING, Alan Murray
Passed away peacefully at home with his family at his side, on July 14, 2008 in his 61st year. Alan is now with the Lord after a valiant battle with cancer. Alan will be greatly missed by his wife Caroline and his loving children David (Tory WESTBROOK) and Danielle. Lovingly remembered by his parents W.A. (Al) and Agnes (DAISY) LAING of Thornbury and Caroline's parents Marcel and Georgette DUPLESSIS of Quebec. Greatly missed by his sister Faye YOUNG (David) and his brothers Bill (Diane) and Jim. Fondly remembered by his niece Katie and nephews James and Joe. Alan retired as an Air Canada Captain after a long aviation career and was extensively involved in the betterment of community organizations and the Air Cadet Program. Friends will be received at the Graham A. Giddy Funeral Home and Chapel, 280 St. David St. South in Fergus, on July 17th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be conducted at St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, 325 St. George St. West in Fergus, on July 18th at 1: 00 p.m. Memorial Donations can be directed to the Air Cadet League of Canada, cards available at the Funeral Home
(519) 843-3100 www.grahamgiddyfh.com

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