REINTJES o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-18 published
REINTJES, Peter
Peacefully at Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Wednesday, April 16, 2008, Peter REINTJES, of R.R.#1, Salford, in his 78th year. Husband of the late Gertrude (VAN RYSWYCK) REINTJES (2005.) Dear father of John and his wife Anne of Embro, Pete and his wife Sue of Thamesford, Diane of Salford and Dave and his wife Mary Jane of Tillsonburg. Dear grandfather of Stephanie, Derek, Daniel and Kaitlin (Devine). Brother-in-law of Peter and Astrid VAN RYSWYCK of Tillsonburg, Bert and Marie VAN RYSWYCK of Ingersoll, Harry and Maria VAN RYSWYCK of Tillsonburg, Joe and Wilma VAN RYSWYCK of Woodstock, John and Josephine VAN RYSWYCK of Foldens, Ted VAN RYSWYCK of Brantford, Martin and Diane VAN RYSWYCK of Ancaster and Betty and Herman BARDOEL of Putnam. Also survived by brothers and sisters in Holland. Predeceased by infant son (1959). Friends will be received at the McBeath-Dynes Funeral Home, 246 Thames St. S., Ingersoll Friday 6-9 p.m. Parish Prayers Friday at 6: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass will be held at Sacred Heart Church, Ingersoll on Saturday, April 19, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery. Memorial donations to Sacred Heart Building Fund would be appreciated.

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REIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-20 published
YOUNG, Jack J.
On Wednesday, June 18, 2008 at North York General Hospital. Jack YOUNG, beloved husband of Estelle. Loving father and father-in-law of Arthur YOUNG and Linda MEISSENHEIMER, Errol and Lorna, Karen and Gerald GALL of Edmonton, and David and Ellen. Dear brother and brother-in-law of John and Helen, Jennie and Bernat GOLDBERGER, Dora BROMSTEIN, Gail WISE, Shirley and the late Sam YOUNG and the late Frimit YASHINSKY, Fanny HOLTZMAN, Sadie MYERS, and Libby (Waese) REIS. Devoted grandfather of Aaron, Evan YOUNG and Amrit BAINS; Melanie, Wendy and Andrew GALL; Sara, Cory, and Alycia YOUNG. Devoted great-grandfather of Owen Jacob. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin) for service on Friday, June 20th at 11: 30 a.m. Interment Beth David B'nai Israel Synagogue section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 126 Laurelcrest Avenue. Memorial donations may be made to the Jack Young Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324 or at www.benjamins.ca

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REISMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-10 published
Negotiator remembered for toughness
By Sandra MARTIN and Campbell CLARK and Greg McARTHUR, Page A4
Simon REISMAN, Canada's chief free-trade negotiator during talks with the United States in the late 1980s, died in his sleep of cardiac arrest early yesterday morning at the Heart Institute in Ottawa.
The tough-talking civil servant and Second World War veteran had a pacemaker installed on Thursday because of ongoing heart problems. He was 88.
In interviews yesterday, his Friends and colleagues from both sides of the negotiating table pondered who the real Simon REISMAN was: Was he the blunt, pushy and crusty debater who forged Canada's first free-trade agreement with the United States, or just an artful negotiator?
Derek Burney, a former Canadian ambassador to the United States, said Mr. REISMAN's bluster was the real deal.
"Charming is not a word you would use, okay?" chuckled Mr. Burney, a onetime chief of staff to Brian Mulroney. "He was Mr. Rough-and-Tumble."
While his angry walkout on free-trade talks in the 1980s seemed to end the negotiations in a very public way, it actually moved them up a notch to top politicians who pushed the free-trade agreement ahead.
"He was one tough bird," said Allan Gotlieb, former Canadian ambassador to the United States. " He was extremely direct and totally unfearful of the consequences of his comments. He was the diametric opposite of the namby-pamby civil servant."
Thomas Niles, the U.S. ambassador to Canada during the talks, said he remembered Mr. REISMAN fondly, but always wondered if his often loud and indignant objections were more strategic than spontaneous.
"A lot of it was for effect, I always had the feeling. Sometimes - I never did it because he was an older man and you always had to show respect - but sometimes I wanted to say 'Simon, Simon, please. Calm down,' " Mr. Niles said, laughing.
Born in Montreal on June 19, 1919, Mr. REISMAN studied economics at McGill University and the London School of Economics where he received a master's degree in economics. After joining the civil service in 1946, he worked on a number of significant economic agreements under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade that helped establish international trading systems and regulations after the Second World War. He also played a major role in the establishment of the Canadian-U.S. Auto Pact in 1965.
His son, physician John REISMAN, said yesterday that Mr. REISMAN appeared to have come through the pacemaker operation without any difficulties. "He was reading The Wall Street Journal yesterday and was active mentally and we thought he was going to make it," Dr. REISMAN said.
Mr. REISMAN leaves his wife Constance and three children. Funeral arrangements are pending.

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REISMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-11 published
REISMAN, Sol Simon, O.C., LL.D.
Died in his sleep March 9, 2008 in his 89th year. Beloved husband for 65 years of Constance CARIN. Dear father of John Joseph (Brenda RUNGE), Anna Lisa (Peter KALMAN), Harriet Frances (Douglas BARRETT) and daughter-in-law Gale BLANK. Much loved grandfather of Will, Jane, and Molly REISMAN; Edie - Jane and Stephen KALMAN; Trish, Julia, Aaron and Kate BARRETT. Born in Montreal June 19, 1919 to Kolman and Manya REISMAN. Attended Baron Byng High School, McGill University (B.A., M.A.). Served overseas as Regimental Officer in World War 2 Royal Canadian Artillery, 11th, 15th and 17th Field Artillery (Troop Commander) in Italy and Holland 1942-1946. Attended the London School of Economics 1945-46. Joined the Department of Finance 1946, Director of International Economic Relations Division; Canadian Delegation to Geneva Trade and Tariff Conference 1947; World Conference on Trade and Employment, Havana, 1947-1948 Economics and Social Council, United Nations, Geneva, 1952, New York, 1953; first and following sessions of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1947-1954; Assistant Director of Research, Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects 1955-1957; Assistant Deputy Minister, Department of Finance 1961-1964; Deputy Minister of Industry 1964-1968 during which time was chief architect of the Canada-U.S. Auto Pact; Secretary of the Treasury Board 1968-1970 Deputy Minister of Finance 1970-1975; received Outstanding Public Service Award, Canada, 1974; Chief Royal Commissioner to investigate Canadian Auto Industry 1978; Chief Negotiator for Canada Aboriginal Land Claims for the Western Arctic, 1983; Ambassador (Trade) and Chief Negotiator Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement 19851988. Honorary Doctorate, Carleton University, 1998; Honoured by the naming of the Simon Reisman Chair on Trade Policy, Carleton University, 2000. Avid salmon fisherman; was able to fish white water until July 2007; embraced reading and life-long learning; continuous observer and commentator of world current events; active participant in the Rideau Club Roundtable; always interested in people and their lives, and an unending curiosity about what made them tick social and extroverted, a dry sense of humour right up to the time of his final Computed Tomography scan; mentally sharp to the very end; unlike his reputation of being tough and hard-boiled, he was always ready to lend a hand; a most loving, inspirational, devoted, supportive, generous and loyal father and grandfather. Special thanks to Doctor Terrence RUDDY, Doctor David BERNEY, Doctor Phil JOSEPH, and the caring and supportive nurses of the Ottawa Heart Institute. Always larger than life, no words can describe how much he will be missed by his family including M'Guy. Funeral Service will be held at Temple Israel, 1301 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa on Wednesday March 12th, 2008 at 2 p.m. Shiva will be held at 146 Roger Road, Ottawa, on Wednesday and Thursday from 4-8 p.m. and Friday from 2-5 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the charity of your choice. Condoleances/Donations/ Tributes at: mcgarryfamily.ca 613-233-1143

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REISMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-15 published
When it came to achieving free trade, he was the right man for the job
As Canada's tough and pugnacious chief negotiator, he was famous for allegedly flicking cigar ash on the cherished, heirloom desk of U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Doing a trade deal with the Americans in the 1980s was like trying to sign a nuclear arms pact with the Soviets during the Cold War, according to former prime minister Brian Mulroney. Getting them to the table was hard, keeping them there was worse, but inking a treaty before the deadline expired was the real trick. "You have to be very tough," Mr. Mulroney said this week.
That's why, when he got the word from U.S. President Ronald Reagan that approval to negotiate a comprehensive free-trade agreement with Canada had squeaked through the Senate Finance Committee in the fall of 1985, he knew he needed Simon REISMAN to make the case and hold the line. Mr. REISMAN, who had flirted with communism while growing up in the Jewish ghetto of Montreal during the Depression, was a fervent free-trade continentalist, who had gone eyeball to eyeball with the Americans for 40 years and was famous for allegedly having flicked his cigar ash on U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly's heirloom desk, a sacred piece of furniture that had once belonged to founding father Alexander Hamilton.
"He was the only person with the background, the knowledge, the skill and the toughness to do this job," Mr. Mulroney said, pointing out that Mr. REISMAN had been part of the negotiations for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades in 1947, and Canada's chief negotiator for the Auto Pact in 1965, and a long-time senior mandarin in the federal civil service. Even so, Mr. Mulroney believed that the only way that Mr. REISMAN could succeed was if "the Americans knew he had 100-per-cent support from the prime minister on down."
Besides predictable problems with the Americans, Mr. REISMAN had difficulties on this side of the border, including an ongoing conflict with Senator Pat Carney, then the minister of international trade. She took - and expressed - great umbrage that Mr. REISMAN was not keeping her in the loop. "He wasn't a team player. He was abrasive and difficult to work with because he didn't like political direction or involvement," she said in an interview. "Even though I was the minister responsible for the negotiations he would insist he wasn't reporting to me. He was exasperating," she said, while acknowledging that he "did know the file."
A former deputy minister of finance who had taken early retirement in 1975, at least partly because he himself was exasperated with the machinations of his political masters, Mr. REISMAN was not going to kowtow to Ms. Carney, especially since he had the ear of the prime minister. After hearing Mr. REISMAN's complaints that "I'm having serious problems with the minister; she [Ms. Carney] has never negotiated an international deal," Mr. Mulroney made his move. "I installed myself as chairman of that executive cabinet committee with Simon and his team reporting directly to me."
Fuelled by his own sharp tongue and blustery manner, Mr. REISMAN also found a willing adversary in the media, especially the anti-free trade Toronto Star.
"I used to chuckle," Mr. Mulroney said, remembering uproars in the House of Commons when opposition members "would be yelling at me that he had told somebody from the Toronto Star to 'go fly a kite" or that the newspaper 'was a rag,' and they would be after me to reprimand Simon. And I was chuckling away because I was in agreement with what he said."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal the year after end of the First World War. The second of four children of Kolman, a factory worker in the rag trade, and Manya REISMAN, he went to Baron Byng High School. A very smart boy, he made it into McGill University, despite the Jewish quota, and graduated with an honours degree in economics and political science in 1941 and a master's degree (summa cum laude) the following year, all the while holding down a variety of menial jobs.
As a young man from an immigrant family during the Depression and the rise of fascism in Europe, he joined the Young Communist League, according to Stephen Clarkson and Christina McCall in The Heroic Delusion, Vol. 2 of Trudeau and Our Times. They quote a recruit to the Young Communist League who said that she took a compulsory course on The History of the Communist Party, allegedly written by Joseph Stalin, from Mr. REISMAN in 1937 and another source who claimed that he was still attending party meetings in Ottawa after the war.
Mr. REISMAN's widow said this week that her husband never joined the Communist Party, but that "he was, as a young person, left, but he couldn't have become more right wing." Many intellectuals espouse communist ideologies in their youth, but what is significant about Mr. REISMAN's early political credo, according to Prof. Clarkson, is that it "helped explain his later fanatical belief in free trade - another all-encompassing belief system."
While a student at McGill, Mr. REISMAN joined the cadet corps. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery in 1942, right after graduation and went overseas that November, a month after marrying Constance (Connie) CARIN. They had met through Friends.
"I disliked him immediately," she said. "I didn't like his forthright abrupt manner and I thought this was not the man for me, but it turned out I was wrong." She was busy the first several times he asked her out but, undaunted by these rebuffs, he told her to name a date when she would be free. She did, and so she learned about the man beneath the brusque self-confident exterior. "He always said what he thought, and he was not suited for diplomacy. He would have been a terrible failure in external affairs, but he was good where he was."
After landing in England in 1942, he served as a troop commander with the 11th, 15th, and 17th Field Artillery in the Italian campaign and finished out the war in the liberation of Holland. While waiting to be repatriated, he studied for several months at the London School of Economics. After four years overseas, he returned home in 1946 and went to Ottawa. There, he accepted the first job he was offered, in the Department of Labour, and moved later that year to the Department of Finance to work under Mitchell Sharp, in the economic policy division.
Within a few months he was working closely with John Deutsch, director of the international economic relations division, and writing speeches for Finance Minister Douglas Abbott. Mr. Deutsch wanted to take him to Geneva as secretary to a 12-man delegation working on preparations for an international trade conference scheduled for Havana, Cuba in 1947. "Either I go [with you] or we dissolve the marriage," Mrs. REISMAN told her husband, having no desire for another long-distance separation. He acquiesced "and we went on from there, for 65 years."
After a dozen years of marriage, the REISMANs had their first child, John Joseph, in 1954, followed two years later by daughter Anna Lisa. A second daughter, Harriet Frances, was born in 1959.
While Mr. REISMAN was in Havana, where delegates from nearly 60 countries met to establish what would become the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades, he noticed that Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King was especially interested in Article 24, a provision that would permit groups of nations to establish free-trade areas. Canada was facing a foreign-exchange crisis that winter, and Mr. King wanted to secure a secret free-trade deal with the U.S. as a potential solution. As it turned out, the crisis passed, Mr. King lost interest in a free-trade deal and coincidentally the U.S. Congress refused to ratify the Havana Charter. Canada, and Mr. REISMAN, would wait another 40 years to complete a continental free-trade deal.
In 1954, Mr. REISMAN was appointed director of the international economics division in the Department of Finance and was seconded the following year to serve as assistant research director on the Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects under Walter Gordon, where he reportedly had no hesitation in challenging his boss's protectionist views. When Mr. Gordon was named Finance Minister in Liberal Prime Minister Lester Pearson's cabinet in 1963, Mr. REISMAN, by then an assistant deputy minister, was promoted out of Finance and into the newly created Department of Industry. As deputy minister, a post he held with great distinction from 1964 to 1968, he led the negotiations that resulted in the Automotive Products Trade Agreement being signed by Prime Minister Pearson and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson in January, 1965.
The Auto Pact removed tariffs on cars, truck, buses and automotive parts between the two countries, which greatly encouraged trade, bolstered the bottom line of the big American car manufacturers, greatly increased assembly-line jobs in Canada and lowered the cost of purchasing automobiles. By 1968, the number of cars that were manufactured in Canada and sold in the U.S. had risen from seven to 60 per cent, while 40 per cent of cars bought in Canada were made in the U.S. There were downsides: Canada didn't develop an indigenous car industry and it was restricted from negotiating similar trade pacts with other countries, such as Japan. The Auto Pact was abolished after the World Trade Organization declared it illegal in 2001, but by then the Free-Trade Agreement, negotiated by Mr. REISMAN, and the subsequent North American free-trade agreement, which added Mexico to the trading mix, had made it largely irrelevant.
Mr. REISMAN was secretary of the Treasury Board from 1968 to 1970 and deputy minister of Finance from 1970 to 1975, when he chose to take early retirement from the federal civil service at age 55. The timing was good, as the federal government had recently decided to index civil-service pensions to the consumer price index. But that wasn't the only reason Mr. REISMAN was leaving. In an interview with The Globe and Mail in December, 1974, he complained about a diminishing scope for "people of energy and a certain independence of mind" in the public service and said he longed for "another career in which there would be a chance to fly on my own wings."
He and another former deputy minister, James Grandy (obituary April 5, 2006), formed a consulting firm, Reisman and Grandy, and quickly signed up a roster of clients that included Bombardier, Power Corp., and Lockheed. A ruckus erupted in the House of Commons over the firm's dealings with Lockheed, which was in the process of negotiating a huge contract to supply airplanes to the federal government. As former public servants, it was alleged that Mr. REISMAN and Mr. Grandy were violating conflict-of-interest guidelines. We aren't lobbyists, Mr. REISMAN insisted, explaining that there was a difference between peddling influence and peddling knowledge. Or, as he said to The Globe: "Some girls dance and some girls are whores… we just dance."
As a consultant, Mr. REISMAN had a number of high-level assignments, including Royal Commissioner to investigate the auto industry in 1978 and chief negotiator for aboriginal land claims in the Western Arctic in 1983. Mrs. REISMAN says the treaty with the Inuvialuit was a highlight for her husband because it was one of the first pieces of legislation affecting aboriginals under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
But the biggest deal of his life materialized when Mr. Mulroney appointed him ambassador (trade negotiations) and chief negotiator for Canada of the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement in November, 1985. "I felt he was an absolute natural for us," Mr. Mulroney said.
"I called him and said that we were going to get into this comprehensive negotiation and could he draft me a memo detailing the kind of person we would need and the challenges that person would encounter. Then Simon sent me, I think, a 35-page memorandum. As Derek Burney [his chief of staff] said, it was the longest job application he had ever seen. Simon knew I was thinking of him, but he also knew that I wanted to get the benefit of his ideas of how this should be conducted."
The two men knew each other personally from salmon fishing trips in Quebec with the likes of Paul Desmarais and John Rae of Power Corporation. "He had a great sense of humour, he was a completely honest man, he shared his views on everything… he wasn't at all devious, but he was a tough guy," said Mr. Mulroney, adding that Mr. REISMAN was "the indispensable player" in the free-trade talks. "Simon was the star. He was the one who took the free-trade concept from infancy to maturity and made it whole."
The negotiations dragged on for two years with two main stumbling blocks. The Americans were not taking the talks as seriously as the Canadians wanted until Mr. REISMAN stomped away from the negotiating table in September, 1987, in a highly publicized snit (orchestrated with Mr. Mulroney in Ottawa, Allan Gotlieb, the Canadian ambassador to Washington, and other key players). Only hours before the deadline was to lapse for signing the treaty, the Americans balked at the dispute-resolution clause, a key consideration for the Mulroney government. Once again, Mr. Mulroney says he intervened to back up his trade negotiator. He phoned James Baker [U.S. Secretary of the Treasury] and threatened to call President Reagan that night and demand to know why "you can do a deal on nuclear arms reduction with your worst enemies and you can't do a free-trade deal with your best Friends." Mr. Mulroney recalled that "Baker nearly jumped out of his skin, because he knew that Reagan would have raised holy hell on that issue immediately. That's why they came around."
Although Mr. REISMAN had slowed his pace somewhat in the last decade, he was still salmon fishing in white water in July and present at a dinner in Montreal to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the free-trade agreement in October. But the following month he fell at the Rideau Club in Ottawa and then, in January, he collapsed at his condominium in Fort Lauderdale and had to be airlifted home. He was admitted to the Heart Institute in Ottawa, where he had a pacemaker installed.
A week ago today, he was reading The Wall Street Journal and speaking on the phone with his wife before falling to sleep. Very early the next morning he lost consciousness and medical staff were unable to revive him.
"He was a larger-than-life personality," said Mrs. REISMAN, earlier this week. "The house is very quiet without him."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal on June 19, 1919. He died in his sleep of cardiac arrest at the Heart Institute of Ottawa on Sunday, March 9, 2008. He was 88. Survived by his wife Connie, three children John Joseph (Joe), Anna Lisa and Harriet Frances. He also leaves two younger sisters, Gertrude SHAPIRO and Helen LUTTERMAN, and 10 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his older brother, Mark.

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REISMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
REISMAN, Bernard
On Thursday, June 12, 2008 at Humber River Regional Hospital - Church Site. Bernard REISMAN, beloved son of the late Louis REISMAN and Ethel GERSHMAN. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Allan REISMAN and Patricia SEAGER, and Joel REISMAN. Loving uncle of Dylan, Noah, Joseph, and Barbra. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Monday, June 16, 2008 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Bnai Avraham Section of Roselawn Cemetery. Shiva 225 Shaftsbury Avenue, Richmond Hill, concluding the evening of June 18. Memorial donations may be made to The Reena Foundation, 905-764-1081.

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REIST o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-15 published
BYERS, Walter
Peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound on Monday April 14, 2008. In his 86th year, Walter BYERS, loving husband and friend of Eva Marie BYERS (née HODGSON.) Loved father of Paul BYERS and his wife Norma, Ruth and her husband Vern BARBER, Patricia and her husband Isaac McINTYRE, Donna and her husband Stan ORSON and Brian BYERS and his wife Mollie. Loving grandfather of twelve grandchildren and seventeen great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Marjorie (Mrs. Lester REIST,) Naomi (Mrs. Clarence GUSEY), Shirley (Mrs. Calvin McLEAN) and Allan BYERS. Fondly remembered by his nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his sister Jean BYERS, Ruth (Mrs. Alvin GORDON) and his brothers Edwin, Austin and Gordon. Walter's career began in 1942 with a horse and wagon with Pan Dandy and then Canada Bread retiring in 1986. But he continued selling baked goods from his vehicle up to present time. Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Wednesday April 16 from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. A funeral service will be conducted at the Calvary Missionary Church on Thursday April 17 at 11 a.m. (visitation will be held at the church one hour prior to service). Interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to either the Calvary Missionary Church or to the Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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REIST o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-14 published
KILLOUGH, Dennis Albert
At Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Saturday, July 12, 2008. Dennis Albert KILLOUGH of Springfield in his 59th year. Beloved wife of Margaret (TOTH) KILLOUGH. Dear father of Jamie, Nancy and Jeffery and wife Gail. Loving grandfather of Justin, Braeden, Mackenzie, Jordan and Gregory. Brother of Jeanette REIST, Karen VAN LINGEN and husband Andy, Kevin and wife Cheryl, Mike and wife Susie, Michelle WIGGLESWORTH and husband Jim and brother-in-law to Mary YULE, Susan HERBERT and husband Dennis. Also survived by several nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Born in Tillsonburg on February 2, 1950 son of the late Harold and Delores RULE) KILLOUGH. Son-in-law of the late George and Elizabeth TOTH. Dennis retired from Ford Motor Co. in 1996 after 30 years of servive. He loved spending time with his grandchildren and enjoyed NASCAR. Cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to the family home (20 Superior Street, Springfield) on Thursday, July 17 from 2-4 p.m. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation can be made at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer (519) 773-8400 or on-line at kebbelfuneralhome.com.

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REIST o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-15 published
KILLOUGH, Dennis Albert
At Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Saturday, July 12, 2008. Dennis Albert KILLOUGH of Springfield in his 59th year. Beloved husband of Margaret (TOTH) KILLOUGH. Dear father of Jamie, Nancy and Jeffery and wife Gail. Loving grandfather of Justin, Braeden, Mackenzie, Jordan and Gregory. Brother of Jeanette REIST, Karen VAN LINGEN and husband Andy, Kevin and wife Cheryl, Mike and wife Susie, Michelle WIGGLESWORTH and husband Jim and brother-in-law to Mary YULE, and Susan HERBERT and husband Dennis. Also survived by several nieces, nephews, aunts and uncles. Born in Tillsonburg, Ontario on February 2, 1950 son of the late Harold and Delores (RULE) KILLOUGH. Son-in-law of the late George and Elizabeth TOTH. Dennis retired from the Ford Motor Company in 2006 after 30 years of service. He loved spending time with his grandchildren and enjoyed watching NASCAR. Cremation has taken place. Friends are invited to the family home, 20 Superior Street, Springfield on Thursday July 17, 2008 from 2-4 p.m. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation can be made at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer (519-773-8400) or at kebbelfuneral home.com

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REITER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-18 published
MAAS, John
After a courageous battle with lung disease, John passed away on Sunday, March 16th, 2008 at Sunnybrook Hospital. Beloved husband of Diane for 45 years. Loving father of Janice (Kurt REITER,) Nancy (Steve MILLAR) and Richard (Karen.) Cherished Papa to Matthew, Kevin and Stephanie and "Opa" to Jack. Dear brother to Titia DUBOURCQ. John will be missed and lovingly remembered by his nieces, nephews extended family, fellow rotarians and many Friends. Friends may visit on Wednesday, March 19th, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the R.S. Kane Funeral Home (6150 Yonge Street, at Goulding, south of Steeles). Memorial service will be held at the R.S. Kane Chapel on Thursday, March 20th, 2008 at 2: 30 p.m. As an expression of sympathy, donations may be made to Rotary International - The Rotary Foundation or Lung Association.
Condolences - www.rskane.ca R.S. Kane 416-221-1159

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REITER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-09 published
REITER, Walter
On June 8, comfortably and surrounded by his loving family, age 81. Husband of Evelyn, father of Barry REITER and Lauren CAMERON, grandfather of Ian, Paul, Evan, Liam and Elise. Traditional service 1 p.m. June 11 at Pardes Shalom Cemetery (Community Section), 10953 Dufferin St, north of Major Mackenzie. Shiva after service until 8 p.m. and June 12, 2-8 p.m., 25 Cheval Drive. Donations to Israeli Soldiers Fund (416.783.3053) appreciated.

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REITMANN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-03-05 published
ROELL, Stephanie
Born October 30, 1928
Died February 22, 2008
She will be sadly missed by her brother Hans GRILL (Kathy,) Gunter GRILL (Renate,) sisters Margarete SCHAUER, Josephine HOZMEE Ina REITMANN.
Also by all her nephews, nieces and their spouses.
You will live in our hearts for ever.
Page 14

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REITZIK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-23 published
BOYD, Mary (née HAYES)
(July 23, 1921-February 20, 2008)
Mary passed away peacefully February 20, 2008. She was born in Regina, Saskatchewan, the firstborn of Irish immigrant parents, Tom and Ella HAYES. She received a B.A. and M.S.W. at the University of Saskatchewan. She continued to practice social work following her marriage to Angus BOYD until the birth of the first child. The family moved west and settled in Edmonton, Alberta where Angus developed a thriving medical practice while Mary assumed the role of "professional homemaker" raising the family of eight children. She played an active role in the C.W.L., Catholic Family Services and the John Howard Society. While she loved theatre, travel, afternoon tea, daily Mass, regular escapes to "the Island", and her annual 39th birthday party at Lake Edith, nothing could compete with her love for Angus. In the mid 1980's they retired to their lovely waterfront home on Chalet Road, Saanich, British Columbia where they spent close to 20 happy years. Following Angus' death in January 2004, Mary moved to the Providence Care Youville Residence in Vancouver, British Columbia. Even while suffering dementia, she was a gracious woman with an ever present smile and continuing concern for others. She was a devoted wife, a loving mother and a woman of deep faith who will be sadly missed by her family and Friends.
Predeceased by her brother Thomas HAYES of Calgary, Alberta. and her husband, Doctor John Angus BOYD. She is survived by her sister-in-law Ann HAYES of Calgary, her children John BOYD of Surrey, British Columbia; Donald BOYD of Langley, British Columbia Mary Ellen BOYD (Dr. Monty REITZIK) of West Vancouver, British Columbia; Jean STAUFFER (Dr. Anthony STAUFFER) of Newport Beach, Calif; Patrick BOYD (Patti PAULSON) of Calgary Alberta.; Angus BOYD (Catherine COUGHLAN) of Edmonton, Alberta.; Kathleen BOYD of Vancouver, B. C and her ten grandchildren: James, Joshua, Joel, Christopher, Patrick, Jamie, Gordie, Raphael, Caitlin and Thomas.
A special thank you goes out to Doctor Marla Gordon as well as Jessica Malkoske and all the wonderful nursing staff of the second and third floors at Youville Residence. The family would particularly like to thank Mary's companions and caregivers, Rebecca and Felicia, for their loving care over the last four years.
A private funeral mass will be held in future. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Tapestry Foundation for Health Care, designating Youville Residence as the recipient would be appreciated (www.tapestryfoundation.ca).

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REIVE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-08 published
SCHMIDT, Theodore " Ted"
Passed away suddenly on July 5, 2008 in Sauble Beach at the age of 78. Reunited with his beloved wife Madeleine Marie (2006). He was an exceptional and caring father who helped raise six beautiful children, 5 sons and 1 daughter. Phil SCHMIDT and wife Norma of London, Larry SCHMIDT and Brenda SCHMIDT of London, Cathy SCHMIDT and companion David MINARD of Tecumseh, Bill SCHMIDT and wife Mary of Emeryville, John SCHMIDT of Windsor, and Rob SCHMIDT and wife Catherine of Georgetown. Cherished Grandpa of 13 Grandchildren: Josh, Sarah, Michael, Andrew, Katelyn, Jaclyn, David, Matthew, Nathan, Erin, Adam, Madison, and Kiersten. Great-Grandpa of William and Nicholas DIMITROPOULOS. Predeceased by his loving parents Leopold and Antonie SCHMIDT. Loving brother of Frank SCHMIDT and Maxine of Orangeville, Hilda PARKER of Windsor, Violet QUICK of Windsor, Adeline TORRIE and Malcolm of Windsor, the late Margaret HARTMAN, Mary KELSCH of Alberta, Anna SCHEIDL, Walter SCHMIDT (Died in World War 2,) Elsie MAKOSKY and Mike of Windsor, and Dolores REIVE of Windsor. Brother-in-law of Ann LANGLOIS and late Lucien, Lucille BONDY, Alphonse LANGLOIS and Josephine, Evangeline FORTIN and late Leon, Paul LANGLOIS and wife Doreen, Bernadette REAUME and Jack. He leaves behind many neices, nephews, cousins, and close personal Friends. Ted was retired from Bell Canada after 37 and a half years of dedicated service. He enjoyed singing in the Our Lady Of Guadalupe Church choir and most recently at Saint Mary's Anglican Church choir in Walkerville. Ted was a member of the Windsor Coin Club, and the Seekers Club. Ted volunteered with Canadian Blood Services, and also a member and one time Chapter President of the Telephone Pioneers of America (Chapter 91). He also was an avid golfer and bowler. Visiting at the Windsor Chapel Funeral Home, 1700 Tecumseh Rd. E. on Tuesday, July 8, 2008 from 7-9 and on Wednesday, July 9, 2008 from 2-4 and from 6-9 p.m. with prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Family and Friends are invited to meet at Our Lady Of Guadalupe on Thursday, July 10, 2008 (834 Raymo Rd.) for visiting at 10 a.m. until time of Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. Interment Heavenly Rest Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy the family has requested in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Hiatus House or to Canadian Blood Services. Online condolences and cherished memories may be sent to the family at www.windsorchapel.com

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REIZES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-09 published
REIZES, Sylvia (née PAIN)
Sylvia passed away peacefully Friday evening April 25th, 2008. Diagnosed with cancer she defied the odds, and in her last years enjoyed a full life. Predeceased by husband and best friend for forty-five years Henryk, she was the proud mother of Stephen, Peter, Alexandra, adoring grandmother of Marika, Milan, Julian and Anna, and loving sister of Charles and Dorothy. Born in Toronto, she resided longest in Montreal, and made her final home in Victoria, British Columbia. Both a talented painter and poet, she lived life with passion for the arts and nature, and love for family and Friends. She engaged with those of all ages and walks of life and was admired and loved by all…she will be sorely missed.
Possibility
No words of hope escape their lips
Unspoken thoughts lie silent
As a mountain
And equally imposing
Unseen unsung
Shared moments breathe an
Unrelenting destiny
The possible awakening
Of a world
Now hidden in a private place
Looking skyward
A white and magical star flickers
Piercing the perpetual darkness
Sylvia REIZES
Friends are invited to join the family at Sylvia's home in Victoria, on Sunday May 18th between 2 and 5 p.m.

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