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"BIG" 2008 Obituary


BIGELOW  BIGGAR  BIGGS  BIGHAM  BIGNALL  BIGNELL  BIGUS 

BIGELOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-06 published
Toronto surgeon 'changed the face of pediatric plastic surgery forever'
Gifted doctor helped 18,000 patients, mostly children with cleft palates and congenital deformities. He made so many volunteer trips to China that a local hospital named him its honorary head
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- William LINDSAY was so devoted to correcting cleft palates that he once performed the procedure on a horse. It was 1965, the patient was a year-old thoroughbred that couldn't eat or nurse properly, and Doctor LINDSAY teamed up with a group of veterinarians from Toronto's Woodbine Race Track who had experience in putting horses under general anesthetic. By this time, Doctor LINDSAY had already acquired a reputation as a gifted plastic surgeon who specialized in cleft palates and other deformities. Special oversized instruments were created for the operation by the Hospital for Sick Children's medical engineering department.
The disorder was repaired and the patient recovered, but she never did race. And in an unusual but perhaps poetic turn of events, Doctor LINDSAY's son, Bill, went on to become a veterinarian specializing in equine surgery (and whose sole regret was that he never got to operate alongside his father).
Dr. LINDSAY, who headed the plastic surgery division at Toronto's Hospital for Sick Children from 1958 to 1986 and taught the specialty at the University of Toronto's medical school for two decades, healed an estimated 18,000 patients, mostly children born with cleft lips and palates and congenital deformities of the hand, as well as accident and burn victims.
Remembered as a gentle, even-tempered and self-effacing man, Dr. LINDSAY "changed the face of pediatric plastic surgery forever," wrote Ronald ZUKER, who trained under Doctor LINDSAY and followed his mentor to the University of Toronto and the Hospital for Sick Children, where he, too, performed cleft lip and palate surgery. "His kind and amiable nature was evident in the clinic when the children would run up to sit on his lap. He was a wonderful and empathetic clinician who led by example."
Being detail-oriented may have been one reason he was drawn to plastic surgery, Doctor LINDSAY recalled in his unpublished memoirs. "It's very fine work, done with much smaller instruments than regular surgery, and one can see the results of one's work, as it isn't hidden inside the body."
The eldest of five children, William LINDSAY was born and raised in Vancouver. His parents left the Ottawa Valley on the afternoon of their wedding in 1919 with a one-way rail ticket to the West Coast, where his father operated the Vancouver Tugboat Company. By 12, his son was working part-time on the tugboats up and down the coast. Later, he toiled as a dining-car waiter aboard Canadian National Railway trains.
Idealism and an uncle's influence led him to medicine, and he ranked fifth among 300 students after his first year in pre-med at the U of T. After graduation in 1945, he served briefly in the Royal Canadian Navy, and maintained a general practice in Sudbury, Ontario
On his first night, he was on call and found himself wandering through a bitterly cold and snowy streetscape searching for his first patient. He found the address, and encountered a young woman in labour. "I got to work," he recalled, "interrupted at times by an aggressive chihuahua who deemed it necessary to attack my shoelaces while I attended his mistress."
Dr. LINDSAY hitched his wagon to a rising star in 1949, when he served as a research fellow with Wilfred BIGELOW (obituary, March 30, 2005), who was conducting pioneering experiments on hypothermia as it affected heart function. Doctor BIGELOW had long wondered whether cooling the body could slow blood flow long enough to access the heart.
The two physicians successfully tested that theory on a dog at the Banting Institute. After chilling the anesthetized animal to a body temperature of 20 degrees Celsius, they interrupted cardiac circulation for 15 minutes with clamps and opened the heart. It wasn't beating. With Doctor LINDSAY watching, Doctor BIGELOW tapped the organ tentatively with an electrical probe. All four chambers responded with one convulsive throb. He tapped it again. Another beat. The organ then continued beating without blood - a first - and then with blood. The dog was rewarmed and survived.
The episode led Doctor BIGELOW to think of a device that could deliver a gentle jolt of some sort without damaging the heart, and he went on to develop the first cardiac pacemaker.
Meantime, Doctor LINDSAY had trained in plastic surgery in Toronto, Montreal and Dallas, and joined Sick Kids in 1953. The following year, the hospital established its Cleft Lip and Palate Research and Treatment Centre under his leadership. Today, it is the largest such centre in Canada, with 3,500 patients in active treatment and 175 new patients each year. It combines 16 disciplines.
Dr. LINDSAY was one of the first McLaughlin fellows. He attended the first two awards dinners in 1953 and 1954 and, in an interview with the U of T's magazine, he recalled the fellowship's benefactor, the legendary auto magnate and philanthropist Samuel McLaughlin. "There would be 14 or 16 men sitting at a long, rectangular table. Mr. McLaughlin would be sitting at the middle of one side. He wasn't very tall but he would command and direct conversation throughout dinner magnificently." Doctor LINDSAY noted, however, that in order to do this, Mr. McLaughlin would have to rise to his feet when he had something to say.
In the 1970s, Doctor LINDSAY evaluated the likelihood of success in the replantation of various appendages, including both physical and emotional measures. He found that the most common replantations - in order of frequency - were thumbs, fingers, hands, arms and legs, although the ear, nose, lips, scalp and penis could also be reattached.
He made the first of several trips to China in the early 1980s, when Canada's ambassador to that country asked him to perform cleft lip and palate surgery on children and treat burn victims at the hospital in Lanzhou, in China's northwestern Gansu province. By the early 1990s, the missions were being underwritten by the Canadian International Development Agency.
"Homes were very poor and they were heated with gas heaters," said Doctor LINDSAY's wife of 63 years, Peggy. "These would often turn over and there were a lot of bad burns to both adults and children." The Canadian doctor imparted his wisdom and skills and, in turn, learned a great deal about Chinese medicine, particularly herb-based salves and ointments for burn victims. He never did find out what was in them, as the Chinese couldn't translate their contents into English. "We never knew whether they just didn't want to tell him or really didn't know."
The Chinese hospital was able to build a new wing and, through the efforts of Doctor LINDSAY and Canadian International Development Agency, it received an anesthetic machine, a respirator, a burn bed and an electric dermatome, a machine used to produce large sheets of skin from a donor area. In gratitude, Doctor LINDSAY was named honorary head of the Gansu Provincial People's Hospital.
A great believer in research, he conducted explorations into tendon healing, which led to a special clinical interest in congenital and traumatic hand surgery. A group of his research fellows formed the Chicken Tendon Club.
Nicknamed the Silver Fox for his characteristic grey hair, he served as president of the Canadian Society of Plastic Surgeons in 1964-1965 and of the American Association of Plastic Surgery in 1970-1971. He was also active in the formation of the Bloorview-MacMillan Treatment Centre (formerly Hugh MacMillan Treatment Centre and originally the Ontario Crippled Children's Centre). A quadruple heart bypass operation around 1980 slowed him down, but not much. In 2003, he was named to the Order of Ontario.
He was happiest providing comfort and hope to thousands of children, but a close second was his time spent at the family farm, called Skytop, north of Hockley Valley. An eco-friendly farmer and environmentalist before those were popular, Doctor LINDSAY planted trees and created ponds while raising Angus cattle. His family and many young colleagues joined him for tree-planting weekends each spring. At his side, his grandchildren learned farming, fishing, skiing, gardening, horsemanship and beekeeping. He was at the farm regularly until the month before his death.
William Kerr LINDSAY was born in Vancouver on September 3, 1920. He died of congestive heart failure in Toronto on February 5, 2008. He was 87. He is survived by his wife of 63 years, Peggy (FRANCES,) children William, Barbara, Katherine and Anne, and 11 grandchildren.

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BIGELOW - All Categories in OGSPI

BIGGAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-27 published
HENDERSON, Ann Elizabeth "Betty" (née KNOLL)
(April 14, 1921-June 26, 2008)
Beloved wife of 62 years to Ren.
Betty is survived by her sister, Mary Louise RILEY (John,) and predeceased by her sister Jean Isabelle.
Loving mother to Children: Ren (Marion), Jamie (Barbara), Ian, Elizabeth JENNINGS (Rob) and Barbara. Predeceased by daughter Pamela.
Loving grandmother to Christie HENDERSON- BIGGAR (Kirk), Sarah HENDERSON, Sarah RIMMINGTON, Graeme HENDERSON (Trish), Anne HENDERSON, Marcus Madot HENDERSON, Scott HENDERSON (Bernice), Julie HENDERSON, Graeme JENNINGS, Tory JENNINGS.
Loving great-grandmother to Charlie, Finlay and Duncan BIGGAR.
After a full, satisfying and eventful life Betty passed peacefully at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital.
Betty was born in Port Colborne and her first career was there in the family shoe business; later, a second career as a remedial teacher with the Carleton and Peel School Boards.
Betty was a proud graduate of Bishop Strachan School and Trinity College, University of Toronto, with Bachelor degrees in Arts and Education.
The family wishes to express their appreciation to Doctor SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER for his direction and care and to the professional staff at 4 Centre Oakville-Trafalgar Memorial Hospital who made Mother's final days as comfortable as possible.
Flowers are gratefully declined but a donation to the Saint_Jude's Anglican Church Memorial Garden Fund, 160 William Street, Oakville, Ontario L6J 1C5 would be much appreciated by the family.
There will be no visitation but a memorial service will be held at Saint_Jude's Anglican Church, 160 William Street in Oakville at 11: 00 a.m. on Friday July 4, 2008.
Reception to follow for Friends and family at The Oakville Club, 56 Water Street in Oakville.
Arrangements entrusted to Kopriva Taylor Community Funeral Home, Oakville (905-844-2600). Email condolences may be made through www.koprivataylor.com

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BIGGS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-27 published
WEISS, Calvin Milton
Passed peacefully into the hands of God at Grey Bruce Health Services, Southampton on Sunday, May 25, 2008 at the age of 82, with his loving wife Irene (GOTTFRIED) at his side. He was the eldest son of the late Milton and Marie WEISS. Loving father of Larry (Sandra) KURT of Ladysmith, British Columbia; Marion (Gord) KOEPKE of Owen Sound; Bob (Ann) WEISS; Muriel (Alan) PRAUGHT both of Kitchener; Robert (Leonie) KURT of Nanimo, British Columbia and Ken WEISS also of Kitchener. Proud Grandfather of Lisa, Lori, Jesse, Derek, Brian, David, Mark, Jeff, Chris, Mike, Lisa and Crystal. Caring great-grandfather of 14. Predeceased by his first wife Ruby WHITELAW (1961.) Brother of Mel, Esther ACKERNECHT Gerry; and, Joyce FERGIN all of Kitchener. In his retirement years Cal enjoyed small engine repair, reading and chatting on his CB. Cal will be sadly missed by his extended family and special Friends. Sincere appreciation is extended to Doctor BILLINGS, Pastor BIGGS and to the many nurses in Southampton and Owen Sound hospitals for their care and support. Visitation from the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, on Wednesday, May 28 from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Time to Celebrate the Life of Calvin WEISS will be held at Faith Lutheran Church, 525 Ivings Drive, Port Elgin, on Thursday May 29, 2008 at 2 p.m. A Time of Fellowship and Sharing will follow in the Social Hall of the Church. A Committal Service will be conducted at Memory Gardens, Kitchener, on Friday May 30th at 11 a.m. As an expression of sympathy donations may be made to the Saugeen Memorial Hospital Foundation or Faith Lutheran Church, Port Elgin. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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BIGGS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-29 published
BIGGS, " Jack" John Alfred
Peacefully, at University Hospital, L.H.S.C., on Thursday, March 27, 2008, "Jack" John Alfred BIGGS, at the age of 82 years. Loving husband of Betty, for over 54 years. Dear father of Wendy JUDD and Dennis BIGGS (Lin FINDLAY.) Beloved grandfather of Colleen and Michelle BIGGS. Jack was very active in the Memorial Boys and Girls Club and worked for many years at Canadian National Railway (car shop) and GM Diesel. Friends will be received at the Evans Funeral Home, 648 Hamilton Rd. (1 block east of Egerton), on Monday, March 31, 2008 from 10-11 a.m. Funeral service will follow in the Evans Chapel at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Grove Cemetery. Donations to the Memorial Boys and Girls Club would be appreciated by the family. Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to logo Mr. BIGGS.

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BIGGS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-02 published
BIGGS, Dorothy Ida
Peacefully on Friday May 30, 2008, surrounded by her family, Dorothy Ida BIGGS born December 18, 1920 in London, Ontario. Beloved wife of the late Jack BIGGS (2004.) Loving mother of Doug BIGGS (Trish), Jacqueline BIGGS, and Ric BIGGS (Mary). Dear grandmother of Megan HOCKEY (Dax,) Courtney BIGGS (Christian,) Danny BIGGS (Carol,) Toby BIGGS, Jeffrey BIGGS (Erin,) and Nicki BIGGS. Great-grandmother of Joshua, Kaitlyn, and Jordan. During her 3½ years at Rosewood Manor, Dorothy's door was always open for others to come and share a cup of coffee and a smile. Cremation has taken place. The interment of ashes will be at Clipperton Cemetery at a later date. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Bluewater Health Palliative Care Unit or the Sarnia Humane Society. Arrangements entrusted to Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. Online condolences may be sent to www.smithfuneralhome.ca.

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BIGGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-15 published
FOULDS, Andrew
In his 88th year. Andy passed on peacefully at home in Vancouver on February 9th, 2008. Survived by his wife Doris (DENNISON,) his sister Mary (Maisie) PREDDICE, predeceased by his sister Margaret HAMILTON and his first wife Jean (SCOTT,) mother of his five sons. He will be sorely missed by his sons David (Judy), Steven (Beth BIGGS), Ian, Tom (Janis BROWNE), and Peter (Sandy) and his grandchildren Carolyn, Stewart, Jennifer FULOP, Fraser, Jessica-Jean, Courtney, Deacon, and Buster BIGGS. Sorely missed by the Dennison and Papau Families; Betty ANDERSEN (David,) John DENNISON, Catherine PAPAU (David), Robert DENNISON (Susanne FREMMING), Michael DENNISON and his step-grandchildren, Carol SAPRIKEN (Steve,) Todd, Christine, and Lisa PAPAU and Andrew DENNISON. Major Andy FOULDS, CD (EM) was a reserve soldier who kept going to war. Andy enlisted in the Canadian Army in 1937 at the age of 17. Andy served in the artillery and was commissioned from WO1 while overseas during World War 2. Returning to the United Kingdom Andy reclassified to Infantry due to Officers being in demand, proceeding to Italy where he joined the Seaforth Highlanders of Canada, and stayed with them until a year after the War ended. Remaining in the Netherlands after the conclusion of the conflict, his gregarious personality fostered Friendships that have weathered the decades. After the War he married SSgt. Jean SCOTT (Canadian Women's Army Corps) from Calgary, and settled in Vancouver. When the call came for Korea, Andy jumped. As an original 2 Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry officer he took the advance party over to Korea. Andy had a successful career in sales and marketing that took the family to Ontario in the 60's. In his spare time he taxied boys to soccer pitches, untangled fishing tackle, golfed, curled and mentored his five boys. Tired of the snow, when he retired he returned to his roots in British Columbia. He married Doris DENNISON on April 17th 1993 and they were blessed with many happy years of love and companionship. At Andy's request there will be no funeral service. A family service of remembrance will be held in Toronto at the Cathedral Church of Saint_James (St. George's Chapel) on Friday, February 22, 2008 at 5: 30 p.m. A celebration of Andy's life will be held in Vancouver at 5455 Balsam St. in Kerrisdale, on Saturday, March 1, 2008 at 3: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations in Andy's honour may be made to a charity of your choice.

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BIGGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-12 published
SINCLAIR, Robert Grey
Robert (Bob) passed gently at the age of 94 on April 9, 2008, surrounded by family. He will be profoundly missed by his wife of seventy years, Irene (née THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON,) their daughters Diane GILDAY (David) and Marilynne SINCLAIR (Brent HOLDEN,) son Gregory SINCLAIR (Kateri LANTHIER) and six grandchildren, Sean (Jane CASKEY), Neil (Kristi SYRON), and Keith GILDAY (Regan BIGGS), and Nicholas, Julia and newborn William SINCLAIR. Robert was the proud great-grandfather of James, Ellen and Walker GILDAY. He was predeceased by his sister Renee DUNTHORNE.
Born in Toronto on July 22, 1913, Robert married Irene in 1937. In 1943, the couple moved to Montreal, where they raised their family, returning to Toronto in 1987. Robert delighted us all with his passion for jazz and swing music - he was a clarinet and saxophone player, and performed in Toronto swing bands by night in the 1930s, while completing Chartered Accountant accreditation by day. He enjoyed a successful career as chief financial officer for a major, Quebec-based construction company. In later years, he and Irene took great pleasure in their cottage on Lake Champlain in upstate New York, hosting innumerable joyful family gatherings. His sense of humour, unshakeable optimism at lowering his golf score 'next time,' and his talent for improvising vivid bedtime stories are indelible memories. We will always cherish the legacy of Robert's gracious, gentle and deeply considerate nature.
The family wishes to acknowledge the thoughtful care and diligence of the staff of the Wellesley Central Place, Robert's home for the last two years of his life. If desired, donations may be made to Wellesley Central Place, 160 Wellesley Street East, Toronto, M4A 1J3.
A family service will be held on Saturday, April 12. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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BIGGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
BIGGS, Stanley Champion, Q.C., LSM, J.D., LL.B
The family of Stanley Champion BIGGS mourns his passing on June 8th, 2008, after a short illness. Stan was born in Toronto in 1913 and was called to the Bar in 1939, then immediately enlisted in the army. As a 2nd lieutenant, later promoted to captain with the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada, he fought on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day 1944 and saw 86 days of front-line action until wounded in the leg. During convalescence, he continued on in England as a military lawyer for the Judge Advocate's General Branch and later was attached to British counsel during the famous Lord Haw-Haw treason trial. After the war, he successfully developed his law practice back in Toronto following the footsteps of his father and grandfather. For over 50 years, he continued practising the law he loved. In 1995, Stan received the Law Society Medal for distinguished service from the Law Society of Upper Canada. Meanwhile, he was also busy with his growing family as well as becoming involved in his community: in professional associations as a school trustee; and as honorary solicitor for several prominent charitable organizations. He was a keen golfer and squash player. Stan also was an early environmentalist, starting in the late 1940s to re-forest land northwest of Toronto, eventually planting over 150,000 trees. His wife, Barbara, predeceased him in 2005 in their 65th year of marriage. Fondly remembered, they leave behind four children: Christopher, Barrett, John and Dinny, as well as seven grandchildren. At age 94, Stan completed his memoirs in a book called As Luck Would Have It in War and Peace, with Trafford Publishing. It recalls many of his challenges, accomplishments and reflections during his long life. A reception open to Friends and family on Tuesday, June 17th between 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (west of Yonge), Toronto, M4R 1A8 (416-489-8733). Messages can be sent to the family at the above address or email below. At Stan's request, a graveside service will be a private family gathering. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to a charity of your choice to support the work of people who in Stan's words, are "doing good for its own sake while here on earth."

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BIGGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-11 published
REHDER, John Edward " Ned" (1916-2008)
John Edward (Ned) REHDER passed away at Leaside Retirement Home on Wednesday July 9th, 2008 after and long and valiant struggle with dementia. Born in Bowmanville in 1916, he worked for the family business, The Bowmanville Foundry, until attending McGill University to study metallurgy. He graduated in 1943 and married Jocelyn BOWDEN. They took up residence in Windsor, Ontario until moving to Ottawa, where he worked for the Canadian Government at the Dept. of Mines and Metallurgy doing research and development. Later he moved to Montreal to take up the post of Vice President of R&D for the Canada Iron Co. While working for this firm he won the Peter L. Simpson gold medal from the American Foundrymen's Society. He stayed with Canada Iron until the 1960's when he left to work for himself as a Consultant. He and Jocelyn divorced in 1973 and in 1975 he moved to Toronto and continued his consulting business. In 1979 he married his second wife, Mignon ELKINS. Upon his retirement he was invited to the Department of Mines and Metallurgy at the University of Toronto as a research assistant. This involved doing work with the Department of Archeology, a subject that gave him the chance to indulge in his passion for history, with particular interest in the Minoan culture. Ned had over a thousand papers published in various trade magazines and journals, and, at the age of 85 had a book "The Mastery and Uses of Fire in Antiquity" published by McGill/ Queens University Press. It was re-published in paperback two years later. He leaves behind his five children from his first marriage; Christine HORNE, Eric, Jonathon, Mark and Michael, his daughters-in-law Maxine REHDER and Jane BIGGS and son-in-law Lee HORNE and his loving and devoted wife Mignon Elkins REHDER. Family will receive Friends at the York Visitation, Chapel and Reception Centre, 160 Beecroft Road (north of Sheppard Ave. west of Yonge St.), Toronto, 416-221-3404 on Monday July 14th from 3: 30 p.m. until time of funeral service in the chapel at 4: 30 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Alzheimer's Society would be appreciated.

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BIGGS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-15 published
Toronto lawyer survived D-Day, defended Lord Haw-Haw in Old Bailey
Wounded during the Battle of Normandy, he was reassigned to defend a Nazi broadcaster accused of treason. After returning to Canada, he practised civil law for 60 years
By Gay ABBATE, Page S8
Toronto -- It was April 3, 1943, and Stanley BIGGS was on the Queen Mary, the ship transporting him and other Canadian soldiers across the Atlantic to fight the Nazis. As he passed the time playing bridge, a familiar voice came across the shortwave radio, announcing the imminent demise of the ship and everyone aboard.
"There are 5,000 Canadians aboard the Queen Mary hoping to reach Southampton by sundown. There is no way this will happen. The Messerschmitts are on the way."
The voice belonged to William Joyce, nicknamed "Lord Haw-Haw" by the British. The American-born Joyce had moved to England but fled to Germany just before the war. There, he became part of the Nazi propaganda machine, broadcasting weekly to England and Allied soldiers from 1939 to 1945. Joyce warned that German fighter aircraft would destroy the ship, but it reached port safely.
That was Mr. BIGGS's first introduction to Lord Haw-Haw. Seventeen months later, with Germany defeated, the two men sat just a few feet apart in an Old Bailey courtroom in London. Mr. Joyce was in the prisoner's box on trial for treason; Mr. BIGGS, a trained lawyer recovering from war wounds, was attached to his court-appointed legal defence team.
For long weeks in September and October of 1945, he did nothing but research treason laws dating back to the 14th century. In the process, he became an expert on the subject, writing several articles and giving speeches on the subject after his return to Canada. Of his involvement in the trial, he wrote in his memoirs: "It was a most interesting and worthwhile experience for a young lawyer to do research and to hear the presentation of argument for the Crown by the Attorney-General." The memoir, As Luck Would Have It In War and Peace, was released by Trafford Publishing (Victoria) earlier this year.
It was the duty of the defence team, Mr. BRIGGS wrote, "to research all of the relevant evidence we could find and to see that, if Joyce was guilty, he was not convicted except in full evidence with the law." During the trial, Joyce never spoke but kept looking around the courtroom as if expecting family or Friends to show up, Mr. BIGGS wrote. No one ever came. A jury convicted him of treason and he was hanged in 1946.
Stanley Champion BIGGS was not, in his own words, "a religious scholar, a cosmic scientist, a World War 2 history professional," areas of endeavour he considered beyond his abilities. The list of what he actually was is much longer: a combat infantry officer, a devoted lawyer for more than six decades, a poet, a school trustee, an environmentalist long before environmentalism was fashionable. He also devoted his life to the principle of doing good for its own sake.
He was born to the law, one of four children to solicitor Richard Atkinson BIGGS and Gertrude CHAMPION, the belle of Brantford, Ontario His grandfather, Stanley Clarke BIGGS, founded the firm of Biggs and Biggs.
Young Stan grew up on Roxborough Street in Toronto's Rosedale neighbourhood. He graduated from the University of Toronto Schools and then studied law at the University of Toronto, graduating in 1936 and then enrolling in the three-year law program at Osgoode Hall Law School. In 1939, he joined the family law firm and was called to the bar that June.
To celebrate, he and classmate J.F. BARRETT went to the world's fair in New York. A group of young ladies graduating from Bishop Strachan School in Toronto plotted to join them there. Among them was Mr. BARRETT's younger sister, Barbara, who clicked with Mr. BIGGS. The granddaughter of Sir Joseph FLAVELLE, a financier and meat packer who was well known for his philanthropy in Toronto, they became engaged by September and married the following June.
After the war broke out, Mr. BIGGS volunteered with the Queen's Own Rifles, leaving behind his wife, who was pregnant with their second son. After months of training in England, he was among the thousands of Canadian soldiers who landed on the beaches of Normandy on D-Day - June 6, 1944.
The regiment landed near Bernières-sur-Mer at about 8 a.m., only to enter a maelstrom. A storm had just passed through the area and rough seas meant that all-important support tanks had been delayed. Unable to wait, the infantry was forced to go ashore unprotected, with the result that the Queen's Own Rifles suffered the worst casualties of any Canadian unit crossing the beaches that day: 60 men killed and another 78 wounded.
Mr. BIGGS, however, emerged without a scratch. He made it through 86 days of continuous front-line combat during the Battle of Normandy, and the long struggle to deny Germany's bitter attempt to halt the Allied breakthrough, until finally he was shot in the leg.
The machine-gun bullet that took him out of the fighting landed him in a courtroom. During and after his convalescence in England, the military decided to make use of his legal skills. Attached to the office of the Canadian Judge Advocates General, he prosecuted or defended soldiers accused of such crimes as assault or rape.
He returned home in December, 1945, with the rank of captain and resumed the life of a civilian lawyer. At first, he helped his father with his client list but also did pro bono work, defending accused who could not afford a lawyer. There was no legal aid system in Ontario until the 1960s.
Mr. BIGGS continued to practise law until 2004. "He loved the law," daughter Dinny BIGGS said. "He was passionate about the rule of law, about studying its background, the evolution of law and jurisprudence."
One of the highlights of his career was his involvement in the creation of the broadcaster CTV. He handled the negotiations that brought together the original parties who acquired the licence for a second national television station.
His client, Joel ALDRED, had originally sought the licence on his own. But with the Canadian Board of Broadcast Governors reluctant to grant one to a single entity, Mr. BIGGS helped him form a partnership with Ted ROGERS.
The new partners entered into an agreement with another group, headed by newspaper owner John BASSETT. The channel went on the air in 1961, but disagreements eventually arose between the two groups. Mr. BIGGS came up with a solution that allowed Mr. ALDRED to sell his shares while leaving Mr. ROGERS as a partner.
Mr. BIGGS continued his pro bono work throughout his career, providing free legal advice to numerous non-profit groups.
That list included the Queen's Own Rifle of Canada Trust, the Canadian Opera Foundation and the Toronto School of Art, which his artist-wife used some of her inheritance to help establish in 1968. In 1955, Mr. BIGGS was named Queen's Counsel. In 1995, he received the Law Society Medal, which the Law Society of Upper Canada awards in recognition of distinguished service in the law profession.
Not content to write just briefs, Mr. BIGGS also loved to dabble in poetry. During the war, he wrote The Queen's Own Rifles on D-Day, a poem that now hangs in the Canadian War Museum. He wrote the piece one day in 1944 when several dozen members of his regiment were killed and dozens more were injured during fighting.
Mr. BIGGS was also a landowner. During his lifetime, he planted more than 150,000 trees, beginning in the late 1940s, when he bought his first piece of farmland. He eventually sold that and bought a 40-hectare farm in Mono Township in Dufferin County, Ontario. The land was hilly and not suitable for crops, so he rented it out for cattle. For relaxation, he started planting seedlings, eventually turning the property into a managed tree farm. In 1991, he was recognized by the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources with an award for woodland improvement.
Humour was another important aspect of Mr. BIGGS's life. His was not slapstick humour but rather a keen wit, said his long-time secretary, Marjorie FOGG. "He always had cute little answers to things," she said.
Mr. BIGGS wrote of the importance of humour in his life in his memoirs: "Without the humorous twists in my exposure to life&hellip I think I would have cracked up long ago. I have always felt that the therapeutic value of good humour should be gladly welcomed."
Toward the end of his life, Mr. BIGGS prepared a final message for his family and Friends summing up the philosophy by which he lived his own life: "Live fully, share extremes, stay well, keep chuckling, have the thrill of dedication to good causes, be good on Earth for its own sake."
Stanley Champion BIGGS was born in Toronto on December 6, 1913. He died June 17, 2008, at Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto after a brief illness. He was 94. He is survived by children Christopher, Barrett, John and Dinny, and seven grandchildren. His wife, Barbara, predeceased him in 2005.

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BIGHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-17 published
GROSSMAN, Sam
At Parkwood Hospital Western Counties Wing on Saturday March 15, 2008, Sam GROSSMAN of London died in his 93rd year. Sam was a veteran of World War 2 Royal Canadian Air Force. Beloved husband of the late Ettie and dear father of Debbie and her husband Michael ROSENZWEIG of London and Pam GROSSMAN and her husband Sylvain RITCH of Vancouver. Dear grandfather of Trina and Alissa both of London. Sam is also survived by his brother Gabie and his wife Doreen GROSSMAN of Montreal, nephews Allan and his wife Fern GROSSMAN of Toronto, Barry GROSSMAN of Montreal and his niece Marlene and Rodney RUTENBERG of Montreal. Funeral service will be held at Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas (between Colborne and Waterloo) on Wednesday, March 19, 2008 at 1 p.m. with Rabbi Ammos CHORNY officiating. Interment in Or Shalom Cemetery. Donations may be made to the Sam Grossman Enrichment Fund in care of the London Jewish Federation- Friendship Club. Special thanks to Dr. Michael BORRIE, Grace and the team at Parkwood Hospital 2 Perth as well as family physician Doctor Gerald BIGHAM. Shiva will take place Wednesday and Thursday evening. Online condolences can be expressed at www.loganfh.ca. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Sam.

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BIGHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-28 published
BIGHAM, Margaret Elizabeth (formerly McLEAN, née LOVE)
Suddenly at Woodstock General Hospital on Monday, May 26, 2008, Margaret Elizabeth BIGHAM (formerly McLEAN, née LOVE,) of Woodstock in her 73rd year. Dear daughter of Jean LOVE of Woodstock and the late Norm LOVE (1981.) Wife of the late Richard BIGHAM (1994.) Loved mother of Deb BUCHANAN (Rick BARNES), Sue NADER (Byron), Wendy GRABOWSKI (Stan,) all of Woodstock, Bob McLEAN of London, Sandi MacDONALD (Steve) of Embro, and Valerie McKIM (Ken) of Brantford, and step-mother of Rick BIGHAM of London. Loving grandmother of Greg BUCHANAN (Michelle), Brent and Jeff NADER, Paul GRABOWSKI, Jen WELSH (Luke), Ryan MacDONALD (Carolyn), Stevie MacDONALD (Bill), David HILL (Amy), Jessica HILL, and the late Joe MacDONALD (1998,) and step-grandmother of Joanne, Mike, and Cory BIGHAM. Also lovingly remembered by her six great-grandchildren. Sister of Donna HILDERLEY (Bruce) of Port Franks, and Jack LOVE (Karen) of Ingersoll. Also survived by her nieces and nephews. Margaret was an active member of the Ladies Auxiliary of the Royal Canadian Legion, Branch 55, Woodstock. Friends will be received at the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, 69 Wellington Street North, Woodstock on Wednesday, 7-9 p.m. and on Thursday, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Royal Canadian Legion service will be held on Wednesday evening at 6: 30 p.m. at the funeral home under the auspices of the Ladies Auxiliary of Branch 55, Woodstock. Funeral Service at Old Saint Paul's Anglican Church, 723 Dundas Street, Woodstock on Friday, May 30, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Bruce GENGE officiating. Interment at The Anglican Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to Bereaved Families of Ontario - London Chapter or a charity of your choice would be appreciated. Smith-LeRoy, (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may be sent at www.smithleroy.com

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BIGHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-31 published
FULLER, Ross
On behalf of the Fuller family, we would like to thank everyone for their sincere sympathy and kindness since our father Ross's death on May 20. We would especially like to thank the E.M.S. for their professional service and University Hospital for their exemplary care. Also, many thanks to Doctor G. BIGHAM and Doctor M. GODDARD for their care and concern. A special thank-you to Paul Mullen and staff at A. Millard George Funeral Home, and Rev. Lorenzo RAMIREZ, the United Church Women and choir of Empress United Church, as well as the pallbearers. Also, thank-you to the members of Ashlar Lodge for the Masonic service. We have been touched by many people and your thoughtfulness is so very much appreciated. Pat MALONE, Janet and Kathy FULLER and families.

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BIGHAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-05 published
KILGOUR, Allan
Margaret KILGOUR is grateful to her children and grandchildren, family and Friends near and far. A sincere thanks to Father PIRT for the special service and the help he provided. Thanks to Doctor BIGHAM and staff of Chelsey Park Clinic for the care of Allan for so many years. Thanks to our neighbours for the concern and food and to his golfing Friends who included him in the game for as long as they could.

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BIGNALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-03-31 published
WILKINS, Kathleen
Peacefully at Gateway Haven in Wiarton, on Saturday morning, March 29th, 2008. Kathleen WILKINS, of Wiarton, in her 94th year. Dear sister of George BIGNALL. Predeceased by her parents, Joseph and Amy WILKINS; her sisters, Mona TINDALL, Ada BLACKMAN and Margaret LEWIS. There will be no Funeral Service. Interment in Glendale Memorial Gardens, Toronto. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Grey Bruce Animal Shelter as your expression of sympathy and may be made through the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K-3X8 (519-376-7492).

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BIGNELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-15 published
MURPHY, Honourable C. Terrence "Terry" Murphy, Q.C.
Retired Superior Court Justice -- Sudbury/Manitoulin
Peacefully, at home with his family, in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Dorothy for 56 years. Dearest and proudest Dad of Sean (Evelyn), Karen BARSANTI (Richard), Mary Lynn (Ken BALDWIN), Michaela and Timothy. Cherished Grandpa of Marc BARSANTI (Angela MARROCCO), Jennifer INGLIS (Matthew), Ryan, Katie, and Robbie BARSANTI, Amelia MURPHY- BEAUDOIN, Eilish, Monica, Eamonn and Michael MURPHY. Great-Grandpa of Mackenzie INGLIS and Nicole BARSANTI. Brother of Patricia DINSDALE (late Bob,) the late Bill MURPHY (Janet), Monica PEZZUTTO (Art) and Sally ZEPPA (late Henry). Brother-in-law of Helen GEORGE (late Phil,) Kay and Bob JENKINS and the late Rita ROCHON (Côme.) Also survived by many loving nieces and nephews.
Born in Sault Ste. Marie, Terry was the oldest son of Charlie and Monica MURPHY of John Street. When he graduated from Osgoode Hall Law School at the age of 22, Terry became the youngest person in Ontario to be called to the Bar. He served a term as Alderman for the City of Sault Ste. Marie in 1965 and was elected to serve as the Liberal Federal Member of Parliament for the riding of Sault Ste. Marie from 1968 until 1972. During this time, he served on the Justice Committee and also chaired the North Atlantic Assembly, a post that required him to visit all the North Atlantic Treaty Organization countries. In 1980 he was appointed as a Judge for the District of Sudbury/Manitoulin, where he sat until his retirement in 2000. In 2005, Terry was honoured to be formally acknowledged by The Advocates' Society, in the book Learned Friends, as one of fifty of the finest advocates practising in Ontario from 1950 to 2000, who exemplified the very highest standards of advocacy and shaped the legal profession in the province. Terry lived life well, with no regrets. He loved his family, music, good wine, good food, stimulating conversation, Dorothy's flower gardens, and the rugged beauty of Northern Ontario. Friends may call at the Northwood Funeral Home (942 Great Northern Road, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario P6A 5K7 705-945-7758) on Tuesday evening from 6 to 9 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held on Wednesday July 16, 2008 at Precious Blood Cathedral at 11: 00 a.m. with Monsignor Bernard BURNS officiating. Memorial donations made to the Sault Area Hospital Cancer Unit or the Sault Ste. Marie Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated by the family. The family thanks Doctor S. BUEHNER and the Palliative Care Team, Community Care Access Centre, Bayshore Nurses, We Care Home Health Services, Dr. D. WALDE, Doctor WANT (Sudbury), Doctor N. SMITH, Doctor D. BIGNELL and Doctor REICH for their excellent care. Thanks also to Jerry ROWE for his special contribution. www.northwoodfuneral.com

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BIGUS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-10 published
MALEK, Mary Jane " Lucille" (née BLACK)
(October 5, 1921-March 7, 2008)
Suddenly on Friday, March 7, 2008, in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Louis E. MALEK. Loving mother of Joseph (Doreen) of Aurora, Edward (Shelley) of Richmond Hill, and Theresa of Toronto. Dear grandmother of Stephanie, William, Oliver, Jordan, and Luke. Predeceased by her sister Kathleen Sarah WARD (nee BLACK). Aunt of Mary LeNoir KIERANS, Kathryn LEAH (Philip), Eleanor BIGUS (Sam,) and Mariette SERRAO (Pat.) Lucille will be sadly missed by her Friends Mary JOHNSTON and Jean JONES. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Funeral Home, 436 Roncesvalles Ave. (at Howard Park Ave.), on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Rosary Prayers at 7: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass on Tuesday, March 11, 2008 at St. Casimir's Church, 156 Roncesvalles Ave., at 10: 15 a.m. Interment Park Lawn Cemetery.

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