MORRISSEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-24 published
MOREASH, William Arthur
Peacefully at Victoria Hospital on Friday June 20th, 2008, William Arthur MOREASH passed away in his 81st year. Beloved husband of Velma (Darrach) MOREASH for 60 years. Father of Sandra WALKER of Prince Edward Island, Shirley (Tommy) WYLIE and Judy (Michael) MORRISSEY. Grandfather of Shane WALKER, Kerry (Robert) BLACKWELL, Bridle CHIAPPETTA (David), Tommy (Jennifer) WYLIE, Corinne (Richard) DALAL and 12 great-grandchildren. Dearest brother of Betty GILBY and Phyllis (Ron) BEARD of Dartmouth, Nova Scotia. Predeceased by brothers Dowe, Alec and Gerald all of Nova Scotia. As per Bill's wishes cremation has taken place. At the family's request memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Dialysis Unit at Victoria Hospital in William's memory. William's final resting place will be in Prince Edward Island.

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MORRISSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-07 published
HORTON, Nelly (née VAN DER TOORN)
Peacefully, in the loving arms of her husband, after a heroic four year battle with cancer, on Saturday, April 5, 2008 at Parkwood Hospital, Nelly HORTON (née VAN DER TOORN) passed away in her 59th year. Loving wife and best friend of Rick for 42 years. Loving mother of Laura PLANK and her husband Rob, Tammy HORTON and Dane ARN. Cherished Nana of Sydney. Will be greatly missed by Baylee, Belle and Mr. Magoo. Nelly will be sadly missed by many family and Friends both in Canada and Holland. Predeceased by her loving mother Joan VAN DER TOORN (2006.) Friends will be received at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), for visitation on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, April 10, 2008 at 1 p.m. (with visitation one hour prior). Interment to follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. In memory, donations to the London Regional Cancer Program would be greatly appreciated. A special thank you from the family to Doctor Mark VINCENT, Connie MORRISSON and Carol WATSON for their care and compassion.

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MORROW o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2008-02-01 published
Pillar of community Bud MORROW dies at 92
By Donna DURIC, Friday, February 01, 2008
"Bud" MORROW made Friends wherever he went. His life was marked by honesty, fairness and active involvement in his community. Right up until the day he died, he enjoyed life, Friends and family.
Alred Frederick " Bud" MORROW died on January 26 at Hanover and District Hospital. He was 93.
More than 300 people came to his visitation on Monday. "I just thought that was a testament to how respected and how well-liked he was in this community," said his granddaughter, Christie. "He was a pillar of the community."
Mr. MORROW, born in 1915 in Aneroid, Saskatchewan., spent his early years as the second eldest of seven siblings moving around throughout the prairies.
He hunted for supper on the way home from school until he quit at 15 to help out the family. The Depression had hit and times were tough. Mr. MORROW became a sort of jack-of-all-trades as he worked a variety of jobs - everything from butcher to hunter.
"He's our own version of Forest Gump," said Christie.
"He's seen it all and been through it all."
In 1939, after the Second World War broke out, Mr. MORROW joined the air force, based in Calgary.
He couldn't pilot an aircraft, though, because he was colour blind, so he worked on the ground, doing repairs.
It was while he was repairing a Mosquito Bomber that he first learned of Hanover. The town's name was imprinted on a wing he was repairing, along with the names of the women working at the factory based here that made the wings.
He would receive other serendipitous callings to Hanover later on.
He started his family in 1943 in Calgary after marrying the late Ruth MARSHALL, whose parents were originally of Allan Park, just outside Hanover.
His in-laws had planned to come back and retire here. His first son Doug was born, and Mr. MORROW headed east to Toronto to get discharged from the air force.
It was during that time he and Ruth decided to visit her parents here in Hanover. He sent her and the baby on their way with one train ticket and to save money, decided he would hitch hike here and meet up with them.
A couple who spotted him in uniform in Bolton, Ontario just happened to be heading to Hanover and offered him a ride.
What was supposed to be a visit turned into a permanent move.
He settled here and twins Al and Hildred were born. Today, Al writes a bi-weekly column for The Post on the history of Hanover and the surrounding area.
Mr. MORROW started a hardware business in downtown Hanover, at the corner of 10th Street and 12th Avenue.
The building is still called The Morrow Centre today, even though it's been more than 10 years since he sold the building.
He did home renovations, sold lumber and mixed paint for customers. "People would drive from all over to get him to mix their paint," says Christie, noting the irony of that talent considering he was colour-blind.
He began to join many committees and organizations while building his successful business.
"Grandpa's philosophy was, 'if you live in the community and earn your living in there, you give back to the community."
He was a member and one-time president of the Rotary Club for 62 years.
He served on the planning board for the town and helped shape the layout of the town as it is today. He was chair of the high school board, involved with the Friends of the Hanover Library and an active member of Grace United Church, which he still attended until his death whenever he felt well enough, said Al.
And he always carried a package of smarties to give to the little ones. He was even buried with a package of smarties, said Al.
A man who spent his life moving around all over the continent ended up in Hanover and his family believes he was always meant to come here.
"We'll miss him. It's going to be a huge void in the fun department."

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MORROW o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-03-28 published
BROWN, Joan Marie (PARKER)
At Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Wednesday, March 26, 2008. Joan Marie BROWN (PARKER) of Markdale, formerly of Guelph in her 79th year. Beloved wife of the late Ivan BROWN. Dear mother of Peter BROWN (Lesley SNEDDON) of Carleton Place, Terry BRODIE (Ray LEWIS) of Markdale, Rebekah THEODORE of Guelph and Virginia STEFFLER (Glenn) of Markham. Grandmother of Matthew, Heather and Evan BRODIE, Madeleine and Abraham THEODORE, Isobel BAKER- BROWN, Emerson and Benjamin STEFFLER. Sister of Doreen MORROW, Barbara MORROW, David PARKER and Walter PARKER. Predeceased by brother Roland. A Funeral Service will be held on Saturday March 29th at the May Funeral Home, Markdale, at 2: 00 p.m. Spring interment in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, donations to the Centre Grey Health Services Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-18 published
WHITELAW, Jean F.
After a courageous battle at Victoria Hospital on April 16th, 2008, Miss Jean F. WHITELAW of London in her 89th year. Loving daughter of the late Archie and Jeanie WHITELAW. Dear sister of the late Emily BUCHANAN and the late Charles WHITELAW. She will be sadly missed by nieces Barbara MORROW of Brantford and Chris WHITELAW of London, and nephew Brian WHITELAW of Australia. Great aunt of David WHITE/WHYTE (Carole), Andrea (Keith BRADSHAW), Amy CORCORAN (Martin GRAHAM), Daizy LUX (Jonathan NAF) and Melissa CORCORAN. In keeping with Jean's wishes, cremation has taken place and a memorial service to celebrate her life will be held in the Lloyd R. Needham Funeral Chapel (520 Dundas Street, London) on Friday, April 18th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. with visitation for one hour prior to service time. Inurnment at Woodland Cemetery. In memory of Jean, contributions to the London Regional Cancer Centre would be greatly appreciated.

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-21 published
BATTEN, Ola Jean (JOHNS)
At her late residence on Sunday, April 20, 2008 Ola Jean (JOHNS) BATTEN of Exeter in her 84th year. Beloved wife of John BATTEN. Dear mother of Sharon and Dave PASSMORE of R.R.#1 Woodham, Helen and Ken KADEY of Huron Park, and Ralph and Cathy BATTEN of Exeter. Dear grandmother of Tom and Sue PASSMORE and Jon PASSMORE; Zachary KADEY; Jason and Jeremy BATTEN and Tanya and Kenny McNICHOL. Dear great-grandmother of Brock and Haley. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Bill JOHNS and Ruth IRVINE, Irene DUNN, Lillian Johns HAILEY all of Exeter, Dianne WEBER of Wingham, Kay and Emerson PENHALE of Exeter, Joan and Jock ANDREWS of Kitchener, and Barbara MORROW of Birr. Predeceased by a brother Emerson JOHNS and brothers-in-law Mervin DUNN, Hans GERSTENKORN and Bill BATTEN. Friends may call at the Haskett Funeral Home, 370 William Street, 1 west of Main, Exeter on Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday, April 22 at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Judith RITCHIE officiating. Interment Zion Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Thames Road- Elimville United Church would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-22 published
BATTEN, Ola Jean (JOHNS)
At her late residence on Sunday, April 20, 2008 Ola Jean (JOHNS) BATTEN of Exeter in her 84th year. Beloved wife of John BATTEN. Dear mother of Sharon and Dave PASSMORE of R.R.#1 Woodham, Helen and Ken KADEY of Huron Park, and Ralph and Cathy BATTEN of Exeter. Dear grandmother of Tom and Sue PASSMORE and Jon PASSMORE; Zachary KADEY; Jason and Jeremy BATTEN and Tanya and Kenny McNICHOL. Dear great-grandmother of Brock and Hailey. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Bill JOHNS and Ruth IRVINE, Irene DUNN, Lillian JOHNS all of Exeter, Dianne WEBER of Wingham, Kay and Emerson PENHALE of Exeter, Joan and Jock ANDREWS of Kitchener, and Barbara MORROW of Birr. Predeceased by a brother Emerson JOHNS and brothers-in-law Mervin DUNN, Hans GERSTENKORN and Bill BATTEN. Friends may call at the Haskett Funeral Home, 370 William Street, 1 west of Main, Exeter on Monday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday, April 22 at 11 a.m. with the Rev. Judith RITCHIE officiating. Interment Zion Cemetery. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Thames Road-Elimville United Church would be appreciated by the family. Condolences may be forwarded through www.haskettfh.com

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-29 published
BOLGER, Lorraine
In Thunder Bay on Saturday April 26, 2008. Lorraine BOLGER of Thunder Bay and formerly of Dutton in her 73rd year. Beloved wife of the late Frank BOLGER. Survived by her Stepchildren Marguerite DOBBIN of Peterborough. Patrick BOLGER of Toronto, Mary COOPER of Cremona, Alberta, Michael BOLGER of Regina, Paul BOLGER of Washago, and step-grandchildren, Sisters and brothers, Irene MORROW, Gerry ALBENE, Bernice DINER, Bernard MORROW, Walter MORROW, all of Thunder Bay, Dolores GORDON of Toronto and sister-in-law Rita MORROW of Thunder Bay and several nieces and nephews. At Lorraine's request there will be no funeral home visitation or service. Donation to Caledonia Gardens II would be appreciated. Arn Funeral Home, Dutton 519-762-2416.

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-04 published
RIEMER, Martha
Peacefully at Horizon Place Retirement Home, London, on May 2, 2008, Martha RIEMER in her 99th year. Predeceased by her loving husband Otto RIEMER, dear daughter Helga RIEMER and Inge MORROW. She will be sadly missed by her loving son-in-law Armand MORROW. The Funeral Service will be held in the Needham Funeral Chapel (520 Dundas Street, London) on Monday May 5th, 2008 at 1 p.m. with visitation 1 hour prior to the service Rev. James R. GAREY officiating. Interment to follow at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Alzheimer's Society would be appreciated.

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-09 published
MORROW, Reverend Edwin
At Extendicare, Halton Hills on Monday, July 7th, 2008 Reverend Edwin MORROW, formerly of London. Beloved husband of the late Jessie (Roberts) (HOLLOWAY) MORROW and the late Cora E. (HART) MORROW. Dear father of Robert E. MORROW and his wife Jacqueline of Georgetown. Also loved by his grandchildren Robert J. MORROW of Georgetown and Janet E. MORROW and her husband James GIGNAC of Brantford and his great-grandchildren Adam and Pamela both of Brantford. Dear step-father of Bill HOLLOWAY and his wife Linda of Brampton. Cremation has taken place. The family will receive Friends one hour prior to a memorial service which will be conducted in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London on Friday, July 11th. at 1: 00 p.m. Interment of cremated remains in Woodland Cemetery, London. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the charity of your choice. Online condolences accepted at www.amgfh.com

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MORROW o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-19 published
PIMENTEL, Jose Carreiro
On Thursday, July 17, 2008, Jose Carreiro PIMENTEL in his 63rd year. Beloved husband of Maria Goreti PIMENTEL. Loving father of David PIMENTEL and Anita PIMENTEL. Dear brother of Eduarda FIGUEIREDO (Horacio), Rosa BRANDAO (Jose), Fatima MONIZ (Humberto), Jerdelina RAPOSO (Jose) and Teresa MORROW (Kris.) Brother-in-law of Joe PIMENTEL (Filomena), Agnes FERGUSON (Jim), Margaret WIGFIELD (Ted,) Teresa DEGRANDIS (David) and Larry SANDER (Connie.) Visitors will be received in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William St. on Sunday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated in Saint_Justin's Church, (855 Jalna Bvd. at Ernest) on Monday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Saint Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Sunday afternoon at 2: 30 p.m. Online condolences at www.oneilfuneralhome.ca.

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MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-09 published
OSBORNE, Hilary
On January 5th, 2008, after a long illness, bravely borne. Beloved wife of Doug ROBERTS. Step-mother to Wendy and her husband Matthew. Loving sister to the Stewarts - Tessa (Hong Kong), Rory (Portugal), Hamish (Denmark) and Felicity (Ireland). Sadly missed by her stepmothers, Vicky OSBORNE and Joyce MacCATHY- MORROW. Cousins Richard BURGESS (London) and John EWART (Emirates) and sister-in-law to Gayle of Mississauga, and Ted of Victoria and a host of Friends. Thank you to the caregivers at Ian Anderson House (Hospice). Hilary OSBORNE is resting at the funeral home of Skinner and Middlebrook Ltd., 12 Lakeshore Road East (1 block west of Hurontario Street), Mississauga, on Friday, January 11, 2008 from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to Ian Anderson House, P.O. Box 61034, 511 Maple Grove Drive, Oakville, Ontario L6J 7P5, would be appreciated. Unable are the loved to die. For love is immortality. - Emily Dickinson

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MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-01 published
BALL, Robert " Bob" Harvey
(January 1, 1929-February 28, 2008)
Bob died at home on Thursday morning, in the tender care of his family. He was loved beyond telling by his wife and sweetheart Janet (née MORROW,) five grateful children, Timothy (d. 1984,) David, Anna GARDNER (John BROCKE,) Doug, and Nathan (Paula KILCOYNE,) as well as 15 beautiful grandchildren, two newly born great-grandchildren, and the hundreds of people whose lives he touched. Born and raised in Regina, Bob will be profoundly missed by his older siblings from Saskatchewan and their extended families; Margaret BLOMMAERT, Jim BALL and Fran APPERLY. Graduating from Scott Collegiate with Honours, Bob began an agricultural degree at University of Saskatoon before he followed a deeper call to sow seeds of the spirit and till soil in the lives of people. After marrying Janet in 1952 he worked the gold mines in Yellowknife, Northwest Territories and as a Fuller Brush Salesman to put himself through seminary at McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario with two infants. As a Home Missions pastor with the Canadian Baptist Union, Bob grew and nurtured young churches in the small towns of Kitimat and Richmond, British Columbia, and Jasper, Alberta. His innovative programming with young adults in the national park stood him in good stead during his term on the pastoral team at First Baptist Church, Calgary from 1971-1976 where he established the Burning Bush Coffee House ministry for youth. Inspired in part by staying as a family in a chalet at L'Abri in Switzerland in 1969, Bob began dreaming and envisioning along with Janet, about creating a hospitality based ecumenical renewal centre. King's Fold Retreat Centre, located in the foothills of the Rockies celebrates its 30th anniversary this year and continues to be place of beauty, peace and deep inspiration for people from all walks of life. Bob was a master stained glass artist, a visionary, an entrepreneur, a dreamer, a romantic, a barista, and a lover of life par excellence. He will be celebrated at Central United Church, Calgary on Monday, March 3 at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to King's Fold Retreat Centre, L'Arche Canada Foundation or the Henri Nouwen Society.

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MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-29 published
MORROW, Mary Ellen (née LEASON)
(November 24, 1926-April 27, 2008)
Mary Ellen MORROW (née LEASON) of Calgary, beloved wife of the late Bill MORROW, passed away on Sunday, April 27, 2008 at the age of 81 years. Mary was born in Cardston, Alberta on November 24, 1926. She was a member of the Kinettes and was also on the Board of Directors for SAIT Polytechnic. She showed special interest and spent may years working with the Progressive Conservative Party. Mary loved gardening, golfing, and her biggest passion, her grandchildren. Mary is survived by her loving family, her children, Caron (Jeff) PATCHELL of Oakville, Ontario, Craig (Lorna) MORROW of Calgary, Alberta; six grandchildren, Meghan, Braeden, Breanne, Brittany, Kristen, and Sean; and two special dogs, Fresko and Missilu. She is also survived by her sister, Hallie (Rob) LOGAN of Florida. Mary was predeceased by her husband Bill MORROW. Those wishing to pay their respects may do so at McInnis and Holloway'S Park Memorial Chapel (5008 Elbow Drive S.W.) on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 from 6: 00 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. A Celebration of Mary's Life will be held at McInnis and Holloway's 'Park Memorial Chapel' on Thursday, May 1, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. Graveside Service to follow at Queen's Park Cemetery. Forward condolences through www.mcinnisandholloway.com. If Friends so desire, memorial tributes may be made directly to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Alberta, 200, 119 - 14th Street N.W., Calgary, Alberta T2N 1Z6 Telephone: (403) 264-5549, www.heartandstroke.ca. In living memory of Mary MORROW, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis and Holloway Funeral Homes Park Memorial Chapel, 5008 Elbow Drive S.W. Telephone: (403) 243-8200.

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MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-07 published
ALBANESE, Philip Carman
Husband, father, grandfather, provider, teacher, knowledge seeker. Born November 12, 1924, in Port Arthur, Ontario Died December 5, 2007, in Thunder Bay of complications following a stroke, aged By Monica STOROZUK, Page L8
Philip was an ordinary man who believed in living responsibly and simply. His life was dedicated to the enjoyment of family and Friends and to the pursuit of knowledge.
He was born in Port Arthur, now Thunder Bay, to an Italian immigrant family. Until the age of 5 he spoke only Italian. He was a reserved child but enjoyed school and playing outdoors with Friends.
At 18, he joined the army with his twin brother, Rino. Together they served for three years overseas during the Second World War. The experience had a positive and lasting effect on Philip. Sixty years later, he declined to apply for veterans' assistance, saying, "Why should they pay me? I should pay them for all they did for me."
When the war was over, Philip attended university and became a high-school teacher. He met and married Geraldine MORROW, proposing to her on Valentine's Day. They soon began a family; within a dozen years they had seven children.
Philip was sensitive to beauty in its many forms. Although his sensibilities relaxed over the years, he never surrendered a deep sense of propriety.
His vast knowledge, acquired through extensive reading, stretched from history and geography to politics, world affairs, art, architecture and music. His appetite for learning never diminished. At 80, when asked about a book he was reading, he replied with great enthusiasm, "Quantum physics. I always wanted to know about quantum physics."
His quest for knowledge was aided by his lack of interest in perfection. In many ways he was an anti-perfectionist. The front steps need repair? They can wait. The shirt needs pressing? No big deal. Time was precious and shouldn't be wasted on the mundane.
Philip knew the value of simple pleasures. In the 1960s, he purchased a piece of property in the country and spent many hours there. In his retirement, he and Geri built a small cabin out of recycled wood and used nails. Someone called it the Bothy, a Scottish word for a simple shelter, and the name stuck. Philip spent a lot of time at the Bothy, gardening, puttering and reading.
In the hours before his death he stayed engaged in the conversation around him, as he had done all his life. As family members quietly talked about a trip to Italy and tried to recall the name of a town near Verona, he excitedly blurted out the name, surprising everyone.
In a fitting tribute to his legacy, Philip was buried with simple tokens of remembrance: the key to the Bothy, a package of tomato seeds, a copy of Vanity Fair, a few coins representing thrift, and loving notes from his grandchildren.
Monica STOROZUK is Philip's daughter.

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MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-06 published
CAMPBELL, Mona Louise (née MORROW) (1919-2008)
It is with great sadness, but with a deep sense of appreciation for an extremely full life, that Mona's children John BAND, Sarah BAND, and Vicki MacRAE, announce her death, at her home in Aiken, South Carolina.
The daughter of the late F.K. and Edna L. MORROW, Mona was predeceased by her beloved husband Lt. Col. K.L. CAMPBELL.
Fondly remembered by John's wife Teri, Vicki's husband Rick CLARKE, grandchildren, Ashlynn (Dave) LOW/LOWE/LOUGH, Courtney BAND, Matthew BAND, Zoe BAND, great-granddaughter Madyn, and her most loyal Friends Rufus and Roxie.
In Mona's memory, the family asks that you plant a tree, adopt a dog, or make a generous donation to your favourite charity. A family service has taken place.

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MORROW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-28 published
'Aggressive and very entrepreneurial,' she ranked among Canada's top Chief Executive Officers
The head of Dover Industries took her company from annual revenues of $10-million to $228-million. She thought nothing of phoning federal finance ministers late at night to give them a piece of her mind
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S12
Toronto -- Mona CAMPBELL was 33 years old when her father died and left behind some companies that milled flour and made ice-cream cones. She'd been the major shareholder in the businesses, and stepped into the top executive slot two years later, in 1954, at a time when women in corporate leadership were unheard of.
Her own father, the wealthy industrialist Frederick MORROW, "didn't think women should be doing this sort of thing," Mrs. CAMPBELL recalled in a 1986 interview. "To begin with, it was sort of a question mark, which makes you want to do that much better. I had no formal training. I had done a lot of work for voluntary organizations, dealing with budgets, scrounging for money. It's really the same thing in a small way."
Either she was being coy or very humble. When she took over, the company had annual revenues of $10-million. Last year, Burlington, Ontario-based Dover Industries Ltd. had revenues of $228-million and employed 475 people.
Described as "Canada's first conglomerate," with interests in paper products, flour milling and straw manufacturing, as well as the ice-cream-cone business, Dover Industries is today one of the largest Canadian-owned flour-milling companies in operation.
Mrs. CAMPBELL served as the company's president, chief executive officer and, until her death, as board chairwoman. In 1976, she became the first woman elected to the board of Toronto-Dominion Bank.
Her success belied a view about women in the corporate world that today could be charitably described as quaint. In a 1980 interview with the Financial Times, Mrs. CAMPBELL declared that single women couldn't be depended on in business "because suddenly romance hits and they marry and maybe their husband moves, so they move." Married women, meantime, are inflexible and may interrupt their careers to have children.
Besides, few women crave the power that comes with the position, she believed. "The majority of women are not interested."
A lot of them feel they just don't need the extra hassle, she told The Globe and Mail the year before. "They are willing to do a great job but I don't know how many more want the added responsibility of representing shareholders." She did not foresee other women serving on her company's board. "One's enough."
She chafed at being called an industrialist. "This is just a job," she said in 1968. "It's not that difficult."
Mrs. CAMPBELL travelled the world and gave away millions of dollars to the arts, notably to the Royal Ontario Museum, where there's a curatorship in her name, and the National Ballet School in Toronto since its inception in 1959. "She knew every student by name," said the National Ballet School's artistic director and co-Chief Executive Officer, Mavis STAINES, who added that Mrs. CAMPBELL often took students to her sprawling Mohill Farm in Puslinch, Ontario, for weekends spent frolicking with her beloved dogs and horses. Ballet, Mrs. CAMPBELL once declared, "is the love of my life."
She was named to the Order of Canada in 1996. In 2001, the Association of Fundraising Professionals honoured her as its outstanding philanthropist of the Year.
She was an only child born into privilege. Her father was a financier who founded the Essa Securities Company, sat on the boards of 15 corporations and amassed a large fortune. He started Dover Industries in 1940 by acquiring and merging three companies - a flour mill, a grain dealer and Robinson Cone, which made ice-cream cones, straws and packaging materials in Hamilton.
A devout Catholic who scandalously married the daughter of a Baptist minister, Mr. MORROW donated a large tract of land in Toronto's north to the Sisters of Saint_Joseph. Morrow Park opened in 1960 and today has an infirmary, residences, a girls' school, and a retreat where Pope John Paul stayed during his 2002 visit to Toronto for World Youth Day.
Mrs. CAMPBELL's first marriage was in 1940 to John BAND, a dashing navy officer who hunted U-boats during the Second World War and became an insurance executive and collector of Canadian art. They cut glamorous figures in society and had three children before going through an acrimonious divorce in 1955.
In 1960, she married Jim BINNIE, father of Ian BINNIE, a justice on Canada's Supreme Court. That, too, ended in divorce. Finally, in 1967, she married Lieutenant-Colonel Kenneth CAMPBELL, a career army man who once authored a scathing report from the Korean front that described the venerable Lee-Enfield.303 rifle as "almost useless." He operated a farm near Guelph that raised cattle and thoroughbreds, and died in 1990.
Mrs. CAMPBELL often said she liked people. Her daughter, Sarah BAND, is more specific: "She loved men."
She loved animals, too, and their welfare was a top priority. Mrs. CAMPBELL was a leading supporter of the Ontario Humane Society and was awarded naming rights to an animal adoption centre in Newmarket, Ontario - Mohill Village. She also endowed the Col. K.L. Campbell Centre for the Study of Animal Welfare, which promotes the welfare of animals through research and education, and the Col. K.L. Campbell Graduate Travel Grant in Equine Studies, both at the University of Guelph.
She was formal and had an old-world elegance, but lean, angular features that bespoke a stern countenance. According to her friend Brenda Nightingale, however, "she was the most generous person you ever met." Her daughter noted Mrs. CAMPBELL's fastidious concern with her appearance: "Every thread on her had to be perfect."
Highly political and a staunch Conservative, she thought nothing of phoning Michael Wilson, finance minister under Brian Mulroney, late at night to give him a piece of her mind, Ms. Nightingale recalled with a laugh.
In business, she was "very aggressive and very entrepreneurial," noted Dover Industries' current president and Chief Executive Officer Howard ROWLEY. " She was very willing to reinvest money back into the company. That's why we've been able to grow at the rate we have."
Her board approved a plan in 1968 to erect a $2-million flour mill in Halifax - the first modern flour mill in Nova Scotia - but rebuffed her move to enter the flour market in Montreal. "A new flour mill in Montreal 10 years ago would been a howling success," she insisted at the time.
She oversaw the company's five subsidiaries: Robinson Cone, Cherry Taylor Flour Mills, Howell Litho and Cartons, Taylor Grain Ltd. and Dover Mills Ltd. of Halifax. A firm believer in acquisitions, the company under her hand bought a paper-box concern in 1956 the Howell Lithographic Company in 1960; Bondware, a paper cup and container firm in 1981; and another flour mill in 2003. The packaging business was sold in 2005.
Dover Industries was touted as Canada's first diversified company but was not as diverse as it appeared. The ice-cream cones came from Cherry Taylor flour and were packed in Howell cartons. Dover Mills ground the flour from Taylor Grain and shipped them in packages that were lithographed in-house.
Still, it was a multi-faceted operation and "she could walk out into the different plants, and she knew most of the people by name," Mr. ROWLEY said. "Truck drivers would phone her from their trucks and talk to her about whatever was on their minds. It could be work-related or just to say hello. And she'd take the call."
Mrs. CAMPBELL treated the company as her inheritance. "I thought I'd have a go at running it," she said in 1968. "My father told me that I would be all right as long as I had a good lawyer, a good accountant and a good banker. We've got them and we've never looked back."
But in case anyone doubted who was in charge, she had this to say in 1980: "When we go out to buy out a company, I'm the one that does the deal." She died the day of her company's annual meeting.
Mona Louise CAMPBELL was born February 3, 1919, in Toronto. She died May 29, 2008, of natural causes in Aiken, South Carolina, where she had lived for several years and where her favourite activity was a Tuesday-night needlepoint group called Stitch and Bitch. She was 89. She leaves her children John BAND, Sarah BAND and Vicki McRAE, four grandchildren and one great-granddaughter.

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MORSE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-17 published
PARTLO, Debra
Surrounded by her loving family after a brave battle with her illness, Debra PARTLO passed away peacefully, at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Saturday, February 16, 2008, in her 55th year. Predeceased by her loving husband Max PARTLO (2003,) and mother Dorothy LAMB (1982.) Wonderful mother and mentor to her children Shannon SCHNEKENBURGER and Roy of Aylmer, Derek PARTLO and his wife Jody of Tillsonburg and Courtney MORSE and her husband Andrew of Straffordville. Proud "Nana" of Maxx and Hilton SCHNEKENBURGER and Landon, Logan and McKenna PARTLO. Loving daughter of Sam LAMB and his friend MaryAnne VANGEERTRUYDE of Tillsonburg. Dear sister of Terry LAMB and his wife Pat; Dan LAMB; Kelly SPRINGER and her husband Dale all of Tillsonburg. Sister-in-law of Art PARTLO and his wife Marion, Barb GULL and the late David, Sharon COULTER and her husband Bob, David PARTLO and his partner Sharon DEPAUW. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her mother-in-law Helen PARTLO (2002.) Deb will be forever remembered as a devoted mother who taught strong and independent values to her family. She was an original member of the Sockette baseball team, where she enjoyed some of the best years of her life. Deb will be deeply missed by all of her Friends. Family and Friends will be received at Ostrander's Funeral Home, Tillsonburg, (519) 842-5221, on Sunday, February 17, 2008 from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. and on Monday, February 18, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Funeral Service for Debra will be held at Saint Paul's United Church, Tillsonburg on Tuesday, February 19, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. Glenn BAKER and Rev. Tom HISCOCK officiating. Interment in the Tillsonburg Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Saint Paul's United Church Memorial Fund or the Tillsonburg Hospital would be appreciated by the family. Personal condolences may be sent to www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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MORSE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-09 published
McGLEISH, Vivian Eleanor (NICHOL)
Passed away peacefully on Friday, June 6, 2008 at Peterborough Regional Health Care Centre in her 83rd year after a courageous battle with cancer. Beloved wife of James McGLEISH of 62 years. Cherished mother of William (Kelley) of Buckhorn, Kevin (Arlene) of Winnipeg, David (Denise) of Prince George, Linda (Fred) STABLER of Cornwall. Dearest grandmother of Corri, James, Kimberly (Claude) and Ryan (Vanessa.) Dear great-grandmother of Emma STABLER. Sister-in-law of Ken McGLEISH (Dorothy) and Marion MORSE. Predeceased by her parents Ellen and David, sisters Kay WRIGHT and Lenore PELLOW. At the request of Vivian, there will be no service. Cremation arrangements have been entrusted to Trent Cremation Services. In memory of Vivian, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated and can be made through Little Lake Cemetery at 1-800-672-9652.

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MORSS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-30 published
MORSS, Maida
Peacefully in her sleep at Kensington Village Nursing Home on June 27, 2008. Maida MORSS in her 97th year. Loving mother of Gordon (Margaret) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Proud grandmother of Scott (Nancy,) Brian (Charlene), and Paul. Great-grandmother of Max, Morgan, Kyle, Blaine, and great great-grandchild Elizabeth. A Memorial Service to be held at 2 p.m. in the chapel of Memorial Funeral Home, 1559 Fanshawe Park East, London (East of Highbury) 519-452-3770. Visitors will be received one hour prior to the service. Interment of Maida's urn to follow at Siloam Cemetery. A reception to be held at the Funeral Home. Should Friends so desire, donations may be made to Kensington Village.

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MORSS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-02 published
MORSS, Maida
Peacefully in her sleep at Kensington Village Nursing Home on June 27, 2008. Maida MORSS in her 97th year. Loving mother of Gordon (Margaret) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART. Proud grandmother of Scott (Nancy,) Brian (Charlene), and Paul. Great-grandmother of Max, Morgan, Kyle, Blaine, and great great-grandchild Elizabeth. A Memorial Service to be held at 2 p.m. on Thursday July 3rd, 2008 in the chapel of Memorial Funeral Home, 1559 Fanshawe Park East, London (East of Highbury) 519-452-3770. Visitors will be received one hour prior to the service. Interment of Maida's urn to follow at Siloam Cemetery. A reception to be held at the Funeral Home. Should Friends so desire, donations may be made to Kensington Village.

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MORTELE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-02 published
LA RUE, Gary Wilson
Suddenly on Saturday, March 29, 2008 in London at the age of 56 Gary leaves behind his Loving Wife of 23 yrs Rosemary, daughters Lisa LA RUE, Elizabeth (Rob) MORTELE of Blenheim and Jill (Duane) ADDY of Chatham, his son and buddy Todd (Chantal) FOSTER of London and other daughter Samantha (Dave) GODARD of Winnipeg. Grand-daughters Alyssa and Kirsten LA RUE, Faith and Paige MORTELE, Stephanie GODARD. Grandsons Ty FOSTER and Jake ADDY and surrogate daughter Denise KELLY and grand-daughter Madison. He also leaves to mourn, his sisters Barbara McINTYRE, Jacquie GILES, Gail (Bill) MILLER, his brother Richard and special sister-in-law Linda LA RUE and step-brother Doug BELL, all of the Chatham area. He will be sadly missed by his father-in-law George GROINUS of Winnipeg, brother-in-law Ed (Iris) GROINUS, Lorette, Manitoba, sisters-in-law Liz (Lado) CHONGVA and Clara (Frank) CHONGVA of Dugald, Manitoba, Marie (Gene) MUDRY of Edmonton, Alberta, Grace PAGE (Henry BON) of Winnipeg, as well as many nieces and nephews and his many close Friends and golfing buddies. Words Gary lived by were "Live life to the fullest, you only live once!" He was especially proud of his Children and Grandchildren. He was predeceased by his father Adrian LARUE, his loving mother Grace (WILSON) BELL and step-father James T. BELL. Born in Chatham, and previously a resident of Sarnia, Mississauga and Cambridge. Donations may be made to The Heart and Stroke Foundation, The Diabetes Association or The Lung Association. Cremation has taken place with D.J. Robb Funeral Home in Sarnia. A memorial service will be held in London at The Community of Christ Church, 1550 Brydges Street, London, Ontario on Friday April 4th, 2008 at 11 a.m.

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MORTENSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-07 published
SOUTHAM, Gordon Hamilton
Hamilton SOUTHAM died peacefully at home on Tuesday July 1st at the age of 91. He was born in Ottawa on December 19th, 1916, the youngest child of Wilson Mills SOUTHAM and Henrietta Alberta CARGILL. After graduating from the University of Toronto with a degree in history in 1939, he abandoned his graduate studies at Christ Church College, Oxford in order to join the war effort and enrolled in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery winning his commission in 1940. That same year, when the Canadian Army reached Britain, he transferred to the Canadian 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon Hamilton, had served until he was killed in action at the battle of the Somme in 1916). In 1943, responding to an urgent call for replacements at the front, he volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery in Italy. He saw action at the battle of Ortona as well as the final battle of Monte Cassino and was mentioned in dispatches.
After the war he worked at the Times of London and the Ottawa Citizen before joining the Department of External Affairs in 1948. He was posted to Sweden from 1949 to 1953, and in 1959, was posted to Poland, where he served first as chargé d'affaires and later as ambassador. On his return to Ottawa in 1962 he was appointed head of the information division of External Affairs. In 1963 he assumed the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance, a grouping of some 60 arts organizations in Ottawa pressing for the building of a national performing arts centre. A feasibility study was commissioned and the Pearson government was persuaded to adopt the project in celebration of Canada's centennial. He was appointed co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre, in February, 1964 with the task of overseeing the construction and planning the programmes and activities of the new institution. After the National Arts Centre's opening, in 1969, he served two terms as director-general before stepping down in 1977.
Of particular note among his many activities since his retirement from the National Arts Centre are his founding and presidency of the Canadian Mediterranean Institute from 1980 to 1986 and a variety of initiatives aimed at raising public consciousness of the importance of the military in Canadian history. He was a founder of the Battle of Normandy Foundation, 1992, one of the main initiators of the new War Museum, inaugurated in 2005 and the founder and president of the Valiants Foundation, responsible for the erection of the Valiants Memorial on Confederation square, in Ottawa, inaugurated by Governor-General Michaëlle Jean in He married Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID in 1940 and they had four children, Peter, Abdul, Jennifer and Michael. In 1969, he married Gro MORTENSEN, and they had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. In 1981 he married Marion TANTOT, mother of Frederic, Manon and Virginie. He shared with Marion his retirement years in Grignan, France, and Ottawa. Marion died in 2005. He will be sadly missed by Gro Mortensen SOUTHAM, his children, his ten grandchildren, and his extended family and Friends. A private family funeral was held on Friday and a memorial service will be held at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church 125 Mackay Street, Ottawa, on Sunday July 20th at 1 p.m.
If desired, donations can be made in his memory to the National Youth and Education Trust at the National Arts Center P.O. Box 1534, Stn B, Ottawa Ontario K1P 5W1.

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MORTENSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-03 published
Champion of culture in Canada 'epitomized the values of the NAC'
Third-generation member of famous newspaper family grew up in a lifestyle of privilege and chose the diplomatic corps over journalism. Later, he helped launch the National Arts Centre and the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
Passionate, romantic, a lover of culture, the high arts and beautiful women, Hamilton SOUTHAM was in many ways an 18th-century gentleman, given to quoting poetry, rereading the classic works of literature and history, attending opera, ballet and theatrical performances, and collecting paintings by modern masters. Until the end of his days, he expressed his faith in the ultimate meaning of life by quoting these lines from Milton's Samson Agonistes: "All is best, though we oft doubt, /What th' unsearchable dispose/Of highest wisdom brings about, / and ever best found in the close."/
Born into the third generation of the Southam newspaper dynasty, he grew up in a gilded world of wealth and privilege, in which winters were spent in Florida and summers in Europe and the family enclave at Big Rideau Lake near Ottawa. Fighting for his country for six years in the Second World War stiffened the public-service component of his complicated character. After working in journalism, he turned his back on the family business and opted for diplomacy in its Pearsonian heyday, serving as ambassador to Poland, among other postings. But it was his lengthy tenure in the trenches of the cultural, linguistic and nationalistic battlefields that forged his legacy as the builder and founding general director of the National Arts Centre, a visionary fundraiser and force behind the Canadian War Museum, the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation and the Valiants Memorial and an active contributor to many other cultural institutions.
How fitting that such a Canadian giant should die on Canada Day, said Peter Herrndorf, president of the National Arts Centre, describing Mr. SOUTHAM as a man of exquisite taste with a single-minded devotion to the arts and an incredible capacity for Friendship. "He had been for many years, well before I came here, one of my heroes and he stayed a hero though my professional life. Never did I imagine that I would not only build on Hamilton's legacy at the National Arts Centre, but also become his friend," said Mr. Herrndorf. "He became like a second dad to me, both in personal terms and very much in professional terms - and in typical dad terms, he was both wonderful in his support and tough when I wasn't living up to what he expected. It's a big loss because he epitomized the values of the National Arts Centre."
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in December, 1916, and named after an uncle who had been killed two months earlier at the Battle of the Somme. His family called him Hamilton because he had an older cousin, Gordon, who lived next door, in what amounted to a family enclave in the elite Rockliffe Park area of Ottawa. His parents' house, called Lindenelm, later became the Spanish embassy.
Hamilton's father, Wilson SOUTHAM, the oldest of six sons of William SOUTHAM (1843-1932,) the proprietor of The Hamilton Spectator and founder of the Southam newspaper empire, was the publisher of the Ottawa Citizen. Hamilton's mother, Henrietta CARGILL, was the daughter of Conservative politician Henry CARGILL, who died after collapsing on the floor of the House of Commons.
The youngest of his parents' six children, Hamilton went to Elmwood School and then Ashbury College, the private boy's school in Ottawa. In those days, French was taught as though it were a dead language, so it was years before he became bilingual. But the school did nurture his love for Latin, the classics, and poetry, which he delighted in declaiming until the end of his life. He also played Gratiano in The Merchant of Venice, "lightly with exactly the right touch of flippancy," according to drama critic Ted Devlin.
After doing summer-school classes at Glebe and Lisgar Collegiates, he entered Trinity College at the University of Toronto in 1934. He graduated with a degree in history in 1939, having taken a year out, halfway through, recovering from a serious car crash that left him with a crooked smile - a rugged distinction in a classically handsome face. After U of T, he sailed to England intending to do a master's degree in modern history at Christ Church College, Oxford. Almost as soon as he arrived, Britain declared war on Germany and he enlisted in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery.
Simultaneously, he renewed his Friendship with Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID, the daughter of a sculptor from a land-owning French family. They had met in Canada that summer through family Friends. When the hostilities commenced, she managed to make her way back to London by ship from New York because the United States was still neutral. They married in London on April 15, 1940, while he was in training. (They eventually had four children and were divorced in the late 1960s; she died in 1998.) A month after the wedding, he received his commission as a lieutenant.
Meanwhile, the 40th battery of the Canadian Field Artillery (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon SOUTHAM, had served) had mobilized for active service under Frank Keen, assistant editor of the Hamilton Spectator, as the 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton. As soon as the battalion arrived in England, Lt. SOUTHAM applied for a transfer from the British Army so that he could serve with the Canadian Forces. By the autumn of 1943, the 1st Canadian Infantry Division, which was heavily engaged in Italy, urgently needed replacements. He volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. He fought in the battle of Ortona in December, 1943, and the final battle of Monte Cassino from April to May, 1944, and was part of the advance of the Canadian Army up through Italy and later from Marseilles northward in France. He was mentioned in dispatches for "gallant and distinguished services" and demobilized with the rank of captain.
After the war, he worked briefly for The Times of London before returning to Canada and an uneasy job as an editorial writer for the Citizen in 1946. "I couldn't write quickly enough," he said in an interview at his home in Rockliffe in 2004. "My editor would give me a subject - 500 words on such and such a subject by 3 o'clock. My instinct was to go to the parliamentary library for a week and then come back with the 500 words," he said. "I was wretched." He went to his uncle Harry SOUTHAM, then publisher of the Citizen, and said, "I can't manage to do this, so I am going to External Affairs."
He wrote the examinations and joined the department in 1948 under Lester Pearson at a time when Canada "had a role to play" and when being part of the foreign service was "riding the crest of a wave, as far as I was concerned." It was "a wonderful time," Mr. SOUTHAM said, his eyes flashing under his expressive beetle brows. "Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very heaven!" he said, quoting Wordsworth.
In 1949, Mr. SOUTHAM (and his family, which now included a second son, Christopher, who is now called Abdul) was posted to Stockholm as third secretary under ambassador Tommy Stone. After nearly four years, they returned to Ottawa before being posted to Warsaw as chargé d'affaires in March, 1959. By then, the Southams had two more children, Jennifer and Michael. This posting was one of the highlights of Mr. SOUTHAM's diplomatic career because he solved the "Polish Treasures" problem.
After Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, the curator of Krakow removed a number of treasures from Wawel Castle, including tapestries and the sword of state. Following a circuitous route, they ended up in museum warehouses in Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec City. After the war, Poland, then behind the Iron Curtain, requested the return of its state treasures. That was fine with the Canadian federal government, but not with Maurice Duplessis, then premier of Quebec. He refused to hand anything over to a Communist government. Amid the diplomatic fracas, "we never sent an ambassador there and they never sent an ambassador here," Mr. SOUTHAM explained.
Mr. Duplessis died in office in September, 1959, and was succeeded by Paul Sauvé, "a more rational man" who agreed to ship the treasures back, causing Poland and Canada "to unfreeze their governments and to exchange ambassadors." And so, Mr. SOUTHAM's grateful government promoted him "sur place" to the rank of ambassador in April, 1960.
In 1962, the Southams returned to Ottawa, where he was appointed head of the information division at External Affairs. He was at work one day when he received a visit from Faye Loeb of the IGA grocery chain. She wanted him to help spearhead a citizens' move to build a performing arts centre in Ottawa. Rashly, he promised to find an appropriate candidate and, if necessary, to take charge himself.
"Time ran out and Faye came back," is the way he described his assumption of the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance in 1963. At its height, the alliance included about 60 arts organizations in Ottawa. They raised enough money (about $7,000) to commission a feasibility study, which recommended both the building of a performing arts centre and the holding of an annual national festival in Ottawa. In 1964, Mr. SOUTHAM took the completed study (with its projected costs of $9-million) to his old boss Mr. Pearson, by this point prime minister, and persuaded him that the proposed building would be an ideal centennial project for the federal government.
"He thought about it for a month and then came back and said, 'We'll do it,' Mr. SOUTHAM said. "After that, it was his project and he never gave up on it." The prime minister arranged for Mr. SOUTHAM to be lent from External Affairs to Secretary of State, which appointed him co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre in February, 1964.
The decision about the architect for the new facility was left up to Mr. SOUTHAM. He recommended Fred LEBENSOLD, who had already built the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver, had won the competition for Confederation Centre in Charlottetown, and would later build Place des Arts in Montreal. Mr. LEBENSOLD did a quick estimate of $16-million and signed on as architect. Mr. SOUTHAM was appointed inaugural director of the National Arts Centre in 1967 and oversaw the construction of Mr. LEBENSOLD's hexagonal buildings on 2.6 hectares on the banks of the Rideau River, defending vociferous criticism along the way as the costs spiralled to a final tally of more than $46-million. (By this time, Mr. SOUTHAM's first marriage had disintegrated. He married Gro MORTENSON of Oslo in 1968, with whom he had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. He and his second wife were divorced in the late 1970s, but as with all of Mr. SOUTHAM's wives, she remained on affectionate terms with him.)
The multifaceted performance centre, with three halls including the country's first professional opera house, two restaurants, two theatre companies and its own touring symphony orchestra, opened in June of 1969 with the National Ballet of Canada performing two commissioned ballets - The Queen by Grant Strate to music by Louis Applebaum, and Kraanerg by Roland Petit to music by Iannis Xenakis. The following night, when the ballet danced John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, something went wrong with the technology in the orchestra pit. Conductor George Crum and some of his musicians slowly ascended above stage level, leading Mr. Crum to say later that it was "the only time I ever looked down on Celia Franca," who was performing as Lady Capulet. After two terms as director-general, Mr. SOUTHAM stepped down in March of 1977.
Less than a year later, after a short respite spent sailing his yacht, Mr. SOUTHAM was persuaded by secretary of state John Roberts to become chair of Festival Canada and take charge of the national celebrations on Canada Day. He was paid a dollar a year and required to appear before a Commons committee to answer questions about his mandate and budget. When some members criticized the fluently bilingual Mr. SOUTHAM for preparing a report in English - he said later that he hadn't had time to have it translated - he sent a letter resigning from his post in French to the minister. It was rejected and Mr. SOUTHAM oversaw celebrations in hundreds of communities across the country and a blow-out televised extravaganza on Parliament Hill on the theme "You and Me - Le Canada, C'est Toi et Moi." In the 1980s, Mr. SOUTHAM was a partner in Lively Arts Market Builders, a scheme to create a television channel devoted to producing and broadcasting plays, concerts, films and programs on the arts. The group received a cable television licence and launched the pay-television C Channel in January, 1983. But it failed to attract subscribers and went into receivership six months later. Rogers Cablesystems Inc. bought its pay-television licence that December for $12,500.
(The following year, Mr. SOUTHAM married for the third and final time. Marion TANTON, a French woman he had known and loved for many years, was the wife of the late Pierre CHARPENTIER, a former Canadian ambassador, and the mother of his three children. She died of cancer in May, 2005.)
In January, 1985, prime minister Brian Mulroney appointed Mr. SOUTHAM chair of the Official Residences Council, a civilian oversight group he had established amidst mounting criticism of the cost of maintaining official residences. Mr. SOUTHAM's tenure was not an easy one; there were political brawls about work done on the speaker's house in Kingsmere; on Stornoway, the residence of the opposition leader; and on both official prime ministerial residences.
His beloved National Arts Centre went through a long period of turmoil beginning in the mid-1980s, involving funding crises, a revolving series of chairs and artistic directors and a strike by the National Arts Centre orchestra, before it began to stabilize more than a decade later with the appointment in the late 1990s of David Leighton as chair of the board and Mr. Herrndorf as president and chief executive - thanks in no small part to Mr. SOUTHAM's behind-the-scenes lobbying. Early in 2000, during Mr. Herrndorf's tenure, a grateful National Arts Centre renamed its opera auditorium Southam Hall in his honour and threw a lavish party for him on his 90th birthday.
After attending the rededication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on September 17, 1999, Mr. SOUTHAM met some Friends for lunch at the Rideau Club. He had been "moved" by the ceremony and by governor-general Adrienne Clarkson's "wonderful" speech, and he began thinking that the fallen soldier "should have some company on Confederation Square," rather like the "great cloud of witnesses," described by St. Paul in his epistles. Those lunchtime musings led to his final public campaign, which was realized seven years later when Governor-General Michaëlle Jean unveiled the $1.1-million Valiants Memorial. He considered the Valiants his second great project after the National Arts Centre. "Parliament Hill is full of statues of prime ministers and politicians, some of them good, some of them not good. But in Ottawa, there shouldn't just be statues of politicians," he said. "It is the capital of the country and there should be statues of the men and women who have made this country."
Aside from building monuments to others, Mr. SOUTHAM enjoyed sitting in the study of his Ottawa home, a well-proportioned, light-filled room lined with bookcases, rereading the complete works of Anthony Trollope and "contemplating three generations of reading." He had his grandfather's books on the top shelf, his father's Everyman editions on the second and his own books on the third shelf. As well, he was examining his own soul. "I have lived my life, and that which I have done may God himself make pure," he said. "I meditate and I don't compare today with yesterday. I have more important comparisons, concerning my inner life, and I have much to think about." He was an Anglican, but he "was thinking the same thoughts" as a Catholic or a Jew or a Muslim. The soul is a more important part of our being than character," he said. "It is essential."
And so he spent his last years in contemplation and in visiting with close Friends and family, enjoying life and engaged with the world around him.
On Canada Day, he was about to go for a drive with his valet when he suddenly felt tired. He lay down for a rest and quietly died.
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in Ottawa on December 19, 1916. He died July 1, 2008, at home in Ottawa of complications from cancer. He was 91. He is survived by his second wife, Gro MORTENSON, his six children and his extended family. A private family funeral is planned followed by a memorial service at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, Ottawa, later in July.

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