SALTS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-28 published
DONALDSON, Sophia "Vi"
Surrounded by family on Sunday, May 25, 2008 at the age of 86. Beloved wife of the late James (1999). Loving mother of Gregory "Harry" of Calgary, Peter and his wife Pauline, Margo (SALTS,) Alan, and Shawn (METCALF) and her husband Ian MacDONALD all of Sarnia. Proud grandmother of Corry SALTS and Jessica (SALTS) Odrcich (Peter), Carrie (Garreth BALFE) and Greg DONALDSON, Wesley (Janet JACKSON,) Joseph and Laura METCALF. Dearest sister of Rose KRUPPER, Sister Josephine KOWALSKI, Ann (George) LEHTO, and Roman KOWALSKI. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sons James and Bruce and brothers Joseph, Michael and Peter KOWALSKI. A lover of music, Vi played trumpet in an all girls traveling orchestra in the 1930s and 1940s. Vi was a longtime member of Sacred Heart Catholic Women's League and volunteered with Sarnia's Meals on Wheels for many years. She will be sadly missed by her favourite cat, Gus. Vi was passionate about gardening and a talented quilter and will be most remembered as a gifted baker and pastry maker. Visitation will be held at the McKenzie and Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 431 N. Christina Street, Sarnia (519-244-3131), on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where prayers will be offered at 8: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated by Fr. Len DESJARDINS at Sacred Heart Church at 11: 30 a.m. on Friday, May 30, 2008. Cremation to follow with private family interment at Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery at a later date. As an expression of sympathy, Friends who wish may send memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, 714 Lite Street, Sarnia, N7V 1A6. Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com A tree will be planted in memory of Vi DONALDSON in the McKenzie and Blundy Memorial Forest. Dedication service Sunday, September 21, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Wawanosh Wetlands Conservation Area.

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SALUDARES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-26 published
BINET, Herbert George " Micky"
Died peacefully on July 25, 2008, a day after this 91st birthday. Father of Stephen (Lynda), David and Elizabeth. Loving grandfather of Brittany and Billy BINET; Andrew, Robert and Penfield BINET and Elizabeth and Alexandra LAING. Predeceased by his wife Elizabeth and their son Peter. Veteran of World War 2 (Royal Canadian Air Force). A private family service was held in the Ward Funeral Home, Oakville (905-844-3221). Special thanks to his caregivers Elma SALUDARES and Edwin NENE and to Doctor R. GABRIEL.

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SALUSTRI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-11 published
SALUSTRI, Doctor Paolo Emilio
We sadly announce the peaceful passing of Paolo, age 91, on 8th June 2008 at Southlake Regional Health Centre. Paolo is survived by his wife Lorenza and son Filippo and now joins his siblings Bettina, Luisa, Marcella, Metella and Tullia. He will be fondly remembered by his extended family and Friends in both Canada and Italy. Heartfelt thanks to Doctor K. JAMES and the caring nurses at the Southlake Palliative Unit for their kindness, respect and attention. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or other charity of choice. May we all live as he did; with the serenity to accept the things we can not change, the strength to change the things we can, and the wisdom to know the difference.

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SALUTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-26 published
Uncompromising, transformative professor nurtured students and grudges across borders
Abused as a child in England, he arranged passage to Canada and built a successful but peripatetic academic career
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Pomp, circumstance and hooded academic gowns were the order of the day when York University celebrated its 40th anniversary in March, 1999. Among the invited guests was John R. SEELEY, the university's first professor of sociology, and a former friend and colleague of inaugural president Murray ROSS.
"What are you doing here?" a clearly affronted Prof. ROSS demanded when Prof. SEELEY, who had travelled from his home in California, arrived at the reception. "I was invited," Prof. SEELEY replied. Enraged, Prof. ROSS threw his gown across the room and stomped out and had to be persuaded to return, according to some of the other guests in attendance.
Prof. ROSS was not alone in his antipathy to Prof. SEELEY, an elfin-like man of diminutive stature (5 foot 4 at a stretch) but outsized moral and intellectual presence. His maddening refusal to compromise personal ethical standards led to his abrupt departure from teaching positions at several universities. Senior bureaucrats at two Ontario universities vetoed decisions to hire him despite his reputation as a top sociologist who eventually had more than 400 publications, including Crestwood Heights: A North American Suburb, Community Chest: A Case Study in Philanthropy, and a collection of psychological essays, The Americanization of the Unconscious.
But the same qualities that frightened administrators and branded him a troublemaker often made him a transformative influence. His capacity for listening, his respect for the individual and his ability to nurture ideas and people, especially children and young adults, made him a moral beacon for many.
"He was more important in my life than either of my parents," criminal lawyer Clayton RUBY said in an interview.
"He picked up everything I was concerned about before I'd finished the sentence and replied, as always, with astute, sensitive advice," said journalist Rick SALUTIN, who, like Mr. RUBY, was a student at York in the early 1960s. "I have no idea what I'll do for advice without him."
Prof. SEELEY grew up physically and emotionally abused in England, experiences that shaped his academic interests as a sociologist, his therapeutic approach as a psychoanalyst and his world view as a citizen.
"It was pretty plain to those of us who knew him that his traumatic and terrible childhood gave birth to a lifelong commitment to treating children well, respecting them as people and honouring their right to be free from abuse," his son Ron said. "The way that he started out being treated as a child, without any recognition of who he was, made him thirsty for knowledge and made him recognize the importance of the emotional nurturing of children."
John Ronald SEELEY was born in the Hampstead area of London in 1913, the second of four sons, to Emil FRIEDEBERG, a German businessman who was a principal in a European commodities firm centred in Antwerp. His mother, Lilly SEELEY, was a wealthy Edwardian society woman who may have been mentally ill. The family probably took her last name because of anti-German sentiment during the First World War.
Young John was beaten and abandoned for long stretches by his mother. After his father died when John was 8, he was sent to a boarding school in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was the youngest pupil by far and unable to speak the language. At 12, he was brought back to England and sent to another boarding school, where the headmaster taught him practical life skills and encouraged him to read, to think for himself and to take pride in his intellectual abilities. John was 15 when he saw what was probably an ad offering passage to Canada and the prospect of land for those willing to work as farm labourers for a specified period of time.
Seeing this as a way to escape his mother, John arranged his passage and worked as a farm labourer for three years, and, with the help of a local Presbyterian minister, completed his high-school education. He moved to Toronto in 1931 and found work as a printer's devil at a graphic arts firm called Rolf Clark Stone. Eventually, he worked his way up to export manager and into the affections of secretary Margaret Mary DEROCHER. Mr. SEELEY left in 1940 to study at the University of Chicago, where he earned a bachelor's degree. He returned to Toronto in 1942, enlisted in the army as a second lieutenant and eventually worked his way up to staff captain. He didn't fight overseas, although he was shipped to London on a short-term project that included a progressive attempt to deal with what we now call post-traumatic stress syndrome and postwar planning for veterans.
In 1943, he and Ms. DEROCHER married in Toronto. Between 1944 and 1955, they had four sons: John, David, Ronald and Peter. After demobilization, he returned to the University of Chicago and began work on his doctorate in sociology. He returned to Toronto in 1949 without having completed his dissertation and took a job as executive director of what is now the Canadian Mental Health Association.
He was also teaching part-time in the psychiatry and sociology departments of the University of Toronto, separate departments that he believed for the rest of his life should be combined. These were also the years when he was researching social mores in Toronto's Forest Hill Village, then studying fundraising methods in Indiana. The SEELEYs moved back to Toronto in late 1956 and he took a job as director of research for what is now the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. That same year, Crestwood Heights was published by the University of Toronto Press. The book, based on his five-year study of Forest Hill (the area was not named), described men working extremely hard to maintain a luxurious lifestyle, wives trained to support their husbands by cultivating social connections, and children inculcated with the same mores so they, too, would learn to value social prestige and wealth. It was a hugely influential book. The following year, the University of Toronto published Community Chest, an examination of organized fundraising in Indianapolis and community perceptions of its effectiveness.
While teaching at the U of T, Prof. SEELEY became friendly with Dr. ROSS, a professor of social work. They talked about the issues of the day, including new approaches to education, given the huge wave of children born after the Second World War who were approaching university age. Many of them felt entitled to higher education and wanted a voice in what and how they were taught. In the preface to The New University (a collection of his speeches that amounted to a draft plan for York University,) Prof. ROSS emphasized the beneficial effects of the more intimate setting of a liberal arts college, acknowledging his debt to Prof. SEELEY for "reading, and commenting on, many of these speeches in their original form."
After Prof. ROSS was named the inaugural president of York in 1959, he invited Prof. SEELEY to join him there as professor of sociology. Within three years, the two men were bitterly and publicly estranged, essentially over the institution's size and nature. By 1963, 10 of the 43-member faculty had resigned, several out of dissatisfaction with Prof. ROSS's leadership and what they felt was muddled thinking and misplaced priorities in turning the university into a massive educational factory. Historian Michiel Horn, author of a forthcoming history of York University, and political scientist Denis SMITH, who served as the university's first registrar, both stated in interviews that amid the challenge to find faculty, establish a curriculum and educate students, Prof. ROSS had a tendency to say what he thought people wanted to hear.
As the relationship soured, Prof. SEELEY arranged to be a visiting professor in the sociology department at Brandeis University for the 1963-64 academic year. While teaching at Brandeis, he resigned from York. The following year, he was a visiting fellow at California's Stanford University, and returned to Brandeis in 1965 as chair of the sociology department. Within a short time, he was at odds with the administration over his political activism against the Vietnam War. He objected vociferously to the university sharing students' personal information (including grades) with the Selective Service System, which administered the military draft.
For most of the next decade, Prof. SEELEY moved his family back and forth across the United States as he took up what invariably turned into short-term appointments at a variety of institutions, including the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, a liberal think tank founded by educational philosopher Robert Hutchins in Santa Barbara, California. This didn't last long, as Prof. Hutchins reorganized the centre two years later after a philosophical and economic parting of the ways that saw many fellows depart, including Prof. SEELEY, and others join, including Alexander Comfort, later the author of The Joy of Sex, and Stanford biologist Paul R. Ehrlich, author of The Population Bomb.
Prof. SEELEY yearned to return to Canada, especially Toronto, but his dissident political activity and fractious reputation apparently mitigated against formal invitations. He was a "lightening rod," said Ron SEELEY. "He was just too hot for many people in staid institutions to handle."
Nevertheless, he was offered a faculty position in the sociology department at the University of Toronto in May, 1974, which was overruled by senior administrators. Then, a search committee from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education chose him to fill a sociology department vacancy, but this, too, was vetoed by a senior executive after education minister Thomas Wells telephoned Ontario Institute for Studies in Education director Robert Jackson to pass on negative comments about Prof. SEELEY. Amid student and faculty protests, The Globe and Mail wrote an editorial asking whether Mr. Wells had improperly influenced the decision.
Prof. SEELEY, by then 61, finished his academic career at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles as a professor of sociology. He finally received his doctorate (philosophy - social sciences) from International College on January 15, 1975. At 65, he retired and began a new career as a psychoanalyst in private practice under a supervising analyst.
In his last years, he became a devout member of his local Episcopal Church and maintained Friendships with family and Friends.
"It was a wonderful experience to be his child," Ron SEELEY said. "The breadth of his knowledge and his intellect were amazing. It was interesting as he was ill and passing - you could feel all of what he had distributed around the world coming back toward him in letters, visits and phone calls, and so many of them said the same thing: that he had touched their lives in a way that nobody else had and that he was like a father to them."
John Ronald SEELEY was born in London on February 21, 1913. He died at Saint_John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California., on December 16, 2007, after a short illness. He was 94. Predeceased by his wife and his siblings, he is survived by four sons, six grandchildren and extended family.

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SALVA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-12 published
MILNES, John Herbert
Died peacefully on April 11th, 2008 at home in his 96th year following a short illness. The past president of Milnes Fuel Oil Limited and the Standard Fuel Company Limited served with the Canadian Intelligence Corps during World War 2.
He will be missed by his sister Helen WILLIAMS, niece Ann HARRINGTON and her husband Robert, nephew Robert WILLIAMS and Robert's wife Linda HUTJENS. He will also be missed by his devoted care givers Leticia PUA, Filma MOCANU and Biennenida SALVA as well as his long time Friends Theresa LUKAC, Nestor and Dolores MAPANAO, and Robert and Patricia BOSWELL and their son Andrew.
A funeral service will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home (159 Eglinton Ave. W. 2 lights west of Yonge St.) Wednesday April 16th, 2008 at 11 a.m. Visitation will be held the hour prior to the ceremony. Interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

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SALVA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-15 published
MILNES, John Herbert
Died peacefully on April 11th, 2008 at home in his 96th year following a short illness. The past president of Milnes Fuel Oil Limited and the Standard Fuel Company Limited served with the Canadian Intelligence Corps during World War 2.
He will be missed by his sister Helen WILLIAMS, niece Ann HARRINGTON and her husband Robert, nephew Robert WILLIAMS and Robert's wife Linda HUTJENS. He will also be missed by his devoted care givers Leticia PUA, Filma MOCANU and Biennenida SALVA as well as his long time Friends Theresa LUKAC, Nestor and Dolores MAPANAO, and Robert and Patricia BOSWELL and their son Andrew.
A funeral service will be held at the Morley Bedford Funeral Home (159 Eglinton Ave. W. 2 lights west of Yonge St.) Wednesday April 16th, 2008 at 11 a.m. Visitation will be held the hour prior to the ceremony. Interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery.

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