REALI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-24 published
REALI, Giovanni
Passed away unexpectedly on June 22, 2008 at London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital, Giovanni REALI at the age of 67. Dearly beloved husband of Antonia for nearly 41 years. Devoted and deeply loved father of Anna Maria; and Sandro (Lucia). Dear brother of Arduino (the late Rosa) REALI of London, Giuseppe (Giuseppina) and Franco (Lucia) of Italy; and the late Pasquale, Rocco and Maria. Remembered by his niece Maria Louisa (Jason) and nephew Salvatore (Monica) and families. Brother-in-law to Angela BASACCO (Mario,) Agnesina D'AMICO (Santi) and Tony (Elena) and their families. Visitors will be received at the John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. The Funeral Mass will be held at Saint Mary's Catholic Church, 345 Lyle Street at York Street on Thursday morning June 26, 2008 at 10: 00 o'clock. Entombment in Holy Family Mausoleum at Saint Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Wednesday evening at 8: 15 p.m. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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REANEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-12 published
Beloved poet, prof, playwright 'an artistic giant'
James REANEY, 1926-2008
By Katherina DEHAAS and Patrick MALONEY, Sun Media, Thurs., June 12, James REANEY, a national literary icon who stayed close to his Southwestern Ontario roots during a celebrated, 50-year career as a playwright, poet and professor, has died.
The longtime Londoner died last night in London following a long illness. He was 81.
"It was a peaceful end to a great life," his son, Free Press journalist James REANEY, said. "We know that he will be remembered and his contributions to Canadian culture will be valued."
Born on a Stratford-area farm in 1926, REANEY was an acclaimed poet, playwright, author, opera librettist and University of Western Ontario English professor.
He won three Governor-General's Awards for poetry and drama, and a 1974 Chalmers Award for best Canadian play.
"He was so great," said Nancy POOLE, a former Museum London director who met REANEY at University of Western Ontario.
"He was a gentleman, an intellectual, an artistic giant in the Canadian scene."
REANEY won his first Governor-General's Award in 1949 at age 23 for a collection of poetry, The Red Heart.
In 1960, he began teaching at University of Western Ontario and started publishing Alphabet, a semi-annual periodical devoted "to the iconography of the imagination."
In 1966, he founded the Listener's Workshop and began working with child and adult actors in choral ensemble works. REANEY, whose play Colours in the Dark premiered in Stratford in 1967, received the Order of Canada in 1975.
His best known dramatic work may be a trilogy of plays about the 1880 massacre of the Donnelly family in Lucan.
He was 10 when his stepfather told him the stirring story, stoking in REANEY an interest that would lead him to write the three plays that not only dramatized the legend, but arguably also brought it into focus historically.
The trilogy is among a handful of Canadian works listed among the 1,000 most significant plays of all time by the Oxford Dictionary of Plays.
He was also an amateur painter and pianist whose works were exhibited in London and Toronto.
REANEY enjoyed such respect that even small details of his life inspired artisans, says Martha HENRY, former Grand Theatre artistic director.
HENRY, who acted in two REANEY plays, recalled a tour last summer of his boyhood home.
"It was amazing," she said. "We went up into the attic where he used to write. He's an icon. A complete original."
REANEY is survived by his wife, son and daughter, two granddaughters and two siblings.

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REANEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-13 published
REANEY, James Crerar
Peacefully at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre, London, on Wednesday, June 11, 2008, in his 82nd year. Survived by his wife Colleen THIBAUDEAU; his son James Stewart REANEY and his wife Susan WALLACE of London and their daughter Elizabeth Wallace REANEY in Seoul, Korea; his daughter Susan REANEY and her husband Ian CHUNN and their daughter Edie Elizabeth Reaney CHUNN of Vancouver; his sister Wilma McCAIG and brother Ron COOKE. Predeceased by his son John Andrew REANEY (1966) and his parents James N. REANEY and Elizabeth CRERAR. Our thanks to the kind and caring staff and fellow residents of Marian Villa, to the many Friends who visited Jamie, and to all who have been involved in his care. A Celebration of Jamie's life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church, 1061 Richmond Street at Sherwood Avenue, London, on Saturday, June 14 at 2: 00 p.m. A day of remembrance will take place this summer. Cremation will be followed by a private interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, London. In lieu of flowers, please consider an act of kindness to someone in need or make a contribution to a charity of your choice. (www.HarrisFuneralHome.ca)

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REANEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-13 published
Life a source of wonder
By Ian GILLESPIE, Free Press Columnist, Fri., June 13, 2008
REANEY's gift to arts will inspire generations
James REANEY once told an interviewer: "I still haven't grown up."
And maybe that was one of the great writer's gifts: An ability to look at life with the open-eyed wonderment of a child.
When I visited his London home in 1994 to talk about his adaptation of Alice Through the Looking Glass for the Stratford Festival, REANEY's conversation veered from the odd to the articulate, often in the same sentence.
At one point REANEY, who died Wednesday evening at age 81, complained that many of his university students had trouble with Lewis Carroll's text.
"They just don't understand why it's such fun to go to a place where everything is backwards," he said gleefully.
REANEY had no trouble navigating a world like that -- where time runs backwards, language loops back and forth and notions of logic need not always apply.
Despite its lyrical whimsy, REANEY's work delved deeply into notions of darkness and evil.
"Many of his ideas came from a sense of kids' play, but it was also informed by a really sharp, politically astute mind," says London-bred playwright/novelist Allan Stratton, who first worked with REANEY in the 1960s. "He was tough as nails, while at the same time being absolutely open and generous."
Poet Stan DRAGLAND, who edited a 1983 book of essays titled Approaches to James REANEY, says "there just seemed to be no lid on his imagination."
DRAGLAND recalls one incident during the early 1970s when both men were teaching at University of Western Ontario, and DRAGLAND told REANEY he'd just delivered a lesson on Jane Austen's novel, Emma.
"And (REANEY) said, 'I love the turkeys at the end of that book,' says DRAGLAND, who now lives in Saint_John's, Newfoundland. "And I thought, what turkeys? I didn't notice the turkeys."
DRAGLAND admits he never found the turkeys. But he figures they're in there, somewhere.
"But the point of the story is he would come from left field with something, and that often made you go back and think," says DRAGLAND. "He was a complete original."
In a 15-year period during the 1960s and 1970s, Keith Turnbull directed almost all of REANEY's major plays -- including the national touring production of The Donnelly Trilogy -- and says REANEY possessed "an absolutely unique and extraordinary imagination."
"He pulled his ideas from a massive and unconventional range, like Yeats and Blake and Peking opera," says Turnbull, who lives in Montreal. "He believed your limits were not geographical, they were imaginative. He said you could sit by a duck pond and have access to the whole universe."
Toronto-based director Paul THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, who guided Toronto's Theatre Passe Muraille in the 1970s, says REANEY was 15 years ahead of his time.
"The rest of us were just thinking about being Canadian playwrights, dramaturges, directors and whatever, and he was doing it," says THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON. "He was a cultural dynamo."
A dynamo tempered by a sense of playful innocence, perhaps. And who left a massive legacy.
"Jamie towers over Canadian literature, and in particular, drama," says Stratton. "He's certainly the finest playwright the country has ever produced. And the Donnelly Trilogy is certainly the finest work in our dramatic canon.
"His loss can't be measured."
He was tough as nails, while at the same time being absolutely open and generous.

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REANEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-19 published
REANEY, James Crerar
The family would like to thank all those who, by thought, word and deed, helped Jamie during his long illness and have been such a consolation to us since his death. We would also like to thank all those who were able to join us for the celebration of his life at Robinson Memorial United Church last month and Remembering Jamie, a celebration of his artistic accomplishments, at Aeolian Hall on July 7. All your love and kindness is very much appreciated. Colleen and the family.

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REANEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
REANEY, James Crerar
Peacefully at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre, London, on Wednesday, June 11, 2008, in his 82nd year. Survived by his wife Colleen THIBAUDEAU; his son James Stewart REANEY and his wife Susan WALLACE of London and their daughter Elizabeth Wallace REANEY in Seoul, Korea; his daughter Susan REANEY and her husband Ian CHUNN and their daughter Edie Elizabeth Reaney CHUNN of Vancouver; his sister Wilma McCAIG and brother Ron COOKE. Predeceased by his son John Andrew REANEY (1966) and his parents James N. REANEY and Elizabeth CRERAR. Our thanks to the kind and caring staff and fellow residents of Marian Villa, to the many Friends who visited Jamie, and to all who have been involved in his care. A Celebration of Jamie's life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church, 1061 Richmond Street at Sherwood Avenue, London, on Saturday, June 14 at 2: 00 p.m. A day of remembrance will take place this summer. Cremation will be followed by a private interment at Mt. Pleasant Cemetery, London. In lieu of flowers, please consider an act of kindness to someone in need or make a contribution to a charity of your choice. (www.HarrisFuneralHome.ca)

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REANEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
Author was 'one of the finest writers Canada has produced'
Long-time University of Western Ontario professor played with form, voice and space on the page, the airwaves and the stage. He rarely strayed from his regional roots
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
Imagine a totally creative person - poet, playwright, short-story writer, painter, pianist. That was James REANEY, one of our most diverse and prolific artists, a man whose virtuosity extended from theatrical workshops with children to literary scholarship in the academy. He played with form, voice and space on the page, the airwaves and the stage. Like Alice Munro, he rarely strayed from his physical roots in Southwestern Ontario, the source of his inspiration.
"James REANEY did not fit any of the usual Canadian literary moulds, which was one of the best things about him. He was a mould-maker," said literary scholar Germaine Warkentin, the editor of several critical volumes of his poetry and prose. Praising him as "one of the finest writers Canada has produced," Prof. Warkentin said: "He had an immense range - poetry both highly literary and very simple, plays that any company could put on, whether professional or community, opera librettos, and (early on) dazzling short stories that upset a literary applecart that needed upsetting."
Margaret Atwood says he "was a true original," who was very "playful, inventive, musical and theatrical." She still remembers seeing him perform his early work, One Man Masque, when she was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto in the late 1950s. "It was never to be forgotten by anybody who saw it," she said. "The first half was life and the second half death and, in order to make the transition, he climbed into a coffin and came out wearing goggles, furry driver's gloves and carrying a blue flashlight. It was one of the strange, surreal moments of theatre," she added - perhaps unnecessarily.
"In the late 19th century and through our own time, poetry got lost in a march toward realism and prose," said Don Rubin, founding editor of the Canadian Theatre Review and Director of York University's Graduate Program in Theatre Studies. "James REANEY was one of those few Western artists of the modern period - T.S. Eliot was another - who sought to bring poetry back into the theatre. Neither he nor Eliot succeeded, but what a glorious war REANEY fought for the art in Canada.
"His Donnellys trilogy is a mammoth achievement and one of the major building blocks of the post-Centennial theatre in this country," said Prof. Rubin. "It proved that poetry really did have a place on our stages and it proved to REANEY himself that he actually had a place on our stages as well."
James (Jamie) Crerar REANEY was born on a farm in South Easthope near Stratford, Ontario, in the middle 1920s. He was the only son of James Nesbitt REANEY and Elizabeth (née CRERAR) REANEY. An imaginative and solitary child who believed that "metaphor is reality," he absorbed the landscape, history and social networks of Southwestern Ontario and made them central to his work. As a child, he attended Elmhurst School, a country school near his home, and studied piano with Cora B. Ahrens, one of first music teachers to travel around Perth County giving lessons.
His parents separated and his mother remarried and had two other children. It may have been his step-father who first told him, when he was 10, the legend of the Black Donnellys, the Irish immigrants who were massacred in their farmhouse near Lucan in 1880. This reimagined story inspired his famous trilogy of plays in the 1970s.
For high school, he went to Stratford Vocational Institute in nearby Stratford, entering in the year that the Second World War began and graduating the same month the Allies invaded Normandy. When asked why he began to write drama, Prof. REANEY responded that the impetus could have been "anything from a neurotic compulsion to bore my community, to a healthy desire to do something that my town could focus on, to things hidden deep in childhood like toys, cardboard cut-out theatres in popcorn boxes and Christmas stockings, and so on." In fact, he wrote his first play in high school because it was expected of him - "they had a tradition of producing plays."
He moved to Toronto in September, 1944, to study English literature at the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1948 and a master's degree the following year. At university, he became involved in performance and writing and Friendships with other literary and artistic types, including the anthologist Robert Weaver, the poet Colleen THIBAUDEAU, and the musician and composer John Beckwith, a lifelong friend and frequent collaborator. They later wrote four operas together, and many other works in which Prof. Beckwith set Prof. REANEY's words to music.
"What I found working with him was that he always understood musically what I was talking about, whereas a lot of writers don't," said Prof. Beckwith. "He had a musical approach and was very interested in opera literature, so it wasn't like starting from square one."
The poet Earle Birney met him in the late 1940s at a party and was enough taken by the experience that he noted: "He was still a varsity sophomore, but a very unusual one. I've never forgotten the impression he made on me that evening - a small packet of firecrackers set alight, he went sizzling and leaping mischievously from one guest to another, an excited child popping adult questions, bounding into the kitchen and back to the hall, and continually exploding with ideas, images and emotions. I thought him a marvellously inventive Ariel, and still do."
At U of T, he was strongly influenced by Northrop Frye and Fearful Symmetry, his book on the poetry of William Blake, which was published in 1947. Even as an undergraduate, he was already writing poetry and short stories. The first brought him acclaim, the second notoriety. He was only 23 when he won the Governor-General's Award in 1949 for his first collection of poems, The Red Heart. A collage in which a young man tries to reconcile his childhood memories with the harsh and often incomprehensible world of experience, the volume contains 42 poems, written during his university days, including The School Globe, in which the poet pictures himself holding the "wrecked blue cardboard pumpkin" with its lines of latitude and longitude, and laments the loss of the "fair fields and lands" of his childhood. Here is how it ends: "If I raise my hand/ No tall teacher will demand/ What I want./ But if someone in authority/ Were here, I'd say/ Give me this old world back/ Whose husk I clasp/ And I'll give you in exchange/ The great sad real one/ That's filled/ Not with a child's remembered and pleasant skies/ But with blood, pus, death, stepmothers, and lies./"
The year before, he had published a short story, The Box Social in the Undergrad, the student magazine at University College. The story, which is told from the point of view of Sylvia, a young woman from a small community who has been impregnated and abandoned by a local hero, has a surprising and disturbing payback ending. When The Box Social, with its bold (for the times) messages about illegitimate stillborn babies, was republished in New Liberty, it ignited a firestorm of protest, including inflammatory letters from 800 subscribers. The furor doused his prospects of becoming editor of Undergrad.
The Bully, another short story he wrote about this time (contrasting the etiquette rituals in high school with the pecking order in a chicken coop), was included in an anthology edited by his friend Robert Weaver in the late 1950s. Margaret Atwood read it as an undergraduate at the University of Toronto and later included it in The New Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories, which she edited with Mr. Weaver in 1987. In her introduction, Ms. Atwood suggested that Prof. REANEY anticipated what came to be called Southern Ontario Gothic, a group of writers including Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Timothy Findley, Jane Urquhart and Barbara Gowdy, who inhabit a literary landscape whose "main features were defined earlier by James REANEY." As for Prof. REANEY's influence on her own work, she said simply: "Without The Bully, my fiction would have followed other paths. If there are such things as 'key' reading experiences, The Bully was certainly one of mine."
After university, he travelled in France and then accepted at job teaching at the University of Manitoba, a position he held for a decade, from 1950-1960. He married his classmate Colleen THIBAUDEAU on her birthday, December 29, 1951. They had three children, James (1952), John (born in 1954; died of meningitis in 1966) and Susan (1959), and combined family life and artistic enterprise. As a poet she has published several volumes including The Martha Landscapes, The Artemesia Book and The Patricia Album.
In the late 1950s, Prof. REANEY took a two-year sabbatical to return to the University of Toronto to complete his doctoral dissertation on The Influence of Spenser on Yeats under Northrop Frye, receiving his degree in 1958, the same year that he published his second volume of poetry, A Suit of Nettles. That book, which earned his second Governor-General's Award, drew upon his academic work and echoed Spenser's The Shepheardes Calendar. Being himself, however, he set his dozen pastoral ecologues, one for each calendar month, in Southwestern Ontario and wrote from the perspective of barnyard geese living through their life cycle from birth to slaughter at Christmas time. The poems, which combine a variety of poetic forms from allegorical to graphic, show him at his quirky, inventive best.
The REANEYs returned to his creative heartland in 1960 when he accepted an academic position at the University of Western Ontario in London. The following decade was a kaleidoscope of literary activity. In 1962, he published Twelve Letters to a Small Town, a collection of a dozen lyric poems in which the poet recreates the geography and social psychology of his home town of Stratford, Ontario, in the era of the 1930s and 1940s in a mythological form.
Living in London, teaching at the university, married to a poet, surrounded by his own children, he began writing plays and books for young people, creating and printing his own literary magazine, Alphabet, on the iconography of the imagination, writing operas and collaborating on setting his poems to music with his friend, composer John Beckwith. He also began working in the theatre with Prof. Beckwith's then wife, Pamela Terry. She organized a public reading of A Suit of Nettles, and persuaded him to write The Killdeer, which she then directed at Toronto's Coach House Theatre. Reviews were mixed after the opening on January 13, 1960. Mavor Moore lauded it in The Telegram as a turning point in Canadian dramatic history, while Nathan Cohen dismissed it as "a desperately bad play" in The Star. Nevertheless, it won a prize at the Dominion Drama Festival.
Prof. REANEY was experimenting with music, form, dialogue and myth and creating his own way of expressing them. Night-blooming Cereus and One-man Masque, which showed both the gentle pastoral side of Prof. REANEY and the sardonic darker side of his sensibility, ran as a double bill in 1960 and were published in The Killdeer and Other Plays in 1963. The plays and his book of poetry Twelve Letters to a Small Town combined to earn him his third Governor-General's award that year. Other plays followed: The Easter Egg; The Sun and the Moon; three marionette plays (Apple Butter, Little Red-Riding Hood and Aladdin and the Magic Lamp); Listen to the Wind, which he also directed; and Colours in the Dark, which premiered at the Avon Theatre at the Stratford Festival. He also developed the Listener's Workshop and began working with child and adult actors.
Having escaped from this swirl of creative activity to spend a sabbatical year with his family in Victoria, about as far from his creative landscape as he could go in Canada, Prof. REANEY began writing The Donnelly Trilogy. The three plays, Sticks and Stones, The St. Nicholas Hotel, Wm. Donnelly, Prop., and Handcuffs, form the pinnacle of Prof. REANEY's work for the theatre. They went through an extensive workshop process before they were premiered at Tarragon Theatre in Toronto between 1973 and 1975 in productions directed by Keith Turnbull. They revolve around a feud which began in Tipperary in Ireland, was transplanted to Canada and culminated in the murders of James Donnelly and five members of his family near Lucan, Ontario. The material, which incorporated kin, revenge, rural Ontario, myth, and the possibility of reworking established views of innocence and guilt, was rich ore for Prof. REANEY. The middle play, St. Nicholas Hotel, won the Chalmers Award for best Canadian Play in 1974, while the trilogy is listed by the Oxford Dictionary of Plays as among the 1,000 most significant plays of all time.
He never stopped writing, painting and creating. His final books of poetry were Performance Poems (1990) and Souwesto Home (2005). The Champlain Society published The Donnelly Documents: An Ontario Vendetta, edited and with an introduction by Prof. REANEY in 2004. Only this spring, the McMichael Gallery in Kleinberg, Ontario, mounted The Iconography of the Imagination, more than 50 landscapes, sketches and drawings that he had made between the 1940s and the mid-1990s.
About five years ago, he was diagnosed with kidney disease. He began having dialysis and eventually needed more medical care than he could receive at home. Nevertheless, he kept on writing, painting and editing, often with the help of Friends and colleagues. Even in his last months, he was able "to make sounds and try to shape them" on an electric keyboard, according to his son James. And while the doctors said he had dementia, Prof. REANEY was able to communicate with his family, even in his final days - making a scowl, for example, when asked to create an image in response to the name Nathan Cohen.
James REANEY, O.C. PhD, F.R.S.C., was born near Stratford, Ontario, on September 1, 1926. He died at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre in London, Ontario, on June 11, 2008. He was 81, and had been suffering from kidney disease and dementia. He is survived by Colleen THIBAUDEAU, his wife of more than 50 years, his children James and Susan, two granddaughters, his two step-siblings and his extended family. A celebration of his life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church in London on Sat. June 14.

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REAR o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-04-09 published
MacKEY, Arlene (née FOSTER)
At the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on Monday, April 7, 2008 at the age of 75. The former Arlene FOSTER, born in Thornbury, a daughter of Ernest and Myrtle (née REAR) FOSTER. Predeceased by her beloved husband Arthur John 'Art' MacKEY (January 5, 2008) of Thornbury. Loved mother of Carol (Jim) RECORD of Owen Sound and Charlene (Stan) WILSON of Thornbury and predeceased by her son Brad MacKEY in 2004 and remembered by Donna. She will be the sadly missed grandmother 'Nana' of Brady RECORD, Catrina, Reid and Matthew WILSON, Melissa (David), Bruce and Travis (Leanne) MacKEY. Dear sister of Lorna JOHNSTON of Thornbury, Agnes MITCHELL of Guelph, Shirley (Terry) JACKMAN of Meaford and Marv (Christine) FOSTER of Hamilton. Predeceased by brothers Ken, Mel and Del FOSTER. Also remembered by brother-in-law Bob (Janet) MacKEY of Meaford and by several nieces and nephews and their families. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury on Thursday from 2 until 4 and 7 until 9 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Doctor Robert BUCHANAN, will be conducted at Saint Paul's Presbyterian Church in Thornbury on Friday, April 11, 2008 at 11 a.m. with a private family service of committal and interment to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, Meaford General Hospital Foundation, or the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital Foundation would be appreciated.

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REARCE o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-04-09 published
REID, Shirley
Thank You - We would like to thank our Friends and families for all the support given to us during the illness and passing of Shirley REID. You do not realize how many lives are touched by one person it seems until they are gone, and Shirley certainly touched many. We are all thankful to have been part of that. A special Thank You goes out to Jimmy and Ruby McGOOGAN two truly wonderful Friends who where there every step of the way with us, and Shirley. Anne REARCE- DAVIDSON (Granny Annie) your support for Shirley will never be forgotten, we are honoured to have you as part of our family. To the health care workers in our community, the Dialysis team at the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital are second to none, they are truly Gods Angels on earth. Deb MORRISON who went over and above, to Doctor LOW/LOWE/LOUGH and staff for your sincere professionalism. The community support at Huron Meadows, outstanding. Tracey FRYER and Angela STEPHENSON we are still in awe of how caring and gentle you are and can not stress enough how you made Shirley's final journey end with the dignity she deserved.
Again Thanks to All for your love and support. Paul and Linda WILSON and Family, Ed and Di Ann HUGHES and Family, The REID and POWELL Family
Page 10

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REARDON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-22 published
REARDON / BARLETTA
In loving memory of a dear daughter and sister, Cathy, who passed away April 20, 1991. "Remembering you forever" Although 17 years have passed by, it hasn't become any easier to cope. We will try to fulfill all your dreams and wishes. In our hearts forever, never forgotten, love Mom, Vince, Rob, Ashley, Kristen and all their families plus all the people who love you. Look after her God, don't leave her alone, for this is her 17th year away from home.

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REARDON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-02 published
LOUBERT, Gary
After a short battle with cancer Gary LOUBERT passed away on June 29, 2008 in his 55th year at London Health Sciences Centre - Victoria Hospital. Predeceased by his father, Gene (1956). Gary is survived by his mother, Anne REARDON, her husband, Charles a brother Kevin LOUBERT, his wife Patty and two sisters, Evlynne LOUBERT, her husband, Ron PIGGOTT and Sharon LOUBERT, her husband Gerald BERTHOLET. Gary will be sadly missed by his special long time friend and companion, Diana GRAY/GREY and her son, Adam. As well as many nephews, cousins, aunts and uncles, especially Nat and Alice LOUBERT. Per Gary's wishes, cremation has taken place. Friends and family will be received for visitation on Friday, July 4 from 9: 30 to 10:30 a.m. at Memorial Funeral Home, 1559 Fanshawe Park Road (east of Highbury). A memorial mass to be held on Friday, July 4 at 11: 00 a.m. at St. Andrew the Apostle Roman Catholic Church, 1 Fallons Lane (at Huron Street). Interment to follow at Saint Peter's Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Cancer Society or charity of your choice in Gary's memory would be gratefully appreciated by the family. There will be a tree planted in Gary's memory.

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REASON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-26 published
SAMUELS, Aileen Ethelwyn
Passed away peacefully at Toronto on Thursday, April 24. Beloved wife of the late Hugh Robert SAMUELS. Aileen is survived by niece Candice HENLYSHYN of Rochester, New York and nephews Craig Hamilton REASON of South Borough, Massachusetts and John Robert REASON of Liverpool, New York and their families. The family would like to thank Dorothy McBROOM and her late husband George, their daughter Janice and her husband Roger BARTON and their family for their kind support of Aileen. A service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with a reception to follow at the funeral home in the Leaside Room. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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REASON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-28 published
SAMUELS, Aileen Ethelwyn
Passed away peacefully at Toronto on Thursday, April 24. Beloved wife of the late Hugh Robert SAMUELS. Aileen is survived by niece Candice HENLYSHYN of Rochester, New York and nephews Craig Hamilton REASON of South Borough, Massachussetts and John Robert REASON of Liverpool, New York and their families. The family would like to thank Dorothy McBROOM and her late husband George, their daughter Janice and her husband Roger BARTON and their family for their kind support of Aileen. A service will be held at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) on Tuesday, April 29, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with a reception to follow at the funeral home in the Leaside Room. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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REAUME o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-10 published
REAUME, Muriel (née MURPHY)
96 years, of Jeannette's Creek, passed away at Copper Terrace, Chatham on Friday, March 7, 2008. Beloved wife of the late Wilfred REAUME (1988.) Loving mother of Irvin and Dola REAUME of Jeannette's Creek, Claudia and James LAEVENS of Pain Court, Ann and Larry STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of London, Elizabeth (Libby) and Luc GAGNIER of Jeannette's Creek. Dearest grandmother of 6 grandchildren, 15 great-grandchildren, and 4 great-great-grandchildren. Predeceased by granddaughter Johnna in 1992. Predeceased by parents James and Theresa (TAGGART) MURPHY. Dear sister of the late Theresa (1996) and late husband Maurice LOUCKS (1997,) the late Gertrude (1990) and late husband Virgil GETTY, the late James (Bud) MURPHY (1989) and surviving wife Margaret of Tilbury. Dearly missed by many nieces and nephews. Visitation at Reaume Funeral Home, 6 Canal St. W., Tilbury from 2-5 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Tuesday. Tilbury Lioness Club service 7: 30 p.m. Tuesday. Parish prayers 8 p.m. Tuesday. Funeral service from the funeral home Wednesday, March 12, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m., then to Saint Peter's Church, R.R.#2, Tilbury for Funeral Mass at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Saint Peter's Cemetery. Memorial donations to Victorian Order of Nurses or charity of choice appreciated.

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REAUME o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-01 published
MOSSOP, Bryan
A resident of Dresden, passed away peacefully surrounded by his family on Sunday, March 30, 2008 at the age of 56. Born in Strathroy, son of the late John and Lois (WOOD) MOSSOP. Beloved Husband and Best friend of Gail (REAUME) MOSSOP. Loving father of Jaime and her husband Bob FISHER of Wardsville, and Brandon MOSSOP of London. Loving grandpa of Tristan, Marlee, and Theron. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Cheryl and Wayne HUBER of London, Brent and Mary Jane MOSSOP of Dresden, Gary and Charlene PATTERSON of Chatham. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends will be received at the Badder Funeral Home and Reception Centre, 679 North Street, Dresden on Tuesday, April 1, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 6: 00 p.m.-8:00 p.m. immediately followed by the funeral service at 8: 00 p.m. with Rev. Carolyn Wilson WYNNE officiating. Cremation will take place. One wish that the family has, is that they would like everyone to please sign their Donor Cards! Donations may be made at the funeral home by cheque to the Make a Wish Foundation. Online condolences and donations may be left at our website www.badderfuneralhome.com "A tree will be planted in Memory of Bryan Mossop in the Badder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp."

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REAUME o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-19 published
BUIST, Christine Margaret McGregor (née LITTLE)
Peacefully at home in Ottawa on Sunday, April 13, 2008. Born in Hamilton, Ontario where she received the gold medal in Honours English from McMaster University, Christine moved to Edinburgh, Scotland after World War 2 to complete post-graduate work and to teach. There she married Robert Pace BUIST, a Royal Air Force pilot, when he came back from fighting in Burma. In 1950 they returned to Canada, first to Montreal and then London, Ontario where she taught at Central and Ryerson schools. Upon retirement she pursued her interests in volunteer work, painting, bridge, travel and publishing her memoirs. After Robert's death she moved to Ottawa to be near her children, bravely starting a whole new life. She leaves her son Ian and his wife Beth, daughter Margaret and her spouse Leslie REAUME and grandchildren John, Andrew and Heather. Friends may call at the Westboro Chapel of Tubman Funeral Homes, 403 Richmond Road (at Roosevelt) on Saturday, April 19, 2008 from 1 p.m. until time of memorial service in the chapel at 2 p.m. A memorial service will also be held in London, Ontario at First St. Andrew's United Church on Monday, April 28, 2008 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory to the Autism Society of Ontario would be appreciated. www.autismontario.com Condolences, tributes or donations may be made at www.tubmanfuneralhomes.com

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REAUME o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-21 published
McALORUM, Robert " Bob" Allan
(January 20, 1942) passed away peacefully at his home in Prospect Hill on May 15, 2008. It is in the spirit of my love for him that I recognize the passing of my beloved husband. Bob leaves behind Geraldine his wife of 43 years, and his children Sean of Midland, Ontario and Shannon of The Pas, Manitoba. He is survived by his parents Robert and Margaret McALORUM of Chatham, and his father-in-law and mother-in-law Jerry and Aldeen MOYNAHAN of Tilbury. Also remembering Bob are his sister and brother-in-law Margie and Terry METCALF of Saint Thomas and sister-in-law and brother-in-law Pam and Cecil REAUME of Tilbury. Cremation occurred following a bedside anointing. A Celebration of Life service will be held at the Granton Wesley United Church in Granton on May 25th. Visitation is at 1 p.m., followed by the service at 2 p.m. officiated by Pastor Paul VOLLICK. Please bring pictures and memories you would like to share. In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to the Bob McAlorum Memorial Fund. Bob was a member of the London, Saint Thomas Chapter of the RAA, the Granton Masonic Lodge, The Royal Canadian Legion Branch #236, and the Retired Teachers Association. Bob was also a member of the Granton Wesley United Church where he served as steward, elder and clerk of session.

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REAUME o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-05 published
PARRY, Sadie Marie (née REAUME)
Passed peacefully Friday July 4, 2008 at Riverview Gardens, Chatham. Born in Wallaceburg 79 years ago, daughter of the late Arborn REAUME and Bridget Alice DOYLE. Beloved wife of Don PARRY, dear mother of Brenda PARRY (Mike) of Banff, Alberta, Betty PARRY (Doug) of Winnipeg, Manitoba, Bonnie WILKIE (Frank) of Okotoks, Alberta, Beverly PARRY (Dan) of North Augusta, Ontario and the late Barbara PARRY. Fond grandmother of Ian and Lauren MORTIER, Mackellar, Quinn, Noah WILKIE and Nate LIVINGSTONE. Loving sister of Geraldine REAUME of Wallaceburg. Marie was a member of New St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, a past President of the Imperial Order of the Daughters of the Empire, Capt. Garnet Bracken Chapter. She was an R.N. graduating from Chatham Saint_Joseph's Hospital in 1953. The family will receive Friends and relatives Sunday July 6, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Bowman Funeral Home, 4 Victoria Avenue (519-352-2390). A funeral service will take place Monday July 7, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. at the funeral home. Interment to follow in Saint Thomas Cemetery. Those wishing to make a memorial contribution are asked to consider the Barbara Gail Parry Pediatric Oncology Association or the New St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church. Online condolences are welcome at www.bowmanfh.ca

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REAUME o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-08 published
SCHMIDT, Theodore " Ted"
Passed away suddenly on July 5, 2008 in Sauble Beach at the age of 78. Reunited with his beloved wife Madeleine Marie (2006). He was an exceptional and caring father who helped raise six beautiful children, 5 sons and 1 daughter. Phil SCHMIDT and wife Norma of London, Larry SCHMIDT and Brenda SCHMIDT of London, Cathy SCHMIDT and companion David MINARD of Tecumseh, Bill SCHMIDT and wife Mary of Emeryville, John SCHMIDT of Windsor, and Rob SCHMIDT and wife Catherine of Georgetown. Cherished Grandpa of 13 Grandchildren: Josh, Sarah, Michael, Andrew, Katelyn, Jaclyn, David, Matthew, Nathan, Erin, Adam, Madison, and Kiersten. Great-Grandpa of William and Nicholas DIMITROPOULOS. Predeceased by his loving parents Leopold and Antonie SCHMIDT. Loving brother of Frank SCHMIDT and Maxine of Orangeville, Hilda PARKER of Windsor, Violet QUICK of Windsor, Adeline TORRIE and Malcolm of Windsor, the late Margaret HARTMAN, Mary KELSCH of Alberta, Anna SCHEIDL, Walter SCHMIDT (Died in World War 2,) Elsie MAKOSKY and Mike of Windsor, and Dolores REIVE of Windsor. Brother-in-law of Ann LANGLOIS and late Lucien, Lucille BONDY, Alphonse LANGLOIS and Josephine, Evangeline FORTIN and late Leon, Paul LANGLOIS and wife Doreen, Bernadette REAUME and Jack. He leaves behind many neices, nephews, cousins, and close personal Friends. Ted was retired from Bell Canada after 37 and a half years of dedicated service. He enjoyed singing in the Our Lady Of Guadalupe Church choir and most recently at Saint Mary's Anglican Church choir in Walkerville. Ted was a member of the Windsor Coin Club, and the Seekers Club. Ted volunteered with Canadian Blood Services, and also a member and one time Chapter President of the Telephone Pioneers of America (Chapter 91). He also was an avid golfer and bowler. Visiting at the Windsor Chapel Funeral Home, 1700 Tecumseh Rd. E. on Tuesday, July 8, 2008 from 7-9 and on Wednesday, July 9, 2008 from 2-4 and from 6-9 p.m. with prayers at 7: 30 p.m. Family and Friends are invited to meet at Our Lady Of Guadalupe on Thursday, July 10, 2008 (834 Raymo Rd.) for visiting at 10 a.m. until time of Funeral Mass at 11 a.m. Interment Heavenly Rest Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy the family has requested in lieu of flowers, donations be made to the Hiatus House or to Canadian Blood Services. Online condolences and cherished memories may be sent to the family at www.windsorchapel.com

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REAVELY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-05 published
REAVELY, Robert Gordon " Bob"
Suddenly at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Friday, May 2, 2008. Robert Gordon (Bob) REAVELY of Strathroy in his 83rd year. Husband of the late Dorothy (AUSSANT.) Dear father of Barbara, Glenn, Gordon, Wayne and Ann. Grandfather of Chantelle. Brother of Arthur REAVELY. Predeceased by brother Allan REAVELY and sister Helen GRAHAM. A celebration of Bob's life will be held at the Strathroy Legion on Wednesday, May 7 from 2-4 p.m. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Denning Bros. Funeral Home entrusted with arrangements (519-245-1023).

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REAY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-31 published
HUNTER, Stanley William
(Royal Canadian Air Cadets, Canadian Army Corporal 1940-1946)
Peacefully in Durham on Wednesday January 30, 2008. Stan HUNTER of Rocky Saugeen in his 87th year. Husband of the late Bernice (née REAY.) Loved and devoted father of Leslie and wife Nancy of R.R.#1, Durham, Lois and her husband the late Alan DOW of Durham, and Heather and her husband Brad BURGESS of R.R.#1, Durham. Sadly missed by grandchildren Michael and wife Kim HUNTER, Landyn DOW and girlfriend Lori, Carrie DOW, Paul DOW, Hunter, Logan and Ally BURGESS, great-grandchildren, as well as many extended family members. Dear brother of Ollie BAILEY of Durham, Charlie and wife Lenore of R.R.#1, Durham and the late Ivan HUNTER. Predeceased by 2 stillborn sons and his parents John Edgar and Jennie (nee BUMSTEAD) HUNTER. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Friday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Durham Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. on Saturday February 2, 2008. Interment in Durham Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Durham Hospital Foundation or Durham Presbyterian Church would be appreciated.

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REAY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-20 published
WILDER, James A.
At Woodstock General Hospital on Wednesday, June 18, 2008, James A. WILDER of Woodstock. Beloved husband of the late Mary (2005.) Loving father of Fred WILDER (and his late spouse Lindy BRECHT) of London. Lovingly remembered by granddaughter Jamie WILDER and Jamie's mother Nancy WILDER. Loving brother of Avion REAY (Albert,) Olive MILLER (Ken KNIGHT,) and Eileen MIGHTON (Irman,) all of Durham and Arthur (Betty) of New Hamburg. Predeceased by his sons James (1971) and Richard (1956) and brother Fred. Survived by several nieces and nephews. Jim was employed at the Oxford Regional Centre for many years and was a member of the Oxford Golf and Country Club, the Probus Club of Woodstock, the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55, Woodstock, and the Woodstock Curling Club. For funeral arrangement details, please contact the Smith-Leroy Funeral Home, Woodstock, (519) 537-3611. www.smithleroy.com

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REAY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-21 published
WILDER, James A.
At Woodstock General Hospital on Wednesday, June 18, 2008, James A. WILDER of Woodstock. Beloved husband of the late Mary (2005.) Loving father of Fred WILDER (and his late spouse Lindy BRECHT) of London. Lovingly remembered by granddaughter Jamie WILDER and Jamie's mother Nancy WILDER. Loving brother of Avion REAY (Albert,) Olive MILLER (Ken KNIGHT,) and Eileen MIGHTON (Irvin,) all of Durham and Arthur (Betty) of New Hamburg. Predeceased by his sons James (1971) and Richard (1956) and brother Fred. Survived by several nieces and nephews. Jim was employed at the Oxford Regional Centre for many years and was a member of the Oxford Golf and Country Club, the Probus Club of Woodstock, the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55, Woodstock, and the Woodstock Curling Club. Friends will be received at the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, 69 Wellington Street North, Woodstock on Sunday, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Royal Canadian Legion service under the auspices of Branch 55, Woodstock will be held at the funeral home on Sunday evening at 6: 30 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Monday, June 23, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Hillview Cemetery, Woodstock. If desired, memorial donations to The Salvation Army or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Smith-LeRoy, (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may be sent at www.smithleroy.com

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REAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-20 published
WILDER, James A.
At Woodstock General Hospital on Wednesday, June 18, 2008, James A. WILDER of Woodstock. Beloved husband of the late Mary (2005.) Loving father of Fred WILDER (and his late spouse Lindy BRECHT) of London. Lovingly remembered by granddaughter Jamie WILDER and Jamie's mother Nancy WILDER. Loving brother of Avion REAY (Albert,) Olive MILLER (Ken KNIGHT,) and Eileen MIGHTON (Irman,) all of Durham and Arthur (Betty) of New Hamburg. Predeceased by his sons James (1971) and Richard (1956) and brother Fred. Survived by several nieces and nephews. Jim was employed at the Oxford Regional Centre for many years and was a member of the Oxford Golf and Country Club, the Probus Club of Woodstock, the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55, Woodstock, and the Woodstock Curling Club. For funeral arrangement details, please contact the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, Woodstock, (519) 537-3611. www.smithleroy.com

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REAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-21 published
WILDER, James A.
At Woodstock General Hospital on Wednesday, June 18, 2008, James A. WILDER of Woodstock. Beloved husband of the late Mary (2005.) Loving father of Fred WILDER (and his late spouse Lindy BRECHT) of London. Lovingly remembered by granddaughter Jamie WILDER and Jamie's mother Nancy WILDER. Loving brother of Avion REAY (Albert,) Olive MILLER (Ken KNIGHT,) and Eileen MIGHTON (Irvin,) all of Durham and Arthur (Betty) of New Hamburg. Predeceased by his sons James (1971) and Richard (1956) and brother Fred. Survived by several nieces and nephews. Jim was employed at the Oxford Regional Centre for many years and was a member of the Oxford Golf and Country Club, the Probus Club of Woodstock, the Royal Canadian Legion Branch 55, Woodstock, and the Woodstock Curling Club. Friends will be received at the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, 69 Wellington Street North, Woodstock on Sunday, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Royal Canadian Legion service under the auspices of Branch 55, Woodstock will be held at the funeral home on Sunday evening at 6: 30 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Monday, June 23, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Hillview Cemetery, Woodstock. If desired, memorial donations to The Salvation Army or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Smith-LeRoy, (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may be sent at www.smithleroy.com

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