ROWED o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-07 published
JEFFRIES, Jean (CAMERON)
At University Hospital, London, on Wednesday, March 5, 2008. Jean (CAMERON) JEFFRIES of London in her 98th year. Beloved wife of the late William Leslie "Bill" JEFFRIES. Predeceased by her brother Bruce W. CAMERON and her sisters Pauline PARKINSON and Grace ROWED. Also loved by her niece Beverley ALLEN and her husband Lewis of London and several other nieces and nephews. Friends will be received by the family one hour prior to the funeral service being conducted in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London on Monday, March 10th at 1: 00 p.m. with interment following in Woodland Cemetery, London. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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ROWELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-22 published
DICKSON/DIXON, Keith Norman
W.W. II Veteran with Royal Canadian Hussars
Peacefully, at Mapleview Nursing Home, on Monday, April 21st, 2008. Keith Norman DICKSON/DIXON, of Owen Sound, in his 86th year. Loved husband of Velma. Loving father of Dennis (Kelley) DICKSON/DIXON, of R.R.#8, Owen Sound, Rodger (Joanna) DICKSON/DIXON, of Sarnia, Rae IRWIN, of Guelph, Marlene (Gary) CARROLL, of Whitby, Marilyn SMITH of Owen Sound, and Randy (Marilyn) DICKSON/DIXON of Calgary. Proud grandfather of nine grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Keith will be missed by his brother Bill (Jane) DICKSON/DIXON, of Orillia, and sisters-in-law Janet DICKSON/DIXON, of Shelburne, Donna DICKSON/DIXON and Shirley DICKSON/DIXON of Owen Sound. Predeceased by his parents, Norman and Emma DICKSON/DIXON, son-in-law Brian SMITH, brothers Ross, Harold and Howard and a sister, Dorothy (John) ROWELL. A Funeral Service for Keith DICKSON/DIXON will be held at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K-3X8 (519-376-7492) on Thursday, April 24th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. Visitation from 11:00 a.m. until time of service. Interment in McLean's Cemetery, Bognor. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Chatsworth Legion or Strathaven Baptist Church, as your expression of sympathy.

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ROWELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-23 published
DICKSON/DIXON, Keith
W.W. II Veteran with Royal Canadian Hussars
Peacefully at Mapleview Nursing Home, on Monday, April 21st, 2008. Keith Norman DICKSON/DIXON, of Owen Sound, in his 86th year. Loved husband of Velma. Loving father of Roger (Joanne) DICKSON/DIXON, of Sarnia, Rae DICKSON/DIXON, of Guelph, Marlene (Gary) CARROLL, of Whitby, Dennis (Kelley) DICKSON/DIXON, of R.R.#8, Owen Sound, Marilyn SMITH, of Owen Sound and Randy (Marilyn) DICKSON/DIXON, of Calgary. Proud grandfather of nine grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. Keith will be missed by his brother, Bill (Jane) DICKSON/DIXON, of Orillia and his sisters-in-law, Janet DICKSON/DIXON, of Shelburne, Donna DICKSON/DIXON and Shirley DICKSON/DIXON, both of Owen Sound and his many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents, Norman and Emma DICKSON/DIXON; his son-in-law, Brian SMITH his brothers, Ross, Harold and Howard DICKSON/DIXON; his sister, Dorothy (John) ROWELL. A Funeral Service for Keith DICKSON/DIXON will be held at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K-3X8 (519-376-7492) on Thursday, April 24th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. with Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. Visitation from 11: 00 a.m. until time of service. Interment in McLean's Cemetery, Bognor. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Royal Canadian Legion Branch #464, Chatsworth or the Strathaven Baptist Church, as your expression of sympathy.

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ROWELL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-03 published
SAWTELL, Marian Ruth (née PEIRCE)
At the Woodstock General Hospital on Wednesday, April 2, 2008. Marian Ruth SAWTELL (née PEIRCE) of Woodstock. Beloved wife of the late R.E. "Bill" SAWTELL (2001.) Dear father of Mary COOK and her husband John, Dawn ROWELL and her husband John and Anne SAWTELL and her husband Robert WATSON all of Woodstock. Loved grandmother of Aveleigh COOK, Elizabeth ERB (Trevor), Susan TURKALJ (Vince), Mary Catherine BAKER (Shaun), Christine ROWELL (Eric DOPF) and great-grandmother of Nicholas ERB, Brooke and Mathew TURKALJ. Predeceased by a daughter Aveleigh Ann, by her parents W.H. "Cap" and Hattie PEIRCE and by her sister Helen HOWARD. Marian was a charter member of the Y's Menettes Club, a member of the Woodstock Oxford Women's Probus Club, had worked with the Women's Committee of the Woodstock Art Gallery and was a member of Central United Church. Friends may call at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock, 519-539-0004 on Friday, April 4, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. John FURRY officiating. Interment later in the Baptist Cemetery. Contributions to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com. The family would like to thank the nursing staff of 3rd and 4th floors and Dr. George, all of Woodstock General Hospital, for their care and kindness.

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ROWLAND o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-04-16 published
SAINT_JACQUES--In memory of Frederick and Alena SAINT_JACQUES
As time goes by without you
And the days turn into years
They hold a million memories
And a thousand silent tears.
Mom and Dad you gave us many things in life
Gifts both great and small
But most of all you gave us love
The greatest gift of all.
Lord if you have a flower garden
Please pick a bouquet for them
And place them in their arms
And please tell them they came from us.
Gone but not forgotten.
Lovingly remembered by Sheila and Charlie ROWLAND, Frank and Kaye, Clarence, Tyler and Megan SAINT_JACQUES

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ROWLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-08 published
DEVELTER, Agnes (née VANDENBILCKE)
Peacefully at Maple Manor Nursing Home on Tuesday, May 6, 2008, Agnes DEVELTER of Tillsonburg at the age of 82 years. Born in Westvleteren, W.F. Belgium on December 25, 1925. Dear daughter of the late Maurice VANDENBILCKE and the late former Madeleine PAPERSTRAETE. Loving wife and best friend of 59 years to Gustaf DEVELTER. Dear mother and mother-in-law of George DEVELTER of Delhi (late Madeline 2005) and Georgette and George BLAKLEY, R.R.#7, Tillsonburg. Proud grandmother of Sherri (Shane) ROWLAND Kathi BLAKLEY (Jerry FINDLAY); Tom BLAKLEY; Donald BLAKLEY. Special great-grandma to Tyler. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Prosper and Simone VANDENBILCKE, Alymer; Willy and Doris VANDENBILCKE, Golden, British Columbia; Godfried VANDENBILCKE, Tillsonburg Godelieve and Michel D'HOINE, Mount Brydges. Also survived by a brother-in-law Cyril DEVELTER of Tillsonburg (late Josie 2005) and by several nieces, nephews and cousins. Predeceased by a brother Daniel VANDENBEILCKE (2008.) Funeral Liturgy Service on Friday, May 9, 2008 at 11 a.m. at the Verhoeve Funeral Home, 262 Broadway, Tillsonburg by Rev. Fr. Matthew GEORGE. Interment in Tillsonburg Cemetery. Donations (by cheque only) to Maple Manor Nursing Home or the charity of your choice. Visitation Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Parish Prayers Thursday evening at 7 p.m.

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ROWLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
ELMSLEY, Marguerite " Margot" (née GREER/GRIER)
29 April 1920 - 14 April 2008
Margot died peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia at Glen Warren Care Home. Margot was predeceased by her husband, C.M.R. ELMSLEY, in 1975. She is survived by her daughter Alex CARRIERE (Cyril BUBAR) of Kelowna, British Columbia, son Tony (Rose) and grandchild Stephanie of Kanata, Ontario, sisters Kathleen GREER/GRIER, Holly ROWLAND (Arthur,) Patricia MARTIN (Michael,) and her brother James GREER/GRIER, all of Victoria. Margot will be missed by her family, her nieces and nephews, their families and many Friends whose hearts she touched with her generosity and lack of malice. Margot was the daughter of Col. and Mrs. H.C. GREER/GRIER of Esquimalt, British Columbia. When her husband Tony was posted to England during World War 2 Margot joined the Canadian Red Cross Corps and served her country at Maple Leaf Club No. 2 in London looking after troops returning from the Continent. After the war she was a devoted wife and mother with happy memories of life in Washington, D.C., Appleton, Ontario and her final 27 years in Victoria, British Columbia with her sisters, their families, and her brother. A memorial will take place at Sacred Heart Church, 4040 Nelthorpe Street, on Wednesday, May 7 at 11 a.m.

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ROWLANDS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-19 published
WATSON, Kathleen Hazel (formerly HAYES, née ROWLANDS)
Peacefully at her residence in London on Monday, February 18th, 2008, Kathleen Hazel (ROWLANDS) (HAYES) WATSON in her 93rd year. Beloved wife of David WATSON and predeceased by her first husband Nelson HAYES (1984.) Dear mother of Joy WATSON and Keith McGIBBON (Mary) and dear grandmother of Jeff BARRETT (Monique,) Tracy FREZELL (Scott), Jennifer RICE, Sara MEZENBERG (Anson) and Jennifer-Lynn McGIBBON. Loved by her great-grandchildren Samantha BARRETT, Adam Barrett, Luke Frezell, Amanda RICE and Caleb MEZENBERG. Dear sister-in-law of Shirley and Carolyn ROWLANDS. Predeceased by her parents Harry and Kathleen ROWLANDS, sister Amy HOLMES, brothers Harry Bill and Jack ROWLANDS and sister-in-law Rita ROWLANDS. Dear Auntie Kae to Chris and Rita ROWLANDS (Jackie,) Lorie JOHNSON (Katie and Andrew), Carin and Eric RASIMUS (Breanne, Marc, Shawna and Amy,) Cathy, Shirley and Bill ROWLANDS. Also survived by David WATSON's family, Heather and Tom WESTBROOK (Tara, Megan and Peter,) Ann and Bob JENEROUX (David and Julie,) Graham and Linda (& children). Friends may call from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street (at Wavell), London. Funeral service in the chapel Wednesday, February 20th at 11 a.m. Interment in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Memorial donations appreciated to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Alzheimers Society.
"Twilight and evening bell, And after the dark! And may there be no sadness of farewell When I embark. For though from out our bourne of time and place The flood may bear me far, I hope to see my pilot face to face When I have crossed the bar." Alfred Tennyson

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ROWLES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-15 published
BOGDAN, Joseph
Peacefully, at Victoria Hospital, on Monday, April 14, 2008, Joseph BOGDAN in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of the late Fran BOGDAN (1987.) Loving father of Susan ROWLES (Steve,) of London, Joe BOGDAN (Holly ALLEN) of Toronto, and Lisa BOGDAN (Dave McMANUS) of London. Also loved by five grandchildren. Visitors will be received in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William St. on Wednesday from 12: 00 noon until the time of the Funeral Service in the Chapel at 2: 00 p.m. with the Reverend John C. VAN DAMME officiating. Interment Saint Peter's Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Society.

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ROWLES o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-06-11 published
ROWLES, Irene
On June 6th, 2006 at Sunset Manor, Collingwood in her 69th year. Irene ROWLES beloved wife of the late William Arthur ROWLES (1969.) Dear mother of David and his wife Debbie ROWLES of Lisle, Ontario. Nana to Derek and DeAnne ROWLES. Visitation was at the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 132 River Road East, Wasaga (705-429-1040) on Wednesday June 11th, 2006 from 11-12 p.m. Funeral Service was in the Chapel at 12 p.m. Cremation. Interment Riverside Cemetery. Sincere thanks to the Staff at Sunset Manor Collingwood. In addition for support by Jennifer STORK- RELSE and Anne STORK. As expression of sympathy donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or Charity of your Choice.
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ROWLES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-08 published
Award-winning radio dramatist wrote more than 1,200 plays and screenplays
'His ruthless honesty… his daring in tackling forbidden subjects, gave rise to more letters to the editor and questions in the House of Commons than the work of any other writer'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
After selling his first play to the nascent radio service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1938, Len PETERSON made a living for more than five decades as a freelance playwright "in a land friendlier to ragweed than to indigenous drama," as he liked to say, without his "wit being dulled." He wrote more than 1,200 dramatic works for radio, the theatre, television and film in a variety of styles, moods and themes and won a series of prizes including several Ohio Columbus Awards, Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists Awards for best radio drama for The Trouble with Giants (1973) and for Evariste Galois (1984) and the John Drainie Award for distinguished contribution to broadcasting in 1974.
His heyday was in radio in the 1940s and early 1950s, working with producer Esse Ljungh, under the legendary Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer-director Andrew Allan. "Nobody engendered more rage and nobody more admiration, than Len PETERSON," Mr. Allan wrote in his autobiography, A Self-Portrait. "His ruthless honesty, his sense of the colloquial, his daring in tackling forbidden subjects, gave rise to more letters to the editor and questions in the House of Commons than the work of any other writer. After we did his Burlap Bags… there were people who wouldn't speak to me. But, in the spring, when it won an award at Ohio State, the same people demanded to hear it again."
Blond, of medium height, with twinkling blue eyes and a cheerful face, Mr. PETERSON had a convivial demeanour, but a passionate and rebellious soul. As experimental as he was prolific, Mr. PETERSON loved to play with form and voice. Fascinated by the writers of his Nordic heritage and the workings of the human psyche, he was also a steadfast advocate of workers' rights and social justice. An early and long-time organizer and negotiator for the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists, he co-ordinated the jury for the John Drainie Award for several years, and was also one of the founders of the Playwright's Co-op, an organization that initially published and distributed plays in typescript form and which later became a bargaining and lobbying unit. (It now exists as the Playwright's Union of Canada and Playwrights Canada Press.)
"He was one of the very few who were able to earn a livelihood by writing radio drama," said John Reeves, a former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio drama producer and winner of the Italia Prize in 1995. "The most striking thing about Len's career was the consistent way he used drama to address social problems. He did that all the time and very effectively." But Mr. PETERSON didn't let his social conscience overpower his creative impulses, according to Mr. Reeves, "To him, the addressing of social drama and the writing of good artistic drama were a seamless garment."
Mr. PETERSON was a very attractive person to be with, says writer and former producer Vincent Tovell, describing him as profoundly compassionate about people and possessing a deadpan and ironic humour. He was "very much aware of the outer world," and "had an ironic sense of its craziness" and he "carved his own path and made a mark because of the depth of his interest in human and social and political affairs." As a dramatist, however, he was "very Scandinavian," according to Mr. Tovell. "Ibsen and Strindberg, the writers to whom he was so finely and naturally attuned -- all of their angst and tension and social concerns were part of his nature."
Leonard (Len) Byron PETERSON, the second of five children of Nils PETERSON, a Norwegian who worked as a locomotive engineer for the Grand Trunk and Canadian National Railways, and Marion (née NORQUIST) PETERSON, a Wisconsin-born woman of Swedish ancestry, was born in Regina on the day that Czar Nicholas II of Russia abdicated -- as he himself liked to point out.
Growing up on the Prairies, he felt surrounded by space. "As kids, oh, we were so free, on the run all the time, across the Prairies. There we were, bounding like antelope," Mr. PETERSON told the Toronto Star in May of 1972. "We spent an awful lot of time dreaming. The sky encouraged that." But it wasn't entirely carefree: his teenage years were shadowed by his little brother's death from appendicitis and the despair and deprivation of the Depression -- which was especially dire in the Prairies.
After graduating from local elementary and secondary schools, Len went to Luther College. He found it uninspiring and far too Anglo-centric, although as a natural athlete, he played quarterback on the school football team and excelled as a gymnast and wrestler. After two years, he switched to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to study math and sciences. There, he also discovered literature as social history, came in contact with professors who praised what he called his "primitive style" and began writing short stories. He graduated with a bachelor of science degree in 1938 and moved to Toronto, determined to become a writer, an unlikely career move that he once compared to "a Manitoban plowman deciding to become a ballet dancer." Nevertheless, he sold a radio script, It Happened in College to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1938 for $15.
"His typewriter never stopped," freelance writer Ron Hambleton, said in an interview this week, recalling that Mr. PETERSON was pounding out plays and short stories when both men were tenants in a house on Spadina Road in Toronto in 1941, and later in a house on Charles Street that Mr. Hambleton and his wife rented. "He was extremely athletic -- a marvellously active fellow -- who was extremely handsome, full of energy, loved the outdoors and had a very unusual imagination, when it came to interpreting everyday life." Mr. PETERSON continued to wrestle and even held an Ontario Wrestling Alliance championship title for two years.
Mr. PETERSON enlisted in the Canadian Army in the infantry in 1942. Fiercely independent, an obsessive reader of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky, a compulsive scribbler and note-taker, he had trouble acclimatizing himself to the regimentation of army life and engendered suspicion from his superior officers who confiscated his notebooks and had him locked up for 10 days as a suspected subversive.
After the Royal Canadian Mounted Police checked into his background, he was transferred to the radio section of National Defence Headquarters and ordered to write radio documentaries, dramas and other propaganda supporting the Canadian war effort. One of the perks of his job was meeting actress Ingrid Bergman (about the time she made a huge impact acting opposite Humphrey Bogart in the wartime classic Casablanca) when she appeared in Canada as part of a Victory Bonds drive. While travelling back and forth to Ottawa, he switched writing gears in his spare time and produced short stories for Maclean's, then a general-interest monthly magazine, and scripts for a hungry national audience of radio listeners.
The decade-long golden age of radio drama began in 1943 when Andrew Allan, who had joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a producer in Vancouver in 1939, was promoted to national drama supervisor and transferred to Toronto. He created the Sunday night drama series that started with Stage 44 and progressed annually through Stage 45, Stage 46, and so on. He was also one of four senior drama producers working on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Wednesday Night, a weekly broadcast of international and original Canadian dramas.
Mr. Allan had great faith in the capacity of his audience to absorb difficult and even disturbing material and in the ability of his writers to invade and stretch listeners' imaginations. "What struck listeners as new and exciting about the Stage series," according to Bronwyn Drainie in her book, Living the Part: John Drainie and the Dilemma of Canadian Stardom, "was not just its crisp, quickly paced professional sound, but also its subject matter, which seemed to have grown up overnight. Canadian writers were emerging from the war years with an agenda… All that blood spilled to defeat Hitler would be wasted if the dark forces that had brought him to power -- racial hatred, class injustice, fear, greed and hypocrisy -- were allowed to grow unchecked here in Canada." Among the writers who found steady work in Mr. Allan's regime were Fletcher Markle, Joseph Schull, Lister Sinclair, Mavor Moore and, of course, Mr. PETERSON.
His first contribution to Stage 44 was Within The Fortress, an empathetic portrayal of German officers trapped in their own stronghold. It created a stir -- it was wartime, after all -- but nothing like the commotion that greeted the second of his three dramas to be broadcast live to air that year. They're All Afraid, which was set in Canada, was an exploration of office bullying, especially of a black worker, and the lack of freedom people experience even in ordinary life.
Although Ernie Bushnell, director general of programs, vociferously criticized the broadcast as bad for morale, Mr. Allan submitted it for the Columbus Award of the Ohio Radio Institute in 1944, where it won the top award in drama and a citation as the best submission in all categories. Mr. Bushnell accepted the award by confessing, "I didn't like this play when it was performed on our network. I still don't like it. But thank you very much," according to Alice Frick in Image in the Mind: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Drama 1944 to 1954. Mr. PETERSON soon reprised his prize-winning ways when his play Burlap Bags, an absurdist drama in the style of Beckett and Ionesco about a man who shields himself from society by covering his face with a burlap bag, also won an Ohio Award.
He published his first and only novel, Chipmunk, in the fall of 1949, about a weak character who commits a single act of defiance. Although the book had stalwart fans, it received a devastating review from William Arthur Deacon, then the literary editor of The Globe and Mail. After cautioning his readers that they would search in vain for easy entertainment, romance or excitement in Chipmunk, Mr. Deacon complained that Mr. PETERSON may have "willingly sacrificed popularity on the altar of his artistic integrity" with his "rigid rejection of the sentimental," and his "ruthless realism."
By now Mr. PETERSON had met Iris ROWLES, an English woman who had arrived in Canada after the war and worked as a secretary first for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's international service and then for the drama department. They were married in 1951 and eventually had five children. "It was extraordinary, especially at that time, for a man to be able to support a family from his writing," said Mrs. PETERSON.
In addition to radio plays, Mr. PETERSON wrote a series of Ohio-Award-winning dramatized broadcasts on human relations titled In Search of Ourselves, and joined forces with actors Lorne Greene and John Drainie to found the Jupiter Theatre, a professional company dedicated to the "emergence of a truly Canadian voice in the theatre." The Jupiter, which lasted only three years, from 1951 to 1954, mounted plays by Europeans including Bertolt Brecht and Jean-Paul Sartre and new Canadian works by Ted Allan, Lister Sinclair and Nathan Cohen. It disbanded before Mr. PETERSON's play, Never Shoot a Devil, could be produced. Besides a lack of working capital in those pre-government-funding days, the Jupiter's demise can be attributed at least partly to the founding of the Stratford Festival, the currency of the Crest Theatre and the launch of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television in 1952.
Although Mr. PETERSON's experimental style was not as suited to television as it was to radio, he contributed to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Folio, G.M. Theatre, First Performance and Playdate. He also worked on a joint Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-NBC live documentary about the St. Lawrence Seaway, which was aired on June 3, 1956, and on Memo to Champlain, a live 90-minute bilingual program, hosted by Joyce Davidson and René Lévesque, that was aired on July 1, 1958 to celebrate the formation of the national microwave network of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television -- the network did not include Newfoundland until the next year.
His first full-length stage play, The Great Hunger, which was produced by the Toronto Arts Theatre in 1960, was set around a killing in the Arctic and explores the communal myths affecting both White and Inuit cultures. In the 1970s he wrote The Workingman, which was premiered at Toronto Workshop Productions in May 1972 to celebrate the centenary of the labour movement in Canada and responded to feminist themes by writing Women in the Attic (1971) which was mounted by Ken Kramer at the Globe Theatre in Regina. He also began writing historical plays for children including Almighty Voice (1970), Billy Bishop and The Red Baron (1974) and Etienne Brulé (1977), all of which were mounted by the Young People's Theatre in Toronto. In just one example of how Mr. PETERSON recycled his research, he had earlier turned his Etienne Brulé material into separate radio and television treatments.
Although he would continue to write for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation -- especially radio -- Mr. PETERSON was increasingly distressed by new management policies at the public broadcaster. "Every few years the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation gets a new Television Wonder Boy (or Girl) who is going to rescue Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television drama," he wrote in an eloquent lament in The Globe in November, 1976. "Each Wonder Boy's handmaids work hard to kill the devil or god in every writer, his uniqueness, his genius, and turn him into a service writer, a formula writer. To a fair degree they succeed in making hacks of the writers and junk of the drama." Mr. PETERSON was 59 when he hammered out that broadside more than 30 years ago, but his sentiments seem as fresh as the current alarums about the latest restructuring at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Bill C-10's potential threat to freedom of speech and artistic expression in Canada.
Leonard PETERSON was born in Regina on March 15, 1917. He died in Saint_Joseph's Hospital in Toronto of complications from a brain hemorrhage on February 28, 2008. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Iris, and by his children Ingrid, Jill, Wendy and Anthony. He also leaves six grandchildren and his extended family. He was predeceased by his daughter, Teresa. There will be a celebration of his life at the Old Mill in Toronto on April 19, 2008.

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ROWLEY o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-01-09 published
POTTS, Phyllis (McLEOD)
Passed away peacefully in Centre Grey Hospital, Markdale on Sunday, January 6, 2008. Phyllis (McLEOD) POTTS in her 82nd year, beloved wife of the late Dean POTTS. Dear mother of Judy (Dan) WICKENS of R.R.#1 Badjeros and loving grandmother of Katie and Lori WICKENS. Dear sister of Hazel (Harry) ROWLEY of Dundalk, Don (Betty) McLEOD and Marion (Bill) GORDON both of Creemore, Mildred (Jim) WALKER of Barrie and Helen (Ron) WRIGHT of Maxwell; sister-in-law of Maureen McLEOD of Glen Huron and aunt to several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a sister Jean (Joe) YAGER and a brother Charles McLEOD. Resting at the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home, Dundalk. Complete service in the chapel on Wednesday, January 9, 2008 at 1 p.m. Spring interment in Badjeros Cemetery. Donations to Markdale Hospital Building Fund would be appreciated. Visitation on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m.
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ROWLEY o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-03-26 published
POTTS, Phyllis Catharine (née McLEOD)
Phyllis Catharine POTTS, beloved wife of the late Dean POTTS, passed away after a brief illness on January 6, 2008 in Centre Grey Hospital, Markdale, Ontario in her 82nd year.
Phyllis was born on December 24, 1926 to Katie (CAMPBELL) and Marshall McLEOD, on Lot 11, Conc. 9 Nottawasaga Township, nestled between the hills of Glen Huron and Dunedin. She was the third of eight children, namely Hazel (Harry ROWLEY,) Don (Betty,) Jean (Joe YAGER,) Marion (William GORDON,) Charles (Maureen,) Mildred (James WALKER) and Helen (Ronald WRIGHT.)
Phyllis earned her education at S.S.#16 Nottawasaga, Glen Huron, Ontario, writing her entrance in Singhampton. After completing school she would go to work at Dunedin General Store. She worked in the homes of the Bowerman's and Sherlock METHERAL's before venturing off to Collingwood to work in Dominion Woolens Textiles Peerless factory which made denim products; and Woolworth Department Store. During that time she boarded at the homes of the Aikins', Hornsby's, Martin's and Wilson's.
Phyllis married Wallace Dean POTTS on October 15, 1955 in Dunedin Knox Presbyterian Church, with a reception in Stayner. A honeymoon was enjoyed in Niagara Falls and also a few days in Northern Ontario. Then returning to start a new life on the family farm on the third line of Osprey Township, between McIntyre and Badjeros. Phyllis continued to work in Collingwood for awhile, before coming home to help Dean on the farm and sawmill and preparing many meals for the hired men who helped in the fields and at the sawmill. No one ever left the table hungry.
Phyllis and Dean had two children, a stillborn son in 1961 and a daughter Judith Phyllis in 1965. Judy married Dan WICKENS on October 15, 1988 and lives close by. Phyllis enjoyed watching her two grandchildren Katie and Lori growing up next door, taking advantage of every opportunity to watch them in their activities. She was indeed a "proud" Grandma.
Phyllis and Dean celebrated 44 years of marriage at the time of Dean's passing in 2000. She was fortunate to live on the family farm until her time of passing.
Baking, flowerbeds, visiting and chatting with family and Friends, and the occasional bus trip, were some of the things that she enjoyed and that helped to pass the time for Phyllis.
Phyllis was predeceased by her parents Marshall in 1987 and Katie in 1989. Husband Dean (2000), sister Jean (1999) and brother-in-law Joe YAGER (1998,) brother Charles (2007.)
A Celebration of Life was held at the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home in Dundalk on January 9, 2008 with Pastor Heather McCARREL officiating. Daughter Judy gave the eulogy and niece Mariane McLEOD played the organ and pallbearers were nephews Roger GORDON, Donald GORDON, Blair GORDON, Robert McLEOD, Alex McLEOD and David WRIGHT. Flowerbearers were granddaughters Katie and Lori WICKENS and nieces Sally STUHL and Dianne ELLIOT/ELLIOTT. Spring interment in Badjeros Southline Cemetery.
Page 6

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ROWLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-28 published
'Aggressive and very entrepreneurial,' she ranked among Canada's top Chief Executive Officers
The head of Dover Industries took her company from annual revenues of $10-million to $228-million. She thought nothing of phoning federal finance ministers late at night to give them a piece of her mind
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Toronto -- Mona CAMPBELL was 33 years old when her father died and left behind some companies that milled flour and made ice-cream cones. She'd been the major shareholder in the businesses, and stepped into the top executive slot two years later, in 1954, at a time when women in corporate leadership were unheard of.
Her own father, the wealthy industrialist Frederick MORROW, "didn't think women should be doing this sort of thing," Mrs. CAMPBELL recalled in a 1986 interview. "To begin with, it was sort of a question mark, which makes you want to do that much better. I had no formal training. I had done a lot of work for voluntary organizations, dealing with budgets, scrounging for money. It's really the same thing in a small way."
Either she was being coy or very humble. When she took over, the company had annual revenues of $10-million. Last year, Burlington, Ontario-based Dover Industries Ltd. had revenues of $228-million and employed 475 people.
Described as "Canada's first conglomerate," with interests in paper products, flour milling and straw manufacturing, as well as the ice-cream-cone business, Dover Industries is today one of the largest Canadian-owned flour-milling companies in operation.
Mrs. CAMPBELL served as the company's president, chief executive officer and, until her death, as board chairwoman. In 1976, she became the first woman elected to the board of Toronto-Dominion Bank.
Her success belied a view about women in the corporate world that today could be charitably described as quaint. In a 1980 interview with the Financial Times, Mrs. CAMPBELL declared that single women couldn't be depended on in business "because suddenly romance hits and they marry and maybe their husband moves, so they move." Married women, meantime, are inflexible and may interrupt their careers to have children.
Besides, few women crave the power that comes with the position, she believed. "The majority of women are not interested."
A lot of them feel they just don't need the extra hassle, she told The Globe and Mail the year before. "They are willing to do a great job but I don't know how many more want the added responsibility of representing shareholders." She did not foresee other women serving on her company's board. "One's enough."
She chafed at being called an industrialist. "This is just a job," she said in 1968. "It's not that difficult."
Mrs. CAMPBELL travelled the world and gave away millions of dollars to the arts, notably to the Royal Ontario Museum, where there's a curatorship in her name, and the National Ballet School in Toronto since its inception in 1959. "She knew every student by name," said the National Ballet School's artistic director and co-Chief Executive Officer, Mavis STAINES, who added that Mrs. CAMPBELL often took students to her sprawling Mohill Farm in Puslinch, Ontario, for weekends spent frolicking with her beloved dogs and horses. Ballet, Mrs. CAMPBELL once declared, "is the love of my life."
She was named to the Order of Canada in 1996. In 2001, the Association of Fundraising Professionals honoured her as its outstanding philanthropist of the Year.
She was an only child born into privilege. Her father was a financier who founded the Essa Securities Company, sat on the boards of 15 corporations and amassed a large fortune. He started Dover Industries in 1940 by acquiring and merging three companies - a flour mill, a grain dealer and Robinson Cone, which made ice-cream cones, straws and packaging materials in Hamilton.
A devout Catholic who scandalously married the daughter of a Baptist minister, Mr. MORROW donated a large tract of land in Toronto's north to the Sisters of Saint_Joseph. Morrow Park opened in 1960 and today has an infirmary, residences, a girls' school, and a retreat where Pope John Paul stayed during his 2002 visit to Toronto for World Youth Day.
Mrs. CAMPBELL's first marriage was in 1940 to John BAND, a dashing navy officer who hunted U-boats during the Second World War and became an insurance executive and collector of Canadian art. They cut glamorous figures in society and had three children before going through an acrimonious divorce in 1955.
In 1960, she married Jim BINNIE, father of Ian BINNIE, a justice on Canada's Supreme Court. That, too, ended in divorce. Finally, in 1967, she married Lieutenant-Colonel Kenneth CAMPBELL, a career army man who once authored a scathing report from the Korean front that described the venerable Lee-Enfield.303 rifle as "almost useless." He operated a farm near Guelph that raised cattle and thoroughbreds, and died in 1990.
Mrs. CAMPBELL often said she liked people. Her daughter, Sarah BAND, is more specific: "She loved men."
She loved animals, too, and their welfare was a top priority. Mrs. CAMPBELL was a leading supporter of the Ontario Humane Society and was awarded naming rights to an animal adoption centre in Newmarket, Ontario - Mohill Village. She also endowed the Col. K.L. Campbell Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare, which promotes the welfare of animals through research and education, and the Col. K.L. Campbell Graduate Travel Grant in Equine Studies, both at the University of Guelph.
She was formal and had an old-world elegance, but lean, angular features that bespoke a stern countenance. According to her friend Brenda Nightingale, however, "she was the most generous person you ever met." Her daughter noted Mrs. CAMPBELL's fastidious concern with her appearance: "Every thread on her had to be perfect."
Highly political and a staunch Conservative, she thought nothing of phoning Michael Wilson, finance minister under Brian Mulroney, late at night to give him a piece of her mind, Ms. Nightingale recalled with a laugh.
In business, she was "very aggressive and very entrepreneurial," noted Dover Industries' current president and Chief Executive Officer Howard ROWLEY. " She was very willing to reinvest money back into the company. That's why we've been able to grow at the rate we have."
Her board approved a plan in 1968 to erect a $2-million flour mill in Halifax - the first modern flour mill in Nova Scotia - but rebuffed her move to enter the flour market in Montreal. "A new flour mill in Montreal 10 years ago would been a howling success," she insisted at the time.
She oversaw the company's five subsidiaries: Robinson Cone, Cherry Taylor Flour Mills, Howell Litho and Cartons, Taylor Grain Ltd. and Dover Mills Ltd. of Halifax. A firm believer in acquisitions, the company under her hand bought a paper-box concern in 1956 the Howell Lithographic Company in 1960; Bondware, a paper cup and container firm in 1981; and another flour mill in 2003. The packaging business was sold in 2005.
Dover Industries was touted as Canada's first diversified company but was not as diverse as it appeared. The ice-cream cones came from Cherry Taylor flour and were packed in Howell cartons. Dover Mills ground the flour from Taylor Grain and shipped them in packages that were lithographed in-house.
Still, it was a multi-faceted operation and "she could walk out into the different plants, and she knew most of the people by name," Mr. ROWLEY said. "Truck drivers would phone her from their trucks and talk to her about whatever was on their minds. It could be work-related or just to say hello. And she'd take the call."
Mrs. CAMPBELL treated the company as her inheritance. "I thought I'd have a go at running it," she said in 1968. "My father told me that I would be all right as long as I had a good lawyer, a good accountant and a good banker. We've got them and we've never looked back."
But in case anyone doubted who was in charge, she had this to say in 1980: "When we go out to buy out a company, I'm the one that does the deal." She died the day of her company's annual meeting.
Mona Louise CAMPBELL was born February 3, 1919, in Toronto. She died May 29, 2008, of natural causes in Aiken, South Carolina, where she had lived for several years and where her favourite activity was a Tuesday-night needlepoint group called Stitch and Bitch. She was 89. She leaves her children John BAND, Sarah BAND and Vicki McRAE, four grandchildren and one great-granddaughter.

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ROWSE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-15 published
ROWSE, Ed
To my loving Husband, our Dad and Grandpa. It had been a year since you left us. We don't understand why, but as the days go by we do accept it. Because we knew it was your time to fly. There is not a day that goes by that we don't think of you. But as we look around we see that you are still with us in the things that you made us. And as we get together, we know we have a part of you in all of us. As we had promised before we let you go we are looking after Mom in our own little ways. Well it is time for us to say goodbye again. But we want you to know that we miss you very much and that we will always love you. With all our love Maxine, children and grandchildren.

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ROWSE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-15 published
ROWSE, Ed
In loving memory of my dad, who passed away March 15, 2007. Words cannot describe how much we miss you. Not a day goes by that we don't think of you. You are always in our thoughts and you will always be forever in our hearts. We miss you so much. Love always, Jill, Bill and Kids.

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