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"ABE" 2008 Obituary


ABEL  ABELA  ABELL  ABERCROMBIE  ABERDINE  ABERNETHY 

ABEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-10 published
STRAUGHAN, Edward J.W.
Of Hanover, passed away peacefully at South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Chesley on Thursday, May 1, 2008 in his 82nd year. Loving father of Tom Lloyd of London, Darby (Sandra) SCHLEICH of Guelph, Laurie (Stan) SHER of Ilderton, Merrilee McGILLOWAY of Calgary, Ted STRAUGHAN of Calgary, Samantha (Peter) ABEL of Putnam and Susan (Jamie) DUVAL of Strathroy. Ed will be fondly remembered by his fifteen grandchildren, five great-grandchildren and his sisters Betty STRUB and Eva MUSTARD. Predeceased by his brother Allan, sisters Marjorie MANTHA and Dorothy NEWMAN and his parents, Edward and Pearl (CUNNINGHAM) STRAUGHAN. At Ed's request, cremation has taken place and a celebration of his life will be held at Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley (519 363-2525) on Thursday, May 22, 2008 at 2 p.m. Interment in Colborne Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to the Elmwood Alcoholics Anonymous or the Chesley Hospital Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. www.cameronfuneralhomes.com

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ABEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-06 published
ABEL, Thomas P. (October 1, 1929-June 6, 2007)
Lovingly remembered and missed by June, Jim, Martin and their families, and the many Friends and associates whose lives he touched.

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ABEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-10 published
JENSEN, Kjeld Berg
Peacefully at his residence, R.R.#1 Elgin on Tuesday January 8, 2008. Kjeld JENSEN in his 85th year. Beloved Husband of Dorothy ABEL. Dear Father of Chris (Doris) JENSEN of Sarnia, Randi (Amber THORNBACK) JENSEN of Ottawa, Lisa (Don) JENSEN- BONHAM of New York. Dear Brother of Ruth JENSEN of North York, Eric JENSEN of Toronto. Fondly remembered by grandchildren; Nissa (Terry), K.C. (Jessica), Kirsten, Dana and great-grandchildren; Kelby, Bryton, Cordae and Callen. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel of the Scotland Funeral Home, 27 Main Street, Elgin on Saturday afternoon at 1 o'clock. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations made to the University Hospitals Kingston Foundation-Cancer Centre or the Charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.
www.scotlandfuneralhome.com

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ABEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-06 published
ABEL, Thomas P. (October 1, 1929-June 6, 2007)
Lovingly remembered and missed by June, Jim, Martin and their families, and the many Friends and associates whose lives he touched.

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ABEL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-26 published
Soccer star and world champion was 'an unbelievable iron man'
A gifted and natural athlete, he was best known as the Canadian who won ABC television's Superstars contest three consecutive times between 1977 and 1979. After that, the network changed the rules
By Peter MALLETT, Page S9
He was a gifted Canadian soccer player who was banned from competing in America's most popular made-for-television athletic competition because he was just too good.
After Brian (Budgie) BUDD won his third consecutive ABC Wide World of Sports' Superstars competition between 1977 and 1979, the notion of a relative unknown competitor from the obscure sport of soccer defeating top major-league and Olympic athletes was too much for network executives to fathom. His success forced them to invoke the infamous "Brian Budd rule" that banned any competitor from the event after they had won it three times.
"He stood out above other athletes," said Canadian Football League Hall of Fame quarterback Tony Gabriel, who had lost to Mr. BUDD in the competition. "That just gave him an aura. Someone who kind of raised the bar and the standard for those competitions." During the 1978 contest, Mr. BUDD topped U.S. Olympic pole-vaulting champion Bob Seagren and Cleveland Browns star Greg Pruitt.
The son of an Atlantic Canadian couple who first settled in Toronto before moving to Delta, British Columbia, Brian was the second of four children and the only boy. His father was a strict disciplinarian and they did not enjoy a happy relationship. One of his favourite childhood stories was how his father, Leighton, introduced him to swimming.
"He [Brian] used to always tell this story about how his father taught him to swim," said his friend Bob COWAN, a former CFRB broadcaster. "Brian would say his father took him down to the docks in the harbour section of Vancouver and threw him right into the deep section of the water. With a pause, Brian would then say: 'The swimming part wasn't hard; it was getting out of the sack he had put me in that was difficult.' "
In any event, he took up competitive swimming, then switched to figure skating. In high school, he turned to athletics and set many records in track and field. He only took to the soccer field in his late teens when a touring all-star team had heard about his abilities as a natural athlete and enlisted him for a tour of Vancouver Island.
After that, he enrolled at the University of British Columbia. In 1973, an incident at a house party - a stranger slashed his throat - nearly ended everything. While he made a full recovery, he was left with a distinctive gravelly voice. He later credited the near-death experience with endowing him with an appreciation for every moment life had to offer.
A year later, he won a Canadian Interuniversity Sport Championship with the University of British Columbia Thunderbirds, graduated with a bachelor's degree in physical education and went professional by joining the Vancouver Whitecaps. Club president and former teammate Bob Lenarduzzi marvelled at Mr. BUDD's first appearance. "He came into the tryout, and I don't think I'm being nasty in suggesting this, but he didn't get by on skill," he said. "It is incredible. I have heard some accounts saying he didn't even play soccer until he was in his late teens - that in itself is incredible. He was a guy who had unbelievable fitness and drive."
At 6 foot 1 and 180 pounds, he was confident, aggressive, outgoing and enthusiastic. Not surprisingly, he was a valuable member of the Canadian national soccer team, playing a total of seven games and scoring two goals. His most satisfying shot occurred against the United States in Port-au-Prince, Haiti, in December, 1976. The game was a qualifying match to settle which of the teams would play in the 1978 World Cup and it was crucial that Canada win. As luck would have it, he scored the winning goal. It was a moment he cherished and talked about for the rest of his life.
Whitecaps owner Herb Capozzi once bet a friend $1,000 that Mr. BUDD could not run to the top of a 30-storey building in less than eight minutes. Mr. BUDD said he could do it in less than three minutes and insisted that, if he won, he and 15 Friends get a free dinner. He ran up the 30 flights in 2 minutes 39 seconds.
By 1978, he had been transferred to the Colorado Caribous, only to be bought by the Toronto Blizzard after two games.
All told, he played seven seasons as a striker in the now-defunct North American Soccer League with the Whitecaps, Caribous, Toronto Metros-Croatia, Blizzard and Houston Hurricane. He also played in the Major Indoor Soccer League with the Cleveland Force and Baltimore Blast. He had 13 goals and 11 assists in 80 North American Soccer League games and 31 goals and six assists in 36 Major Indoor Soccer League games.
Along the way, Mr. BUDD also crossed the Atlantic to test the British soccer waters and earned a place on the player roster for Ayr United, a Scottish team.
It was in the middle of his soccer career that Mr. BUDD entered ABC's Superstars competition. The idea was to have the world's top athletes from different sports compete against one another in a kind of decathlon. While requirements varied from year to year, entrants generally took part in many different events, including a 100-metre sprint, 800-metre foot race, weightlifting, rowing, cycling, swimming, a gymnastic segment and an obstacle course. They were forbidden from entering in their particular specialty event.
By all accounts, Mr. Pruitt, Mr. Seagren and the others did not see Mr. BUDD coming. He swept the field before him and set records in swimming, the 800 metres, gymnastics and other events, and came away with a pocketful of cash. It is estimated that he won $200,000 in the three years before ABC decided he was unbeatable and rewrote the rules.
The decision came as a something of a shock. As a slender, unimposing underdog from Canada he had taken on the world's best (and better known) athletes and beaten them again and again. Privately, he was said to have entertained suspicions that ABC wanted him off the show because he was relatively unknown to U.S. television viewers. To the network's credit, Kyle Rote, Jr. and Anne Henning - two subsequent winners of Superstars contests - lost their eligibility after they had each won three times.
His success turned him into something of a Canadian celebrity. During an interview with Peter Gzowski on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television, he shared his methodology in winning the chin-up portion of the event. "I guess it comes from being knocked down [on the soccer field] and helping yourself up again is how I got any arm strength," he said with a laugh. "Looking at Greg Pruitt - they couldn't get their arms in my pants, their arms were so big."
His techniques were anything but orthodox. Gordon SWEETZER, his Toronto Blizzard roommate, described his friend practising on a beach during a training camp in Portugal. "He used an old rowboat for conditioning and a child's playground at the hotel to do chin-ups. I asked him: Shouldn't you be doing this in a gym? But that was just his style; he just attacked everything with so much zeal. He was an unbelievable iron man."
Although born in Toronto, Mr. SWEETZER had spent most of his life in Britain and was new to Canadian customs when he returned to play for Blizzard in the mid-seventies. As both of them were young and unattached, Mr. BUDD took him under his wing. According to Globe reporter Allan ABEL, Mr. SWEETZER's problem was too much attention from female soccer fans. They had, he said, "tried to get in as much mischief as possible."
Apparently, Mr. BUDD had asked: "What's the difference between Canadian and English girls?"
"For one thing," Mr. SWEETZER replied, "There's more of 'em over here. It's the density of the population."
"How about the quality?"
"That's not too bad either."
"When you tell them you're a Blizzard, do they fall all over you?"
"Well, they recognize you," Mr. SWEETZER replied. "But I wouldn't say that they fall. That's a bit of a myth. Let's just say that they're there, and they want to get to know you. There is some work involved."
After his career on the soccer field ended in 1980, Mr. BUDD co-authored a fitness book, The Executive Guide to Fitness (1982), then entered the business world, first as a community relations director for the Blizzard and later with Molson, Labatt and Kittling Ridge Estate Wines and Spirits.
Later, he worked as a colour commentator for North American Soccer League broadcasts on Global Television and CHIN radio. He also became a regular on cable television's TheScore and the channel's English Premier League and Major League Soccer broadcasts. His success arose from his natural charisma and from a scorching sense of humour. He kept a joke journal to use at speaking engagements and during television broadcasts. After all, it had worked on the soccer field. Once, during a game against Pele and the league's star-studded New York Cosmos, the Brazilian legend congratulated him afterward: "You may not be the best soccer player I have ever played against, but you definitely are the funniest."
He soon learned that a well-placed joke would help close a deal at Labatt or for sizing up a crucial play during a soccer broadcast.
"Sometimes, his sense of humour went too far because he always seemed to test the limit of what was acceptable," said Mr. COWAN, the former CFRB broadcaster.
Once during a wedding ceremony, Mr. BUDD decided it would be fitting to wear a kilt. During the reception, and after downing a few drinks, he approached the grandmother of the bride and somehow got the notion it would be funny to pull the kilt up and over her head. Needless to say, it didn't go over well.
His charity work, however, was appreciated. Whatever organization needed his services, he would be there at the drop of a hat, said Mr. COWAN. He once flew to Jamaica as part of an effort with the Toronto Police Service to help disadvantaged children.
His charity work allowed him to forge Friendships with the likes of hockey legends Lanny McDonald and Doug Gilmour, football commentator John Madden, the cast of SCTV and the rock band The Good Brothers. He became particularly close to SCTV John Candy.
Robert Iarusci, a former national teammate of Mr. BUDD and a co-worker at Labatt, recalled a 1993 charity golf tournament in which they joined a foursome with Mr. Candy and fellow SCTV star Eugene Levy. "John Candy had just returned from filming the movie Uncle Buck and, on the golf course, BUDD and Candy just exchanged jabs all afternoon. It was hysterical. Every time John went to take a swing at the ball, BUDD would say something to distract him - it was a great afternoon and the party went well on into the early morning hours."
For all that, he said Mr. BUDD shattered the stereotype of the "dumb jock" when he underwent an aptitude test before joining Labatt in 1996. While most applicants took three hours to complete the test, he breezed through it in about half an hour, much to the astonishment of executives.
"He was always about 10 minutes ahead thinking of what the outcome of an event or situation we would have to deal with," said his wife, Brenda. "His brain just worked so fast and his thought process was just so much quicker, he just came up with solutions to complex problems."
Mr. BUDD maintained a busy pace. Over the years, he devised such things as electronic media-oriented fitness programs, took computer courses, played soccer for an amateur team, took up skydiving and scuba diving, as well as squash. He also swam 1.5 kilometres a day and talked a mile a minute. "I never sleep," he told The Globe and Mail in 1985. "I was never particularly gifted as a soccer player but was always under severe pressure because I won the Superstars. Really, I'm built like an olive on sticks."
Brian BUDD was born on April 8, 1952, in Toronto. He died in hospital on June 11, 2008, after suffering a heart attack at home. He was 56. He is survived by his wife, Brenda; son Riley, 8; and daughter Bridgette, 6. He also leaves his mother, Bertha, and sisters Barbara, Sonya and Lisa.
On June 14, a rowdy, sellout crowd observed a moment of silence at the 20,000-seat BMO Field in Toronto before a game between Toronto FC and Colorado Rapids.

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ABELA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-22 published
MacDONALD, Lillian (née MILES)
Peacefully at Woodstock General Hospital on Sunday, July 20th, 2008, Lillian MacDONALD (née MILES) of Park Place Retirement Home Woodstock, and formerly of Willowgrove Crescent, in her 101st year. Beloved wife of the late Ray MacDONALD (1988.) Loved mother of Howard and his wife Marilyn of Toronto. Dear Grandmother of Jane (Adrian BATTEN,) Martha (Bill NICOLOFF,) and Mary Sue (David ABELA.) Cherished great-grandmother of Evan and Andrew BATTEN; Maddy, Carly and Amy NICOLOFF and Kylie and Holly ABELA. Lillian is survived by her sister Ethel ABRAHMS of Port Charlotte, Florida as well as many nieces and nephews. Family will receive Friends at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock (519-539-0004) on Monday, July 28th, 2008 after 12: 30 p.m. where the complete service will be held in the chapel at 1: 30 p.m. Because of Lillian's fond love of children, contributions to the Sunshine Foundation of Canada would be greatly appreciated. The family would like to extend a special thank you to all the caring staff at Park Place Retirement Home, as well as Joanne Penny and Ethel Beamish. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com

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ABELA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-21 published
McKAY, Ann
Mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, world traveller, singer, conversationalist, humorist. Born August 17, 1907, in Aberdeen, Scotland. Died February 5 in Toronto of old age, aged 100.
By Georgina ABELA and Nellemarie HYDE, Page L6
Ann Urquhart Davies Clyne McKAY lived for 50 years in Aberdeen and 50 years in Toronto.
Early life wasn't easy for Ann, known as Annie. Her mother, Mary CLYNE, lost her leg at 4 when she was run over by a horse and cart, yet she managed to raise Annie and her two sisters (a third sister died at eight months old.) Hugh URQUHART, Annie's father, was a Gordon Highlander who fought in the Boer War.
Annie married Frank McKAY in her teens and gave birth to four children: Nan, Francis, Hugh and Ronald. Sadly, she was widowed at the age of 47. Two years later, she and Ronald immigrated to Canada.
Those first years in Toronto were difficult for Annie and Ron, having no job skills or family nearby. Annie moved between jobs, then was delighted to be hired by Connaught Laboratories, where she remained a devoted employee, sterilizing lab equipment, until her retirement.
Motivated by a strong desire to visit her son Francis in New Zealand, Annie babysat in the evenings for extra money to pay the fare. She was forever grateful to the travel agent who advised her to go by ship from San Francisco on a world cruise, calling in at all the exotic places she never thought she would see. She got off the ship at one port in Japan, travelled with a fellow passenger the length of the country by train and caught up with the boat at another port. While staying several months with her son and his family, Annie worked in a dress shop to help finance more travel in New Zealand. One of the highlights of her trip was joining a much younger group of people to walk the arduous Milford Track.
Annie loved singing old Scottish songs and hymns. She was quick-witted and funny, and always lightened the mood. Who could forget her description of bathing without a bathtub in Scotland: "First you wash down as far as possible, then you wash up as far as possible, and then you wash possible."
Although she wasn't happy about compulsory retirement, Annie travelled when she could, returning twice to New Zealand, to Scotland many times, and to Florida every year. She had 13 grandchildren and 14 great-grandchildren.
Annie loved to walk through her neighbourhood. In her 80s, while out on her daily walk, she was hit by a car. With both legs and her pelvis broken, the prognosis wasn't good. The doctors didn't think she would survive surgery, and didn't operate for three days. But survive she did, and lived to travel more, to Scotland, London, Paris and Daytona Beach, Florida Despite several small strokes in her 90s, Annie celebrated her 100th birthday surrounded by family and Friends.
Georgina ABELA and Nellemarie HYDE are Annie's cousins.

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ABELL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-25 published
PLINIUSSEN, Egon
Egon, 81, died peacefully in Kingston, Ontario on Thursday, March 13, 2008. He is survived by his son and daughter-in-law, John Kurt PLINIUSSEN and Marion ABELL of Kingston, his brother and sister-in-law, John and Birgit PLINIUSSEN of London, and his grandchildren, Erika and Kurtis PLINIUSSEN- KOZIOL of London. He is predeceased by his wife of 55 years, Edith PLINIUSSEN who died on June 18, 2006. Egon was born in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1926 and immigrated to Canada in 1957. He worked at Proto Tools and ABB in London, and earlier in the Carlsberg plant in Copenhagen. Egon loved the ocean and traveled with Edith to different parts of Canada and U.S.A. in their motor home. They spent many winters in Zephyr Hills, Florida, where he was an avid golfer. Egon was a tremendous fan of his grandchildren and their sports. In the last two years, he was lovingly cared for by his daughter-in-law and son, John. We will miss his positive attitude, his hearty laugh and his unique ability to tell stories. A graveside service will be held this spring in London. The family has significant gratitude for the compassionate teams at the Saint Mary's Palliative Hospital and the Kingston General Hospital. Online condolences can be sent to jpliniussen@business.queensu.ca.

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ABELL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-22 published
ABELL, Evelyn Anne (née WATTS)
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on July 20, 2008. Evelyn Anne ABELL of Metcalfe Gardens, Saint Thomas and formerly, R.R.#1, Aylmer in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Russell ABELL (1988.) Survived by step-daughters, Doreen WARD of Emsdale, and Dorothy MEYER and husband Warren of R.R.#7 Aylmer. Step-grandmother of Megan ABELL of R.R.#1, Aylmer and sister-in-law of Heather WATTS of Edmonton, Alberta. Also survived by a number of nieces and nephews. Precedeceased by a stepson Leonard ABELL and wife Pamela and a brother Ensley WATTS. Born in Malahide Township Ontario on April 23, 1920 daughter of the late Hubert and Myrtle (LAUR- ENSLEY) WATTS. Evelyn had lived most of her life in Aylmer and Malahide Township. She was member of the Verdun Chapter #36, of the Order of the Eastern Star. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, July 24, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Dunboyne Cemetery. Rev. Donald GRAHAM, officiating. Donations to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind would be appreciated. Condolences at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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ABERCROMBIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-02 published
WIGGIN, Jack
We regret to announce the passing of Jack WIGGIN on April 26th, 2008 in Vernon Jubilee Hospital at the age of 87 years. With an M.Sc. and M.D. from Queen's University, as well as a PhD from Cambridge University, Jack had a distinguished career in medicine and health sciences that spanned six decades. Among his numerous accomplishments, he will be particularly remembered for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of Canadian clinical research and biomedical science. His many professional titles included Captain in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps., family physician, Chief Superintendent of the Defence Medical Research Laboratories, Deputy Chairman (Scientific) of the Defence Research Board of Canada, Director General of Research Programs and Scientific Advisor to the Minister of National Health and Welfare, Deputy Medical Director of the Canadian Red Cross Transfusion Service, Scientific Editor of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Associate Professor in the McGill University School of Medicine, and editor as well as contributing author of several medical textbooks. A man of steadfast principle, unwavering integrity and extraordinary generosity, his proudest accomplishments, above all others, were as husband to his loving wife Mary of 63 years, father to two sons, John (Nancy) of Kimberley, British Columbia and Doug (Heather DOW) of Vancouver, British Columbia, three daughters, Pam (Bill SEMPLE) WIGGIN of Ottawa, Ontario, Carol WIGGIN of Victoria, British Columbia and Sue (Brian GUY) WIGGIN of Vernon, grandfather to ten grandchildren, Matthew (Karina HOULE) of Vancouver, British Columbia, Laura (Ryan) CAIN, of Cranbrook, British Columbia, Kate, Robb, Keara, Christopher, Geordie, Alex, Graeme, and Thomas and great-grandfather to Anna and Molly. Jack will also be lovingly remembered by his sister, Barbara ABERCROMBIE of England, brother-in-law, Don McQUAY of Whitby, Ontario, sister-in-law, Betty CLARKE of Vernon as well as numerous nieces and nephews. His family is profoundly thankful for the gift of sharing in his remarkable life and for the memories they will forever treasure. They extend heartfelt appreciation to Doctor Dave ARNOLD and the wonderful staff of Vernon Jubilee hospital for their sensitive and expert care in easing Jack's passing and the warm support they gave to the family. There will be no service by request of the family. Cremation. Flowers are gratefully declined. Those wishing to make contributions in memory of Jack may do so to Doctors Without Borders - Canada, #402 720 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2T9. Arrangements have been entrusted to:
Pleasant Valley Funeral Home, 4303 Pleasant Valley Road, Vernon, British Columbia V1T 4M4 Phone: 250-542-4333

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ABERCROMBIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-10 published
WIGGIN, Jack
We regret to announce the passing of Jack WIGGIN on April 26th, 2008 in Vernon Jubilee Hospital at the age of 87 years. With an M.Sc. and M.D. from Queen's University, as well as a PhD from Cambridge University, Jack had a distinguished career in medicine and health sciences that spanned six decades. Among his numerous accomplishments, he will be particularly remembered for his outstanding contribution to the advancement of Canadian clinical research and biomedical science. His many professional titles included Captain in the Royal Canadian Medical Corps., family physician, Chief Superintendent of the Defence Medical Research Laboratories, Deputy Chairman (Scientific) of the Defence Research Board of Canada, Director General of Research Programs and Scientific Advisor to the Minister of National Health and Welfare, Deputy Medical Director of the Canadian Red Cross Transfusion Service, Scientific Editor of the Canadian Medical Association Journal, Associate Professor in the McGill University School of Medicine, and editor as well as contributing author of several medical textbooks. A man of steadfast principle, unwavering integrity and extraordinary generosity, his proudest accomplishments, above all others, were as husband to his loving wife Mary of 63 years, father to two sons, John (Nancy) of Kimberley, British Columbia and Doug (Heather DOW) of Vancouver, British Columbia, three daughters, Pam (Bill SEMPLE) WIGGIN of Ottawa, Ontario, Carol WIGGIN of Victoria, British Columbia and Sue (Brian GUY) WIGGIN of Vernon, grandfather to ten grandchildren, Matthew (Karina HOULE) of Vancouver, British Columbia, Laura (Ryan) CAIN, of Cranbrook, British Columbia, Kate, Robb, Keara, Christopher, Geordie, Alex, Graeme, and Thomas and great-grandfather to Anna and Molly. Jack will also be lovingly remembered by his sister, Barbara ABERCROMBIE of England, brother-in-law, Don McQUAY of Whitby, Ontario, sister-in-law, Betty CLARKE of Vernon, as well as numerous nieces and nephews. His family is profoundly thankful for the gift of sharing in his remarkable life and for the memories they will forever treasure. They extend heartfelt appreciation to Doctor Dave Arnold and the wonderful staff of Vernon Jubilee Hospital for their sensitive and expert care in easing Jack's passing and the warm support they gave to the family. There will be no service by request of the family. Cremation. Flowers are gratefully declined. Those wishing to make contributions in memory of Jack may do so to Doctors Without Borders - Canada, #402 720 Spadina Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5S 2T9. Arrangements have been entrusted to: Pleasant Valley Funeral Home, 4303 Pleasant Valley Road, Vernon, British Columbia V1T 4M4 Phone: 250-542-4333

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ABERDINE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-29 published
MANTLE, Terry Harold
Passed away peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services, Owen Sound on Sunday, April 27, 2008 in his 65th year. Survived by his mother Shirley MANTLE of Smith Falls and his children Troy and his wife Trish MANTLE of Kitchener, Debbie ABERDINE of Owen Sound, Tevea STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of Chatsworth, Jason DOREY of Owen Sound and Gabrielle SLACK of Owen Sound. Sadly missed by Tory-Lynn and Tanner MANTLE. Many thanks to Doctor Fred VEENSTRA and the staff on 4-1 for their support and professionalism. Cremation has taken place. As per Terry's wishes, no service will be held. Arrangements entrusted to Grey Bruce Cremation and Burial Services 519-371-8507

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ABERNETHY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-19 published
ABERNETHY, John David
Suddenly in Owen Sound, on Thursday, January 17th, 2008, John David ABERNETHY, of Owen Sound, in his 56th year. Dearly loved husband of Gisele ABERNETHY (née FOURNIER.) Loving father of Jacqueline, of Owen Sound, and Danielle, and her fiancé, Tim AUDAS, of Guelph. Beloved son of Pearl ABERNETHY (née KING,) of London, and the late Donald ABERNETHY. Loved brother of June KEELING, (Ron “Butch”,) of Owen Sound, Jim ABERNETHY, of Hamilton, Gerry ABERNETHY (Terri,) of Pickering, and Joanne ABERNETHY- CHRISTOU, of Hamilton. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 -14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K 3X8 (519-376-7492), on Sunday evening from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service for John ABERNETHY will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Monday, January 21st, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, or the Arthritis Society as your expression of sympathy.

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