NORBURY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-04 published
Mercurial bag-carrier teased greatness from unproven professionals
Canadian caddie's genius - and foibles - were chronicled in a bestselling book about the P.G.A. tour's wild side
By Robert THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
Toronto -- There was always a dichotomy to the life of Steve DUPLANTIS.
On one hand, the PGA Tour caddie from Brampton, Ontario, was known as one of the best at his trade, a man who could elicit top performances from the players whose bags he carried. He worked with several of the best and brightest on golf's premier stage for 15 years, working for players such as Jim Furyk, Rich Beem, Daniel Chopra and Tommy Armour III. Through his guidance, leadership and sheer determination, Mr. DUPLANTIS led several players to the top performances of their careers.
"He was one of the better caddies," said Mr. Armour, who used the Canadian's services when he set the tour's 72-hole scoring record in 2003. "That's why he kept getting hired. He was very confident with what he said."
On the other hand, although Mr. DUPLANTIS was all focus on the course, his life away from golf was anything but. He married his first wife, an exotic dancer, in 1995 after knowing her for just 19 days. He proposed to his second wife while still married to the first, and his predilection for a good time often led him to turn up late for tee times - then have to search for a new job.
However, his talent for elevating the play of those he worked with was undeniable, and once on the course, he could distance himself from the distractions.
"He was a throwback," said tour caddie Patrick Smith. "He raised the level of every player he worked for. He could take guys who were marginal and they would play well."
Mr. DUPLANTIS was drawn to the game of golf early in his life. As a junior member at North Halton Golf and Country Club in Georgetown, Ontario, the young golfer would often play from daybreak to dusk. When he wasn't playing, he could be found at the range, pounding ball after ball.
"He'd play 36 holes a day in weather that was below freezing and then complain that he only got in 36 before he lost feeling in his hands and toes," John MITCHELL, his mother's ex-husband, told Sports Illustrated columnist Alan Shipnuck.
His passion for the game and self-confidence led Mr. DUPLANTIS to chase a scholarship to the United States, although he wasn't a blue-chip prospect. He got a partial scholarship to Spartanburg Methodist in South Carolina, playing two years. "Maybe I wasn't as great as I wanted to be," he once said. "But I loved it."
It was in 1993, his sophomore year at Spartanburg, that Mr. DUPLANTIS was bit by the caddie bug. At the Greater Greenville Classic on the Nike Tour, he became reacquainted with Clarence Rose, a PGA Tour journeyman he had first met at the Canadian Open some years previous. Mr. Rose didn't have a regular caddie and asked Mr. DUPLANTIS whether he was interested. Mr. DUPLANTIS worked so well that Mr. Rose asked him to stay on for the summer, including caddying in a PGA Tour event that earned the rookie bag carrier $600 (U.S.).
Mr. Rose stopped playing at the end of the summer, and Mr. DUPLANTIS decided to forgo school and try to make his way as a professional caddie. In 1994, lacking a regular job, he encountered upstart PGA Tour pro Jim Furyk at the Anheuser-Busch Golf Classic. Mr. Furyk asked him to carry his bag that week and finished 10th, earning Mr. DUPLANTIS $2,000 and a regular job.
"He was a very likable person," Mr. Furyk said. "He had a way about him and a charisma."
As Mr. Furyk's star rose - including wins in 1995 and 1996 - Mr. DUPLANTIS began to develop a reputation for leading a wild life away from his day job. At a tournament in Texas, he met Vicki, a woman he would later refer to as a "titty dancer," and married her a couple of weeks later. She was pregnant soon afterward and gave birth to a daughter, Sierra, in 1996. Within a year, the couple were in the midst of a divorce and an ugly custody battle.
While his personal life was in disarray, his player became a big name on the PGA Tour. Mr. DUPLANTIS caddied for him at 1997 Ryder Cup in Spain, as well as at golf's four major tournaments.
But the distractions in his personal life began taking a toll. Mr. Furyk said his caddie was late "maybe a dozen times. Maybe two dozen. It all blends together." Despite earning huge sums, the tardiness eventually forced Mr. Furyk to fire him in 1999.
Mr. DUPLANTIS didn't stay down long. In May, only months after being fired by Mr. Furyk, he was on the bag for a former cellphone salesman turned PGA Tour pro named Rich Beem. Coming into the Kemper Open, Mr. Beem was floundering, having missed five straight cuts. But that week, with Mr. DUPLANTIS urging him on and keeping him focused, Mr. Beem won the tournament. Announcer Ken Venturi called Mr. DUPLANTIS's work that week one of best caddie performances in history.
The partnership with Mr. Beem didn't last long, however. The two parted ways before the year was finished.
"He was a hell of a caddie at times and other times he was sometimes difficult to get along with," Mr. Beem said. "That's the nature of this business."
Mr. DUPLANTIS's life, warts and all, as well as his time with Mr. Furyk and Mr. Beem, was captured in Bud, Sweat and Tees, a book by Mr. Shipnuck. Released in 2001, it became a bestseller after Mr. Beem won the 2002 PGA Championship.
Through the challenges, Mr. DUPLANTIS displayed an unflagging desire to keep working.
"He just really loved everything about the game," said Ted McIntyre, editor of Ontario Golf, a magazine to which the caddie contributed as a columnist for several years. "He could be maddening, but when he delivered, it was always worth waiting for."
He worked everything from the LPGA Tour to the PGA Tour's dreaded qualifying school, six gruelling rounds played on consecutive days. In the second stage of 2005 Q-School, he carried the bag of John Maginnes, a journeyman pro on his last legs. Even though Mr. Maginnes was struggling to find some magic in his declining game, he found Mr. DUPLANTIS's instinct for the game to be exhilarating.
"He would talk you through the shot before you hit it, visualizing it right along with you," Mr. Maginnes said. "I never discovered the origin of Stevie's insight but it was apparent in his approach to the game. He couldn't realize that although I could see the shot we discussed, execution was another matter all together. But for the first time in a long time, I was excited about playing, if only for a moment."
He spent most of 2007 caddying for rising Swedish star Daniel Chopra, including a start at the Canadian Open in Markham, Ontario, where Mr. Chopra missed the cut. Family Friends say he seemed almost not to be working the weekend last July, and spent time with his daughter and family Friends. He stayed in Toronto for a short period after the Canadian Open, playing in a fundraising tournament and demonstrating his golfing prowess by taking the prize for longest drive.
At the start of the 2008 PGA Tour year, he found himself with yet another new golfer - Eric Axley, who had appeared to be on the rise in 2006 before struggling throughout 2007. It appeared to be a good match - another golfer who might fulfill his potential with the help of a savvy caddie. They were set to play the Buick Invitational, the fourth event of the PGA Tour season, in late January, when he stepped in front of a taxi and was killed.
"Am I shocked by this? No," Mr. Armour told reporters. "I tried several times to get him some help. And I told him in 2003, 'Bud, if you don't change, you're going to die a tragic death.' "
Despite his unpredictable disposition, it was his ability to get the best from others that kept those around him hoping he'd change his ways.
"He was a real charmer," Mr. McIntyre said. "Guys like Steve don't come around very often. He always found a way to make the golfers he worked for better. It was on the course that he always shined."
Steve DUPLANTIS was born in Brampton, Ontario, on September 20, 1972. He died after being struck by a taxi in Del Mar, California., on January 23, 2008. He was 35. He leaves mother Sandra and her husband Denis CANTIN; father Steve and his wife Jackie; brother Danny, sister Amy and brother-in-law Chris NORBURY, plus grandparents Dorothy and Art BILTON.
He also leaves daughter, Sierra - donations to her trust fund can be made payable to the Sierra Duplantis Trust Fund, care of the

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NORCOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-03 published
NORCOP, Charlotte (née HOLMES)
On April 1, 2008. Daughter of the late Helen Paget HOLMES and the late Ronald HOLMES. Predeceased by brother Ronald HOLMES. Leaves husband James, nephews Geoffrey, Richard (Mary), Michael (Monica) and Peter HOLMES and grand-nieces and nephews, as well as brother-in-law John NORCOP, and sister-in-law Anita NORCOP Angus and nephew Christopher LOGAN (Teresa.) Charlotte was educated at Brown School, Camp Onawa, Bishop Strachan School and University College, University of Toronto. Hers was a life largely devoted to the Arts through her years at the National Ballet of Canada and the Ontario Arts Council, where she was Theatre and Dance Officer and later Director of Operations. Her life was also filled with enthusiasm for learning, for travel and for her wide circle of Friends. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of Charlotte's life will be held on Sunday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at the Arts and Letters Club of Toronto, 14 Elm St. If desired, donations may be made to the Celia Franca Scholarship Fund, which Charlotte established at the National Ballet School, Toronto.

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NORCOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-07 published
NORCOP, Charlotte (née HOLMES)
On April 1, 2008. Daughter of the late Helen Paget HOLMES and the late Ronald HOLMES. Predeceased by brother Ronald HOLMES. Leaves husband James, sister-in-law Patricia Stott HOLMES, nephews Geoffrey, Richard (Mary,) Michael (Monica) and Peter HOLMES and grand-nieces and nephews, as well as brother-in-law John NORCOP, and sister-in-law Anita Norcop ANGUS and nephew Christopher LOGAN (Teresa). Charlotte was educated at Brown School, Camp Onawaw, Bishop Strachan School and University College, University of Toronto. Hers was a life largely devoted to the Arts through her years at the National Ballet of Canada and the Ontario Arts Council, where she was Theatre and Dance Officer and later Director of Operations. Her life was also filled with enthusiasm for learning, for travel and for her wide circle of Friends. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of Charlotte's life will be held on Sunday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at the Arts and Letters Club of Toronto, 14 Elm St. If desired, donations may be made to the Celia Franca Scholarship Fund, which Charlotte established at the National Ballet School 416-964-3780 ext. 2102.

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NORCOP o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-10 published
NORCOP, Charlotte (née HOLMES)
On April 1, 2008. Daughter of the late Helen Paget HOLMES and the late Ronald HOLMES. Predeceased by brother Ronald HOLMES. Leaves husband James, sister-in-law Patricia Stott HOLMES, nephews Geoffrey, Richard (Mary,) Michael (Monica) and Peter HOLMES and grand-nieces and nephews, as well as brother-in-law John NORCOP, and sister-in-law Anita Norcop ANGUS and nephew Christopher LOGAN (Teresa). Charlotte was educated at Brown School, Camp Onawaw, Bishop Strachan School and University College, University of Toronto. Hers was a life largely devoted to the Arts through her years at the National Ballet of Canada and the Ontario Arts Council, where she was Theatre and Dance Officer and later Director of Operations. Her life was also filled with enthusiasm for learning, for travel and for her wide circle of Friends. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of Charlotte's life will be held on Sunday, April 13 at 4 p.m. at the Arts and Letters Club of Toronto, 14 Elm St. If desired, donations may be made to the Celia Franca Scholarship Fund, which Charlotte established at the National Ballet School 416-964-3780 ext. 2102.

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NORDEEN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-21 published
BROWN, Miriam Katherine (née REINHART)
Peacefully, went home to be with her Lord and Saviour on Friday, July 18th, 2008, aged 93 years, at the Elgin Lodge Retirement Home, Port Elgin. She was predeceased by her husband Clarke, her sons, Rev. Douglas and Larry and by her parents, J. Wesley and Ethel REINHART. Miriam is survived by her beloved sister Joyce STOW of Southampton and her grandchildren Margo BROWN, Jennifer NORDEEN, Monique MARTIN and Annelise LOVELL. She will be fondly remembered by her four great-grandchildren, step-son Bryan JONES, nephew Rick STOW, niece Nancy STOW, great-nephew Stefan POHL, two great-nieces, the staff and residents at Elgin Lodge and by many cousins, neighbours, Friends, as well as her special friend and caregiver, Valerie FULHAM. Miriam will be remembered for her strong faith, zest for life, her terrific sense of humour and her fondness for her dog, Gordie. A Celebration of Miriam's Life will be conducted at 11 a.m. on Saturday July 26th, 2008 in the Chapel of the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, with Reverend Allan PERKS officiating. Private Interment of Ashes, Southampton Cemetery. Expressions of Remembrance to the Gideon Society or to the Charity of your Choice. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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NORDEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-01 published
VAN NORDEN, Julia (also known as Toos VAN NORDEN- WOUTERS, née Jacoba WOUTERS)
(February 8, 1919-February 26, 2008)
She died in Saint Paul's hospital in the presence of her loving and devastated husband Herman after prolonged and cruel suffering from two simultaneous malignant diseases. She is survived by her children and their spouses (Sophia VAN NORDEN and Roger DEE in Vancouver, Wilma VAN NORDEN and Robert ELM in Vancouver, and Simon VAN NORDEN and Laura RIZZI in Montreal,) by her grandchildren (Clare, Alexander and Natalie,) by her sister Johanna (Ans) PLANKEEL and her children and grandchildren, and by her sister-in-law Adela KELLERMAN in Antwerp, Belgium. Her early life was marked by struggle, first the financial struggle to earn enough for a university education during the Depression, and then working in the Dutch resistance during World War 2. After the war, she obtained her M.D. and was decorated by the Queen of the Netherlands for her wartime efforts. She came to Vancouver with her husband in 1951 where they established both a young family and a successful medical practice. As a professional wife, she made caring for her grateful husband a priority, while at the same time maintaining her independent opinions, activities and finances. As a mother she was a hard taskmaster, but she enjoyed seeing all her children earn advanced university degrees and establish professional careers. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to www.dyingwithdignity.ca.

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NORLEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-10 published
NORLEY, Sean " Jeffery" (February 25, 1969-May 7, 2008)

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NORMAN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.collingwood.the_connection 2008-04-18 published
COLLINS, Floyd Ronald
Passed away suddenly on Tuesday, April 15, 2008 at the Sunset Manor Nursing Home, Collingwood. Floyd was predeceased by his wife Bertha COLLINS; father of Darlene and her husband Fred DUGGAN. Grandfather of Patrick, Jane and Campbell DUGGAN. Dear brother of Bert COLLINS of Ravenna. Floyd will be missed by his close friend Irene NORMAN. A funeral service will be held on Friday, April 18, 2008 at the First Presbyterian Church, 200 Maple Street, at 2: 00 p.m. with visitation in the church from 12-2 p.m. Interment First Presbyterian Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Parkinson's Foundation would be appreciated. Friends may visit the on-line Book of Memories at www fawcettfuneralhomes.com.
Page 44

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-05 published
COUMANS, Myra Hawley (CRUICKSHANK)
(September 3, 1907-January 3, 2008)
Died peacefully, in the afternoon after her cup of tea, at Grandview Manor, Berwick, Nova Scotia. Myra, was the wife of Arnot B. COUMANS, loved mother of Carol, who died in childhood, and Kendra NEWKIRK (Harbourville, Nova Scotia.) Loving grandmother to Sarah NEWKIRK and her husband Jason GATT (Toronto) and Emily NEWKIRK (Wolfville, Nova Scotia). Loving great-grandmother to Thea GATT. Beloved sister of the late Barbara BONISTEEL (Norv.) She was loved by her nieces Jean Ann NORMAN (Bob - Ontario) and Myra CRAVEN (Dave - New York) and nephew Bruce BONISTEEL (Nova Scotia.) Great aunt to Todd NORMAN (Joye) and Tashia NORMAN. Great-grand nephews are Jack and Patrick NORMAN. Myra was before her time in organic gardening and good nutrition leading to a very long life. A family gathering has been held. Donations in her memory may be made to Grandview Manor, Berwick, Nova Scotia B0P 1E0 902-538-3118 or The Hospital for Sick Children (Toronto).

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-05 published
NORMAN, Mildred
Passed away peacefully at her home on Sunday, February 3, 2008 at the age of 87. Beloved wife of the late Stanley. Loving mother of Robert, Ronald and his wife Sandy, and Barbara WOLFRAIM and her husband Peter. Dear grandmother of 7 grandchildren and 5 great-grandchildren. Special thanks to Roseline, Parveen, and Ladelle for the loving care they provided. Friends may call at Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario St. (Hwy 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Wednesday from 4-8 p.m. Funeral Service to be held in the Chapel on Thursday, February 7, 2008 at 11 a.m. Interment Springcreek Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Scott Mission.

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-16 published
VORSTER, Nels (1918-2008)
Born in Den Haag, The Netherlands on October 6, 1918, Nels passed away at Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto on February 11, 2008.
Raised in Belgium, France and the Netherlands (Bilthoven), she married Gerke (Gerry) VORSTER in 1939 bearing two children during the occupation of 1940-45. The family emigrated to Canada in 1951 and settled in Toronto. Gerry died in 1977 and Nels spent the next 30 years in active widowhood, living in her own apartment until she entered hospital a few weeks before her death. She focussed on her family, sons Hans (Bardi NORMAN) and Menno (Julie GRGAR) and her grand_sons Quinn (Monika DUKSZTA) and Michael. They, and her Friends, shall miss her greatly.
A memorial service will be held on Wednesday, February 20 at 4 p.m. in the chapel at Toronto Necropolis, 200 Winchester Street.

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-28 published
NORMAN, Dorothy A. (née WOOD)
On Thursday, February 21th, 2008 in Toronto at Belmont House at the age of 95. Beloved wife of the late Gerald F. NORMAN, and loving mother of Carol HORNBECK (the late Ken,) and Sandra Way (Jack); dear Nanny of Alison, Martha and Michael; survived by her brothers Everett and Chester and sister, Lil PARSONS. According to her wishes, a private family service and interment was held on February 27 at Saint_John's Anglican Church, York Mills, Toronto. The family would like to give their heartfelt thanks to the wonderful and caring staff at Belmont House. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Belmont House, 55 Belmont Street, Toronto, M5R 1R1 or the Canadian National Institute for the Blind, 1929 Bayview Ave., Toronto M4G 3E8 (cnib.ca)

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-03 published
GUTOWSKI, Peter
With dignity and grace, at home with family, March 31, 2008, in Toronto, Ontario Beloved husband of Peggy (née PEIRCE) for 47 years, father of Michele (George RADZISZEWSKI,) pre-deceased by his brother Marek, his mother Sophie and his father General Michael GUTOWSKI. Sadly missed by his uncle Spyszek GUTOWSKI, cousin Asia GUTOWSKA- NORMAN and son Alexander, cousin Jan GUTOWSKI and wife Maria, sister-in-law Donna Mae CLAPP, nieces Wendy and Laurie and their children Katelyn, Cameron, Brodie and Benton, and his many colleagues and Friends in aviation. Peter was born in Leszno, Poland, November 17, 1935. He was foremost an aviator. He became interested in piloting as a teenager and took his training at Toronto Island Airport. He was hired by Trans-Canada Airlines, now Air Canada, in October, 1957 as a co-pilot and was promoted to captain in July, 1967 at age 31. Widely known as a superb pilot, Pete GUTOWSKI was a master of smoothness and precision in flying. As a hobby Pete flew with Warplane Heritage of Hamilton, Ontario, a society dedicated to maintaining World War 2 airplanes in flying condition. Peter flew as a commercial pilot to the mandatory retirement age of 60. His love of flying then too him to business aviation and he flew a corporate jet for another eleven years, until stricken with cancer. In all, he piloted for 53 accident-free years. He passionately loved the art, and his fellow professionals. Funeral service will be at Saint_Jerome's Parish Roman Catholic Church, 8530 Chinguacousy Road, Brampton, Ontario, on Monday, April 7, at 11 a.m. A reception will follow at Lionhead Golf and Country Club, 8528 Mississauga Road, Brampton, from 1 to 4 p.m.

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-25 published
NORMAN, Jack
On Monday, June 23, 2008 at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre. Jack NORMAN, beloved husband of the late Maxine NORMAN. Loving father and father-in-law of Michael NORMAN and Lisa MAASLAND, Nadine, Lawrence NORMAN and Christine WHETTER, and the late Robert NORMAN. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Lou and Bernice, Bella and Larry RITTENBERG, Jerry NOVITSKY and Penny MURRAY, Hindi and Howard WAX, and the late Manny NORMAN. Devoted grandfather of Matthew, Jonathan, Madeline, Olivia, and Cole. At Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (three lights west of Dufferin), for service on Wednesday, June 25th at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Holy Blossom Memorial Park. Shiva 39 Elwood Boulevard. Donations may be made to the Jack Norman Memorial Fund, c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324 or at www.benjamins.ca.

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-12 published
ADAMSON, Helen Madeline (formerly SMITH, née HEARNE)
Born May 16, 1916 in Burford, Ontario, passed away peacefully at The George Derby Centre for Veterans in Burnaby, British Columbia on July 2, 2008, leaving sisters Dorothy OILLE of Ajax, Ontario and Betty INNS of Regina, Saskatchewan. She is survived by daughters Dr. Christine Adamson NORMAN and husband Richard N. NORMAN of Cape Coral, Florida, Ninkey Dalton EGLEE (ADAMSON) and husband Charles H. EGLEE of Los Angeles, California, loving grandchildren Chloe WOLMAN, Matthew WOLMAN both of Toronto, Ontario, and Blythe DALTON and Eli EGLEE of Los Angeles, California. Helen proudly served her country in the Canadian Army during World War 2 achieving rank of Lt. Nursing Sister and was awarded the following medals: Defense Medal, C.V.S.M. and Clasp. Internment is planned for October where she will come to rest in Mount Pleasant Cemetery in the Adamson Family Plot. Donations may be sent in her name to The George Derby Center, Burnaby, British Columbia.

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NORMAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-18 published
NORMAN, Frank Willard
It is with profound sadness that his family announces that Frank passed away peacefully on July 16, 2008 at the age of 92. Survived by his beloved wife of 66 years, Helen and his 6 children, Frances HALLIDAY (Bob), Patricia (Bob MUSTARD), Barbara, Cathy BRAINE (Bruce), Robert (Kristie) and Mary LOHMUS (John). He is survived by his remaining sister, Marion NORMAN, IBVM. Predeceased by his sisters Eleanor MOSS and Dorothy MATTHEWS. Proud Grandpa of 12 grandchildren; Wendy "Rebecca" RITSON (Tim) of France, Jim HALLIDAY (Amanda), Rob BRAINE, Janet HALLIDAY (Andy Hughes), Elizabeth BRAINE of United Kingdom, Pieter TRIP, Gavin MOGAN and Gaelen NORMAN of British Columbia, Trisha and Jennifer LOHMUS, Tyler and Shawn NORMAN of California and 6 great-grandchildren Holly, Maddie, Sophia, Stephen, Ashlyn, and Callum. Frank was founding partner and retired president of Hanford Lumber, twice President of the Toronto Camera Club and an Royal Canadian Air Force World War 2 Veteran. He was an avid photographer, world traveler, wine connoisseur and life-long fan of the Argos and Leafs. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W., Etobicoke (between Kipling and Islington Aves.) on Sunday, July 20, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Monday, July 21, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. at Our Lady of Peace Church, 3914 Bloor St. W., Toronto. Private interment at a later date. Donations may be made to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. On-line condolences may be made at www.turnerporter.ca.

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NORQUIST o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-08 published
Award-winning radio dramatist wrote more than 1,200 plays and screenplays
'His ruthless honesty… his daring in tackling forbidden subjects, gave rise to more letters to the editor and questions in the House of Commons than the work of any other writer'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
After selling his first play to the nascent radio service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1938, Len PETERSON made a living for more than five decades as a freelance playwright "in a land friendlier to ragweed than to indigenous drama," as he liked to say, without his "wit being dulled." He wrote more than 1,200 dramatic works for radio, the theatre, television and film in a variety of styles, moods and themes and won a series of prizes including several Ohio Columbus Awards, Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists Awards for best radio drama for The Trouble with Giants (1973) and for Evariste Galois (1984) and the John Drainie Award for distinguished contribution to broadcasting in 1974.
His heyday was in radio in the 1940s and early 1950s, working with producer Esse Ljungh, under the legendary Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer-director Andrew Allan. "Nobody engendered more rage and nobody more admiration, than Len PETERSON," Mr. Allan wrote in his autobiography, A Self-Portrait. "His ruthless honesty, his sense of the colloquial, his daring in tackling forbidden subjects, gave rise to more letters to the editor and questions in the House of Commons than the work of any other writer. After we did his Burlap Bags… there were people who wouldn't speak to me. But, in the spring, when it won an award at Ohio State, the same people demanded to hear it again."
Blond, of medium height, with twinkling blue eyes and a cheerful face, Mr. PETERSON had a convivial demeanour, but a passionate and rebellious soul. As experimental as he was prolific, Mr. PETERSON loved to play with form and voice. Fascinated by the writers of his Nordic heritage and the workings of the human psyche, he was also a steadfast advocate of workers' rights and social justice. An early and long-time organizer and negotiator for the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists, he co-ordinated the jury for the John Drainie Award for several years, and was also one of the founders of the Playwright's Co-op, an organization that initially published and distributed plays in typescript form and which later became a bargaining and lobbying unit. (It now exists as the Playwright's Union of Canada and Playwrights Canada Press.)
"He was one of the very few who were able to earn a livelihood by writing radio drama," said John Reeves, a former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio drama producer and winner of the Italia Prize in 1995. "The most striking thing about Len's career was the consistent way he used drama to address social problems. He did that all the time and very effectively." But Mr. PETERSON didn't let his social conscience overpower his creative impulses, according to Mr. Reeves, "To him, the addressing of social drama and the writing of good artistic drama were a seamless garment."
Mr. PETERSON was a very attractive person to be with, says writer and former producer Vincent Tovell, describing him as profoundly compassionate about people and possessing a deadpan and ironic humour. He was "very much aware of the outer world," and "had an ironic sense of its craziness" and he "carved his own path and made a mark because of the depth of his interest in human and social and political affairs." As a dramatist, however, he was "very Scandinavian," according to Mr. Tovell. "Ibsen and Strindberg, the writers to whom he was so finely and naturally attuned -- all of their angst and tension and social concerns were part of his nature."
Leonard (Len) Byron PETERSON, the second of five children of Nils PETERSON, a Norwegian who worked as a locomotive engineer for the Grand Trunk and Canadian National Railways, and Marion (née NORQUIST) PETERSON, a Wisconsin-born woman of Swedish ancestry, was born in Regina on the day that Czar Nicholas II of Russia abdicated -- as he himself liked to point out.
Growing up on the Prairies, he felt surrounded by space. "As kids, oh, we were so free, on the run all the time, across the Prairies. There we were, bounding like antelope," Mr. PETERSON told the Toronto Star in May of 1972. "We spent an awful lot of time dreaming. The sky encouraged that." But it wasn't entirely carefree: his teenage years were shadowed by his little brother's death from appendicitis and the despair and deprivation of the Depression -- which was especially dire in the Prairies.
After graduating from local elementary and secondary schools, Len went to Luther College. He found it uninspiring and far too Anglo-centric, although as a natural athlete, he played quarterback on the school football team and excelled as a gymnast and wrestler. After two years, he switched to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to study math and sciences. There, he also discovered literature as social history, came in contact with professors who praised what he called his "primitive style" and began writing short stories. He graduated with a bachelor of science degree in 1938 and moved to Toronto, determined to become a writer, an unlikely career move that he once compared to "a Manitoban plowman deciding to become a ballet dancer." Nevertheless, he sold a radio script, It Happened in College to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1938 for $15.
"His typewriter never stopped," freelance writer Ron Hambleton, said in an interview this week, recalling that Mr. PETERSON was pounding out plays and short stories when both men were tenants in a house on Spadina Road in Toronto in 1941, and later in a house on Charles Street that Mr. Hambleton and his wife rented. "He was extremely athletic -- a marvellously active fellow -- who was extremely handsome, full of energy, loved the outdoors and had a very unusual imagination, when it came to interpreting everyday life." Mr. PETERSON continued to wrestle and even held an Ontario Wrestling Alliance championship title for two years.
Mr. PETERSON enlisted in the Canadian Army in the infantry in 1942. Fiercely independent, an obsessive reader of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky, a compulsive scribbler and note-taker, he had trouble acclimatizing himself to the regimentation of army life and engendered suspicion from his superior officers who confiscated his notebooks and had him locked up for 10 days as a suspected subversive.
After the Royal Canadian Mounted Police checked into his background, he was transferred to the radio section of National Defence Headquarters and ordered to write radio documentaries, dramas and other propaganda supporting the Canadian war effort. One of the perks of his job was meeting actress Ingrid Bergman (about the time she made a huge impact acting opposite Humphrey Bogart in the wartime classic Casablanca) when she appeared in Canada as part of a Victory Bonds drive. While travelling back and forth to Ottawa, he switched writing gears in his spare time and produced short stories for Maclean's, then a general-interest monthly magazine, and scripts for a hungry national audience of radio listeners.
The decade-long golden age of radio drama began in 1943 when Andrew Allan, who had joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a producer in Vancouver in 1939, was promoted to national drama supervisor and transferred to Toronto. He created the Sunday night drama series that started with Stage 44 and progressed annually through Stage 45, Stage 46, and so on. He was also one of four senior drama producers working on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Wednesday Night, a weekly broadcast of international and original Canadian dramas.
Mr. Allan had great faith in the capacity of his audience to absorb difficult and even disturbing material and in the ability of his writers to invade and stretch listeners' imaginations. "What struck listeners as new and exciting about the Stage series," according to Bronwyn Drainie in her book, Living the Part: John Drainie and the Dilemma of Canadian Stardom, "was not just its crisp, quickly paced professional sound, but also its subject matter, which seemed to have grown up overnight. Canadian writers were emerging from the war years with an agenda… All that blood spilled to defeat Hitler would be wasted if the dark forces that had brought him to power -- racial hatred, class injustice, fear, greed and hypocrisy -- were allowed to grow unchecked here in Canada." Among the writers who found steady work in Mr. Allan's regime were Fletcher Markle, Joseph Schull, Lister Sinclair, Mavor Moore and, of course, Mr. PETERSON.
His first contribution to Stage 44 was Within The Fortress, an empathetic portrayal of German officers trapped in their own stronghold. It created a stir -- it was wartime, after all -- but nothing like the commotion that greeted the second of his three dramas to be broadcast live to air that year. They're All Afraid, which was set in Canada, was an exploration of office bullying, especially of a black worker, and the lack of freedom people experience even in ordinary life.
Although Ernie Bushnell, director general of programs, vociferously criticized the broadcast as bad for morale, Mr. Allan submitted it for the Columbus Award of the Ohio Radio Institute in 1944, where it won the top award in drama and a citation as the best submission in all categories. Mr. Bushnell accepted the award by confessing, "I didn't like this play when it was performed on our network. I still don't like it. But thank you very much," according to Alice Frick in Image in the Mind: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Drama 1944 to 1954. Mr. PETERSON soon reprised his prize-winning ways when his play Burlap Bags, an absurdist drama in the style of Beckett and Ionesco about a man who shields himself from society by covering his face with a burlap bag, also won an Ohio Award.
He published his first and only novel, Chipmunk, in the fall of 1949, about a weak character who commits a single act of defiance. Although the book had stalwart fans, it received a devastating review from William Arthur Deacon, then the literary editor of The Globe and Mail. After cautioning his readers that they would search in vain for easy entertainment, romance or excitement in Chipmunk, Mr. Deacon complained that Mr. PETERSON may have "willingly sacrificed popularity on the altar of his artistic integrity" with his "rigid rejection of the sentimental," and his "ruthless realism."
By now Mr. PETERSON had met Iris ROWLES, an English woman who had arrived in Canada after the war and worked as a secretary first for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's international service and then for the drama department. They were married in 1951 and eventually had five children. "It was extraordinary, especially at that time, for a man to be able to support a family from his writing," said Mrs. PETERSON.
In addition to radio plays, Mr. PETERSON wrote a series of Ohio-Award-winning dramatized broadcasts on human relations titled In Search of Ourselves, and joined forces with actors Lorne Greene and John Drainie to found the Jupiter Theatre, a professional company dedicated to the "emergence of a truly Canadian voice in the theatre." The Jupiter, which lasted only three years, from 1951 to 1954, mounted plays by Europeans including Bertolt Brecht and Jean-Paul Sartre and new Canadian works by Ted Allan, Lister Sinclair and Nathan Cohen. It disbanded before Mr. PETERSON's play, Never Shoot a Devil, could be produced. Besides a lack of working capital in those pre-government-funding days, the Jupiter's demise can be attributed at least partly to the founding of the Stratford Festival, the currency of the Crest Theatre and the launch of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television in 1952.
Although Mr. PETERSON's experimental style was not as suited to television as it was to radio, he contributed to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Folio, G.M. Theatre, First Performance and Playdate. He also worked on a joint Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-NBC live documentary about the St. Lawrence Seaway, which was aired on June 3, 1956, and on Memo to Champlain, a live 90-minute bilingual program, hosted by Joyce Davidson and René Lévesque, that was aired on July 1, 1958 to celebrate the formation of the national microwave network of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television -- the network did not include Newfoundland until the next year.
His first full-length stage play, The Great Hunger, which was produced by the Toronto Arts Theatre in 1960, was set around a killing in the Arctic and explores the communal myths affecting both White and Inuit cultures. In the 1970s he wrote The Workingman, which was premiered at Toronto Workshop Productions in May 1972 to celebrate the centenary of the labour movement in Canada and responded to feminist themes by writing Women in the Attic (1971) which was mounted by Ken Kramer at the Globe Theatre in Regina. He also began writing historical plays for children including Almighty Voice (1970), Billy Bishop and The Red Baron (1974) and Etienne Brulé (1977), all of which were mounted by the Young People's Theatre in Toronto. In just one example of how Mr. PETERSON recycled his research, he had earlier turned his Etienne Brulé material into separate radio and television treatments.
Although he would continue to write for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation -- especially radio -- Mr. PETERSON was increasingly distressed by new management policies at the public broadcaster. "Every few years the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation gets a new Television Wonder Boy (or Girl) who is going to rescue Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television drama," he wrote in an eloquent lament in The Globe in November, 1976. "Each Wonder Boy's handmaids work hard to kill the devil or god in every writer, his uniqueness, his genius, and turn him into a service writer, a formula writer. To a fair degree they succeed in making hacks of the writers and junk of the drama." Mr. PETERSON was 59 when he hammered out that broadside more than 30 years ago, but his sentiments seem as fresh as the current alarums about the latest restructuring at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Bill C-10's potential threat to freedom of speech and artistic expression in Canada.
Leonard PETERSON was born in Regina on March 15, 1917. He died in Saint_Joseph's Hospital in Toronto of complications from a brain hemorrhage on February 28, 2008. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Iris, and by his children Ingrid, Jill, Wendy and Anthony. He also leaves six grandchildren and his extended family. He was predeceased by his daughter, Teresa. There will be a celebration of his life at the Old Mill in Toronto on April 19, 2008.

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NORRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-07 published
TRIMBLE, William Burbage Smyth
Educator, died at Sunrise of Aurora on Monday, June 2nd 2008. Born in California, he grew up in Toronto, obtaining his education at the University of Toronto, from which he held four degrees. His education was interrupted by five years of service with the R.C.N.V.R., most of which was spent on loan to the Royal Navy. He served first in Combined Operations and was on the carrier ship M.V. Ettrick when it was torpedoed on its return from the North African landings. He went back to sea as a Fighter Direction Officer, attached to the first squadron of night fighters ever to operate from an aircraft carrier. He was awarded a Mention in Despatches on one of several Murmansk convoys. He was discharged in 1945 as a Lieutenant-Commander. Back in civilian life, he saw himself first and foremost as a teacher. Along with any administrative duties, he always insisted on remaining part time in the classroom. He served as Vice- President of Ryerson, professor of education at the University of Toronto, Vice-President of Humber College and first Chairman of The Board of George Brown College. He and his wife (Dorothy ROBERTSON) spent three years in Lesotho, Africa in the 1970s where he helped to implement a World Bank education project and Dorothy was Field Supervisor for Oxfam and Save the Children Fund. Bill had a gift for writing. His family treasure his letters and stories, but many students will remember his texts, Understanding the Canadian Economy and Basic Economics for Lesotho. While accomplished in his profession, Bill's devotion to family was a priority. A man ahead of his times, he was a sensitive and caring husband and father, actively engaged in the raising of his children. He leaves his wife of sixty-three years, daughters Catherine WOLFE, Virginia WALSH (Michael WALSH) and Margaret NORRIE, son Alan TRIMBLE (Andrea ROTH,) grandchildren Martin WOLFE (Karen HISLOP), Heather WOLFE (Dean RIMANDO), Thomas WALSH, Alan WALSH, Mira TRIMBLE, Rebecca ALTON (Eric ALTON) and Hannah NORRIE, step-grandchildren Joshua McKAY and Oliver McKAY and great-grand_sons Henry and Alexander WOLFE. Bill and his family very much appreciated the compassion and support of Sunrise and Community Care Access Centre caregivers who enabled Dorothy and Bill to remain together during his last years. A memorial service in celebration of Bill's life will be held at Friends (Quaker) Meeting House, 17030 Yonge Street, west side of Yonge Street just south of Eagle Street and North of Mulock Drive, Newmarket, on Saturday, June 21st, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Thompson Funeral Home, 905-727-5421. If desired, donations may be made to Canadian Friends Service Committee, 60 Lowther Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1C7.

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NORRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-11 published
TRIMBLE, William Burbage Smyth
Educator, died at Sunrise of Aurora on Monday, June 2nd 2008. Born in California, he grew up in Toronto, obtaining his education at the University of Toronto, from which he held four degrees. His education was interrupted by five years of service with the R.C.N.V.R., most of which was spent on loan to the Royal Navy. He served first in Combined Operations and was on the carrier ship M.V. Ettrick when it was torpedoed on its return from the North African landings. He went back to sea as a Fighter Direction Officer, attached to the first squadron of night fighters ever to operate from an aircraft carrier. He was awarded a Mention in Despatches on one of several Murmansk convoys. He was discharged in 1945 as a Lieutenant-Commander. Back in civilian life, he saw himself first and foremost as a teacher. Along with any administrative duties, he always insisted on remaining part time in the classroom. He served as Vice- President of Ryerson, professor of education at the University of Toronto, Vice-President of Humber College and first Chairman of The Board of George Brown College. He and his wife (Dorothy ROBERTSON) spent three years in Lesotho, Africa in the 1970s where he helped to implement a World Bank education project and Dorothy was Field Supervisor for Oxfam and Save the Children Fund. Bill had a gift for writing. His family treasure his letters and stories, but many students will remember his texts, Understanding the Canadian Economy and Basic Economics for Lesotho. While accomplished in his profession, Bill's devotion to family was a priority. A man ahead of his times, he was a sensitive and caring husband and father, actively engaged in the raising of his children. He leaves his wife of sixty-three years, daughters Catherine WOLFE, Virginia WALSH (Michael WALSH) and Margaret NORRIE, son Alan TRIMBLE (Andrea ROTH,) grandchildren Martin WOLFE (Karen HISLOP), Heather WOLFE (Dean RIMANDO), Thomas WALSH, Alan WALSH, Mira TRIMBLE, Rebecca ALTON (Eric ALTON) and Hannah NORRIE, step-grandchildren Joshua McKAY and Oliver McKAY and great-grand_sons Henry and Alexander WOLFE. Bill and his family very much appreciated the compassion and support of Sunrise and Community Care Access Centre caregivers who enabled Dorothy and Bill to remain together during his last years. A memorial service in celebration of Bill's life will be held at Friends (Quaker) Meeting House, 17030 Yonge Street, west side of Yonge Street just south of Eagle Street and North of Mulock Drive, Newmarket, on Saturday, June 21st, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Thompson Funeral Home, 905-727-5421. If desired, donations may be made to Canadian Friends Service Committee, 60 Lowther Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1C7.

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NORRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-14 published
TRIMBLE, William Burbage Smyth
Educator, died at Sunrise of Aurora on Monday, June 2nd 2008. Born in California, he grew up in Toronto, obtaining his education at the University of Toronto, from which he held four degrees. His education was interrupted by five years of service with the R.C.N.V.R., most of which was spent on loan to the Royal Navy. He served first in Combined Operations and was on the carrier ship M.V. Ettrick when it was torpedoed on its return from the North African landings. He went back to sea as a Fighter Direction Officer, attached to the first squadron of night fighters ever to operate from an aircraft carrier. He was awarded a Mention in Despatches on one of several Murmansk convoys. He was discharged in 1945 as a Lieutenant-Commander. Back in civilian life, he saw himself first and foremost as a teacher. Along with any administrative duties, he always insisted on remaining part time in the classroom. He served as Vice- President of Ryerson, professor of education at the University of Toronto, Vice-President of Humber College and first Chairman of The Board of George Brown College. He and his wife (Dorothy ROBERTSON) spent three years in Lesotho, Africa in the 1970s where he helped to implement a World Bank education project and Dorothy was Field Supervisor for Oxfam and Save the Children Fund. Bill had a gift for writing. His family treasure his letters and stories, but many students will remember his texts, Understanding the Canadian Economy and Basic Economics for Lesotho. While accomplished in his profession, Bill's devotion to family was a priority. A man ahead of his times, he was a sensitive and caring husband and father, actively engaged in the raising of his children. He leaves his wife of sixty-three years, daughters Catherine WOLFE, Virginia WALSH (Michael WALSH) and Margaret NORRIE, son Alan TRIMBLE (Andrea ROTH,) grandchildren Martin WOLFE (Karen HISLOP), Heather WOLFE (Dean RIMANDO), Thomas WALSH, Alan WALSH, Mira TRIMBLE, Rebecca ALTON (Eric ALTON) and Hannah NORRIE, step-grandchildren Joshua McKAY and Oliver McKAY and great-grand_sons Henry and Alexander WOLFE. Bill and his family very much appreciated the compassion and support of Sunrise and Community Care Access Centre caregivers who enabled Dorothy and Bill to remain together during his last years. A memorial service in celebration of Bill's life will be held at Friends (Quaker) Meeting House, 17030 Yonge Street, west side of Yonge Street just south of Eagle Street and North of Mulock Drive, Newmarket, on Saturday, June 21st, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Thompson Funeral Home, 905-727-5421. If desired, donations may be made to Canadian Friends Service Committee, 60 Lowther Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1C7.

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NORRIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-18 published
TRIMBLE, William Burbage Smyth
Educator, died at Sunrise of Aurora on Monday, June 2nd 2008. Born in California, he grew up in Toronto, obtaining his education at the University of Toronto, from which he held four degrees. His education was interrupted by five years of service with the R.C.N.V.R., most of which was spent on loan to the Royal Navy. He served first in Combined Operations and was on the carrier ship M.V. Ettrick when it was torpedoed on its return from the North African landings. He went back to sea as a Fighter Direction Officer, attached to the first squadron of night fighters ever to operate from an aircraft carrier. He was awarded a Mention in Despatches on one of several Murmansk convoys. He was discharged in 1945 as a Lieutenant-Commander. Back in civilian life, he saw himself first and foremost as a teacher. Along with any administrative duties, he always insisted on remaining part time in the classroom. He served as Vice- President of Ryerson, professor of education at the University of Toronto, Vice-President of Humber College and first Chairman of The Board of George Brown College. He and his wife (Dorothy ROBERTSON) spent three years in Lesotho, Africa in the 1970s where he helped to implement a World Bank education project and Dorothy was Field Supervisor for Oxfam and Save the Children Fund. Bill had a gift for writing. His family treasure his letters and stories, but many students will remember his texts, Understanding the Canadian Economy and Basic Economics for Lesotho. While accomplished in his profession, Bill's devotion to family was a priority. A man ahead of his times, he was a sensitive and caring husband and father, actively engaged in the raising of his children. He leaves his wife of sixty-three years, daughters Catherine WOLFE, Virginia WALSH (Michael WALSH) and Margaret NORRIE, son Alan TRIMBLE (Andrea ROTH,) grandchildren Martin WOLFE (Karen HISLOP), Heather WOLFE (Dean RIMANDO), Thomas WALSH, Alan WALSH, Mira TRIMBLE, Rebecca ALTON (Eric ALTON) and Hannah NORRIE, step-grandchildren Joshua McKAY and Oliver McKAY and great-grand_sons Henry and Alexander WOLFE. Bill and his family very much appreciated the compassion and support of Sunrise and Community Care Access Centre caregivers who enabled Dorothy and Bill to remain together during his last years. A memorial service in celebration of Bill's life will be held at Friends (Quaker) Meeting House, 17030 Yonge Street, west side of Yonge Street just south of Eagle Street and North of Mulock Drive, Newmarket, on Saturday, June 21st, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Thompson Funeral Home, 905-727-5421. If desired, donations may be made to Canadian Friends Service Committee, 60 Lowther Avenue, Toronto, Ontario M5R 1C7.

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