MARSHMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-24 published
MARSHMAN, Elsie (née SHUTLER)
Of Elgin Manor and formerly of Port Stanley passed away on Friday, May 23rd, 2008, at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital, in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Thomas Hubert MARSHMAN (1996) and dear mother of Heather and her husband Bob HEWITT of Welland, Noreen and her husband Richard LANNING of Port Stanley and Molly MARSHMAN and her friend Hector NUNEZ of Toronto. Loved grandmother of Tom and his wife Diane LANNING and Catherine and her husband Russ MOORE. Sadly missed by 5 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Ben and his wife Jean SHUTLER of England. Predeceased by 2 sisters and 6 brothers. Elsie was born in England on May 1st, 1920, the daughter of the late Sidney and his wife Olive DOWNER) SHUTLER. She came to Canada in 1947 formerly and lived 32 years in Welland and then Port Stanley. A private family service will be held. No visitation. Cremation, with interment of ashes in Union Cemetery. Remembrances may be made to the Elgin Children's Foundation or the Easter Seals. Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas in charge of arrangements.

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MARSLAND o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-17 published
JADISCHKE, Wilhelm
Peacefully at London Health Sciences Centre, Victoria Hospital, on Saturday February 16th, 2008, Wilhelm JADISCHKE of London in his 95th year. Beloved husband of the late Frieda JADISCHKE (November 2004). Cherished father of Gus (Beverley), Heinz (Elaine), Arthur (Kathleen), Kurt (Rose) and predeceased by son Willi (Joanne) (June 1998.) Loving Opa to Andy JADISCHKE, Debbie HIRST, Kathy MARSLAND, Vicky SIMPSON, David and Michael JADISCHKE, Valerie KHAN, Marcus JADISCHKE, Amanda WILLIAMS and Hannah LUKINGS. Family and Friends may call at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street (at Wavell), London, on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service in the chapel on Tuesday February 19th at 1 p.m. with Pastor Garry FESS of Royal View Pentecostal Church officiating. Interment in Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. In memory of Wilhelm donations can be made to the Gideon Bible Society or Dorchester Community Church Building Fund.

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MARTEL o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-06-04 published
MARTEL--In loving memory of our dear mother Tessie who passed away June 4, 2003.
A million times we've needed you
A million times we've cried
If love could have saved you
You never would have died.
Things we feel most deeply
Are the hardest things to say
My dearest one, we loved you
In a very special way.
If we could have one lifetime wish
One dream that could come true
We'd pray to God with all our hearts
For yesterday and you.
Lovingly remembered by Darlene and Bill, Norma and Allan, Don and Ruth.

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MARTEL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-03 published
FLETCHER, Stella Marie (CASTILLOUX)
At University Hospital, London on Tuesday, July 1, 2008. Stella Marie (CASTILLOUX) FLETCHER of London in her 88th year. Beloved wife of Harold FLETCHER. Dear sister of Isobelle KEIGHEN and Ovila CASTILLOUX and his wife Germaine all of Newport, Gaspe. Dear sister-in-law of Marjorie CASTILLOUX, Clem KARBACZ and Irene BLACK. Predeceased by her brothers James CASTILLOUX and Reina CASTILLOUX, her sisters Theresa KARBACZ, Edith MARTEL and Rita DAGENAIS. Also loved by her niece Lorraine ROY and her husband Gilbert, her nephew Marcel DAGENAIS and many other nieces and nephews. Friends will be received by the family from 7 to 9 p.m. Friday at the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London where the funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday, July 5th at 10: 00 a.m. Interment in Mount Pleasant Cemetery, London. Omar Temple No. 111 of the Daughters of the Nile will hold a service in the chapel Friday at 7: 00 p.m. As an expression of sympathy memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, 123 St. George Street, London N6A 3A1 On line condolences accepted at www.amgfh.com

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MARTELL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-21 published
CUNNINGHAM, Margaret Elizabeth (née BROOKFIELD)
Veteran of World War 2
Of Lion's Head, peacefully at Grey Bruce Health Services Lion's head on Sunday, May 18th, 2008. Margaret Elizabeth “Betty” (nee BROOKFIELD) in her 89th year. Loving wife of the late James Alexander CUNNINGHAM (2001.) Devoted mother of Joanne CORMIER and her partner Robert CLARKE, of Lion's Head, and Mary Louise CUNNINGHAM- SMITH and her husband Greg SMITH, of Oakville. Cherished grandmother of Alexander WHITTAKER (Anne,) David CORMIER (Jessica,) Justin CORMIER, John CORMIER (Christine), Jason CLARKE, and Amanda CLARKE and great-grandmother of Abigal, Annabelle, Lily and Hannah. Sadly missed by her niece Claudia LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH, of North Carolina; her cousin Penny MUNROE, of Toronto; and Friends Nancy HOWALD, of Miller Lake, Beth MARTELL, of Lion's Head, Linda SCHAEFER of Wiarton, and Al MUTCH, of Owen Sound. Predeceased by her brother Robert BROOKFIELD. Betty served during World War 2 as an Army Captain stationed at Canadian Forces Base Borden. Cremation has taken place. Betty's daughters invite Friends to join with them for a Celebration of Life memorial at Joanne's home (25 Jackson's Cove Rd., R.R.#3 Lion's Head) on Friday, May 23rd, 2008 at 3 o'clock. Arrangements entrusted to the Thomas C. Whitcroft Funeral Home and Chapel, Sauble Beach (519) 422-0041. Donations to the Bruce Peninsula Clinic (Lion's Head) would be greatly appreciated and may be made through the funeral home. Condolences may be expressed on-line at www.whitcroftfuneralhome.com

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MARTELL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-10 published
HILL, Jerrine Mabel
Peacefully at her home, with her family by her side, on Sunday, March 9, 2008 in her 75th year. Dearly loved wife of the late Leonard HILL of Keswick. Loving mother of Linda HILL of Newmarket, Jim and Pat HILL, Leonard and Lori HILL, all of Keswick, Janet and Allan MARTELL of Toronto, Jerrine and Mike PEARSON, Lou-Ann and Bob KNOBEL and Patricia HILL, all of Keswick, Donna and Daniel VIENO of St. Catharines and Robert HILL of Keswick. Cherished grandmother of 19 grandchildren and 9 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of June SIMINICK of Toronto. Jerrine will be greatly missed by many Friends and relatives. Visitation from M.W. Becker Funeral Home, 490 The Queensway S., Keswick, 1-888-884-4486, on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service from the chapel on Wednesday, March 12, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. Cremation to follow. If desired, donations made to the Canadian Cancer Society or Southlake Regional Health Centre Foundation would be appreciated by the family.

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MARTELLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-02 published
DUTTON, Eileen Lowman (née LODATO)
Peacefully at home on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late John DUTTON (2000.) Loving mother of Janice. Survived by sister Monica MARTELLE and many dear nieces and nephews. Predeceased by brothers Leonard and Gordon LODATO and sister Bernice PALLISTER. Beloved " Grandma" to Billy and Jason. Eileen served in the Royal Canadian Air Force (Womens' Division) during World War 2 and was a member of Victory Branch Legion. She was also a long time member of the C.W.L. and a life member of the Ontario Hospital Auxiliaries. Eileen loved bright colours and requested that her Friends wear cheerful clothing to her visitation and Mass. Friends may call on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James St. at Richmond. The funeral Mass will be celebrated at Saint Michael's Catholic Church, 515 Cheapside Street at Maitland, on Saturday, May 3 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Saint Mary's Cemetery, Woodstock. On Friday at the funeral home, a Legion Memorial Service under the auspices of Victory Branch #317 will be conducted at 2 p.m. and Parish Prayers will be held at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial contributions to Ark Aid or Mission Services London (for the Men's Mission or Rothhome) would be gratefully acknowledged.

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MARTELLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-21 published
LOGAN, Laura May (formerly WILCOCKS, née MARTELLE)
Peacefully at the North Lambton Lodge in Forest on June 19, 2008, Laura May (née MARTELLE) LOGAN passed away in her 87th year. Beloved mother of Wayne and Dorothy, Harley and Dorothy, Nelson and Mary, Garry and Judy WILCOCKS, Janet and John FITCHETT, Willa and Doug CAMPBELL, Paul and Rita, and Brian and Kelli WILCOCKS. Loving step-mother of Norma and Dave VAUGHAN, Paul and Linda LOGAN, and Marion and Chuck HOLLINGSWORTH. Cherished grandmother of 31 grandchildren, 38 great-grandchildren, and 1 great-great-grandchild. Sadly missed by siblings June, Leo, Marjorie, Phyllis, Jackie, Nancy, and Alan. Predeceased by husband Donald LOGAN (1999,) husband LaVerne WILCOCKS (1971,) son Elmer (1965,) grandchild Angela WILCOCKS (1995,) siblings Margaret, Bill, George, Joe, Betty, and Floyd. Resting at the Gilpin Funeral Chapel, Forest for visitation on Sunday, June 22 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service on Monday, June 23, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at Arkona Cemetery Rev. Joanne MacODRUM officiating. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundations gratefully acknowledged. Online condolences at gilpinfuneralchapel.com.

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MARTELLO o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-04-30 published
HOWES, Mildred Middleton " Snookie" (née JONES)
On Wednesday, the 23rd of April 2008 at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood. Surrounded by love, she passed quietly away. Mildred of Stayner, loving wife of the late Henry Desmond HOWES, mother of William (Fikret,) Wendy (the late Frank JEFFRIES,) Judy (Jim ROBBINSON,) Patricia HOWES, Richard (Sylvie) and David. Proud Grandmother to James, Tammy, Stephen, Kevin, Miranda, Olivier, Aurelie, Corrine, Colin and Henry. Beaming "G.G." to Kate, Emma, Andrew and Finlay. Loved and faithful sister to the late Mary HYLAND and Patricia SOULES. Beloved sister-in-law to the late William, Maureen MARTELLO, Terrence and the late Brian. Special Aunt to many nieces and nephews and a kind and lovely soul to any that crossed her threshold. We are grateful for the care that has been provided to Mom by Doctor Scott HOUSTON, the staff of Blue Mountain Manor and Collingwood General and Marine Hospital. Friends were received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, 7313 Highway 26 (Main Street), Stayner Thursday April 24, 2008 from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral Service was held at Jubilee Presbyterian Church, 7320 Highway 26, Stayner Friday April 25, 2008 at 1 o'clock. Interment Stayner Union Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to World Vision, Sleeping Children Around the World, Collingwood General and Marine Hospital Foundation or the charity of your choice. For further information and to sign the online guest book, log on to: www.carruthersdavidson.com
"God sees the little sparrow fall it marks His tender view…"
Page 15

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MARTENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-12 published
MARTENS, Margaret Louise Eleanor (née HOUSTON)
Of Regina
With great sadness, the family wishes to announce the passing of Louise, dear mother and grandmother on Sunday January 6, 2008 at the age of 92 years, with her grand_son at her side, after a brief illness and her half-century-long battle with osteo-arthritis. Her memory will linger in our hearts forever. Louise was predeceased by her husband Ernest Allen MARTENS in 1953 (b. family homestead, Main Center, Saskatchewan,) her parents, Kate Matilda GARDINER in 1960 (b. family farm, Westbrook, Ontario) and Arthur Russell HOUSTON in 1966 (b., family homestead, Starbuck, Manitoba,) her maternal grandparents, Charlotte Eleanor LEONARD in 1916 (b. Westbrook, Ontario) and Jacob James GARDINER in 1923 (b. family homestead, Westbrook, Ontario,) her paternal grandparents, Margaret McBURNEY in 1943 (b. Beverly, Ontario) and Robert HOUSTON, Sr. in 1934 (b. Lesmahagow, Scotland). A true Canadian with deep roots here, Louise is a descendant of a family (Leonard/Chilton) who came to North America in 1620 on the Mayflower, and she is also a descendant of another family (McDonell) of United Empire Loyalists. She is survived by her sons Geoffrey of Westport, Ontario, and James (Lorena May BLONDIN) of Regina, and her grandchildren, Robert and Miranda. Louise was the daughter of a Canadian Pacific Railway station-agent and was born in the station-house in Perdue, Saskatchewan, in 1915. Her early schooling was there, and her piano-lessons only a short ride away over the rails to Saskatoon where she subsequently attended the University of Saskatchewan (Home Economics), and later on, business school in London, Ontario. With a young family to support, Louise returned to work (Government of Saskatchewan), finally retiring in 1982. Where did the time go? She will be remembered for her independence and her dedication and generosity to her family, Friends and co-workers. She loved Rachmaninoff; but despised country-music. She was her own woman to the end. A memorial service will be held at Speers Funeral Chapel, 2136 College Avenue, Regina, Saturday, January 12, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m.; coffee and tea to follow at the Family Centre.

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MARTH o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-18 published
MARTH, Serena
Peacefully at Parkwood Hospital, on Tuesday, June 17, 2008, Serena MARTH. Beloved wife of Glen "Bud" MARTH. Loving mother of Kyle MARTH and his wife Janiss, and Koral KLIEWER and her husband Rob. Devoted Grandy of Sienna, Kaden, Nathan, and Avery. Dear sister of Dan HEATHERINGTON. Visitation will be held on Thursday from 6-9 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the funeral service will be conducted on Friday, June 20, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Woodland Cemetery. Those wishing to make a donation in memory of Serena are asked to consider the London Health Sciences Foundation-Cancer Program. Online condolences condolences@westviewfuneralchapel.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-05 published
BRUIN, Dorothy (née VERNON)
Of Wiarton and formerly of Lion's head passed away peacefully on Thursday, January 3, 2008 in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Alfred BRUIN (1983.) Cherished mother of Gwen (Ken) MORRIS of Port Elgin, Fred (Marge) BRUIN of Wiarton, Tom (Pat) BRUIN of Gravenhurst and David (Laurie) BRUIN of Wiarton. She will be sadly missed by 11 grandchildren, 12 great-grandchildren, sisters Doris MARTIN of Owen Sound and Lillian HABART of London and sister-in-law Anne BRUIN of Windsor. Dorothy was predeceased by her parents Ellen (CLARKE) and John VERNON. Family and Friends are invited to share their memories at the George Funeral Home, 430 Mary Street, Wiarton on Sunday, January 6, 2008 from 2: 00 to 4: 00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Dorothy's life will be held at the funeral home on Monday, January 7, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Rev. George BELL officiating. Interment Eastnor Cemetery. Donations made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Wiarton Hospital would be appreciated by the family as expressions of sympathy. Condolences may be sent to the family at www.georgefuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-17 published
TILLMAN, Beatrice (née EARLL)
On Tuesday, January 15, 2008 at Hotel-Dieu Grace Hospital, Windsor. Beatrice TILLMAN (née EARLL) in her 95th year. Wife of the late Turner TILLMAN. Loving mother to Valerie and her husband Douglas COON of Windsor. Sadly missed by her grand_son Ryan. Predeceased by her brothers and sisters, Susan WILSON, William EARLL, Gertrude GREEN, Ethel MARTIN, Sarah HALL, Eliza Jane SCOTT, Rachael HACKLEY, Moses EARLL, Edward EARLL, Estelle BLACKBURN, and Chonita WILSON. Friends are invited to Tannahill Funeral Home for visiting on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted in the chapel on Saturday, January 19th at 11 o'clock. Bishop Lionel RILEY officiating. Interment Greenwood Cemetery. Memorial donations to the GBRHC Foundation would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-30 published
GROGAN, Emmett Francis
(Former Reeve of Albion Township, retired owner of Grogan Meats Ltd. and was also a farmer, realtor and returned to farming, the occupation he loved)
With sadness and love the family of Emmett Francis GROGAN wish to announce his passing on Sunday, January 27, 2008 in his 84th year. He was born February 11, 1924 in Lockton, Albion Township. Predeceased by his wife Nadine GROGAN (1997) and his son James GROGAN (1996.) Dear father of Mary and John VAN DYK, Waterloo John and Bruna GROGAN, Toronto; Barbara GROGAN, Waterloo, Harold and Kim GROGAN, Bolton; Roberta and Bill LINKLETTER, Bolton. Loved grandpa of Michelle VAN DYK and Jason BELANGER, Ottawa Paul and Sarah VAN DYK, London; Tom and Mikaela LINKLETTER, Caledon Kevin LINKLETTER and Jenn, Vernon, British Columbia; Erika GROGAN and Jeff Graham, Oshawa; Levi GROGAN and Sydney GROGAN, Bolton. Cherished great-grandpa of Henry VAN DYK. Dear brother to Marjorie and John GIBB, Louis (deceased) and Jean GROGAN, Priscilla and Clare JONES, Pauline and Vince (deceased) HENNEBURY, Jennifer CHAPMAN, Janet and Peter MARTIN. Fondly remembered by nieces and nephews. Emmett will be remembered by Friends and family around Bolton and Caledon and later by Friends in Tara, Port Elgin and Walkerton. He was an avid euchre and cribbage player, if you were fast enough and good enough to keep up! He was also a regular fixture at jamborees and Saturday night dances. According to Emmett's wishes, his body has been donated to McMaster University for medical research. The family will receive Friends at Saint_John the Evangelist Roman Catholic Church, Albion, 16066 The Gore Road, Caledon on Tuesday morning, February 5 from 10 o'clock until time of Memorial Mass at 11 o'clock. Following the Mass, a reception will be held at the Caledon Community Complex, 6215 Old Church Road, Caledon. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Emmett's honour to the Canadian Cancer Society, or Grey Bruce Regional Health Centre - Owen Sound, 1400 - 8th Street East, P.O. Box 1400, Owen Sound N4K 6M9, or the charity of your choice. Arrangements by Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S., Bolton (905-857-2213). Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-16 published
GIBBONS, Marlene (née MARTIN)
It is with great sadness that the family of Marlene GIBBONS announces her passing at the age of 51 years, on Friday, February 15th, 2008. Marlene will be dearly missed by her soul mate and beloved husband of 34 years, Frank GIBBONS. She will be forever in the hearts of her daughter Caroline and her husband Kevin PURDY of Port Elgin, Francine and her partner Jay PILGRIM of Kitchener, her son Thomas and his wife Susan of Port Elgin and youngest daughter Tracey and her partner Michael HASTINGS of Southampton. Nana by blood, and mother by heart to William GIBBONS. Loving and devoted Nana to Frankie, Abbigail, Cloe, Olivia, J.R., Michael and Lauren. Special Nana and second mother to many. Loving sister and sister-in-law to Eileen and Adrian TUNS, Wayne and Deanna MARTIN, Joan and Paul SCHILDROTH, Mike and Nancy MARTIN, Eleanor and Paul PETRIE, Roger GIBBONS, Ronnie GIBBONS, Murray and Edith GIBBONS. Marlene will be greatly missed by her mother Marie MARTIN and father-in-law Reg GIBBONS. Marlene is predeceased by her father Bruce MARTIN, her mother-in-law Marietta GIBBONS, and her brother-in-law William RICHARD (Billy) GIBBONS. A Celebration of Life will take place on Tuesday, February, 19th at 11: 00 a.m. at the South-Port Pentecostal Temple, Hwy 21, Sparks Corner with the Rev. Gord CLARK officiating. Donations to the Port Elgin Salvation Army Foodbank or to the Children's Ministries of South-Port Pentecostal Temple would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Arrangements in care of the W. Kent Milroy Port Elgin Chapel. Portrait and memorial online at www.milroyfuneralhomes.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-03-06 published
TAILOR/TAYLOR, Ian David
Of Chesley, formerly of Scotland, passed away at South Bruce Grey Health Centre, Chesley on Wednesday, March 5, 2008 in his 79th year. Beloved husband of Olive. Loving father of Ian and his wife Mary of Paisley, Brian and his wife Angela, Audrey TAILOR/TAYLOR and her husband Pete, Elizabeth and her husband Jon BORLAND and Michael all of Scotland. Ian will be fondly remembered by his step children, Linda EARL, Brenda WHIBLEY, Marsha HAWTON, Lenore BRISTOW, Janice HAMEL and Ron KAUFMAN. He will be missed by his seven grandchildren and three great-grandchildren. Brother of Eddie (Margaret) MARTIN of Toronto, Lynne MARTIN and Maida MARTIN, both of Scotland. Predeceased by his first wife Mary “Maisie&rdquo TAILOR/TAYLOR. At Ian's request, cremation has taken place and a celebration of his life will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Saint_John's United Church would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Cameron Funeral Home, Chesley. www.cameronfuneralhomes.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-23 published
GREIG, Robert John
In his 80th year. Passed away at the Meaford Long Term Care Centre on Tuesday, May 20, 2008. Dear brother of Muriel WRAY of Stratford. Survived by his brothers-in-law, John WRAY and Arthur MARTIN and his nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents John and Lena GREIG, sister Alice MARTIN and brother Elliott and sister-in-law Olive GREIG. Resting at The Gardiner-Wilson Funeral Home, Meaford, where the funeral service will be conducted by Rev. Judith OLIVER on Monday morning, May 26 at 11 a.m. Interment of ashes in Lakeview Cemetery. As your expressions of sympathy donations to The Meaford Nursing Home Auxiliary Memorial Fund would be appreciated. Visitation on hour prior to the funeral service.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-03 published
BOTHWELL, Edna Mary (née BOYD)
It is with heavy hearts, we announce the passing of our Mom, Edna Mary BOTHWELL, in her 94th year, at the Grey Bruce Health Services-Owen Sound, on June 1st, 2008. Born May 18th, 1915, she was the only daughter of the late Bob and Sadie (COOK) BOYD. Mom will have endless stories to tell our Dad, Allan (May 23, 1959). Most importantly that two teenagers and a toddler, Mayme, Marie and Alvena increased the family to include sons-in-law, Bill HILLIS, Doug ORMSBY and Tom MARTIN; also five grandchildren and six great-granchildren. Several nieces and nephews survive, as well as special friend, Marg RADBOURNE, sister-in-law Viola (Mrs. Gordon BOTHWELL,) and Friends at the Parkway Apartments, where she thoroughly enjoyed “calling home” for the past thirty-one years. Mom loved to dance, play euchre and just talk. When her beloved Toronto Maple Leafs return, she will be the brightest star watching over them. We look forward to your visit at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K 3X8 (519-376-7492), on Wednesday, from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service for Edna BOTHWELL will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Thursday, June 5th, 2008, at 1: 30 p.m. with Rev. Cathy HIRD officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the Intensive Care Unit - Grey Bruce Health Services, as your expression of sympathy.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-03 published
NIXON, Annie McPhail "Nan" (née McLEAN)
Nan NIXON passed away peacefully at Errinrung Residence in Thornbury on Monday May 26, 2008 at the age of 93. Born in Greenock, Scotland, she was the daughter of John and Lilius (née DELGARNO) McLEAN. At the age of 15 Nan immigrated to Canada with her parents and siblings. Although Nan received a limited education and faced many challenges in her earlier life, as was so often the case in those years, she was able to fulfill her most important dreams, those of raising her family and being a kind and loving mother, grandmother and great-grandmother. She is remembered by her family and Friends as a wise woman whose patience and forgiveness set examples for all to follow. She loved her home and ensured that it was always a welcoming environment for all and her homemaking skills were passed as a legacy to her children. Her home was always clean, the treadle sewing machine rarely resting as she made and re-made clothing for her family and the results of her knitting and quilting were cherished by all who received her homemade gifts. Above all Nan loved to play with the grandchildren sharing their laughter while enjoying checkers, dominoes, snakes and ladders and many card games. She encouraged her family to strive to succeed by endeavoring to do their best at whatever task might be in front of them. She shared her spirit with the gentle 'toughness' that was her inspiring strength of character. Nan was predeceased by her husband Robert Henry NIXON in 1956 when she was a woman of 41 years of age and she remained undaunted in her dedication that her family should know the warmth and security of home. She is remembered as a loving mother by her daughters Dorothy FROST of Thornbury, Isobel LEVACQUE of Collingwood and Debra Nixon McLEOD of Nottawa and she was predeceased by her son Bill NIXON. She is lovingly remembered as a dear mother-in-law by her daughter-in-law Betty (SANGSTER) Nixon VANDERLINDEN of Clayhurst, British Columbia, and by her son-in-law Roger McLEOD of Nottawa. She will also be remembered by her brother Jim McLEAN of Parksville, British Columbia and by sisters-in-law May McLEAN and Joy McLEAN, both of Meaford. Nan was also predeceased by sons-in-law Bill FROST, Ray LEVACQUE and Dale VANDERLINDEN and by brothers and sisters John McLEAN (Isabelle,) Jean SMITH (Harvey,) May MARTIN (Ray), David McLEAN, Tom McLEAN (Ethel), and Bill McLEAN. Nan will be most affectionately remembered as the devoted matriarch of her family including her seven grandchildren and thirteen great-grandchildren and her many nieces and nephews and their families. As Nan desired, a family service of committal and interment of her cremated remains, officiated by Reverend Dr. Brian GOODINGS of Grace United Church, was conducted at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery on Friday May 30 where Nan's ashes were interred with her late husband. If so desired, and in memory of Nan, memorial donations to Thameswood Lodge, a residence for cancer patients in London, Ontario, would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, in Thornbury to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-25 published
JACKSON, Margaret Mary
Peacefully at Georgian Heights Nursing Home in Owen Sound on June 23, 2008. In her 91st year, Margaret Mary JACKSON the beloved wife of the late Emmet Dwight JACKSON. Loving mother of Glenn and his wife Teresa, of Owen Sound and Sharon and her husband John SMITH, of Guelph. Margaret will be fondly remembered by her loving grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Loving sister of John MARTIN and Grace (Mrs. Howard GIBBONS.) Predeceased by her son Dwight and by her sisters Gladys (Mrs. Roy GILKES) and Minnie (Mrs. Ken LORENZ). Friends may call at the Breckenridge-Ashcroft Funeral Home on Wednesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held at the funeral home on Thursday at 11 a.m. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-02 published
JOHNSON, Daphne Roscoe (née MARTIN)
Daphne Roscoe JOHNSON (née MARTIN,) of Annan, passed away peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services, on Monday evening, June 30th, 2008. Dearly beloved wife of John JOHNSON. Loving mother of Elis JOHNSON and his wife, Linda, of Big Bay, Ross JOHNSON and his wife, Kathy, of Owen Sound and Heather Anne JOHNSON, of Toronto. Loving grandmother of Kristopher, Jeremiah, Dylan and Tanner JOHNSON. Predeceased by her parents, Doctor W.Y. (William) and Mary MARTIN; her brothers, Tommy and Richard MARTIN; her sister, Kitty PEARSON. Daphne will be sadly missed by all her loving family. Funeral arrangements are incomplete at this time. For further information please contact the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K-3X8 (519-376-7492).

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-05 published
JOHNSON, Daphne Roscoe (née MARTIN)
Daphne Roscoe JOHNSON (née MARTIN,) of Annan, passed away peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound, on Monday evening, June 30th, 2008. Dearly beloved wife of John JOHNSON. Loving mother of Elis JOHNSON and his wife, Linda, of Big Bay, Ross JOHNSON and his wife, Kathy, of Owen Sound and Heather Anne JOHNSON, of Toronto. Loving grandmother of Kristopher, Jeremiah, Dylan and Tanner JOHNSON. Predeceased by her parents, Doctor W.Y. (William) and Mary MARTIN; her brothers, Tommy and Richard MARTIN; her sister, Kitty PEARSON. Daphne will be sadly missed by all her loving family. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario, N4K-3X8 (519-376-7492) on Thursday, July 10th, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Private Family Memorial Service for Daphne JOHNSON will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel on Friday with Rev. Dr. Jawn KOLOHON officiating. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Grey Bruce Health Services Foundation as your expression of sympathy.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-16 published
McCUTCHEON, Barry Wilford Tucker
Peacefully at the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound, with his loving family by his side, on Tuesday, July 15th, 2008. Barry Wilford Tucker McCUTCHEON, of Owen Sound, in his 66th year. Dearly beloved husband of Donna McCUTCHEON (née WIGGINS.) Loving father of Rob McCUTCHEON, of Owen Sound and Doug McCUTCHEON and his fiancée, Stacey, of Victoria, British Columbia. Cherished brother of Orla CATHRAE and her husband, Doug, of Owen Sound and Connie MARTIN and her friend, Stephen McDOWELL, of Leamington. Barry is survived by his in-laws, Marion McCANN, Marjorie WIGGINS, Alex BAKER, John McCANN and his nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents, Robert and Evelyn McCUTCHEON (née TUCKER;) his brother, Charles McCUTCHEON and his wife, Betty; his brother-in-law, Bill MARTIN. Barry was the owner of Barry's Piano Sales and Service for 31 years. Friends may call at the Brian E. Wood Funeral Home, 250 - 14th Street West, Owen Sound, Ontario N4K-3X8 (519-376-7492) on Thursday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service for Barry McCUTCHEON will be held in the Chapel on Friday, July 18th, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. David SHEARMAN officiating. Interment in Eastnor Cemetery. If so desired, the family would appreciate donations to the Grey Bruce Health Services Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolences for the family may be sent to brian@woodfuneralhome.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-21 published
BROWN, Miriam Katherine (née REINHART)
Peacefully, went home to be with her Lord and Saviour on Friday, July 18th, 2008, aged 93 years, at the Elgin Lodge Retirement Home, Port Elgin. She was predeceased by her husband Clarke, her sons, Rev. Douglas and Larry and by her parents, J. Wesley and Ethel REINHART. Miriam is survived by her beloved sister Joyce STOW of Southampton and her grandchildren Margo BROWN, Jennifer NORDEEN, Monique MARTIN and Annelise LOVELL. She will be fondly remembered by her four great-grandchildren, step-son Bryan JONES, nephew Rick STOW, niece Nancy STOW, great-nephew Stefan POHL, two great-nieces, the staff and residents at Elgin Lodge and by many cousins, neighbours, Friends, as well as her special friend and caregiver, Valerie FULHAM. Miriam will be remembered for her strong faith, zest for life, her terrific sense of humour and her fondness for her dog, Gordie. A Celebration of Miriam's Life will be conducted at 11 a.m. on Saturday July 26th, 2008 in the Chapel of the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, with Reverend Allan PERKS officiating. Private Interment of Ashes, Southampton Cemetery. Expressions of Remembrance to the Gideon Society or to the Charity of your Choice. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-04 published
GOOD, Milton Roy (1911-2008)
Milton passed away, unexpectedly at K-W Health Centre of Grand River Hospital on Monday, March 3, 2008, in his 97th year. Milton Roy GOOD was born on June 20, 1911, on a small farm in Waterloo Township (now in the City of Waterloo) to Henry and Mary (MARTIN) GOOD. He was the third child and eldest son in a family of eight and is survived by his brother Harold, and three sisters, Edna, Erma and Vera. In 1938 he married the late Verna I. SCHNIEDER/SNIDER/SNYDER and had two sons, James (wife Eva) and John, and two grand_sons, Thomas and James. After Verna's death in 1976, he married Eleanor (YOUNG) HIGH. Their marriage ended with the death of Eleanor in 2001. He is survived by his wife, Margaret (BRUBACHER) GOOD. In 1927 Milton joined the Royal Bank at the Waterloo branch and for twenty-one years served at several Ontario branches, resigning in 1948 to take on the position of Office Manager at the Kitchener firm of H. Boehmer and Company. In 1961 he became President and General Manager, seeing the firm through a period of substantial expansion until it was sold in 1973. At the age of eighteen, in 1929, he was appointed Treasurer of The Mennonite Mission Board of Ontario, a position he held for the next twenty-one years. In this office he became involved with many church agencies in Canada and the United States where he served as the first Board Chair of Mennonite Mutual Aid which he helped organize. In Canada, he was involved in establishing Conrad Grebel University College and was the first Chair of its Board of Governors. Milton GOOD was a member of the Board of J.M. Schneider Ltd. for a number of years. He was also President of the K-W Symphony. After retiring from active business in 1976 he became Chair of the Fundraising Committee for the Centre in the Square, successfully completing the financing of that project. In 1974 he established Good Foundation Inc., a private foundation that has supported many charities, mostly in the Waterloo region. In 1995 he was the guest of honour at the annual dinner sponsored by the Mayor of Kitchener, and in 1996 he was elected to the Waterloo County Hall of Fame. Relatives and Friends are invited to share memories of Milton during visitation at the Erb and Good Family Funeral Home, 171 King Street South in Waterloo, on Friday, March 7 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service to celebrate Milton's life will be held at Erb Street Mennonite Church, 131 Erb Street West, Waterloo, on Saturday, March 8, 2008 at 11 a.m. with Rev. Eleanor EPP- STOBBE officiating. Following the service, everyone is invited to remain at the church for refreshments and a time to visit with the family. Private interment at Parkview Cemetery. Condolences for the family and memorial donations to Conrad Grebel University College or the Mennonite Central Committee may be arranged by contacting the funeral home at 519-745-8445 or www.erbgood.com. In living memory of Milton, a donation will be made to the Trees for Learning Program by the funeral home.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-10 published
GOFF, Frances Elinor (née COPELAND)
At Woodstock General Hospital on Sunday, March 9, 2008, Frances Elinor GOFF (née COPELAND) in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Harry William GOFF (2005.) Loved mother of Shirley MARTIN and her husband Judson of Toronto. Cherished aunt of Janise BROOKS and her husband Thomas of Woodstock. Sister-in-law of Molly STRICKLER of Embro. Funeral arrangements entrusted to the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock (519-539-0004). Contributions to the Woodstock General Hospital Building Fund would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com A very special thank you to Jenny DEMPSEY and Carolyn MATRESKY- POST who were her loving caregivers for the last three years.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-11 published
GOFF, Frances Elinor (née COPELAND)
At Woodstock General Hospital on Sunday, March 9, 2008, Frances Elinor GOFF (née COPELAND) in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Harry William GOFF (2005.) Loved mother of Shirley MARTIN and her husband Judson of Toronto. Cherished aunt of Janis BROOKS and her husband Thomas of Woodstock. Sister-in-law of Molly STRICKLER of Embro. Friends may call at the Longworth Funeral Home, 845 Devonshire Ave., Woodstock (519-539-0004) on Wednesday March 12, 2008 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. where the complete funeral service will be held in the chapel on Thursday at 11 a.m. with Rev. Ruth BUTT officiating. A private family interment will take place at the Innerkip Cemetery in the spring. Contributions to the Woodstock General Hospital Building Fund would be appreciated. Online condolences at www.longworthfuneralhome.com A very special thank you to Jenny DEMPSEY and Carolyn MATRESKY- POST who were her loving caregivers for the last three years.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-20 published
WILLIAMS, Marlene (née JONES)
At Alexandra Marine and General Hospital on Tuesday, March 18, 2008. Marlene (JONES) WILLIAMS of Goderich in her 69th year. Wife of the late Charles WILLIAMS (1983.) Dear mother of Bryan (Kendra) LOVETT of Edmonton, Alberta and grandmother of Dori LOVETT. Sister of Robert (Gertrude) JONES and Elizabeth MARTIN all of London. Also survived by good friend Glen ALLEN of Goderich and step-daughter Gayle SZEWE. Also predeceased by parents Walter and Elsie (LAWLOR) JONES and step-son Steven WILLIAMS. Friends may call at McCallum and Palla Funeral Home, Cambria Road at East Street, Goderich on Friday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Funeral Home on Saturday afternoon at 1: 30 p.m. Interment Maitland Cemetery. Friends may sign the book of condolences at www.mccallumpalla.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-29 published
MARTIN, Betty Muriel (née SEARBY)
Peacefully at Wildwood Care Centre, Saint Marys, Betty Muriel (nee SEARBY) passed away on March 28, 2008 in her 86th year. Beloved wife of the late Mervin MARTIN (2002.) Loving mother of Jim and Carol MARTIN of R.R.#1 Saint Marys, Judy and Larry NEWCOMBE of Calgary and Janice MARTIN of London. Dear grandmother of Luke MARTIN of R.R.#1 Saint Marys, Sarah and Phil SILVA of Mississauga, Craig and Rachael NEWCOMBE, Ian NEWCOMBE and Lara NEWCOMBE all of Calgary. Cherished sister of Dorothy LONG (Frank,) Joan DUTCHUK both of Windsor, brother-in-law Everett and his wife May MARTIN of Mount Forest and sister-in-law Lois and her husband Ross McINTOSH of Carlingford. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by parents Arthur and Florence SEARBY (PARNHAM) and sisters Frances CLARKE and Edith MATTINEN. The visitation will be held at the Andrew L. Hodges Funeral Home, 47 Wellington St. South, Saint Marys (519-284-2820) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The Funeral Service will be conducted at the funeral home on Monday, March 31, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. Interment in Saint Marys Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation. Online condolences at www.hodgesfuneralhome.ca.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-29 published
NOYLE, Shirley Irene (née LUMLEY)
A resident of Wallaceburg passed away on Wednesday, March 26, 2008 at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, "Sydenham Campus", in Wallaceburg, at the age of 68. Shirley was born in Sarnia and is the loving daughter of Margaret (FILES) LUMLEY and the late Howard William LUMLEY (1990.) Beloved wife of Robert "Bob" NOYLE. Loving mother and mother-in-law of: Joanne and Tom LANE of Port Lambton, Bryan and Colleen NOYLE of Wallaceburg, Susan and Jim MARTIN of Kitchener and Dawne and Jim RICHMOND of Oro. Loving grandmother of 14 and great-grandmother of 6. Kind sister and sister-in-law of: Eric and Catherine LUMLEY of Sombra, Cora Ann LUMLEY and the late James "Jim" LUMLEY (2007) of Sombra. Friends will be received at the Eric F. Nicholls Funeral Home Ltd., 639 Elgin Street, Wallaceburg, on Sunday, March 30, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will be held on Monday, March 31st, 2008 from Saint_James Anglican Church, Wallaceburg, at 11 a.m., with Rev. Len MYERS, officiating. Interment of ashes in Moore Union Cemetery. As an expression of sympathy, donations to the Diabetes Association may be left at the funeral home. As a living memorial a tree will be planted in Nicholls Memorial Forest in memory of Shirley Irene NOYLE.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-03 published
VAN ZANDWYK, Luella (née MARTIN)
Peacefully into God's loving arms, at South Huron Hospital, Exeter, on Wednesday, April 2, 2008, Luella (MARTIN) VAN ZANDWYK of R.R.#2 Zurich, in her 75th year. Beloved wife of the late John VAN ZANDWYK (1990). Dear mother of Harry of R.R.#2 Zurich, Michael and Emelien of R.R.#2 Zurich, Janny and Ted DUCHARME of London and Dorothy BONVIE of Zurich. Loving grandmother of Daniel and Maaike, Deanna and Hebron, Derek, Laura, Michael, Kallie, Amber and Morgan. Dear sister and sister-in-law of Albert and Luanna MARTIN, Alma MARTIN, Irvin and Grace MARTIN, Gladys MARTIN, Marion MARTIN. Predeceased by her parents Menno and Louina (STECKLE) MARTIN, brothers Harvey MARTIN and Melvin MARTIN, sisters Velina OESCH and husband Bill, Emma BEARINGER and husband Enos and Melinda MARTIN in infancy. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews and the VAN ZANDWYK family. Visitation in the J.M. McBeath Funeral Home, 49 Goshen St. N., Zurich on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted on Saturday, April 5, 2008 at 1 p.m. in the Zurich Mennonite Church. Interment Zurich Mennonite Cemetery. Pastor Phil WAGLER officiating. Memorial contributions may be made to the Kidney Foundation, Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Zurich Mennonite Church Elevator Fund. Condolences may be forwarded through jmmcbeathfuneralhome.com A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Luella VAN ZANDWYK.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-04 published
O'NEIL, Dorothy May (née ROBERTS)
Of Saint Thomas, passed away on Thursday, April 3rd, 2008, at her late residence, in her 98th year. Predeceased by her husband Aljoe W. O'NEILL (1978) and loved mother of Marjorie (Darrell) DENNIS, Sheila (Tom) MARTIN and Douglas ALJOE and his partner Jane McGUGAN all of Saint Thomas. Loved grandmother of Gordon DENNIS, Michael (Tammy GREDIG) Dennis, Neil DENNIS and partner Tanya HOLCOMBE, Jennifer (Joel) HAYES, Andrea (Jamie) HAWKRIGG and Mandy (Kevin) RUTKAUSKAS. Loved great-grandmother of Benjamin DENNIS, Heather, Kyle and Nathan DENNIS, Peri and Lex HAYES, Jett HAWKRIGG and Adley and Will RUTKAUSKAS. Dear sister of Olive BOND of Saint Thomas and cousin of Marilyn (Roberts) CORNFOOT and Marie (Roberts) DAVIS of North Wales. Dear aunt of Muriel (Paul) MARENTETTE, Brenda (Brendon) BRADLEY, Margaret (Wayne) BROOKE and Judy (Stewart) BARNUM and George COOK of London as well as their families. Dorothy was born in Saint Thomas on July 3rd, 1910, the eldest daughter of Harry Edward and Bertha MUNRO) ROBERTS. She graduated from Arthur Voaden Vocational School with the Medal of Proficiency and was secretary to Doctor Voaden for several years. In 1951 she joined the staff of City Hall as secretary and cashier in the offices of City Engineer and City Treasurer until she retired in 1972, and then enjoyed traveling. She was a life member of Central United Church, and a member for 58 years of the Edna Rebekah Lodge and was also Past Noble Grand. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas on Saturday from 2-3 p.m. followed by a private family service. Interment in Elmdale Cemetery. Remembrances may be made to the charity of choice.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-05 published
Family of slain little girl grateful for support
By Canadian Press, Sat., April 5, 2008
Cornwall -- Family members coping with the apparent murder of a five-year-old girl said yesterday they are overwhelmed by the support of the local community.
Alissa MARTIN- TRAVERS was found dead in her home early Thursday morning with what police described as obvious signs of trauma.
Officers arrived at the home after receiving a frantic 911 phone call from the girl's mother at about 1: 30 a.m. She reported someone had barged into her home and injured her daughter.
When police arrived, they found the girl's lifeless body.
"She was a beautiful child," said her grandmother Susan CROSS.
"She was outgoing, outspoken and she loved everybody…. She was my girl. I helped raise that child and she was an amazing child."
Hundreds of stuffed animals and flowers lined the block of the girl's home, and CROSS said she was overwhelmed by the outpouring of sympathy.
"It's so beautiful," she said.
"I never, ever thought the public would do this for us. I'm so amazed. I want to thank everybody here in Cornwall for doing what they did for my granddaughter, and for my son and my daughter-in-law. It's amazing. My heart goes out to everyone here."
The family is planning a traditional aboriginal funeral for the girl.
Shane HALEY, 20, appeared in a Cornwall court yesterday amid heavy security to face a first-degree murder charge. The case was adjourned to Wednesday.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-05 published
O'NEIL, Dorothy May (née ROBERTS)
Of Saint Thomas, passed away on Thursday, April 3rd, 2008, at her late residence, in her 98th year. Predeceased by her husband Aljoe W. O'NEIL (1978) and loved mother of Marjorie (Darrell) DENNIS, Sheila (Tom) MARTIN and Douglas ALJOE and his partner Jane McGUGAN all of Saint Thomas, and the late Nancy ELDER (2005.) Loved grandmother of Gordon DENNIS, Michael (Tammy GREDIG) DENNIS, Neil DENNIS and partner Tanya HOLCOMBE, Jennifer (Joel) HAYES, Andrea (Jamie) HAWKRIGG and Mandy (Kevin) RUTKAUSKAS. Loved great-grandmother of Benjamin DENNIS, Heather, Kyle and Nathan DENNIS, Peri and Lex HAYES, Jett HAWKRIGG and Adley and Will RUTKAUSKAS. Dear sister of Olive BOND of Saint Thomas and cousin of Marilyn (Roberts) CORNFOOT and Marie (Roberts) DAVIS of North Wales. Dear aunt of Muriel (Paul) MARENTETTE, Brenda (Brendon) BRADLEY, Margaret (Wayne) BROOKE and Judy (Stewart) BARNUM and George COOK of London as well as their families. Dorothy was born in Saint Thomas on July 3rd, 1910, the eldest daughter of Harry Edward and Bertha (MUNRO) ROBERTS. She graduated from Arthur Voaden Vocational School with the Medal of Proficiency and was secretary to Doctor Voaden for several years. In 1951 she joined the staff of City Hall as secretary and cashier in the offices of City Engineer and City Treasurer until she retired in 1972, and then enjoyed traveling. She was a life member of Central United Church, and a member for 58 years of the Edna Rebekah Lodge and was also Past Noble Grand. The family will receive Friends and relatives at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas on Saturday from 2-3 p.m. followed by a private family service. Interment in Elmdale Cemetery. Remembrances may be made to the charity of choice.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-09 published
OKE, Lloyd Douglas
With tremendous courage after a very lengthy illness, Lloyd Douglas OKE at University Hospital on April 7, 2008. Lloyd was predeceased by his beloved wife and partner Nettie OKE (née MARTIN,) sister Audrey and brothers Orville and George. Lloyd was the father of Robert OKE, Michael OKE (Angie) and Kelley OKE (Mark PRITCHARD.) Proud grandfather of Daniel and Kristine. Uncle of Jack, Mickey and Marty CRUICKSHANK. Lloyd was born in Wascada, Manitoba. He grew up during the dust bowl in the height of the Depression, learning to be tough, smart and resourceful on a family farm that was literally blowing away. Lloyd left the farm and started his life in Copper Cliff where he met his partner of 53 years, Nettie. Lloyd became a loving husband, father and later grandfather. He became a very successful business owner of Oke Electronics. Lloyd was incredibly bright with many interests and talents. He could bake the most incredible pie, install a furnace or fix a car while hemming his pants and inserting a zipper. He loved golf, baseball, football and even won the Richmond Hotel football pool. He loved politics and good literature introducing his daughter to Indian Poetry and classics like Jane Eyre. Lloyd was a very special person who will be dearly missed. The family would like to express their very sincere thanks to Doctor SCHMIDT and his team. Very special thanks to the nursing staff of Family Medicine/ Palliative Care University Hospital. The loving care and support you provided Lloyd and his family will never be forgotten. A tree will be planted in Lloyd's memory and at the request of the family there will be no formal service. Please honour Lloyd instead by making a donation to Family Medicine/ Palliative Care University Hospital. Cheques should be made payable to Family Medicine/ Palliative Care and mailed to London Health Sciences Foundation, 747 Baseline Rd. E., London, Ontario, N6C 2R6

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-18 published
HELKA, Lewis Martin
At his residence on Thursday April 17, 2008. Lewis Martin HELKA of R.R.#1 Belmont in his 89th year. Beloved husband of Marjorie (HAMILTON) HELKA. Dear father of Gordon HELKA and wife Michele of R.R.#1, Belmont, Melissa HELKA of Belmont, and Melanie and husband Rodney DEBLIECK of R.R.#1 Belmont. Loved by his grandchildren Amanda, Chris, Katie, Lauren, Hayley and Seth. Brother of Stuart HELKA, Harvey HELKA and wife Helen and Kay SHYMKIW and husband Paul. Predeceased by a brother Jack HELKA and sisters Charlotte BESWARICK and Donna BOND. Brother-in-law of Olive HELKA. Born in Tillsonburg, Ontario on October 20, 1919 son of the late John Henry and Ethel (MARTIN) HELKA. Lewis farmed all his life at R.R.#1, Belmont. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Saturday 7-9 p.m. and Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Monday April 21, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Necropolis Cemetery. Rev Janelle TOWLE officiating. Donations to Saint_Joseph's Health Care, Urology Department would be appreciated. Condolences at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-21 published
LAUZON, J.N. "John"
In memory of a loving husband and father, who passed away 21st April, 2007. Interment took place in the Field of Honour, Point Claire, Quebec 4th July, 2007. Father K. MARTIN officiated. Our lives go on without you But nothing is the same We have to hide our heartaches When someone speaks your name. Sad are the hearts that love you Silent are the tears that fall Living our lives without you Is the hardest part of all. Love and missed so very much, your wife Jean, sons, Kenneth, John, Brian, Raymond, and daughter Dianne

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-22 published
MARTIN, Irvin
Peacefully, at South Huron Hospital, Exeter, on Friday, April 18, 2008, Irvin MARTIN of Zurich in his 73rd year. Beloved husband of Grace (ERB) MARTIN. Dear father of Dwayne and Claudia, D'Arcy and Sheri all of Zurich and Derrick and Jacqueline of Keswick. Loving grandfather of Noah and Cole; Laiken, Aerin and Jadon Kristine. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Albert and Luanna MARTIN, Alma MARTIN, Gladys MARTIN, Marion MARTIN, Roy and Lenore ERB, Margaret and Cleve GINGERICH, Mary Lou ERB and Pearl Ann and Mahlon MARTIN. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Menno and Lovina (STECKLE) MARTIN, one son Dennis in infancy, sisters Luella (Jan) ZANDWYK, Velina (Bill) OESCH, Emma (Enos) BEARINGER and brothers Harvey and Melvin MARTIN. Visitation in the J.M. McBeath Funeral Home, 49 Goshen St. N., Zurich on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be conducted on Friday, April 25, 2008 at 3 p.m. in the Zurich Mennonite Church. Cremation. Interment Zurich Mennonite Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made to the Zurich Mennonite Church Elevator Fund or a charity of one's choice. Condolences forwarded through www.jmmcbeathfuneralhome.com A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Irvin MARTIN.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-22 published
MILLS, Glen C.G.
Suddenly on his farm, Milglen Farms, in Blanshard Ward, as the result of a farming accident, on Sunday, April 20, 2008. Glen C.G. MILLS age 44 years beloved husband and best friend for 24 years of Linda (CURRAH) MILLS. Proud and loving father of Mandy MILLS and Rob MARTIN, Jeff MILLS, Melissa MILLS and Jamie MILLS. Cherished son of Winnie MILLS of Blanshard Ward and the late Roy MILLS (2004) and dear son-in-law of Don and Trudy CURRAH of Kirkton and Patsy CURRAH of Saint Marys. Dear brother of Joyce KIRKBY (Wayne,) John MILLS (Jacqui,) Judy NEWMAN (Dave,) Karen KNOTT (Barry,) Audrey PECKHAM (Rob.) Sadly missed by brothers-in-law, sisters-in-law and many nieces and nephews and their families. Resting at the L.A. Ball Funeral Chapel, 7 Water St. N., Saint Marys on Tuesday 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Saint Marys United Church (85 Church St. S.) on Wednesday, April 23, 2008 at 2 p.m. with Rev. Pirie MITCHELL officiating. Interment will follow in Kirkton Union Cemetery. In Glen's memory donations to Saint Marys Lion's Club, Foundation for Education Perth Huron (for South Perth Playground), Saint Marys Library (Audio Books) would be appreciated as expressions of Sympathy. Online condolences may be sent to www.ballfc.ca.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-26 published
FAUST Frank H.
Born in Newark, New Jersey, on March 14, 1911, died in Oakville, Ontario on April 24, 2008. A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, with a B.Sc. Degree in Chemistry, Frank's professional life was with his father's Company Yokum Faust Chemicals in London. After the sale of Yokum Faust Chemicals to a national firm, Frank and his family relocated to Montreal, Quebec for several years and then to Oakville, Ontario. Predeceased by his wife of nearly 60 years, Mildred C. FAUST, he is survived by his three children: Francia STEVENS (John) in Naples, Florida, Tom FAUST (Judy) in Oakville, Ontario, Mari-Ellen MARTIN (Joe) in Vancouver, British Columbia; his grandchildren: Derek JOHANNSON (Anne) in Baltimore, Maryland; Leslie SIMMONS (Scott) in Wilmington, North Carolina Stephen FAUST (Julia) in Uxbridge, Ontario; Heather FAUST- MAZUREK (Robert) in Santa Cruz, California; and Joseph, Jason and Jeremy MARTIN in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is survived by nine great-grandchildren and four step grandchildren. He is survived by his brother Tom FAUST (Julia) of Oakville, Ontario and Freeport, Bahamas and sister Erdyne KILLINGSWORTH in London, Ontario. Funeral Service will be held on Monday, April 28th, 2008 at The Oakview Funeral Home Chapel at 56 Lakeshore Road West (one block East of Kerr Street) Oakville 905-842-2252 at 10 a.m. A parishioner of Saint Michael's in London, St. Malachy's in Montreal and St. Andrew's in Oakville. Frank will be interred at Saint Peter's Cemetery in London, Ontario. In lieu of flowers, donations to The Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-01 published
CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Dorelise " Doris" (née GIGNAC)
Our dear and loving mother, Dorelise "Doris" (née GIGNAC) CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, left us on Friday, April 25, 2008, peacefully, after a brief illness at Parkwood Hospital, London. Late of Ashwood Manor in Lambeth and formerly of Glencoe, Ontario. Born August 1, 1924 and raised in Albertville, Saskatchewan. Predeceased by her husband, Joseph CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER (1999,) her parents, Donat and Marie GIGNAC (nee GOBEIL) and her brothers, Lucien and Damien. Loving mother of Raymond (Anne) CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Irene (Gerry) Noordhoek, Eleanor (Paul) RENAUD, Roland (Judy) CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Richard (Percy) CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Aline (Joseph) DE VILLER, Robert (Karen) CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER, Dianne (Ken) KETT and Maria (Darrell) MOORE. Cherished grandmother of Jamie (Claudia,) Jason (Jennifer), Scott, Chris, Andrew (Nicola), Adam, Julie (Michael), Caroline (Brendan), Rachelle (Steven), Brieanne (Dustin), Bryan (Tammy), Craig, Peter, Andrea, Crystal, Shaun, Celleste, Alvin, Dillan, Alixandria, Nathan, Joshua and Evan. Great-grandmother to Brody, Ethan, Carter, Megan, Aidan, Abby, Cohen, Erin, Aidan and Charlotte. Dear sister of Lucienne BRASSARD, Emelda CHENIER/CHENÉ, Rose BOUTIN, Mathilda DUSSAULT, Ralph (Georgette) GIGNAC, Sr. Hélène GIGNAC, Ubald (Flore) GIGNAC, Sr. Angeline GIGNAC, Raymond (Gaetane) GIGNAC, Elise (Andre) Brule and sister-in-law of Therese GIGNAC (Lucien), Aline MARTIN- LIETE (Damien). Predeceased by brothers-in-law, Cleophas BRASAARD, Albert CHENIER/CHENÉ, Philippe BOUTIN and Charles DUSSAULT. Dorelise will be sadly missed by her dear friend Ken KING and by her many cousins, nieces, nephews and in-laws to whom she was close: Mary Rose CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER of Windsor and Laurette CLOUTIER/CLOUTHIER of Dodsland, Saskatchewan and her Friends in Glencoe and at Ashwood Manor, Lambeth. Her gentle and loving spirit will be missed and remembered always. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Van Heck Funeral Home, 172 Symes Street, Glencoe on Sunday afternoon from 2-5 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated at St. Charles Church, Glencoe on Monday, April 28th at 10 a.m. Fr. Frank MURPHY officiating. Interment North American Martyrs Cemetery, Wardsville. Expressions of sympathy may be made through memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or St. Vincent de Paul Store, Glencoe.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-05 published
MARTIN, Jeanette V.
Peacefully, on May 3, 2008 at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital in her 71st year, Jeanette V. MARTIN passed on. Jeanette was cherished mother to Karen BAUMAN/BOWMAN and Rick, Donna PERRIE and husband Mike and Douglas LAMB. She was loving Nana to Scot, Trevor and Alysa. She will be greatly missed by her special friend John FARRELL and her sister Helen WELSH of Virginia, U.S.A. as well as her large family in Scotland and her many Canadian Friends and family. Visitation will be held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Tuesday, May 6 from 7-9 p.m. where a memorial service will be held on Wednesday, May 7 at 1 p.m. Cremation has taken place. Donations to the Strathroy Hospital Foundation would be appreciated. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Jeanette.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-13 published
HOUSE, Janet I.
At the Welland Hospital, on Sunday May 11, 2008, Jan HOUSE of Fonthill, in her 70th year. Beloved wife of Gord and loving mother of Wendy MARTIN of London, Lynne MARTIN of Southbourne, England and Kathy DORAY (Mike) of London. Also loved by her grandchildren Adam CARR, Shelley DUNLOP and Ryan DUNLOP and her cousin Stewart FOX (Pat) in England. At Jan's request cremation has taken place. A memorial service will be conducted at Kirk-on-the-Hill Presbyterian Church, 1344 Haist Street, Fonthill on Saturday May 17, 2008 at 12: 00 noon with Rev. Calvin LEWIS officiating. In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or to a charity of your choice. James L. Pedlar Funeral Home in charge of funeral arrangements (905-892-5762) Online condolences may be forwarded through www.pedlarfuneralhome.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-13 published
KAPOGINES, Betty Jane
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Sunday, May 11, 2008. Betty Jane KAPOGINES of Aylmer in her 69th year. Beloved wife of Michael KAPOGINES. Dear mother of Kelly GARROD and husband Mike of Aylmer, Karen HUNT and husband Keith of Aylmer and Peter KAPOGINES of Cochrane, Alberta. Loving grandmother of Ryan, Megan, Erin, Samantha and Kristen. She will be sadly missed by a sister-in-law Wanda KAPOGINES and a number of nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her mother Vera (FOOTE) CRANE and her sisters Patricia PLUG and Sandra MARTIN. Born in Saint Thomas, Ontario on March 22, 1940. She was a member of the Ladies Dart League at the Columbus Club. Betty loved the outdoors and camping with her family. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Wednesday, May 14, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment, Aylmer Cemetery. Rev. Donald GRAHAM, officiating. Donations to the Cancer Society or the Aylmer Community Foundation would be appreciated. Condolences can be expressed at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-14 published
DUNN, Jack R.
At Bluewater Rest Home, Zurich, on Monday, May 12, 2008, Jack R. DUNN formerly of R.R. 1 Bayfield passed away in his 68th year. Dear son of Bert and the late Eileen DUNN. Beloved husband of Elaine (Schade) DUNN of Bayfield. Dear father of Wayne and Angie DUNN of R.R.#1 Bayfield, Cheryl DUNN and Don BOSMAN of R.R.#1 Bayfield, Al and Paula DUNN of R.R.#2 Zurich, Gayle and Jurgen VANALTENA of R.R.#1 Bayfield, and Keven DUNN and friend Tanya POPPE of R.R.#2 Zurich. Loving papa of Lucas and Nicole DUNN, Jacquelyn and Sheridyn VANALTENA, Samantha, McKayla and Mitchell DUNN and Kyle and Jilaine DUNN. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Doug and Susan DUNN, Marg and Earl HORNER, Phyl and Doug LIGHTFOOT and Mona and Erle HAMILTON. Nephew of Jean LINDSAY, Ted and Jean DUNN, Audrey MARTIN and Phyllis KEMP. Sadly missed by many nieces and nephews. Visitation in the J.M. McBeath Funeral Home, 49 Goshen St.. N., Zurich on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the complete funeral service will be conducted on Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 11 a.m. Pastor Elly DOW officiating. Cremation to follow. Memorial contributions may be made to the Bluewater Rest Home or the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Condolence forwarded through www.jmmcbeathfuneralhome.com A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Jack DUNN

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-22 published
LONG, Margaret (née JOHNS)
Of Listowel, passed away peacefully at Listowel Memorial Hospital on Tuesday May 20, 2008. She was formerly of Atwood and was born 91 years ago in Usborne Township, a daughter of the late William and Ida (PASSMORE) JOHNS. Margaret was a member of Atwood United Church and Atwood United Church Women. Beloved wife of the late Fred LONG who predeceased her in 1979. Loving mother of Marion and Lloyd KNOBLAUCH of Listowel, Bill and Ruth of R.R.#1 Atwood, David and Frances of Atwood, Joyce McCOURT and fiance Jim SPENCE of Goderich, Murray and Elizabeth of R.R.#1 Elmwood, Don and Wanda of R.R.#2 Atwood, Susan and Bob MARTIN of R.R.#4 Listowel, Carol and Kevin GURR of London. Special grandma of 23 grandchildren and 25 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Dorothy RATCLIFFE of Saint Marys. Also remembered by brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law Jean JOHNS, Blanche JOHNS, Jim GRINNEY, Bruce and Gertie LONG and by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her grand_son Ken KNOBLAUCH, son-in-law Murray McCOURT, three brothers and three sisters. Margaret's family invites relatives and Friends to share their memories at the Brenneman Funeral Home 141 John Street, Atwood, on Thursday May 22, 2008 (today) from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held at Atwood United Church on Friday May 23 at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Michelle OWENS officiating. Interment to follow in Elma Centre Cemetery, Atwood. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations to Atwood United Church or Listowel Memorial Hospital would be appreciated by the family and can be arranged by calling the funeral home at 519-356-2382 or www.brennemanfuneralhome.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-26 published
KERR, Margaret Jean (DOBIE)
Of Saint Thomas in her 91st year at Parkwood Hospital, London on May 24th, 2008, with her family at her side. Beloved wife of 53 years of Wilbert (1999) and the most wonderful Mother to Jim (Linda) of Fonthill and Mary (Robert) MARTIN of St. George. Cherished Grandmother of Jodie (Joel) BELLEROSE; the late Amy Kerr DICKSON/DIXON (2005;) Nicole (Chip) FOSTER; Peta (Wes) SNEEK; Katie MARTIN and Jacqueline MARTIN. Very special "GGma" to Benjamin and Spencer BELLEROSE; Paige DICKSON/DIXON; Keeley and Charlie SNEEK; Lake and Finn FOSTER. Margaret is also survived by her sister Elizabeth FISHER and sisters-in-law Georgeana DOBIE; Martha TAILOR/TAYLOR; Florence KERR Alberta KERR; Stella GREENWOOD and sister and brother-in-law Ena and Charlie BROWN. Fondly and lovingly remembered by many nieces, nephews and Friends. Margaret enjoyed her 30 year teaching career and was very proud to have given hundreds of Saint Thomas children their first experience at school as their kindergarten teacher-she was a "mother to all". She was also honoured to pilot the fist Junior Kindergarten in Saint Thomas at Arthur Voaden Secondary School in the 1970's. Margaret and Wilbert appreciated their life together and enhanced the community with their involvement in Saint Thomas - the Bambi Shop, dedicated members of Knox Presbyterian Church for over 50 years, teaching, the Seniors' Centre and various volunteer organizations. The family is extremely grateful to the kindness, caring and support of Doctor Cathy FAULDS and Doctor Cathy WALSH; Lori LATKEY and the staff at Metcalfe Gardens; the Acute Care staff at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital and the amazing nurses on the Palliative wing at Parkwood. Visitation will take place on Tuesday, May 27th from 6: 30 to 8:30 p.m. and a celebration of Margaret's life will be held at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 28th. Both the visitation and service will be at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas. Remembrances may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-26 published
WALDEN, Myrtle Luella
Peacefully at Marian Villa on Saturday, May 24, 2008 in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Raymond Victor WALDEN (1993) and daughter of the late Luella Ashton STEELE. Loving mother of James WALDEN and his wife Anita of Port Severn and June and her husband Dave COLWELL of London. Proud grandmother of Mark WALDEN and his wife Samieh, Brent WALDEN and his wife Tracy, Sean WALDEN and his wife Joelle, Riisa WALDEN, Kim and her husband Rick MARTIN, David COLWELL, and Rob COLWELL and his wife Charlotte. Dear G.G. of Krista, Tara, Zachary, Lindsay, Megan, Delaney, and Makenna. Friends may call on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James St. at Richmond. The funeral service will be conducted at New Saint_James Presbyterian Church, 280 Oxford St. East at Wellington, on Wednesday, May 28 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment at a later date in Maple Leaf Cemetery, Chatham. Memorial contributions to the charity of your choice would be gratefully acknowledged.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-29 published
MIKALACHKI, Alexander (1933-2008)
Professor Emeritus, Ivey School of Business University of Western Ontario On Tuesday, May 27, 2008 after struggling valiantly with Lewy Body Dementia. Beloved husband of Dorothy (MARTIN). Loved by his daughter, Jodi, his sons, Sandy (Nicole SPRIET,) and Rob (Lisa TREMAINE,) and by his five grandchildren, Brooke, Kelsey, Kristen, Owen and Keira. Al's life revolved around his family, his vocation, and his athletic activities. He began his long association with the Ivey Business School (then known as the Western Business School) as a student in the MBA program, where he won the gold medal. He went on to earn a PhD from Western, the first person to be granted a PhD in Business from a Canadian University. As a professor in the Ivey School, he was honoured with the Edward G. Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching. He was also inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame at Concordia University, where he obtained his undergraduate degree, primarily for his achievements as a basketball player. Even approaching the later stages of his disease, he was still playing basketball regularly. Cremation has taken place. Visitation will be held on Friday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the memorial service will be conducted on Saturday, May 31st, 2008, at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Al's memory to the Richard Ivey School of Business, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-29 published
MARTIN, Greta Jean (née SIMPSON)
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Wednesday, May 28, 2008. Greta Jean MARTIN of Aylmer in her 79th year. Beloved wife of 62 years of Roy MARTIN. Dear mother of Mary HENDERSON, Jim MARTIN, Carol Ann McCALLUM, John MARTIN and Nancy BOHM and husband John all of Aylmer. Loving grandmother of Mark, Rob, Susanne, Michelle, Amber, Christopher, Clayton, Courtney, Ashley, David and Kyle. She will be sadly missed by a brother Harold SIMPSON and a sister Ruby HEWSON and a number of great-grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Born in Burford on July 30, 1929 daughter of the late Aubrey and Marguerite (WERELEY) SIMPSON. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Friday, May 30, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Aylmer Cemetery. Rev. Donald GRAHAM, officiating. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated. Personal Condolences can be made at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-09 published
McCAHILL, Neil Ross
Peacefully on Saturday, June 7, 2008 at Sprucedale Care Centre, Strathroy with his beloved granddaughter Elizabeth by his side. Neil Ross McCAHILL of Strathroy in his 99th year. Beloved husband of the late Margaret Helen (EVOY.) Loving father of Patricia Ann McCAHILL- SMITH (Dean) of Hale, Michigan and Wawa, Ontario. Cherished grandfather of Jennifer Susan HALFMAN (Brad) of Mesa, Arizona, Janet Ross KRUMMEL (Robert) of Snow Camp, North Carolina and Elizabeth Ann EAVES (Brian) of Birch Run, Michigan. Also survived by 8 great-grandchildren, his brother Donald McCAHILL (Mary) of Sarnia, his special niece Lynn MARTIN of Toronto, special nephew Neil of Sarnia and many other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his brothers George and Jack McCAHILL. Neil was born in Forest, Ontario on June 2, 1910 to Donald and Pearl McCAHILL. He was married to Margaret Helen EVOY in Quebec on December 21, 1936. He spent most of his years as a financial advisor to various companies including President of Sales for Canadian Canners (Aylmer). One of Neil's greatest joys was the winters he and Margaret spent in Jamaica Bay Park in Florida. He was a proud member of the Middlesex/London Kiwanis Club, London Lions Club and the Canadian Professional Sales Association of which he was a life member. At Neil's request cremation has taken place and a celebration of his life will take place at a later date. Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy entrusted with arrangements (519-245-1023).

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-13 published
CAMPBELL, Irene N.
With great sadness we announce the passing of Irene N. CAMPBELL on June 10, 2008 in her 66th year. Beloved wife of Carl Roderick CAMPBELL, and loving mother of Nancy (and Tom HO) of Hong Kong, Robert of London, and Catherine (and Gary JOHNSTON) of London. Daughter of the late Floyd BARKER and Mary BARKER. Survived by grandchildren Stephanie and Melanie HO and Jonathan MARTIN- CAMPBELL, and her sister Marie LOTT of London. Her family extends their heartfelt thanks to the nursing staff and support workers of 4th floor University Hospital and 5th floor Marion Villa. Visitation will be held at the Salvation Army Hillcrest Community Church, 310 Vesta Road, London (corner of Huron and Vesta, west of Highbury) on Friday, June 13, 2008 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held at the church on Saturday, June 14, 2008 at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. Donations will be accepted to the Arthritis Society of Canada or the charity of your choice.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-14 published
Two men gunned down in central Toronto
The 25-year-old victims, Dylan ELLIS and Oliver MARTIN, were not known to police
By The Canadian Press, Sat., June 14, 2008
Toronto -- Police are investigating a "cowardly act" after two 25-year-old men who never had a run-in with the law were gunned down in a central Toronto neighbourhood.
Dylan ELLIS and Oliver MARTIN were shot and killed as they sat in their high-end Range Rover sport utility vehicle around midnight Thursday after watching a basketball game with Friends.
Police said another person in the back of the sport utility vehicle was unharmed in the shooting. Paramedics fought to save the two men, but they were pronounced dead when they arrived at hospital.
The incident appears to have been totally unprovoked, police said.
"These two victims were not at all known, and I repeat not at all known, to the Toronto police or any police agency in Canada," Det.-Sgt. Gary GIROUX said at a news conference yesterday morning.
Because the victims were driving a high-end sport utility vehicle, police are exploring the possibility the incident was an attempted carjacking, GIROUX said.
Both victims were still wearing their seatbelts when emergency crews arrived at the scene in what's described as a quiet neighbourhood.
"I can imagine that the community in this particular area, as the police are, should be outraged by the cowardly act that's taken place," GIROUX said.
MARTIN worked in Toronto's financial district, while ELLIS was a photographer, GIROUX said. The homicides are the city's 24th and 25th murders this year -- 13 of which were gun-related.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-16 published
MARTIN, David George
Peacefully, on Saturday June 14th, 2008 at the Georgetown Hospital. Dave, 62 years of age, beloved husband of Barbara (née PINK) for the past 39 years. Loving father of Paul and his wife Jeannette, Jeff and Darren and his wife Allison. Cherished grandfather of Cassidy and Xavier. Dear brother of Jim, Brian and Karen DICKINS. Dave was an active participant with the Georgetown Minor Hockey Association and the Halton Hills Sport Museum. Dave was employed in the Forestry Industry for the past 40 years. Friends will be received at the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Rd., north of Maple Ave., Georgetown 905-877-3631 on Wednesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral and Committal Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday June 19th, 2008 at 3: 00 p.m. Reception to follow in the Trafalgar Room. Cremation. In memory contributions to the Cancer Assistance Services of Halton Hills, Halton Hills Sports Museum or the Diabetes Association would be appreciated. To send expressions of sympathy visit www.jsjonesandsonfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-25 published
MARTIN, Joseph " Joe" (March 19, 1933-June 25, 2007)
God saw you getting tired, A cure was not to be, So He put His arms around you, And whispered "Come to Me." With tearful eyes we watched you, And saw you pass away, Although we loved you dearly, We could not make you stay. A golden heart stopped beating, Hard working hands at rest, God broke our hearts to prove to us, He only takes the best. In loving memory of a wonderful Dad and Grandpa. Dearly missed by John and Karen, grandchildren Christopher, Jonathan, Connor and Matthew. Until we Meet Again

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-25 published
MARTIN, Joseph (March 19, 1933-June 25, 2007)
It broke our hearts to lose you But you did not go alone For part of us went with you The day God called you home Dearly missed by your loving wife Helga, son Robert (Monica), daughter Sue (Barry) and grandchildren Alecia (Jeremy), Jessica, Jordan

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-02 published
KOCH, Marian " Mike"
At University Hospital on Monday, June 30, 2008, Marian "Mike" KOCH in his 85th year passed away peacefully. Beloved husband of 48 years to Sarah "Sadie". Survived by his brother Stefan KOCH and sister Krystyna DOJLIDO of Poland. Dear father of Ann and Ralph WARDROP, Barbara KOCH, Adriene BATE, Ted KOCH, Pat and Jeff GALLAGHER, Michelle and Jim MARTIN. Predeceased by sons Leslie KOCH and Douglas REID. Lovingly remembered by 16 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. Family and Friends will be received at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell) on Wednesday, July 2nd from 7 to 9 p.m. Funeral service on Thursday, July 3rd at 4 p.m. in the chapel. Cremation to follow. Memorial donations to Alzheimer's Society or Parkinson's Disease would be greatly appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-06 published
MARTIN, James Gordon
Suddenly at Wingham Hospital on Friday July 4, 2008. James Gordon MARTIN of Port Albert in his 57th year. Lovingly remembered by wife Dorothy BRINDLEY, mother Mona MARTIN and predeceased by father Gordon MARTIN. Beloved father of Patty (Paul) COOKE, Cindy (J.P.) AUSTIN, Stephen (Gail) BRINDLEY. Grandfather of Lucas and Kelly COOKE, Megan, Chad and Mallory AUSTIN. Dear brother of Anna Mae (Larry) FISHER, brother Paul (Pamela) MARTIN. Also fondly remembered by uncle Earl MARTIN and aunts Dawn MARTIN, Sara GRIGG and several nieces, nephews, cousins and their families. Friends will be received at McCallum and Palla Funeral Home, Cambria Rd. at East St. Goderich on Monday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Funeral Home on Tuesday July 8, 2008 at 11 a.m. Interment Dungannon Cemetery. Memorial donations to Nile United Church or the charity of your choice gratefully acknowledged. Friends may sign the book of condolences at www.mccallumpalla.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-08 published
WATSON, Catherine " Kitty" Alice (née MARTIN)
Peacefully at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on July 6, 2008, Catherine (Kitty) Alice (née MARTIN) WATSON of R.R.#3 Thedford passed away in her 66th year. Beloved wife of David WATSON. Loving mother of John and Jane SWANSON of London, and Trudy McPHEE and Steve BINKLEY of R.R.#3 Thedford. Cherished grandmother of Stevie, Kellie and James. Much loved sister to Norman MARTIN. Sadly missed sister-in-law of Robert and Eleanor WATSON, Crystal THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Carol and Terry MARTIN, and Annetta WATSON. Predeceased by brother Jim MARTIN, brothers-in-law Clint WATSON and Jack THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, and sister-in-law Ora MARTIN. Resting at the Gilpin Chapel, 97 Victoria Street, Thedford for public visitation on Wednesday, July 9, 2008 from noon-2 p.m. A private family service will follow with interment at Pinehill Cemetery with Rev. Doug WRIGHT officiating. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society gratefully acknowledged. Online condolences at www.gilpinfuneralchapel.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-16 published
SWIFT, Clifford Edward
At London Health Sciences Centre - University Hospital on Monday, July 14, 2008 Clifford Edward SWIFT formerly of Lambeth in his 92nd year. Beloved husband of the late Dorothy (MacFIE) SWIFT. Loving father of Diana JOHNSTON and her husband Bill of Grand Bend and Douglas SWIFT and his wife Helen of Komoka. Survived by his grandchildren Alicia and her husband Michael, Katie, Clifford and Rachel. Special thanks to the 2nd floor staff at Extendicare London Limited and especially his buddy, Roland MARTIN. (Funeral arrangements have been entrusted to A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London, (519) 433-5184). Online condolences accepted at www.amgfh.com.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-22 published
BRYANT, Thomas Walter
Picton, Ontario, Friday, July 11th, 2008, age 86. Beloved husband of Dona and the late Ada and Edith. Loved father of Karen (Siebert) GRAAT, Gladstone, Virginia (Garry) MARTIN, Picton, Joanne (Alan) HANNA, Bloomfield. Dear brother of Mick (Fred) EGGETT, Ileen (Don) ROSSO, all of London. Proud grandfather of Sharon, Bryan, Jackie, Ashley, Amy, Paul and Emily.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-01-09 published
GOSS, Albert John Thomas
Peacefully following a long battle with lung disease on Wednesday January 2, 2008 at the General and Marine Hospital, Collingwood in his 72nd year. Tom of Wasaga Beach, formerly of Georgetown, beloved husband of Bev for over 50 years. Loving father of Phillip and his wife Janet, Karen and her husband Fred McDONALD, Linda GOSS and her husband André FONTAINE and Lorraine GOSS and her boyfriend Ryan CARNEY. Dear Gramps of Freddy, Stanley, Patrick, Matthew and Julie. Dear son of Doris and the late Bert GOSS. Brother of Doug and his partner Doreen WILSON, Larry and his wife Sylvia KING, Carol and her late husband John MARTIN and Janice GOSS and her partner John DENOTTBECK. Tom will be missed by Bev's siblings Fran O'DONOHOE, Paul, David, Peter and Stephen ENGLAND and their families, by Bev's Aunt and Uncle Betty and Nelson READER and their family and by his nieces, nephews and many good Friends. Tom was retired from Air Canada and was an active member of the Wasaga Beach Men's Probus and Woodworker's Club. Friends were received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home, 509 River Road West, Wasaga Beach (E. Of Zoo Park) (705-429-8766) from 7-9 p.m. on Friday. Funeral Service was held in the Chapel on Saturday January 5, 2008 at 11 o'clock. Spring Interment Stayner Union Cemetery. Remembrances to The Lung Association would be appreciated by the family. For more information or to sign the online guest book, log on to www.carruthersdavidson.com.
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MARTIN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-01-16 published
MARTIN, Velma Elda (née FISHER)
Went home to be with her Lord on January 11, 2008 in Red Deer General Hospital, Alberta at the age of 82. Velma was born on her father's farm in Sunnidale Township, Ontario on Saturday July 11, 1925. She was the youngest of 7 children born to William and Eliza FISHER. She attended the 12th Line school and graduated in 1943 from Marvel School of Hair Design in Toronto. She married Harry MARTIN on February 22, 1947 and they were blessed with 4 children and almost 50 years of Marriage. They built their home in Wasaga Beach in 1950 where Mom established Martin's Hairstyling and Dad, Martin's Camping which they operated until 1975. She accepted Christ as her Saviour in 1964. Her Bible was her constant companion (even taking it to the Beach) and her passion was sharing her faith and praying for others. She leaves to rejoice in a life rich in faith, Sharon (Gordon) QUANTZ of Didsbury, Alberta, Jim (Basia) MARTIN of Okotoks, Alberta, Sheilah (Don) LINDOFF, Red Deer, Alberta, and Rebecca (Ron) Wasaga Beach, Ontario, she will be greatly missed by her grandchildren: Sharla (Jason) HUBBARD, Trevor (Julie) QUANTZ, Roger (Teresa) QUANTZ, Liza (Jared) STIMSON, Scott (Gina) MARTIN, Joseph (Jacquelin) MARTIN, Jordon, Breton and Courtney LINDOFF, Joshua (Carrie) BELL, Matthew (Amanda) BELL, Sherah (Alex) PERRY, Shiloh and Josiah BELL, and 11 great-grandchildren, Brooklyn, Ainsley and Eden HUBBARD, Isaiah and Emma QUANTZ, Clay, Cole and Blake MARTIN, Gabriel, Jacob and Jericho MARTIN. Memorial Service to be held on Thurs. January 17, 2008 at the Living Stones Church in Red Deer, Alberta, 2020-40th Ave, at 2 p.m. Visitation will be held at Watts Funeral Home, River Road E. in Wasaga Beach, Ontario (705) 429-1040 on Saturday, January 19, 2008, 2-4 and 7-9 with the Funeral being held Sunday January 20th, 2008 at 3 p.m. at Faith Evangelical Missionary Church, at 1355 River Rd, West, Wasaga Beach, Ontario. Memorial Donations to Africa Church Planting - Jim and John Stanley or Mission of Mercy Calcutta India, through Faith Church, 1-705-429-2059.
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MARTIN o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-04-30 published
HODKINSON, Coral
Passed away peacefully following a lengthy illness on Saturday April 26, 2008 at her home with her family at her side in her 75th year. Coral of Wasaga Beach, formerly of Bramalea, beloved wife of Peter for over 51 years. Cherished mother of Jill and her husband Gary GABRIELS of Stayner. Dear grandma of Christopher and Meghan. Survived by her sister Diana MARTIN of England. Friends will be received at the Carruthers and Davidson Funeral Home -Wasaga Beach Chapel, 509 River Road West, (East of Zoo Park Rd) Wasaga Beach, (705-429-8766) Friday May 2, 2008 from 6 to 8 p.m. Remembrances to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by Coral's family. For further information and to sign the online guest book, log on to: www.carruthersdavidson.com
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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-04 published
MARTIN, Alloys Christina Mary Morgan "Billy" (née STEELE)
90, died at her home in Gloucester, Massachusetts on Saturday, December 29, 2007 with her family by her side. She was born January 1, 1917 in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, the daughter of Ira J. and Lillian K. (FOWLER) STEELE.
She grew up on her family's cattle ranch in Lloydminster, Saskatchewan, driving teams of work horses and riding a pony to a one-room school. She loved horses and her deep bond with them and many other animals was a source of comfort and delight throughout her life. She received a Bachelor of Arts in teaching from Victoria College, University of Toronto. During World War 2, she worked for the Canadian Navy in vision research. She continued her education at Harvard University where she received a Ph.D. in physiology in 1952 and pursued research in endocrinology. While her children were growing up, she devoted herself to their well-being, and encouraged them in their dreams. She became a skilled silversmith, studying for many years at the DeCordova Museum School. Her designs were original and beautifully executed, gifts that delighted their recipients. Her reading spanned a universe of interests, and her creative talents were also expressed in knitting, in gardening and in dancing. She worked hard and believed strongly in sharing whatever she had with those less fortunate. She was interested in and supported many efforts to achieve justice for both people and animals and to preserve the wild places of the Earth.
On June 20, 1952 she married Christopher MARTIN who survives. She leaves four children, daughters Kathleen MARTIN and partner Karol Bruce PAPIERNIK of Saxtons River, Vermont, and Janet MARTIN and husband Joerg MAYER of Southbridge, Massachussetts, sons Christopher and fiancee Marcia WEBSTER of Shelburne Falls, Massachussetts, and Malcolm and wife Celeste of Weehawken, New Jersey, also two beloved grandchildren, Lillian and Jasper of Weehawken, New Jersey, two nephews, Stephen SACKSTON of Caledon East, Ontario, and James SACKSTON and wife Lois of Fenelon Falls, Ontario, two grandnieces and their children, and many Friends made over her lifetime.
She was predeceased by four brothers, Ira, Kenneth, Jack and Bill and one sister, Lois Katherine SACKSTON.
Burial was in the family plot in Saxtons River Cemetery. A memorial gathering will be held in the spring. Fenton and Hennessey Funeral Home, Bellows Falls, Vermont is handling the arrangements. Mrs. MARTIN loved flowers and while she would have appreciated them, the family asks that the resources be devoted in her memory to a charity of one's choice.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-09 published
He was 'the last of a generation of real publishers' in Canada
A wordsmith who learned the book business in New York, he moved to Toronto in search of independence, writes Sandra MARTIN. 'He wanted to make a difference, and he thought he could do it with information'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
An entrepreneur, a wordsmith and a fiercely independent businessman with a canny eye for real estate, Robert FITZHENRY moved to Canada from the New York publishing world in 1966 and established Fitzhenry and Whiteside. In the 1970s and 1980s, Fitz and Witz was a prominent player in the Canadian book scene, doing about $20-million in annual business, mainly by representing Harper and Row and other major U.S. publishers.
Initially, Mr. FITZHENRY was a distributor who claimed he had no interest in publishing books (known to be one of the more spectacular ways of going broke, especially in the days before wide-scale federal and provincial subsidies). Then, almost without trying, he won a couple of huge contracts to produce elementary-school, social-study materials from the province of British Columbia in the late 1960s. "He wanted to make a difference," said his daughter Sharon FITZHENRY, now president of the company, "and he thought he could do it with information."
So, he began publishing an eclectic list of non-fiction titles, mostly reference works that reflected his own fascination with words and language. F&W's first trade title, which appeared in centennial year, was Public Opinion and Canadian Identity, a statistical analysis of Canadians and their perceptions of Canada. He later published a significant series of reference books, including developing and producing several editions of the Funk and Wagnalls Canadian College Dictionary, the F&W Book of Quotations, The Canadian Thesaurus and Canadian Facts and Dates.
"Sponsoring studies on Canadian English as Bob has done for so many years is a relatively self-effacing activity with modest dividends for a publisher," J.K. (Jack) CHAMBERS, professor of linguistics at the University of Toronto, wrote in the preface to the 2001 edition of the thesaurus. "Neither his profile nor his profit margin makes Bob do it. It goes deeper than that. Bob FITZHENRY is word-struck, and always has been. His feelings are word-shaped. He published these books because he wants to read them. Those of us who are also word-struck are in his debt."
Describing Mr. FITZHENRY as "a decent guy," and "a smart businessman," bookseller Frans DONKER of the Book City chain in Toronto said of his former employer: "He was a quiet guy, definitely not a Jack McClelland, but he had influence. I think a lot of people in this industry owe him a big favour for letting them [as young kids] run divisions or offices in other parts of the country," said Mr. DONKER, himself the beneficiary of Mr. FITZHENRY's laissez-faire management style.
As a publisher, Mr. FITZHENRY "saw opportunities and went after them," said Marty CUTLER, now owner of Fairmount Books, a Markham, Ontario, wholesale and remainder operation, who worked as a sales rep for Fitzhenry and Whiteside more than 30 years ago. "He was generous, supportive, encouraging and fascinating. Here was an incredibly well-read, self-educated man, so it was very interesting to have such a smart guy, and such an interesting guy, mentor me. He was the last of a generation of real publishers and we are very lucky to have had him."
Early Years
Robert (Bob) Irvine FITZHENRY, the only son of Irvine and Margaret (LANE) FITZHENRY, was born in New York in the last year of the First World War. His sister, Ann, was born two years later. Irvine FITZHENRY, who was a travelling clock and watch salesman and repairman, had undiagnosed Huntington's disease (a genetic neurological disorder that affects movement, emotions and mental abilities) and was often mistakenly assumed to be a hopeless drunk. His daughter inherited Huntington's and died in 1961, but his son was spared.
During the Depression, and the most debilitating stages of her husband's illness, Margaret FITZHENRY supported her family by opening a pricey restaurant, Margaret Ann's Tearoom, in New Rochelle, New York Bob was the busboy.
After completing high school in New Rochelle, Mr. FITZHENRY enrolled in the University of Michigan, where he worked on the university paper, The Michigan Daily, and earned money in the summers in Florida as a tutor. He graduated in 1938 with a bachelor's degree in English and became a stringer for United Press International, working out of Columbus, Ohio. He quickly rose to chief of that United Press International branch, but quit after he was forced to witness an execution at the Ohio State Penitentiary.
He was drafted into the U.S. Army and was sent to boot camp at Fort Dix, N.J. After training, he was posted to Newport, R.I., then the enclave of many of America's richest families, serving as a sergeant on a searchlight crew watching the seas and the sky for enemy submarines and aircraft. After Pearl Harbour, he transferred to the U.S. Army Air Forces, trained in Texas as a bomber pilot and was promoted to lieutenant. The Second World War ended before he could be sent overseas.
After he was demobilized, he went to work for Harper and Brothers as a junior salesman in the southeastern United States, travelling by train and later in a car, which he named Hesperus, with trunks of books. In 1949, Mr. FITZHENRY was promoted and transferred to Chicago by his mentor, Cass Canfield (the editor and executive who brought James Thurber and E.B. White to Harper's, and one of the founders of the journal Foreign Affairs). That same year, on January 22, Mr. FITZHENRY married Hilda ANDERSON, who was what would now be called an executive assistant to a financial estate manager on Wall Street. Eventually they had three children: Sharon, Bridget (who died from a heart attack in 1987) and Hollister (Holly.) Mrs. FITZHENRY died on February 8, 2007, at the age of 91.
Mr. FITZHENRY rose to the position of vice-president of sales for Harper and Row (the company that was formed in 1962 after the merger of Harper and Brothers and Row, Peterson and Co.), but after nearly 20 years with Harper, he "was tired of working for somebody else," Sharon FITZHENRY said. He toyed with the idea of moving to Australia or buying a little newspaper in Rhode Island, but eventually settled on Canada.
A consummate animal lover, Mr. FITZHENRY wanted to bring the family pets, which included the requisite cats and dogs, a pony and a burro named Mahalia along with his household goods. Apparently, he was stopped by Canada Customs and Immigration and sent a message back to his wife in New York saying, "I can't get my ass across the border."
Fitzhenry and Whiteside
He set up Fitzhenry and Whiteside with Cecil WHITESIDE (vice-president, sales for the Musson Book Co.) in Scarborough, now part of greater Toronto. The two men knew each other because Mr. WHITESIDE had been buying Harper books from Mr. FITZHENRY for years. In the new company, which was founded on April Fool's Day, 1966, Mr. FITZHENRY managed the sales, marketing and finance (that included representing the huge Harper and Row account in Canada) while Mr. WHITESIDE was in charge of servicing orders.
From 1970 to 1974, Peter CRABTREE, now president of Crabtree Publishing, helped build a school textbook division for Fitzhenry and Whiteside. " This was new territory for 'Fitz,' Mr. CRABTREE said in an e-mail message, "because his company was centred around selling to bookstores and libraries." Nevertheless, "he threw himself into the challenge with vigour, enthusiasm, and humour" and "we spent many happy hours recalling our misadventures with departments of education across Canada, as we competed with Canada's publishing community for school adoptions."
Mr. DONKER began working for Mr. FITZHENRY as a sales rep in eastern Canada in 1971. Two years later, Mr. FITZHENRY "threw him the ball to set up a remainder division" called Beaver Books. Mr. DONKER, who was in his mid-20s and had only been in Canada (from his native Holland) for four years, is still grateful for the opportunity. "Fitz did that to many a young snip-snapper," said Mr. DONKER, "and he would seldom interfere." Every two weeks or so, they would discuss sales and "progress" but essentially Mr. DONKER was on his own "to run the division and make mistakes and learn on the job" - work experience that Mr. DONKER took with him when he founded Book City in 1976.
"You could call him eccentric," said Mr. DONKER, remembering that Mr. FITZHENRY still sent handwritten letters to authors and booksellers in the 1970s and that he once published a book on the history of the Holstein cow. The title caused great hilarity in the trade, according to Mr. DONKER, but it ended up selling more than 10,000 copies.
Sharon FITZHENRY, who was a children's librarian in Indiana, came to Toronto to work with her father in 1971, about the time her marriage broke up. She described her father as "a damn tough boss," who was "always in charge." Before starting work at F&W, Ms. FITZHENRY, who had been a heavy smoker, had been nicotine-free for two years - "Within two months I was smoking again," she said. But that was fine with her because, as she admitted, "I'm nuts about the man."
In the mid-1990s, she succeeded him as president of F&W and has since expanded the publishing program, especially in the area of children's books, with the acquisition of Stoddard Kids in 2002 and Red Deer Press in 2005.
Mr. FITZHENRY had a sharp eye for the bottom line and he tended to consider authors and freelance editors mere suppliers instead of delicate artistes in need of financial and editorial nurturing. He was also stubborn. After signing a contract with John Robert Colombo in 1973 to produce Colombo's Canadian Quotations and receiving two-thirds of the manuscript, Mr. FITZHENRY decided the book would sell better with a new title: The Fitzhenry and Whiteside Book of Canadian Quotations. An "aghast" Mr. Colombo demurred at a very chilly lunch, but Mr. FITZHENRY, who appeared to have a momentary hearing loss, was intransigent. Mr. Colombo took his book away and saw it published with great success in 1974 by Hurtig Publishers in Edmonton.
In the late 1980s, mergers and acquisitions were rocking the publishing industry. About the time that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. acquired Harper and Row in the U.S. in 1987 and William Collins and Sons in 1990 to form HarperCollins, there was a move to establish a Canadian company called Harper, Fitzhenry and Collins. The plan was to run it out of F&W's 7,000-square-metre warehouse and office facility in Markham, which had turned into an astute real-estate purchase on Mr. FITZHENRY's part. The new company would amalgamate the Canadian agency business of both Harper and Collins and establish a Canadian-owned publishing arm called Fitzhenry that would be eligible for government book-publishing programs. The problem, according to an industry expert, was that Mr. FITZHENRY wanted to run the whole show and wasn't willing to answer to either an American or a British superior. Giving up his independence after 20 years of being his own boss was a cost he wasn't willing to consider, no matter the compensations. Consequently, the deal fell through, HarperCollins was formed in Canada and Mr. FITZHENRY lost the lucrative Harper and Row agency business that had been a very significant part of his bottom line for more than 20 years.
Final Days
Mr. FITZHENRY had a stroke in 1995 that left him paralyzed on his right side and suffering from aphasia. Showing enormous grit, he relearned some communication skills. Mr. Cutler remembers visiting him with Mr. DONKER. "We had to initiate the conversation and keep it going, but he could still listen and communicate with his eyes," Mr. Cutler said with admiration.
Another stroke, five years later, left Mr. FITZHENRY unable to swallow and drastically diminished his ability to communicate. After 2000, he was bedridden and nurtured by a feeding tube. With enormous help from his family, he was able to live in his own home, where he eventually died in his sleep.
Robert Irvine FITZHENRY was born in New York on April 10, 1918. He died in Toronto last Thursday. He was 89 and had suffered two severe strokes. Predeceased by his wife, Hilda, and his daughter Bridget, he is survived by daughters Sharon and Hollister, three grandchildren and extended family. A private family funeral will be followed by a memorial service at a later date.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-11 published
WRIGHT, Alexander Gordon (1911-2007)
Canadian educator, athlete, government administrator, naval officer, camper, author and leader of youth, died in Beeton at age 96 on Thursday, November 15, with his wife and two sons by his side. He had just been read the newspaper report that his passionate cause of protecting the Sir Frederick Banting Homestead was achieved by local legislation passed 3 nights before. He leaves his beloved wife of 68 years, Ruth, and two sons, Alec and John, and four grandchildren, Grace, Adam, Wesley and Jonathan, and three great-grandchildren, Brianna, A.J. and Evan, and 6 nieces, Eleanor, Anne, Barbara, Victoria, Lois, Joan, and four nephews, Ken, Bill, James and Gordon. He was pre-deceased by daughter Carol Anne, sister Laurabelle and brother Frank. Dean of the clan and witty host of annual reunions, Gord will be sorely missed. His university yearbook states his football name as 'Flash Gordon' and his academic motto: 'Facta non verba'. Both proved true for the next 70 years. There will a celebration Memorial on Saturday, January 19, 2008, at his branch, Alliston Legion, 111 Dufferin Street South, from 2: 00 p.m. to 4:00 p.m. All are invited to attend. Eldest of three children of Annie and James, this farm boy from Kippen, Ontario, was a track and field star athlete who was the first Canadian to use the Western Roll. Doing post-graduate research he won the rare University of Toronto 'Bronze T' for being a member of 3 championship teams in different sports: football, gymnastics and wrestling. He was Canadian Champion in Wrestling and did a double major (Chemistry and Physics) during the Depression, working his way through school. Doing post-grad research he admired the work of Banting, discoverer of insulin. In Schumacher High School, teacher Gord started coaching sports and pioneered community evening classes in high schools in Ontario. Gord married the professor's daughter, Ruth BAKER of Guelph. They later raised their 3 children in Lorne Park on a large property with many gardens and travelled and camped. Decorated as a World War 2 convoy Encryption Officer in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve, Gord also taught unarmed combat to troops going to the front and developed a program for literacy of enlisted men. After World War 2, Gord served with the Dept. of Veterans Affairs, demobilising troops and re-training them for jobs in a changed society. From 1947-62 he was Director of Physical and Health Education for Ontario where he pioneered leadership education camps for youth: Ontario Athletic Leadership Camp at Couchiching for athletes and Ontario Camp Leadership Centre at Bark Lake for campers. He co-founded Ontario Federation of Secondary School Athletics and was President of Can. Association of Health, Physical Education and Recreation. Then he became Canada's first Director of Fitness and Amateur Sport in Ottawa. Under a new Minister Gord resigned and returned to teaching high school: Vice-Principal at Banting Memorial High School in Alliston, birthplace of his old hero, Sir Frederick Banting. Gord moved the family there in 1963 and he and Ruth became major contributors to the area. He became a popular Principal, retiring in 1974 with many Ontario Scholars and champion athletes as his legacy. Using his international contacts, Gord had stick-handled businesses and politicians into creating the nationally respected outdoor multi-sport fields and amphitheatre beside the high school. It was later dedicated as the G.A. Wright Playing Fields. Gord co-founded the Alliston Potato Festival and the Sir Frederick Banting Educational Committee. The thrust of the latter was to establish a forum for educating the public and diabetics about the disease and its management, and to establish a camp for juvenile diabetics for them to learn and help one another. Gord won many local and international awards, the latest being Ontario's Senior Achievement, 2006, and Museum on the Boyne's Wall of Fame, 2006. Previously he won Queen's Jubilee Medal, Rotary's Paul Harris Fellow, Lion's Citizen of the Year, South Simcoe Achievement and many others. He has been a popular writer of local articles and a regular supporter of the University of Guelph, where he and Ruth contributed the Baker-Wright Walkway through the research Arboretum. Secretary of Class of Ontario Agricultural College '33, which set a record of meeting annually for 70 years and set a precedent with the Year '33 Bursary to worthy students, many of whom gratefully continued their studies and went on to major contributions to agriculture and science. Gord and class-mate, Doctor Bert 'Honey' MARTIN, led their class into researching and sponsoring several well-received books on leading professors at Ontario Agricultural College/University of Guelph. Ruth and Gord hosted many Guelph reunions at their winter home in Venice, Florida and many more at their Mansfield chalet. Gord at age 90 wrote Leadership - Beyond the Playing Field with journalist, Katherine MOOIJ of Beeton, a critically acclaimed guide to teaching youth to be leaders via athletics. Published by YorkWright Planning Associates Ltd., it is also available through Can. Association of Health, Physical Education and Recreation, the non-profit professional body. You are invited to view and add notes to Gord's new blog site: www.freewebs.com/gawright/. Thoughout his long and productive life, Gord led and served others, encouraging them to innovate and strive to be the very best they could. He and Ruth loved to listen to the successes of others, so many of whom they had helped. A model of service and humility to family and Friends alike, he leaves big shoes to fill. With a twinkle in his eye and a quip on his lip, Gord was always a typification of Olympian sculptor Tait McKenzie's 'Joy of Effort'. To continue the dream of helping others, donations in Gord's honour are encouraged to the Sir Frederick Banting Legacy Foundation, 2 John Avenue, Alliston, Ontario, L9R 1J8. Email foundation@banting.ca or view www.discoveryofinsulin.com. Thanks, Gord - you taught us much and gave us the spirit to try.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-12 published
MARTIN, R.J. "Jack"
At his home on Thursday, January 10, 2008, beloved husband of the late Ismay MARTIN, in his 94th year. Predeceased by his sister Isobel SWAN, and niece Barbara MARTIN and survived by his brothers Harold and George, niece Jane MARTIN, and nephews; Paul and David MARTIN, and James and George SWAN. Great uncle to Kathryn, Jennifer and Erica SWAN and Catherine and Elizabeth STRATTON. Jack was a teacher with the Hamilton Wentworth District School Board for over 40 years. Friends will be received by the family on Saturday morning from 10 until the time of Jack's Service at 11 o'clock at the Cattel, Eaton and Chambers Funeral Home, 53 Main Street, Dundas, with a reception to follow next door at the Cattel Centre. Interment in Palmerston Cemetery. Expressions of sympathy to the Robert and Bella Martin Scholarship Fund, c/o Commemorative Giving Office, 3rd Floor, Old Medical Building, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6 would be appreciated by the family. Special thanks to his caregivers; Rey GARCENA, Niza, Jo, and his nephew, Doctor James SWAN, for all of their care and compassion. www.catteleatonandchambers.ca

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-12 published
He was the 'king of real estate' who kick-started Toronto film festival
After retiring 'at the top of his game,' he made a trip to France and happened on Cannes and its film fête. Thus inspired, he returned home to help launch one of his own
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
A lawyer who made serious money in real-estate deals in the 1950s and 1960s, Dusty COHL was seduced by the movie business and spent the last 40 years schmoozing backers, stars and directors. Tall and lanky, with a grizzled beard and an ear-to-ear grin, and wearing his trademark black cowboy hat festooned with shiny pins and badges and outré T-shirt, he appeared to be the epitome of louche.
In fact, the film producer and co-founder of the Toronto International Film Festival was a family man who remained married for more than 50 years to the girl he met in high school. He was also a genial and supportive father figure to many fledgling producers, directors and programmers in the Canadian film business.
"He was unconventional in his ideas and his dress, but he wasn't unconventional in his living habits and his loyalties," said film and television producer Ted KOTCHEFF. "He was the very heart and soul of the Canadian film industry and the most lovable man that I have ever met, hands down," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who had known Mr. COHL "longer than anybody," dating back to summer camp in the mid-1940s.
"Dusty broke the mould of the bland, boring, polite Canadian, which was very important in the early days [of the Toronto film festival]," said public-relations consultant Helga STEPHENSON, who began working for Toronto International Film Festival in 1978 and was executive director from the mid-1980s until the early 1990s.
"With his huge sense of fun and flair, he helped a lot in getting critics and filmmakers here," she said. "Once they got here, they discovered it was a superb film festival, with an incredible audience, and that Toronto was a great place to be. But getting them here was the trick - and then he would entertain them once they were here."
Murray (Dusty) COHL was born on Euclid Street in Toronto in the same year as the stock-market crash on Wall Street. His father, Karl, was a Communist who worked as a house painter, a union organizer and, ultimately, as an insurance agent, while his mother, Lillian, sold bed linens at Eaton's, according to Brian D. Johnson in Brave Films, Wild Nights: 25 years of Festival Fever.
An only child, he attended Charles G. Fraser elementary school and Camp Naivelt (New World), a Bolshevik Jewish summer camp west of Toronto, from the age of 5. It was at camp that he shed his hated first name and acquired the nickname Dusty. Another camper, Harris Black, was called Blacky, and the kids decided that Murray COHL should be Dusty, as in coal dust.
"He was my camp counsellor," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who attended Camp Naivelt from 1943 through 1945. "He was my boyhood hero." What Mr. KOTCHEFF loved about Dusty were the same qualities that have always captured people's affections: "He was so full of good humour and intelligence, and he was a born non-conformist. Even back then, he was unconventional in his dress, which appeals to young people." Dusty let his T-shirt hang outside his shorts while the other counsellors were all tucked in.
"He had his own style," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who also has a much darker memory from those days: seeing his hero "ejected" from camp in the summer of 1945 after a "kangaroo court" found him guilty of being an "anarchist Trotskyite" - at 16. "He always saw that as a very amusing incident in his life, but that was Dusty. He was dedicated to following his own vision of things. He was an original."
After public school, he went to Harbord Collegiate from 1941 to 1947. That's where he met Joan CAIRN, although she says she knew of him from Camp Naivelt. When he asked her to dance, she felt very comfortable in his arms, and thought he might be "the one." After high school, he went to the University of Toronto, earning a bachelor of arts degree in 1950. On December 23, 1951, he and Joan married (they just celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary) and eventually had three children, Robert, Karen and Steven.
After the U of T, he entered Osgoode Hall Law School, coming first in his class one year and graduating with a law degree in 1954. For most of the next 20 years, Mr. COHL worked as a zoning and real-estate lawyer, putting together land parcels and property developments in Toronto and Florida. He was "tremendously successful," according to his close friend, film producer Barry Avrich, but retired from the business "at the top of his game" when people starting referring to him as "the king of real estate."
In 1964, he and his wife were holidaying in the south of France and she suggested they visit Cannes. By chance, they found a parking place in front of the Carlton Hotel, ordered a drink on the terrace and "saw and felt the pulse of the action" of the annual film festival, which happened to be on at the same time. "I was like a kid falling into Disneyland," he said later. It was another four years before they returned to Cannes, but, from then on, they were regulars at its film festival.
In 1973, he met William (Bill) MARSHALL, a filmmaker and communications whiz who had helped propel David Crombie into the Toronto mayor's office in 1972 and was then working as his executive assistant. Both Mr. MARSHALL and Mr. COHL have claimed credit for the idea of launching a film festival in Toronto; what is certainly true is that they both embraced the concept as enthusiastically as seals sliding down water slides.
After visiting film festivals in Berlin and Atlanta, the two men went to Cannes, where they rented a suite at the Carlton, ensconced themselves in the bar on the terrace and started schmoozing. "Dusty was the only person I knew in Canada who had actually been to Cannes in those days," Mr. MARSHALL recollected in a telephone interview.
"There were only about six of us making movies," he said. "We wanted a film festival [in Toronto] because foreign people might come and we'd get to sell our movies." Henk VAN DER KOLK (Mr. MARSHALL's partner in a company they enthusiastically called the Film Consortium of Canada) was the managing director of the festival, Mr. MARSHALL was the executive director, and Mr. COHL was "the accomplice." As such, he was to schmooze and, in Mr. MARSHALL's estimation, there was nobody better at talking, bringing people together and creating a buzz.
In October of 1976, they launched the Toronto International Film Festival at the Ontario Place Cinesphere on a budget of about $500,000, half of which was in goods and services. That first year, they wantonly courted Warren Beatty through a Toronto cousin, but he failed to show. Unexpectedly, Jeanne Moreau and Dino De Laurentiis did. And they had a bit of luck by screening Cousin, Cousine, which was later nominated for three Academy Awards.
In 1978, they defied the then-powerful but now-defunct Ontario Censor Board by showing an uncut version of In Praise of Older Women, based on Stephen Vizinczey's bestseller, and almost caused a riot by handing out 4,000 passes to a screening at a cinema that only seated 1,000. The overflow crowd engendered one of the slick-talking Mr. MARSHALL's more elusive qualifiers: "We're not oversold. We're just over-attended."
After three years, Mr. COHL and Mr. MARSHALL retreated and Wayne CLARKSON became the first of several professional managers of the burgeoning festival.
In addition to Toronto International Film Festival, which has long been one of the top film festivals in the world, Mr. COHL put his "accomplice" skills to work, co-producing feature films such as Outrageous! - based on a short story by Margaret Gibson (obituary, March 15, 2006) and starring her friend, impersonator Craig Russell - and The Circle Game. He was a consulting producer on The Last Mogul, Rush: Grace Under Pressure Tour, Guilty Pleasure, The Extraordinary World of Dominick Dunne and Bowfire and was executive producer of The Scales of Justice, which began on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in the 1980s and was aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television from 1991 to 1995. Hosted by lawyer Edward GREENSPAN, it featured docudramas based on real cases in Canadian criminal law.
Mr. COHL also worked with his cousin, rock promoter Michael COHL, famous for organizing tours for the Rolling Stones and other pop stars, on a concert series on cable television in the 1980s called First Choice Rocks. Less successfully, the two COHLs worked with basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain in an attempt to bring an National Basketball Association franchise to Toronto. "I miss him already," Michael COHL said yesterday. "He was great."
In 1990, Mr. COHL started the Floating Film Festival, an almost annual, luxury Caribbean cruise featuring films programmed by critics such as Roger Ebert, Richard Corliss and George Anthony. The Floating Film Festival combined the best elements of "the smallness of Telluride, the warmth of Toronto and the glamour of Cannes," according to Mr. COHL. It even had its own emblematic T-shirt depicting an art deco-style cruise ship flying a flag with a cowboy hat inspired by Mr. COHL's black Stetson. The 10th edition of the Floating Film Festival, which will sail from Los Angeles on February 25, is dedicated to Mr. COHL and features a tribute to actress Gena Rowlands.
Mr. COHL was also a member of the founding board of Canada's Walk of Fame, which, since its inception in 1998, has celebrated the achievements of more than 100 music, arts and sports celebrities, including Wayne Gretzky, Karen Kain, Gordon Pinsent and Kiefer Sutherland, by encasing their names in a slab of cement on the sidewalks in the entertainment district. In May of 2003, Mr. COHL was invested into the Order of Canada for "his pride in Canadian talent" and his "desire to celebrate our achievements."
Late last fall, he was diagnosed with liver cancer.
Murray (Dusty) COHL was born in Toronto on February 21, 1929. He died at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre of liver cancer on January 11, 2007. He was 78. Mr. COHL is survived by his wife, Joan, three children and five grandchildren. There will be a private family funeral followed by a public celebration of his life at a later date.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-16 published
MORRIS, Nesta Mary (née MARTIN)
Died peacefully, surrounded by her family, at her home in Waterloo, Ontario on Monday, January 14, 2008. Daughter of the late John Henry MARTIN and Elsie Florence (SMALL) of Portsmouth, England. Sister to Kenneth MARTIN (deceased) and Marjorie JOWETT of Havant, England. Nesta taught at the Sunshine Home for the Blind, Harrow, England and nursed at the Evalina Hospital for Children, London. She married Peter, a geologist, in 1955 and came to Canada in 1955 where she taught briefly in Montreal and Niagara Falls. As the wife of a geologist she travelled to remote parts of the world where her kindness and good humour won her many Friends. Dear wife of Peter MORRIS. Devoted mother of Martin Vaughan MORRIS of Guelph and Charlotte Louise RYAN and her husband Jerome Xavier RYAN of Toronto. Loved by her only grandchild, Peter Xavier RYAN. She will be missed by her sister Marjorie, her sister-in-law Mary MARTIN of Vancouver, British Columbia, and by many cousins, nephews and nieces, and grand-nephews and grand-nieces. During Nesta's long and painful struggle with cancer, she was sustained by the devoted care of Doctor Donna WARD and Lisa HOLISEK, Community Palliative Nurse, and by Joan, Paula and Sarah of the Palliative Care team. Also by many Friends and neighbours and by the Parkminster United Church congregation. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of Nesta's life will be held at Parkminster United Church, Waterloo, Ontario on Saturday, January 26, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. the Reverend John GERTRIDGE officiating. For those wishing to donate, in lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Parkminster United Church or Leprosy Mission Canada and can be arranged through the Erb and Good Family Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo, 519-745-8445 or www.erbgood.com. In living memory of Nesta, a tree will be planted through the Trees for Learning Program by the funeral home.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-25 published
MARTIN, Louis (1935-2008)
At Pavillon Alfred-Desrochers, on January 22, 2008, following a long illness passed away Louis MARTIN, journalist. He leaves to mourn his wife, Hélène FILION, his three sons and daughters-in-law, Nicolas (Élise DESJARDINS,) Stéphane (Maya HARTLEY) and Alexis (Claire GEOFFRION,) his grandchildren: Béatrice, Gabrielle, Laurent, Zoé and Éloi. son of the late Joséphine DÉCARY and the late Hector MARTIN, he was the brother of Fernande (Pierre JUNEAU,) the late Suzanne (the late Pierre BLONDIN,) the late Denise (Francis CORBETT,) Yves (Louise-Marie CHOUINARD,) Geneviève (Gilles BEAUSOLEIL,) Françoise (André LAMY,) Luc (Louise BOUCHARD,) Hélène (Michel BRÛLÉ.) He also leaves to mourn his sisters-in-law and his brother-in-law from the Filion family, as well as many nephews, nieces, grandnephews, grand-nieces. The family will receive condolences on Friday, January 25, 2008 from 6 to 10 p.m. and Saturday, January 26 starting at 9: 30 a.m. at: Alfred Dallaire Memoria 1111, Laurier West, Outremont www.memoria.ca 514-277-7778 Valet Parking where at 11 a.m. a memorial ceremony will be held. The family would like to thank the management and the staff of Pavillon Alfred-Desrochers for the excellent care provided to Louis. In memory of Louis, donations to the Institut universitaire de gériatrie de Montréal would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-26 published
Uncompromising, transformative professor nurtured students and grudges across borders
Abused as a child in England, he arranged passage to Canada and built a successful but peripatetic academic career
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Pomp, circumstance and hooded academic gowns were the order of the day when York University celebrated its 40th anniversary in March, 1999. Among the invited guests was John R. SEELEY, the university's first professor of sociology, and a former friend and colleague of inaugural president Murray ROSS.
"What are you doing here?" a clearly affronted Prof. ROSS demanded when Prof. SEELEY, who had travelled from his home in California, arrived at the reception. "I was invited," Prof. SEELEY replied. Enraged, Prof. ROSS threw his gown across the room and stomped out and had to be persuaded to return, according to some of the other guests in attendance.
Prof. ROSS was not alone in his antipathy to Prof. SEELEY, an elfin-like man of diminutive stature (5 foot 4 at a stretch) but outsized moral and intellectual presence. His maddening refusal to compromise personal ethical standards led to his abrupt departure from teaching positions at several universities. Senior bureaucrats at two Ontario universities vetoed decisions to hire him despite his reputation as a top sociologist who eventually had more than 400 publications, including Crestwood Heights: A North American Suburb, Community Chest: A Case Study in Philanthropy, and a collection of psychological essays, The Americanization of the Unconscious.
But the same qualities that frightened administrators and branded him a troublemaker often made him a transformative influence. His capacity for listening, his respect for the individual and his ability to nurture ideas and people, especially children and young adults, made him a moral beacon for many.
"He was more important in my life than either of my parents," criminal lawyer Clayton RUBY said in an interview.
"He picked up everything I was concerned about before I'd finished the sentence and replied, as always, with astute, sensitive advice," said journalist Rick SALUTIN, who, like Mr. RUBY, was a student at York in the early 1960s. "I have no idea what I'll do for advice without him."
Prof. SEELEY grew up physically and emotionally abused in England, experiences that shaped his academic interests as a sociologist, his therapeutic approach as a psychoanalyst and his world view as a citizen.
"It was pretty plain to those of us who knew him that his traumatic and terrible childhood gave birth to a lifelong commitment to treating children well, respecting them as people and honouring their right to be free from abuse," his son Ron said. "The way that he started out being treated as a child, without any recognition of who he was, made him thirsty for knowledge and made him recognize the importance of the emotional nurturing of children."
John Ronald SEELEY was born in the Hampstead area of London in 1913, the second of four sons, to Emil FRIEDEBERG, a German businessman who was a principal in a European commodities firm centred in Antwerp. His mother, Lilly SEELEY, was a wealthy Edwardian society woman who may have been mentally ill. The family probably took her last name because of anti-German sentiment during the First World War.
Young John was beaten and abandoned for long stretches by his mother. After his father died when John was 8, he was sent to a boarding school in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was the youngest pupil by far and unable to speak the language. At 12, he was brought back to England and sent to another boarding school, where the headmaster taught him practical life skills and encouraged him to read, to think for himself and to take pride in his intellectual abilities. John was 15 when he saw what was probably an ad offering passage to Canada and the prospect of land for those willing to work as farm labourers for a specified period of time.
Seeing this as a way to escape his mother, John arranged his passage and worked as a farm labourer for three years, and, with the help of a local Presbyterian minister, completed his high-school education. He moved to Toronto in 1931 and found work as a printer's devil at a graphic arts firm called Rolf Clark Stone. Eventually, he worked his way up to export manager and into the affections of secretary Margaret Mary DEROCHER. Mr. SEELEY left in 1940 to study at the University of Chicago, where he earned a bachelor's degree. He returned to Toronto in 1942, enlisted in the army as a second lieutenant and eventually worked his way up to staff captain. He didn't fight overseas, although he was shipped to London on a short-term project that included a progressive attempt to deal with what we now call post-traumatic stress syndrome and postwar planning for veterans.
In 1943, he and Ms. DEROCHER married in Toronto. Between 1944 and 1955, they had four sons: John, David, Ronald and Peter. After demobilization, he returned to the University of Chicago and began work on his doctorate in sociology. He returned to Toronto in 1949 without having completed his dissertation and took a job as executive director of what is now the Canadian Mental Health Association.
He was also teaching part-time in the psychiatry and sociology departments of the University of Toronto, separate departments that he believed for the rest of his life should be combined. These were also the years when he was researching social mores in Toronto's Forest Hill Village, then studying fundraising methods in Indiana. The SEELEYs moved back to Toronto in late 1956 and he took a job as director of research for what is now the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. That same year, Crestwood Heights was published by the University of Toronto Press. The book, based on his five-year study of Forest Hill (the area was not named), described men working extremely hard to maintain a luxurious lifestyle, wives trained to support their husbands by cultivating social connections, and children inculcated with the same mores so they, too, would learn to value social prestige and wealth. It was a hugely influential book. The following year, the University of Toronto published Community Chest, an examination of organized fundraising in Indianapolis and community perceptions of its effectiveness.
While teaching at the U of T, Prof. SEELEY became friendly with Dr. ROSS, a professor of social work. They talked about the issues of the day, including new approaches to education, given the huge wave of children born after the Second World War who were approaching university age. Many of them felt entitled to higher education and wanted a voice in what and how they were taught. In the preface to The New University (a collection of his speeches that amounted to a draft plan for York University,) Prof. ROSS emphasized the beneficial effects of the more intimate setting of a liberal arts college, acknowledging his debt to Prof. SEELEY for "reading, and commenting on, many of these speeches in their original form."
After Prof. ROSS was named the inaugural president of York in 1959, he invited Prof. SEELEY to join him there as professor of sociology. Within three years, the two men were bitterly and publicly estranged, essentially over the institution's size and nature. By 1963, 10 of the 43-member faculty had resigned, several out of dissatisfaction with Prof. ROSS's leadership and what they felt was muddled thinking and misplaced priorities in turning the university into a massive educational factory. Historian Michiel Horn, author of a forthcoming history of York University, and political scientist Denis SMITH, who served as the university's first registrar, both stated in interviews that amid the challenge to find faculty, establish a curriculum and educate students, Prof. ROSS had a tendency to say what he thought people wanted to hear.
As the relationship soured, Prof. SEELEY arranged to be a visiting professor in the sociology department at Brandeis University for the 1963-64 academic year. While teaching at Brandeis, he resigned from York. The following year, he was a visiting fellow at California's Stanford University, and returned to Brandeis in 1965 as chair of the sociology department. Within a short time, he was at odds with the administration over his political activism against the Vietnam War. He objected vociferously to the university sharing students' personal information (including grades) with the Selective Service System, which administered the military draft.
For most of the next decade, Prof. SEELEY moved his family back and forth across the United States as he took up what invariably turned into short-term appointments at a variety of institutions, including the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, a liberal think tank founded by educational philosopher Robert Hutchins in Santa Barbara, California. This didn't last long, as Prof. Hutchins reorganized the centre two years later after a philosophical and economic parting of the ways that saw many fellows depart, including Prof. SEELEY, and others join, including Alexander Comfort, later the author of The Joy of Sex, and Stanford biologist Paul R. Ehrlich, author of The Population Bomb.
Prof. SEELEY yearned to return to Canada, especially Toronto, but his dissident political activity and fractious reputation apparently mitigated against formal invitations. He was a "lightening rod," said Ron SEELEY. "He was just too hot for many people in staid institutions to handle."
Nevertheless, he was offered a faculty position in the sociology department at the University of Toronto in May, 1974, which was overruled by senior administrators. Then, a search committee from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education chose him to fill a sociology department vacancy, but this, too, was vetoed by a senior executive after education minister Thomas Wells telephoned Ontario Institute for Studies in Education director Robert Jackson to pass on negative comments about Prof. SEELEY. Amid student and faculty protests, The Globe and Mail wrote an editorial asking whether Mr. Wells had improperly influenced the decision.
Prof. SEELEY, by then 61, finished his academic career at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles as a professor of sociology. He finally received his doctorate (philosophy - social sciences) from International College on January 15, 1975. At 65, he retired and began a new career as a psychoanalyst in private practice under a supervising analyst.
In his last years, he became a devout member of his local Episcopal Church and maintained Friendships with family and Friends.
"It was a wonderful experience to be his child," Ron SEELEY said. "The breadth of his knowledge and his intellect were amazing. It was interesting as he was ill and passing - you could feel all of what he had distributed around the world coming back toward him in letters, visits and phone calls, and so many of them said the same thing: that he had touched their lives in a way that nobody else had and that he was like a father to them."
John Ronald SEELEY was born in London on February 21, 1913. He died at Saint_John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California., on December 16, 2007, after a short illness. He was 94. Predeceased by his wife and his siblings, he is survived by four sons, six grandchildren and extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-29 published
In building a national literary culture, he saw that 'writers need an audience'
Technically a radio producer, he spent half a century nurturing Canadian talent
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
When Alice LAIDLAW was a student at the University of Western Ontario, she heard that somebody named Robert WEAVER was buying short stories and broadcasting them on the radio. After he bought a story from a friend of hers, she wrote him a letter in 1951, enclosing "The Strangers" and "The Widower." He suggested some changes to the first story and offered to buy it.
"That was probably the greatest moment of my life," she said in a telephone interview yesterday. Not only did she have a piece accepted, but she "was going to be paid." And so began Mr. WEAVER's long relationship with the writer we now know as Alice MUNRO.
But it wasn't just praise that she and so many other yearning writers, including Mordecai Richler and Norman Levine, appreciated from Mr. WEAVER, a radio producer, anthologist and magazine editor.
"He was always wonderful to work with because he didn't pull any punches. Even after I was selling stories fairly regularly, his criticisms were very valuable," Ms. MUNRO said. "His approach was always encouraging, businesslike - I think it was very Canadian. It wasn't overly enthusiastic, but it accepted the fact that this was important work to you and to him and we were bound to do our best with it." This was very comforting to Ms. MUNRO in the days when she had "nobody else" beyond her first husband to encourage her.
"He was the guy," Margaret Atwood said yesterday of Mr. WEAVER, one of Canadian literature's most formidable talent spotters from the 1950s through the end of the last century. She recalled reading one of his first anthologies of short fiction when she was still in high school. "It was crucial for me because it told me that there were [Canadian] writers." He broadcast some of Ms. Atwood's early stories on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in the 1960s, and the two later worked together with editor William Toye on two editions of The Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories in English (1986 and 1995). He was a "doll" to work with, she said.
"He always concealed the extent to which he was well read and literary," Ms. Atwood said, describing Mr. WEAVER as self-effacing and apparently untutored. "That was his front. Underneath he was very smart and he had a very, very good ear," she said. "He took a chance on unpublished writers and he understood that writers need an audience - and he was providing that audience," through radio programs such as Anthology and the short stories that he collected and published in more than a dozen anthologies, including five volumes of Canadian Short Stories published by Oxford University Press.
Although technically a radio producer, Mr. WEAVER's real métier was broader and deeper. Essentially, he was a literary editor who was obsessed with discovering new talent and nurturing it by providing outlets and markets. Almost unconsciously, he was also building an audience and a literary culture as he traversed the country, meeting with writers and the staff at local Canadian Broadcasting Corporation stations, serving as both a talent scout and a bridge-builder between Toronto and the regions.
He would hold impromptu salons in hotel rooms, where he puffed on his pipe, chatted with writers and swallowed an inordinate amount of hard liquor, while conversation swirled around him. He never seemed drunk - "not ever," according to Ms. Atwood - but he must have had a hollow leg, according to people who knew him in those days. While he could be a stern critic, he also bought less than stellar work from good writers who were broke and in need of a commission.
Robert Leigh WEAVER was born in Niagara Falls, Ontario, on January 21, 1921. His father, Walter WEAVER, was a doctor and a widower with one daughter when he married Jessie GEARY, the daughter of a local historian who had written books about the War of 1812. Bob was their first child, followed two years later by Grace, so he grew up sandwiched between two sisters in a small town that had a patina of sophistication from its powerful tourist attraction.
Although he loved sports and remained a hockey and football fan all of his life, he was not much of an athlete, according to his biographer Elaine Kalman Naves in Robert Weaver: Godfather of Canadian Literature. Reading was an early pleasure, but one that he realized also had a seriousness of purpose - especially in a family in which reading "was part of the process of being human." The public library, which he frequented from the time he was in grade school, alternately sated and aroused his appetite for books.
His father died in 1931, when Bob was 10, just as the Depression was beginning to wreak its economic havoc. Two years later, an impoverished Mrs. WEAVER moved with her children to Toronto, where they settled in a rooming house owned by four of her late husband's sisters near the University of Toronto. Bob went to high school at Lawrence Park Collegiate, but he was a desultory student who was much more interested in reading and learning on his own than being taught by "unmarried, frumpish, middle-aged women." He graduated from high school in 1938 and got a job at the Dominion Bank on the corner of Avenue Road and Davenport, delivering bank drafts and picking up deposits from local businessmen.
In 1942, he tried to enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force, but failed an examination and switched to the army. He was stationed near Kingston, but was never sent overseas. The army did what it did for so many veterans: It gave him the opportunity to attend university, through the financial support of its veterans' aid program.
He entered University College at the University of Toronto in 1944, when he was 23 and mature enough to realize how lucky he was to be alive and involved in an expansive scholarly and social environment inhabited by the likes of Northrop Frye and Morley Callaghan. He joined the staff of The Varsity, edited the University College magazine in his second year, made Friends with three nascent literary talents - Henry Kreisel, James Reaney and Colleen Thibodeau - and became a force in The Modern Letters Club, a group that was agitating to bring the study of literature into the modern world. He was writing fiction, poetry and prose himself, but even then, with the help of some blunt comments from Mr. Reaney, he realized that his real talent lay in editing.
After graduating with a bachelor's degree in philosophy and English, he joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corp. as a program organizer in the Talks and Public Affairs Department in November, 1948. He was given a 15-minute program niche on Friday evenings called Canadian Short Stories and a magazine-style show of arts reviews called Critically Speaking. These were the outlets that he used to create both a home and an audience for new writers as well as established ones, such as Malcolm Lowry and Sinclair Ross. And he raised the rates from $35 to $50 for any stories he broadcast.
A year later he began editing (with Helen James, his radio producer) an anthology of stories that they had broadcast on Canadian Short Stories and thereby provided his writers with a crossover audience from radio to print. That first anthology included stories by Mr. Ross, Hugh Garner and Ethel Wilson. By 1954, Mr. WEAVER had persuaded his bosses to let him produce Anthology, a 30-minute literary magazine. It first aired on October 19, 1954, with a lineup that included The Secret of the Kugel, a short story by an expatriate Montreal writer in London: Mr. Richler.
Anthology broadcast literary fiction by scads of writers who are now famous, including Austin Clarke, Leonard Cohen, Timothy Findley, Margaret Laurence, Gwendolyn MacEwen, Michael Ondaatje, Alistair MacLeod, Brian Moore, Al Purdy and Jane Rule. By 1968, the program had been extended to a 60-minute format and moved from Tuesday to Saturday evenings. According to Ms. Kalman Naves, Anthology regularly drew an audience of more than 50,000 listeners, "a figure that probably exceeded the combined readership of all the little magazines in the country at the time."
By 1974, Mr. WEAVER was head of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Arts. Four years later, Howard Engel became the producer of Anthology and Mr. WEAVER moved up the hierarchy again to become executive producer, literary projects. A decade later, he published The Anthology anthology to commemorate the program's 30th anniversary. It finally went off the air when budget cuts squeezed Mr. WEAVER into early retirement in 1985, although he continued to have an office at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation until 2002, when he was 81.
In 1956, he approached Ivon Owen, the managing editor of Oxford University Press and an acquaintance from university days, about starting a literary quarterly. Mr. Owen brought Mr. Toye, another editor from Oxford, to the initial lunch. The three men were soon joined by Kildare Dobbs, then an editor at Macmillan, poet Anne Wilkinson and Millar MacLure, an English professor at the U of T, with all of the editors working for free, although contributors were paid. Nominally a collective, Mr. WEAVER's strong editorial hand was evident until Tamarack folded in 1982.
Mr. WEAVER and his first wife, Mary McKELLAR (now COUTTS,) divorced in the mid-1960s and he married Audrey MacKELLAR in December, 1968. She became the mother of his two children, David and Janice. In 1979, he suffered a couple of strokes, which slowed him down, but didn't deter him from developing another literary bastion: the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Literary Competition. As he explained to his biographer: "I think I was always coming up with new things to do because I was afraid that some of the things we were doing would come to an end and then… how do you feed writers and keep going?"
There were 3,000 submissions the first year, an outpouring that has continued over the decades. The Canada Council became a partner in 1997 and began providing the prize money for what is now called the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Literary Awards/Prix Littéraires Radio-Canada. Winning entries are published in English and French in enRoute magazine and broadcast on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio.
Robert Leigh WEAVER was born January 21, 1921, in Niagara Falls, Ontario He died January 26, 2008, in the Toronto East General Hospital from complications from pneumonia. He was 87. Mr. WEAVER is survived by his second wife, Audrey, children David and Janice, and younger sister Grace. A private family service is planned.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-02 published
Toronto modernist's projects married pragmatism, poetic sensibility
Award-winning university collaboration conjures an architecture both sustainable and beautiful
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
An architect who was ahead of the curve in thinking how sustainable design can be integrated in elegant architectural solutions, Adrian DICASTRI brought his love of music and culture along with his analytical skills to the art and practice of his profession.
"What a lot of people didn't realize about Adrian was his poetic sensibility," said his friend Dereck REVINGTON, another architect who described Mr. DICASTRI's major buildings as "full of colour and light and a subtle dancing rhythm."
Pragmatism had to be satisfied first, but what characterized Mr. DICASTRI's work was a luminous and lyrical modernism, Mr. REVINGTON said. "His definition of sustainability was much more complex than simply creating ecologically friendly buildings. He spoke continuously about the importance of cultural, environmental and aesthetic sustainability."
Adrian John DICASTRI was born in Victoria, the second of five sons and one daughter of architect John DICASTRI (obituary September 22, 2005) and his wife Florence Margaret (GREENWOOD,) who was always called Paddy. The family lived first in the Rockland area of Victoria - in a house his father had designed - and then in a rambling former seniors' residence close to the ocean in Oak Bay that the senior Mr. DICASTRI renovated to accommodate his large and rambunctious family.
As a boy, Adrian was the only child who showed any ability at sketching and drawing, according to his younger brother Julian. He also swam "like a porpoise" and loved being in the water, a passion he would later sustain in "landlocked Toronto" by designing and building a family cottage on Georgian Bay.
He attended St. Patrick's Elementary School and then Oak Bay junior and senior high schools, graduating in 1969. He worked in his father's architectural office for a couple of years and then, at 19, went travelling in Europe for six months.
After returning, he resumed his Friendship with Susan McDONALD, who had been a year or so behind him in high school, and entered the University of Victoria, where he studied English literature in a general arts program. A ferocious reader, he was torn in those early years between teaching and architecture. He left after two years and went travelling again, this time to Mexico and Central America. By the time he returned, he had affirmed his decision on a career in architecture. He won a place in the University of Waterloo's co-op degree program in January, 1976.
After completing nearly three years of his degree, he and Ms. McDONALD (by then his wife) moved to Toronto, where he enrolled in the architecture program at the University of Toronto. Larry RICHARDS, former dean of the faculty of architecture, remembers him as "an outstanding, leading student" who was also a very nice guy. Mr. DICASTRI graduated with a bachelor of architecture degree in 1982. son Nicholas was born in 1983 and daughter Julia in As a young architect, Mr. DICASTRI worked at Diamond and Schmitt architects in Toronto. "He was an extraordinarily focused and smart guy who was a really great critic on projects in development," said Don SCHMITT, a principal in the firm. "He was a real modernist, and rigorous in his focus on rational solutions and elegant but spare design." Mr. SCHMITT also remembered him as being relaxed and possessing a dry sense of humour, qualities that "are very important in the culture of an office."
Architect John VAN NOSTRAND hired Mr. DICASTRI in 1984. "He was interested in working in a smaller firm where he could have more direct influence," Mr. VAN NOSTRAND said. The two eventually became partners, working on some major social housing projects until government support for that market dried up in the early 1990s. They also did a number of university projects, including the revitalization of St. George Street on the University of Toronto campus.
"He was a brilliant designer and he got brilliant buildings done, but he did it in a very pragmatic way," said Mr. VAN NOSTRAND. "He had real stamina for sticking with long projects and making sure that they were finished off as well as they were started. And he was a good leader. People who worked for him respected him and wanted to make good buildings for him."
In the mid 1990s, their firm went after the contract for the Computer Science and Engineering Building at York University. Mr. DICASTRI, fascinated by the idea of creating sustainable buildings, was superb at forging connections and put together a collaboration that included Vancouver architect Peter Busby, a noted green designer.
"That building is really a reflection of Peter Busby and his West Coast thinking and Adrian DICASTRI and his practical, plain thinking and his understanding of the complexity of York University and where it could go," said architect Peter CLEWES.
The building, which has operable windows, uses "passive strategies" to maximize natural light and ventilation and decrease the need for air-conditioning. It won several awards, including the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Governor-General's Medal in Architecture. Mr. CLEWES said it demonstrates that "it is not only the spaces within buildings that are important, but the spaces they create outside of themselves." A complex and seminal building in Mr. DICASTRI's career, it speaks to how he was beginning to think about collaboration with others and about the practicalities of creating buildings that are both sustainable and yet beautiful to live and work in. "That was a turning point for him."
Mr. CLEWES and Mr. DICASTRI, who had known each other since the 1980s, often commiserated about the capriciousness of a career in architecture - which is known as a fine vocation and a horrible profession, especially during economic downturns. They were both partners in architectural firms that were struggling to sustain themselves when Mr. DICASTRI called Mr. CLEWES in 1998 and proposed they merge practices. He cited the computer sciences building at York as an example of the kinds of things they could do together.
"It came out of the blue," Mr. CLEWES said this week - but the more he thought about it, the more he realized that "for the first time in about eight or nine years, [I felt] I could stick my head up above water and look around and say, 'This could mean something more than simply surviving.' "
The following year, Van Nostrand Dicastri and Wallman Clewes Bergman merged to form Architects Alliance. Mr. DICASTRI's strength as a strategic thinker and team builder came into play on one of the firm's significant projects, the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research at the U of T, which they did in collaboration with Stefan Behnisch Architekten in Germany. The completed building - elegant, intriguingly situated, ecologically green, technologically but subtly complicated - has won popular accolades and several design prizes, including the International Award from the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Design Excellence Award from the Ontario Association of Architects.
It was poignant that Mr. DICASTRI, at the point when his professional and family lives were happily and productively established, was diagnosed with bladder cancer in 2006. The next 15 months were a relentless struggle with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation as he fought against what proved to be an unconquerable illness. A week ago, he received a specially designed box containing individually written letters, poems and messages of esteem and affection from his colleagues at Architects Alliance. He was still well enough to read and share them with his family.
Adrian John DICASTRI was born in Victoria on September 5, 1952. He died at home in Toronto on January 29, 2008, of metastasized bladder cancer. He was 55. He is survived by wife Susan McDONALD, children Nicholas and Julia, five siblings and extended family. There will be a celebration of his life Tuesday in the Great Hall, Hart House, University of Toronto.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-09 published
GALT, Barbara Carlyle (née HUNT)
Barb passed away peacefully on Wednesday, February 6 2008 at Westside Care in Kelowna, British Columbia. Predeceased by her loving husband Doug GALT, infant daughter Heather, sister Betty (Jack) and parents Col. Archibald and Marjorie HUNT.
Survived by her children Ian, Kelowna, David (Myra) Whistler, British Columbia, Pam (Steve) Calgary Alberta. Grandchildren Taylor and Kelsey GALT, Carley and Sydney GALT, Jenn and Chris MARTIN, Sister Patricia (Ted.)
The family would like to extend heartfelt thanks to Westside for the loving care given to Mom. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimers Society of British Columbia or Arthritis Society of B.C.
A private family gathering in Victoria will take place in the Spring.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-11 published
CLEMENT- MARTIN, Laurel
Thirteen years ago we held your tiny body in our arms. We carry your spirit in our hearts forever. Love Ann, Tom and Mallory.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-18 published
Val ROSS, 57: Journalist And Author
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
An award-winning journalist with a lyrical style, a passion for the arts, an acute ear for dialogue and a prodigious memory for arcane details, Val ROSS was a reporter's reporter.
"She knew everyone and everything and she managed to use her sources and her knowledge to advantage, but without ever compromising her sources or cheating her readers," said Edward GREENSPON, editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail. "She had a disarming manner, but she was tough and she wrote the truth."
While undergoing treatment for brain cancer, Ms. ROSS sent Mr. GREENSPON an e-mail urging him to expand the newspaper's coverage of native people. "You really should do this," she wrote. "Attention must be paid." And then in her typically wry way, she talked about the ravages of brain cancer by writing, "I have lost balance a lot, but I bet you always suspected I leaned to the left."
Ms. ROSS was born in Toronto on October 17, 1950, the elder child and only daughter of Erma and Jack ROSS. She went to the Institute of Child Study and Jarvis Collegiate. As talented with a brush as she was with a pen, she attended Saint Martin's School of Art in London, England, after completing high school and thought seriously about becoming a visual artist.
Nevertheless, after a year in swinging London and travelling in Europe, she returned to Canada and entered University College at the University of Toronto in 1969, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1972. She worked briefly in urban planning and then in broadcasting at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation before building a prolific career as a freelance writer, contributing regularly to magazines such as Chatelaine, Saturday Night and Toronto Life. She was a staff writer and editor for Maclean's magazine in the late 1970s and early 1980s, before being hired as managing editor of The Globe and Mail's now defunct Toronto magazine. She spent the rest of her career at The Globe and Mail, working as publishing reporter - winning a National Newspaper Award in 1992 for critical writing - deputy editor of the Comment section, and most recently as an arts reporter concentrating on cultural institutions.
"I wanted her to go back to arts reporting," Mr. GREENSPON said yesterday, "because of her connectedness to the arts community. She brought a lot of insight, knowledge and understanding to her work."
An author as well as a journalist, she produced two children's books. The Road to There, which won the $10,000 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children's Non-Fiction in 2004, related the history of cartography from early sailors mapping the world to modern scientists charting the galaxies. Praising the book's dynamic quality, jury members said they were "mesmerized by how beautifully [Ms. ROSS] wove together the stories."
Two years later, Ms. ROSS published a second children's book, You Can't Read This, a history of banned and silenced literature. In reviewing the book for The Globe, Deborah Ellis, herself a prize-winning author of children's books, wrote: "The history of books and writers is a tense, often bloody one, with poets forced by mad emperors to commit suicide and translators burned at the stake by religious leaders anxious to hold on to their power. By using examples of real people facing such torments, ROSS brings that history alive for us. This is no dry textbook. It is a primer for anyone wanting to act with courage and needing to know that those acts will come with a price."
In her final book, she switched to adult non-fiction by tackling an oral history of novelist, playwright and essayist Robertson Davies. She had almost completed a draft of Robertson Davies: A Portrait in Mosaic, when she was diagnosed with brain cancer the day after her 57th birthday in October, 2007.
"Raw courage is not what we associate with writing a book," her editor Douglas Gibson said yesterday. "Yet, what I saw as Val ROSS fought brain cancer to finish her book on Robertson Davies left me shaken. It was a privilege to make what she teasingly described as 'house calls' to help her see the book through the last editing stages, and to be able to assure her just last week that the book is very good," he said. "It is made up of many voices recalling Davies; but the strongest, most memorable voice throughout is Val's."
On Friday evening she collapsed and was taken to Saint_Joseph's Hospital. Her husband and three children gathered around her hospital bed and read some of her favourite poets aloud - E.E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, John Donne, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. Ms. ROSS, despite slurred speech from the effects of her disease, was able to finish many of the stanzas by drawing upon her formidable memory. The next morning she was transferred to Saint Michael's Hospital, where that night she underwent neurosurgery to try to give her more time with her family. Her spirit was willing, but her heart gave out.
Valerie Jacqueline ROSS was born in Toronto on October 17, 1950. She died, surrounded by her family, early in the morning of February 17, 2008, at Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto, a mere four months after having been diagnosed with brain cancer. She was 57. Ms. ROSS leaves her husband, Morton RITTS, her children, Max, Maddie and Zoe, her mother, Erma, her brother, Philip, and her extended family. There will be a celebration of her life on Saturday, February 23, at 3 p.m. at Massey College in Toronto.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-03 published
MARTIN, Kenneth Harold
Following cardiovascular failure February 25 while scuba diving in Bonaire. He is sorely missed by his wife, Beverley, sons Ken and Todd and their families, brothers Brian and David, Aunt Hazel and countless others. We are grateful that he had one last glimpse of his beloved underwater world before he left us to join his greatly missed daughter, Shari. In lieu of flowers, the family would be grateful for donations to the Canadian Heart and Stroke Foundation. Friends and neighbours warmly welcomed to the family home on March 7 and 8 in the afternoon. Write toddmartin76@gmail.com for info.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-05 published
HAY- ROE, Moira
On March 3rd, 2008 at North York General Hospital in her 81st year. Predeceased by her husband Kenneth HAY- ROE. Will be sadly missed by son Tony HAY- ROE (Lynn,) daughter Penny HAY- ROE (Michael,) by grandchildren Andrew, Alex, Jennifer and Brian and by sister Sheelagh THACKRAY and brother Patrick MARTIN. A Memorial Service will be held in the chapel of the Morley Bedford Funeral Home, 159 Eglinton Ave. W. (2 lights west of Yonge St.) on Saturday, March 8th 11: 00 a.m. Reception to follow the service. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the charity of ones choice.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-08 published
Award-winning radio dramatist wrote more than 1,200 plays and screenplays
'His ruthless honesty… his daring in tackling forbidden subjects, gave rise to more letters to the editor and questions in the House of Commons than the work of any other writer'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
After selling his first play to the nascent radio service of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1938, Len PETERSON made a living for more than five decades as a freelance playwright "in a land friendlier to ragweed than to indigenous drama," as he liked to say, without his "wit being dulled." He wrote more than 1,200 dramatic works for radio, the theatre, television and film in a variety of styles, moods and themes and won a series of prizes including several Ohio Columbus Awards, Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists Awards for best radio drama for The Trouble with Giants (1973) and for Evariste Galois (1984) and the John Drainie Award for distinguished contribution to broadcasting in 1974.
His heyday was in radio in the 1940s and early 1950s, working with producer Esse Ljungh, under the legendary Canadian Broadcasting Corporation producer-director Andrew Allan. "Nobody engendered more rage and nobody more admiration, than Len PETERSON," Mr. Allan wrote in his autobiography, A Self-Portrait. "His ruthless honesty, his sense of the colloquial, his daring in tackling forbidden subjects, gave rise to more letters to the editor and questions in the House of Commons than the work of any other writer. After we did his Burlap Bags… there were people who wouldn't speak to me. But, in the spring, when it won an award at Ohio State, the same people demanded to hear it again."
Blond, of medium height, with twinkling blue eyes and a cheerful face, Mr. PETERSON had a convivial demeanour, but a passionate and rebellious soul. As experimental as he was prolific, Mr. PETERSON loved to play with form and voice. Fascinated by the writers of his Nordic heritage and the workings of the human psyche, he was also a steadfast advocate of workers' rights and social justice. An early and long-time organizer and negotiator for the Alliance of Canadian Cinema, Television and Radio Artists, he co-ordinated the jury for the John Drainie Award for several years, and was also one of the founders of the Playwright's Co-op, an organization that initially published and distributed plays in typescript form and which later became a bargaining and lobbying unit. (It now exists as the Playwright's Union of Canada and Playwrights Canada Press.)
"He was one of the very few who were able to earn a livelihood by writing radio drama," said John Reeves, a former Canadian Broadcasting Corporation radio drama producer and winner of the Italia Prize in 1995. "The most striking thing about Len's career was the consistent way he used drama to address social problems. He did that all the time and very effectively." But Mr. PETERSON didn't let his social conscience overpower his creative impulses, according to Mr. Reeves, "To him, the addressing of social drama and the writing of good artistic drama were a seamless garment."
Mr. PETERSON was a very attractive person to be with, says writer and former producer Vincent Tovell, describing him as profoundly compassionate about people and possessing a deadpan and ironic humour. He was "very much aware of the outer world," and "had an ironic sense of its craziness" and he "carved his own path and made a mark because of the depth of his interest in human and social and political affairs." As a dramatist, however, he was "very Scandinavian," according to Mr. Tovell. "Ibsen and Strindberg, the writers to whom he was so finely and naturally attuned -- all of their angst and tension and social concerns were part of his nature."
Leonard (Len) Byron PETERSON, the second of five children of Nils PETERSON, a Norwegian who worked as a locomotive engineer for the Grand Trunk and Canadian National Railways, and Marion (née NORQUIST) PETERSON, a Wisconsin-born woman of Swedish ancestry, was born in Regina on the day that Czar Nicholas II of Russia abdicated -- as he himself liked to point out.
Growing up on the Prairies, he felt surrounded by space. "As kids, oh, we were so free, on the run all the time, across the Prairies. There we were, bounding like antelope," Mr. PETERSON told the Toronto Star in May of 1972. "We spent an awful lot of time dreaming. The sky encouraged that." But it wasn't entirely carefree: his teenage years were shadowed by his little brother's death from appendicitis and the despair and deprivation of the Depression -- which was especially dire in the Prairies.
After graduating from local elementary and secondary schools, Len went to Luther College. He found it uninspiring and far too Anglo-centric, although as a natural athlete, he played quarterback on the school football team and excelled as a gymnast and wrestler. After two years, he switched to Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois, to study math and sciences. There, he also discovered literature as social history, came in contact with professors who praised what he called his "primitive style" and began writing short stories. He graduated with a bachelor of science degree in 1938 and moved to Toronto, determined to become a writer, an unlikely career move that he once compared to "a Manitoban plowman deciding to become a ballet dancer." Nevertheless, he sold a radio script, It Happened in College to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1938 for $15.
"His typewriter never stopped," freelance writer Ron Hambleton, said in an interview this week, recalling that Mr. PETERSON was pounding out plays and short stories when both men were tenants in a house on Spadina Road in Toronto in 1941, and later in a house on Charles Street that Mr. Hambleton and his wife rented. "He was extremely athletic -- a marvellously active fellow -- who was extremely handsome, full of energy, loved the outdoors and had a very unusual imagination, when it came to interpreting everyday life." Mr. PETERSON continued to wrestle and even held an Ontario Wrestling Alliance championship title for two years.
Mr. PETERSON enlisted in the Canadian Army in the infantry in 1942. Fiercely independent, an obsessive reader of Nietzsche and Dostoevsky, a compulsive scribbler and note-taker, he had trouble acclimatizing himself to the regimentation of army life and engendered suspicion from his superior officers who confiscated his notebooks and had him locked up for 10 days as a suspected subversive.
After the Royal Canadian Mounted Police checked into his background, he was transferred to the radio section of National Defence Headquarters and ordered to write radio documentaries, dramas and other propaganda supporting the Canadian war effort. One of the perks of his job was meeting actress Ingrid Bergman (about the time she made a huge impact acting opposite Humphrey Bogart in the wartime classic Casablanca) when she appeared in Canada as part of a Victory Bonds drive. While travelling back and forth to Ottawa, he switched writing gears in his spare time and produced short stories for Maclean's, then a general-interest monthly magazine, and scripts for a hungry national audience of radio listeners.
The decade-long golden age of radio drama began in 1943 when Andrew Allan, who had joined the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as a producer in Vancouver in 1939, was promoted to national drama supervisor and transferred to Toronto. He created the Sunday night drama series that started with Stage 44 and progressed annually through Stage 45, Stage 46, and so on. He was also one of four senior drama producers working on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Wednesday Night, a weekly broadcast of international and original Canadian dramas.
Mr. Allan had great faith in the capacity of his audience to absorb difficult and even disturbing material and in the ability of his writers to invade and stretch listeners' imaginations. "What struck listeners as new and exciting about the Stage series," according to Bronwyn Drainie in her book, Living the Part: John Drainie and the Dilemma of Canadian Stardom, "was not just its crisp, quickly paced professional sound, but also its subject matter, which seemed to have grown up overnight. Canadian writers were emerging from the war years with an agenda… All that blood spilled to defeat Hitler would be wasted if the dark forces that had brought him to power -- racial hatred, class injustice, fear, greed and hypocrisy -- were allowed to grow unchecked here in Canada." Among the writers who found steady work in Mr. Allan's regime were Fletcher Markle, Joseph Schull, Lister Sinclair, Mavor Moore and, of course, Mr. PETERSON.
His first contribution to Stage 44 was Within The Fortress, an empathetic portrayal of German officers trapped in their own stronghold. It created a stir -- it was wartime, after all -- but nothing like the commotion that greeted the second of his three dramas to be broadcast live to air that year. They're All Afraid, which was set in Canada, was an exploration of office bullying, especially of a black worker, and the lack of freedom people experience even in ordinary life.
Although Ernie Bushnell, director general of programs, vociferously criticized the broadcast as bad for morale, Mr. Allan submitted it for the Columbus Award of the Ohio Radio Institute in 1944, where it won the top award in drama and a citation as the best submission in all categories. Mr. Bushnell accepted the award by confessing, "I didn't like this play when it was performed on our network. I still don't like it. But thank you very much," according to Alice Frick in Image in the Mind: Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio Drama 1944 to 1954. Mr. PETERSON soon reprised his prize-winning ways when his play Burlap Bags, an absurdist drama in the style of Beckett and Ionesco about a man who shields himself from society by covering his face with a burlap bag, also won an Ohio Award.
He published his first and only novel, Chipmunk, in the fall of 1949, about a weak character who commits a single act of defiance. Although the book had stalwart fans, it received a devastating review from William Arthur Deacon, then the literary editor of The Globe and Mail. After cautioning his readers that they would search in vain for easy entertainment, romance or excitement in Chipmunk, Mr. Deacon complained that Mr. PETERSON may have "willingly sacrificed popularity on the altar of his artistic integrity" with his "rigid rejection of the sentimental," and his "ruthless realism."
By now Mr. PETERSON had met Iris ROWLES, an English woman who had arrived in Canada after the war and worked as a secretary first for Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio's international service and then for the drama department. They were married in 1951 and eventually had five children. "It was extraordinary, especially at that time, for a man to be able to support a family from his writing," said Mrs. PETERSON.
In addition to radio plays, Mr. PETERSON wrote a series of Ohio-Award-winning dramatized broadcasts on human relations titled In Search of Ourselves, and joined forces with actors Lorne Greene and John Drainie to found the Jupiter Theatre, a professional company dedicated to the "emergence of a truly Canadian voice in the theatre." The Jupiter, which lasted only three years, from 1951 to 1954, mounted plays by Europeans including Bertolt Brecht and Jean-Paul Sartre and new Canadian works by Ted Allan, Lister Sinclair and Nathan Cohen. It disbanded before Mr. PETERSON's play, Never Shoot a Devil, could be produced. Besides a lack of working capital in those pre-government-funding days, the Jupiter's demise can be attributed at least partly to the founding of the Stratford Festival, the currency of the Crest Theatre and the launch of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television in 1952.
Although Mr. PETERSON's experimental style was not as suited to television as it was to radio, he contributed to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Folio, G.M. Theatre, First Performance and Playdate. He also worked on a joint Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-NBC live documentary about the St. Lawrence Seaway, which was aired on June 3, 1956, and on Memo to Champlain, a live 90-minute bilingual program, hosted by Joyce Davidson and René Lévesque, that was aired on July 1, 1958 to celebrate the formation of the national microwave network of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television -- the network did not include Newfoundland until the next year.
His first full-length stage play, The Great Hunger, which was produced by the Toronto Arts Theatre in 1960, was set around a killing in the Arctic and explores the communal myths affecting both White and Inuit cultures. In the 1970s he wrote The Workingman, which was premiered at Toronto Workshop Productions in May 1972 to celebrate the centenary of the labour movement in Canada and responded to feminist themes by writing Women in the Attic (1971) which was mounted by Ken Kramer at the Globe Theatre in Regina. He also began writing historical plays for children including Almighty Voice (1970), Billy Bishop and The Red Baron (1974) and Etienne Brulé (1977), all of which were mounted by the Young People's Theatre in Toronto. In just one example of how Mr. PETERSON recycled his research, he had earlier turned his Etienne Brulé material into separate radio and television treatments.
Although he would continue to write for the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation -- especially radio -- Mr. PETERSON was increasingly distressed by new management policies at the public broadcaster. "Every few years the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation gets a new Television Wonder Boy (or Girl) who is going to rescue Canadian Broadcasting Corporation television drama," he wrote in an eloquent lament in The Globe in November, 1976. "Each Wonder Boy's handmaids work hard to kill the devil or god in every writer, his uniqueness, his genius, and turn him into a service writer, a formula writer. To a fair degree they succeed in making hacks of the writers and junk of the drama." Mr. PETERSON was 59 when he hammered out that broadside more than 30 years ago, but his sentiments seem as fresh as the current alarums about the latest restructuring at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation and Bill C-10's potential threat to freedom of speech and artistic expression in Canada.
Leonard PETERSON was born in Regina on March 15, 1917. He died in Saint_Joseph's Hospital in Toronto of complications from a brain hemorrhage on February 28, 2008. He was 90. He is survived by his wife, Iris, and by his children Ingrid, Jill, Wendy and Anthony. He also leaves six grandchildren and his extended family. He was predeceased by his daughter, Teresa. There will be a celebration of his life at the Old Mill in Toronto on April 19, 2008.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-10 published
Negotiator remembered for toughness
By Sandra MARTIN and Campbell CLARK and Greg McARTHUR, Page A4
Simon REISMAN, Canada's chief free-trade negotiator during talks with the United States in the late 1980s, died in his sleep of cardiac arrest early yesterday morning at the Heart Institute in Ottawa.
The tough-talking civil servant and Second World War veteran had a pacemaker installed on Thursday because of ongoing heart problems. He was 88.
In interviews yesterday, his Friends and colleagues from both sides of the negotiating table pondered who the real Simon REISMAN was: Was he the blunt, pushy and crusty debater who forged Canada's first free-trade agreement with the United States, or just an artful negotiator?
Derek Burney, a former Canadian ambassador to the United States, said Mr. REISMAN's bluster was the real deal.
"Charming is not a word you would use, okay?" chuckled Mr. Burney, a onetime chief of staff to Brian Mulroney. "He was Mr. Rough-and-Tumble."
While his angry walkout on free-trade talks in the 1980s seemed to end the negotiations in a very public way, it actually moved them up a notch to top politicians who pushed the free-trade agreement ahead.
"He was one tough bird," said Allan Gotlieb, former Canadian ambassador to the United States. " He was extremely direct and totally unfearful of the consequences of his comments. He was the diametric opposite of the namby-pamby civil servant."
Thomas Niles, the U.S. ambassador to Canada during the talks, said he remembered Mr. REISMAN fondly, but always wondered if his often loud and indignant objections were more strategic than spontaneous.
"A lot of it was for effect, I always had the feeling. Sometimes - I never did it because he was an older man and you always had to show respect - but sometimes I wanted to say 'Simon, Simon, please. Calm down,' " Mr. Niles said, laughing.
Born in Montreal on June 19, 1919, Mr. REISMAN studied economics at McGill University and the London School of Economics where he received a master's degree in economics. After joining the civil service in 1946, he worked on a number of significant economic agreements under the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade that helped establish international trading systems and regulations after the Second World War. He also played a major role in the establishment of the Canadian-U.S. Auto Pact in 1965.
His son, physician John REISMAN, said yesterday that Mr. REISMAN appeared to have come through the pacemaker operation without any difficulties. "He was reading The Wall Street Journal yesterday and was active mentally and we thought he was going to make it," Dr. REISMAN said.
Mr. REISMAN leaves his wife Constance and three children. Funeral arrangements are pending.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-10 published
'Best premier Ontario never had,' Donald C. MacDONALD dies at By Sandra MARTIN, Page A10
Often called the best premier that Ontario never had, Donald C. MacDONALD, former leader of the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation and the New Democratic Parties in Ontario, died Saturday night of heart failure at Mount Sinai Hospital in Toronto. He was 94.
Mr. MacDONALD, who was born in Cranbrook, British Columbia, on December 7, 1913, earned a bachelor's and a master's degree from Queen's University in Kingston, Ontario, and then served in the Royal Canadian Navy during the Second World War.
After working as treasurer and organizer of the federal Co-operative Commonwealth Federation Party, he represented the Ontario provincial riding of York South for the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation for nearly 30 years, from 1955 until 1982 (when he resigned his seat to make way for Bob Rae's switch from federal to provincial politics).
"His great quality, his essence was his indefatigable optimism," Mr. Rae said yesterday. Mr. Rae is now running for the Liberals in the federal by-election of Toronto-Centre on March 17. "Every cloud had a silver lining, every setback a way to jump ahead. He lived and fought for what he believed in, and touched all of us with his ebullient determination."
Mr. MacDONALD served as provincial party leader from 1951 to 1961. When the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation became the New Democratic Party in 1961, Mr. MacDONALD continued as leader until 1970 when he was succeeded by Stephen Lewis.
A journalist and university lecturer, he wrote his memoirs, The Happy Warrior, in 1988.
He leaves his wife Simone, two daughters, a son and his extended family. At his request, there will be no funeral. A public celebration of his life is being planned for a later date.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-15 published
When it came to achieving free trade, he was the right man for the job
As Canada's tough and pugnacious chief negotiator, he was famous for allegedly flicking cigar ash on the cherished, heirloom desk of U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Doing a trade deal with the Americans in the 1980s was like trying to sign a nuclear arms pact with the Soviets during the Cold War, according to former prime minister Brian Mulroney. Getting them to the table was hard, keeping them there was worse, but inking a treaty before the deadline expired was the real trick. "You have to be very tough," Mr. Mulroney said this week.
That's why, when he got the word from U.S. President Ronald Reagan that approval to negotiate a comprehensive free-trade agreement with Canada had squeaked through the Senate Finance Committee in the fall of 1985, he knew he needed Simon REISMAN to make the case and hold the line. Mr. REISMAN, who had flirted with communism while growing up in the Jewish ghetto of Montreal during the Depression, was a fervent free-trade continentalist, who had gone eyeball to eyeball with the Americans for 40 years and was famous for allegedly having flicked his cigar ash on U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly's heirloom desk, a sacred piece of furniture that had once belonged to founding father Alexander Hamilton.
"He was the only person with the background, the knowledge, the skill and the toughness to do this job," Mr. Mulroney said, pointing out that Mr. REISMAN had been part of the negotiations for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades in 1947, and Canada's chief negotiator for the Auto Pact in 1965, and a long-time senior mandarin in the federal civil service. Even so, Mr. Mulroney believed that the only way that Mr. REISMAN could succeed was if "the Americans knew he had 100-per-cent support from the prime minister on down."
Besides predictable problems with the Americans, Mr. REISMAN had difficulties on this side of the border, including an ongoing conflict with Senator Pat Carney, then the minister of international trade. She took - and expressed - great umbrage that Mr. REISMAN was not keeping her in the loop. "He wasn't a team player. He was abrasive and difficult to work with because he didn't like political direction or involvement," she said in an interview. "Even though I was the minister responsible for the negotiations he would insist he wasn't reporting to me. He was exasperating," she said, while acknowledging that he "did know the file."
A former deputy minister of finance who had taken early retirement in 1975, at least partly because he himself was exasperated with the machinations of his political masters, Mr. REISMAN was not going to kowtow to Ms. Carney, especially since he had the ear of the prime minister. After hearing Mr. REISMAN's complaints that "I'm having serious problems with the minister; she [Ms. Carney] has never negotiated an international deal," Mr. Mulroney made his move. "I installed myself as chairman of that executive cabinet committee with Simon and his team reporting directly to me."
Fuelled by his own sharp tongue and blustery manner, Mr. REISMAN also found a willing adversary in the media, especially the anti-free trade Toronto Star.
"I used to chuckle," Mr. Mulroney said, remembering uproars in the House of Commons when opposition members "would be yelling at me that he had told somebody from the Toronto Star to 'go fly a kite" or that the newspaper 'was a rag,' and they would be after me to reprimand Simon. And I was chuckling away because I was in agreement with what he said."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal the year after end of the First World War. The second of four children of Kolman, a factory worker in the rag trade, and Manya REISMAN, he went to Baron Byng High School. A very smart boy, he made it into McGill University, despite the Jewish quota, and graduated with an honours degree in economics and political science in 1941 and a master's degree (summa cum laude) the following year, all the while holding down a variety of menial jobs.
As a young man from an immigrant family during the Depression and the rise of fascism in Europe, he joined the Young Communist League, according to Stephen Clarkson and Christina McCall in The Heroic Delusion, Vol. 2 of Trudeau and Our Times. They quote a recruit to the Young Communist League who said that she took a compulsory course on The History of the Communist Party, allegedly written by Joseph Stalin, from Mr. REISMAN in 1937 and another source who claimed that he was still attending party meetings in Ottawa after the war.
Mr. REISMAN's widow said this week that her husband never joined the Communist Party, but that "he was, as a young person, left, but he couldn't have become more right wing." Many intellectuals espouse communist ideologies in their youth, but what is significant about Mr. REISMAN's early political credo, according to Prof. Clarkson, is that it "helped explain his later fanatical belief in free trade - another all-encompassing belief system."
While a student at McGill, Mr. REISMAN joined the cadet corps. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery in 1942, right after graduation and went overseas that November, a month after marrying Constance (Connie) CARIN. They had met through Friends.
"I disliked him immediately," she said. "I didn't like his forthright abrupt manner and I thought this was not the man for me, but it turned out I was wrong." She was busy the first several times he asked her out but, undaunted by these rebuffs, he told her to name a date when she would be free. She did, and so she learned about the man beneath the brusque self-confident exterior. "He always said what he thought, and he was not suited for diplomacy. He would have been a terrible failure in external affairs, but he was good where he was."
After landing in England in 1942, he served as a troop commander with the 11th, 15th, and 17th Field Artillery in the Italian campaign and finished out the war in the liberation of Holland. While waiting to be repatriated, he studied for several months at the London School of Economics. After four years overseas, he returned home in 1946 and went to Ottawa. There, he accepted the first job he was offered, in the Department of Labour, and moved later that year to the Department of Finance to work under Mitchell Sharp, in the economic policy division.
Within a few months he was working closely with John Deutsch, director of the international economic relations division, and writing speeches for Finance Minister Douglas Abbott. Mr. Deutsch wanted to take him to Geneva as secretary to a 12-man delegation working on preparations for an international trade conference scheduled for Havana, Cuba in 1947. "Either I go [with you] or we dissolve the marriage," Mrs. REISMAN told her husband, having no desire for another long-distance separation. He acquiesced "and we went on from there, for 65 years."
After a dozen years of marriage, the REISMANs had their first child, John Joseph, in 1954, followed two years later by daughter Anna Lisa. A second daughter, Harriet Frances, was born in 1959.
While Mr. REISMAN was in Havana, where delegates from nearly 60 countries met to establish what would become the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades, he noticed that Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King was especially interested in Article 24, a provision that would permit groups of nations to establish free-trade areas. Canada was facing a foreign-exchange crisis that winter, and Mr. King wanted to secure a secret free-trade deal with the U.S. as a potential solution. As it turned out, the crisis passed, Mr. King lost interest in a free-trade deal and coincidentally the U.S. Congress refused to ratify the Havana Charter. Canada, and Mr. REISMAN, would wait another 40 years to complete a continental free-trade deal.
In 1954, Mr. REISMAN was appointed director of the international economics division in the Department of Finance and was seconded the following year to serve as assistant research director on the Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects under Walter Gordon, where he reportedly had no hesitation in challenging his boss's protectionist views. When Mr. Gordon was named Finance Minister in Liberal Prime Minister Lester Pearson's cabinet in 1963, Mr. REISMAN, by then an assistant deputy minister, was promoted out of Finance and into the newly created Department of Industry. As deputy minister, a post he held with great distinction from 1964 to 1968, he led the negotiations that resulted in the Automotive Products Trade Agreement being signed by Prime Minister Pearson and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson in January, 1965.
The Auto Pact removed tariffs on cars, truck, buses and automotive parts between the two countries, which greatly encouraged trade, bolstered the bottom line of the big American car manufacturers, greatly increased assembly-line jobs in Canada and lowered the cost of purchasing automobiles. By 1968, the number of cars that were manufactured in Canada and sold in the U.S. had risen from seven to 60 per cent, while 40 per cent of cars bought in Canada were made in the U.S. There were downsides: Canada didn't develop an indigenous car industry and it was restricted from negotiating similar trade pacts with other countries, such as Japan. The Auto Pact was abolished after the World Trade Organization declared it illegal in 2001, but by then the Free-Trade Agreement, negotiated by Mr. REISMAN, and the subsequent North American free-trade agreement, which added Mexico to the trading mix, had made it largely irrelevant.
Mr. REISMAN was secretary of the Treasury Board from 1968 to 1970 and deputy minister of Finance from 1970 to 1975, when he chose to take early retirement from the federal civil service at age 55. The timing was good, as the federal government had recently decided to index civil-service pensions to the consumer price index. But that wasn't the only reason Mr. REISMAN was leaving. In an interview with The Globe and Mail in December, 1974, he complained about a diminishing scope for "people of energy and a certain independence of mind" in the public service and said he longed for "another career in which there would be a chance to fly on my own wings."
He and another former deputy minister, James Grandy (obituary April 5, 2006), formed a consulting firm, Reisman and Grandy, and quickly signed up a roster of clients that included Bombardier, Power Corp., and Lockheed. A ruckus erupted in the House of Commons over the firm's dealings with Lockheed, which was in the process of negotiating a huge contract to supply airplanes to the federal government. As former public servants, it was alleged that Mr. REISMAN and Mr. Grandy were violating conflict-of-interest guidelines. We aren't lobbyists, Mr. REISMAN insisted, explaining that there was a difference between peddling influence and peddling knowledge. Or, as he said to The Globe: "Some girls dance and some girls are whores… we just dance."
As a consultant, Mr. REISMAN had a number of high-level assignments, including Royal Commissioner to investigate the auto industry in 1978 and chief negotiator for aboriginal land claims in the Western Arctic in 1983. Mrs. REISMAN says the treaty with the Inuvialuit was a highlight for her husband because it was one of the first pieces of legislation affecting aboriginals under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
But the biggest deal of his life materialized when Mr. Mulroney appointed him ambassador (trade negotiations) and chief negotiator for Canada of the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement in November, 1985. "I felt he was an absolute natural for us," Mr. Mulroney said.
"I called him and said that we were going to get into this comprehensive negotiation and could he draft me a memo detailing the kind of person we would need and the challenges that person would encounter. Then Simon sent me, I think, a 35-page memorandum. As Derek Burney [his chief of staff] said, it was the longest job application he had ever seen. Simon knew I was thinking of him, but he also knew that I wanted to get the benefit of his ideas of how this should be conducted."
The two men knew each other personally from salmon fishing trips in Quebec with the likes of Paul Desmarais and John Rae of Power Corporation. "He had a great sense of humour, he was a completely honest man, he shared his views on everything… he wasn't at all devious, but he was a tough guy," said Mr. Mulroney, adding that Mr. REISMAN was "the indispensable player" in the free-trade talks. "Simon was the star. He was the one who took the free-trade concept from infancy to maturity and made it whole."
The negotiations dragged on for two years with two main stumbling blocks. The Americans were not taking the talks as seriously as the Canadians wanted until Mr. REISMAN stomped away from the negotiating table in September, 1987, in a highly publicized snit (orchestrated with Mr. Mulroney in Ottawa, Allan Gotlieb, the Canadian ambassador to Washington, and other key players). Only hours before the deadline was to lapse for signing the treaty, the Americans balked at the dispute-resolution clause, a key consideration for the Mulroney government. Once again, Mr. Mulroney says he intervened to back up his trade negotiator. He phoned James Baker [U.S. Secretary of the Treasury] and threatened to call President Reagan that night and demand to know why "you can do a deal on nuclear arms reduction with your worst enemies and you can't do a free-trade deal with your best Friends." Mr. Mulroney recalled that "Baker nearly jumped out of his skin, because he knew that Reagan would have raised holy hell on that issue immediately. That's why they came around."
Although Mr. REISMAN had slowed his pace somewhat in the last decade, he was still salmon fishing in white water in July and present at a dinner in Montreal to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the free-trade agreement in October. But the following month he fell at the Rideau Club in Ottawa and then, in January, he collapsed at his condominium in Fort Lauderdale and had to be airlifted home. He was admitted to the Heart Institute in Ottawa, where he had a pacemaker installed.
A week ago today, he was reading The Wall Street Journal and speaking on the phone with his wife before falling to sleep. Very early the next morning he lost consciousness and medical staff were unable to revive him.
"He was a larger-than-life personality," said Mrs. REISMAN, earlier this week. "The house is very quiet without him."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal on June 19, 1919. He died in his sleep of cardiac arrest at the Heart Institute of Ottawa on Sunday, March 9, 2008. He was 88. Survived by his wife Connie, three children John Joseph (Joe), Anna Lisa and Harriet Frances. He also leaves two younger sisters, Gertrude SHAPIRO and Helen LUTTERMAN, and 10 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his older brother, Mark.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-18 published
Philanthropist won Breeder's Cup as the owner of thoroughbreds
With her husband, Ernie SAMUEL, she made significant donations to the Royal Ontario Museum. Together, they also owned Dance Smartly, at one time the world's top money-winning mare
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
A woman with an insatiable appetite for life and an inherent belief in the value of giving back, Liza SAMUEL was a volunteer, a horse breeder, president of the second oldest company in Canada, a philanthropist and probably the richest woman in the country. As a couple, Liza and Ernie SAMUEL were Friends, lovers and lifelong partners in a range of interests and pursuits including family, business, the Gaslight nightclub, which they owned and operated in Yorkville in the 1960s, sailing, horse breeding and even a hydroponics venture. "They believed if you can dream it, you can do it," said their son Mark.
Elizabeth (Liza) June SAMUEL was the only child of William Roy and Constance (WRIGHT) CHADBURN, a family of missionaries and entrepreneurial inventors. One of her antecedents invented the Chadburn telegraph, a device that enabled a crew member on the bridge of a ship to pull a handle that would ring bells in the engine room to communicate instructions, such as "dead slow" and "full steam"; the company, centred in Liverpool, England manufactured a great number of navigational instruments. Her parents lived in England, but happened to be visiting Paris in June, 1933, when she was born.
In the early days of the Second World War, when Liza was about 6, she and her mother were evacuated to Canada. Her daughter Kim still has the beloved doll her mother brought with her on the ship crossing the treacherous Atlantic. They settled in Montreal and Liza attended The Study, a private girls school. Her father, who was in the Home Guard, stayed behind in England until after the Germans were defeated. After joining his wife and daughter, he moved his family to the Moore Park area of Toronto and sent his daughter to Bishop Strachan School in Forest Hill.
When she was about 14, Liza went on a blind date with 16-year-old Ernest (Ernie) SAMUEL, a student at St. Andrew's College, a boarding school in Aurora, Ontario Although immediately smitten, she wisely decided to connect with him as a friend - while "she conspired with the nanny of the house to eliminate all other suitors," Mark SAMUEL said. After high school, she entered Trinity College at the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor of arts degree in 1955. She married Mr. SAMUEL on September 4, 1956. Children Kim, Tammy and Mark followed.
Mr. SAMUEL, who was born Ernest WILLINSKY, was the great-grand_son (on his mother's side) of Lewis SAMUEL, who founded the steel company Samuel, son and Company in 1855, a dozen years before Confederation. He was also the grand_son of Sigmund SAMUEL, a noted philanthropist who bequeathed the Sigmund Samuel Canadiana Gallery at the Royal Ontario Museum in Toronto. After his parents' marriage disintegrated when he was 3, Ernie and his mother moved into his grandfather's house, which was literally a treasure trove of furniture and the decorative arts.
At his grandfather's request, Ernie WILLINSKY legally assumed SAMUEL as his surname. After graduating in engineering from the U of T, he joined the family firm, which was then a steel-warehousing and distribution business, in 1953. Less than a decade later, he was president. He redirected the company into processing, then product manufacturing.
"He took over the company as a $6-million-dollar business and by the time he was done it was a $2-billion operation," Mark SAMUEL said. "He was an enterprise builder and she [his mother] was very supportive of that."
Mrs. SAMUEL, who had done some work as an actress in radio plays, "kept the home fires burning" while her husband built the company, which is now a leading North American processor and distributor of carbon steel, stainless steel and aluminum industrial products. In 1985, Mr. SAMUEL transferred the manufacturing and technology operations into Samuel Manu-Tech Inc., a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange, and expanded Samuel into the United States after the Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement was signed in 1988.
In the 1960s, the SAMUELs became involved in horse racing after they bought the show-jumper Canadian Club. The horse, ridden by equestrian James Day, was part of the Canadian team that won the gold medal at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City. They then moved into thoroughbreds, buying two foundation mares in 1972, and establishing Sam-Son Farm in Milton and the Sam-Son training centre in Ocala, Florida, which produced a number of champion horses, including Chief Bearheart, Sky Classic, and above all, Dance Smartly, a granddaughter of Northern Dancer and daughter of Danzig. In addition to everything else, Mrs. SAMUEL named all the horses.
As a three-year-old, Dance Smartly (known as Daisy because of the white flower-shaped mark on her forehead) ran her way into the record books in 1991 as the first filly to win Canada's Triple Crown, the first Canadian-bred winner of a Breeder's Cup Race and, for quite some time, the leading money-winning mare in the world. Mr. SAMUEL was named Racing Man of the Year in Canada and received the American Thoroughbred Horse Racing Eclipse Award for outstanding owner in 1991, the year Sam-Son Farm netted $6.9-million and broke the record for earnings. As a broodmare, Dance Smartly produced two consecutive winners of the Queen's Plate: Scatter the Gold (2000) and Dancethruthedawn (2001) and was inducted into both the Canadian and American horse racing halls of fame. After suffering an irreparable injury in an arthritic knee joint, she was euthanized in August, 2007, at 19, and buried at Sam-Son Farm in Milton, Ontario
Following the tradition established by his grandfather, Mr. and Mrs. SAMUEL were generous benefactors of the Royal Ontario Museum. His family tradition meshed seamlessly with her interests. She began as a volunteer in the 1980s, trained as a docent and became president of the museum volunteers. Besides hands-on work, the money she and her husband gave in the 1980s and 1990s enabled the museum to complete its Samuel European Galleries. They both served as board members, with Mrs. SAMUEL chairing the board and co-chairing the foundation board of governors.
In the late 1990s, Mr. SAMUEL suffered a head injury while on a sailing vacation with his wife and was in extremely ill health for about three years. She retreated from her volunteer activities to care for her ailing husband, while taking on many of his responsibilities at the family business. Having been a director of Samuel Manu-Tech since 1986, she became chair and also moved up from vice-chair to chair of Samuel. "She was very strong on governance," said her son, describing how she instituted boards of directors at both the public and private companies. Just as Mr. SAMUEL was recovering from his head injury, he was diagnosed with a brain tumour and died four months later on May 25, 2000. He was 69.
Instead of enjoying retirement with her husband after more than 40 years of marriage, Mrs. SAMUEL had to rebuild her life as a single woman. One of the first places she turned was to the Royal Ontario Museum, which as an institution had always been "close to her heart," according to her children.
"She carried on with a tremendous ferocity," said William THORSELL, who became chief executive officer of the Royal Ontario Museum in August, 2000. "I think she found the Royal Ontario Museum was a way of re-establishing with the broader world," he said, pointing out that she began serving on committees and boards at the museum again, including the committee to select the architect for Renaissance Royal Ontario Museum. (She favoured Daniel Libeskind.) In 2002, she was awarded the Queen Elizabeth II Jubilee Medal for her contributions to the community.
The next year, she donated $5-million to the museum, which dedicated its newly restored rotunda in memory of Mr. SAMUEL and in honour of Mrs. SAMUEL. She was also extremely generous to Renaissance Royal Ontario Museum, donating a total of $8.5-million. Later this year, the museum will unveil a 1,000-square-metre "green roof" in her honour on the south roof of the building's west wing. Built with donations from several trustees, Liza's Garden will be visible from the C5 restaurant.
Daughter Tammy SAMUEL- BALAZ took over the leadership of Sam-Son Farm, the family's horse breeding and racing interests, after her father's death in 2000. Like her brother and sister, she had been involved with horses all her life. An accomplished rider when she became president and general manager of the family's horse operations, she became one of the most significant figures in Canadian thoroughbred racing. In her 20s, she was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Although she appeared to have triumphed over the disease, and went on to marry and have two children, she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 2004 and died in January.
Mrs. SAMUEL's own ill health forced her to step down as chair of the Samuel group of companies in favour of her son Mark in January, 2006, although she accepted a position as Chairman Emeritus. Daughter Kim SAMUEL- JOHNSON is in charge of the family charitable foundation.
Stalwart even after her daughter Tammy's death, she enjoyed smoking and drinking "and did both right up to the end," according to her son. A few days before, she indulged in a last drink and a final cigarette and told her daughter Kim: "You know I have loved your father all my life."
Elizabeth June SAMUEL was born June 20, 1933, in Paris. She died of cancer and emphysema at her home on March 16, 2008. She was 74. Predeceased by husband Ernie and daughter Tammy, she is survived by daughter Kim, son Mark, five grandchildren and extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-22 published
Canadian ambassador to Moscow and envoy to United Nations was a man of peace
He inherited his famous father's fascination with international affairs and dedication to peace, disarmament and security issues but purposely 'ducked the public spotlight'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
As a diplomat, Geoffrey PEARSON was one of our men in Paris during the Algerian war of independence, in New Delhi when India invaded what is now Bangladesh, and at the United Nations and in Moscow during some of the chilliest days of the Cold War. But no matter what he achieved in his own life, in more than 30 years in the foreign service, he could never escape the shadow of his father's fame as a diplomat, Nobel Peace Prize winner and Canada's 14th prime minister.
"I don't like it, but there's nothing I can do about it," he told an interviewer after he was appointed Canada's ambassador to the Soviet Union in 1980. The headline in The Globe and Mail? "Pearson's son gets Moscow post."
He was philosophical about the inevitable link, saying it was better to be known as the son of someone who's well known for the things he did right than the things he did wrong. But he did admit once that, "although I might have enjoyed politics, I've ducked the public spotlight, have backed away from a political career because I'm Mike Pearson's son."
A man who inherited his mother's wit and his father's fascination with international affairs and dedication to peace, disarmament and security issues, Mr. PEARSON was also a dedicated family man. When he was a child in the 1930s and 1940s, it was common practice for diplomats and their wives to send their children to boarding schools at home or abroad while they served their country in foreign fields. It was the way things were, but it was not the way he wanted to bring up his own five children. They accompanied their parents around the world, and mostly attended local schools.
"We were all marked by the foreign-service experience," said his eldest daughter, Hilary PEARSON. " All five of us have been influenced to think bigger, think broader, to look out. That's what happens when you are a foreign-service kid. You are very aware of the world."
Geoffrey PEARSON was born in Toronto on Christmas Day, 1927, the elder child and only son of Lester Bowles PEARSON, then a lecturer in modern history at the University of Toronto, and his wife, Maryon Elspeth (née MOODY) - at least that's the official version. In fact, Doctor William (Billy) DAFOE delivered the baby at 11: 58 p.m. on December 24 and, being an obliging fellow, agreed to register the time of birth as 12: 02 a.m. the following morning, according to historian John English in Shadow of Heaven, the first volume of his biography of Lester Pearson.
By the time, Geoffrey entered Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario, at 14, he had attended, by his count, five schools, including Ravenscourt in Winnipeg and Ashbury in Ottawa. At Trinity College School, he was dubbed Joker because of his poker face. "He yawned his way to the sixth form and left with a well-earned scholarship to Varsity," reported the Trinity College School yearbook for 1945, while also paying tribute to his sportsmanship, his dry wit, and his responsibility as a house prefect.
Geoffrey had to sit out a year before university because he had contracted tubercular pleurisy. He spent months in the sun in Bermuda at a school friend's house and then in Arizona at a ranch belonging to one of his father's American colleagues, where he learned to ride horses and explore the desert.
He enrolled in Trinity College at the University of Toronto in 1946, studying history under Frank Underhill and Donald Creighton. Along with his friend Mike MacKENZIE, he spent the summer of 1948 as a cadet officer on a merchant-navy steamer, with responsibility for collecting garbage, making tea for the officer who stood the 4 a.m. watch and cleaning the ship's whistle, a task that involved climbing a 10-metre ladder braced against the ship's funnel. They stopped at major ports on the English Channel and, while the ship was docked, they made quick excursions into England, the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany (where they had an adventure when an army friend tried to take them through Berlin on the day the Russians imposed a blockade).
The following summer, he attended an international student seminar in the Dutch city of Breda, where he edited the Breda News and perhaps anticipated his future diplomatic career when he summed up the experience by opining that, for five weeks, he and the other students had "formed an international community… conscious not so much of having fully comprehended the problem of liberty and order as of having understood the bases on which an eventual solution to it must be built."
Before returning to university for his final year, he and Lucy Landon Carter MacKENZIE, a Trinity student and the younger sister of his friend Mike, became an item. He graduated in 1950 and went to Oxford on a Massey scholarship. She graduated the following year and moved to London to work as a tutor to the daughter of Dana WILGRESS, then the Canadian high commissioner. Ms. MacKENZIE and Mr. PEARSON travelled back to Canada - at her parents' request - where they were married in a private ceremony at her family home in London, Ontario, on Boxing Day, 1951.
They both returned to Oxford, where, in 1952, he completed his M.A. in philosophy, politics and economics. That summer, he wrote the exams for the Department of External Affairs, one of two dozen successful candidates in a field of more than 250 applicants. A year later, he was posted to Paris as third secretary. After four years in France - years in which Canada was a member of the International Control Commission trying to oversee France's withdrawal from Indochina, the Algerian war began, the Suez crisis erupted and the first two of his five children were born - the Pearsons returned to Ottawa.
By all accounts, 1957 was a busy year: their third child was born; the Louis St. Laurent Liberals were defeated by John Diefenbaker's Progressive Conservatives; his father won the Nobel Peace Prize and was subsequently chosen leader of the Liberal Party. All in all, Geoffrey PEARSON "accepted with alacrity," as he writes in Anecdotage, his privately printed memoirs, a secondment to work in the political division of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization Secretariat, an invitation that would take him away from Ottawa.
The secondment ended in June of 1961, by which time the Pearsons had produced their fourth child and only son. Mr. PEARSON was offered the No. 2 job in the Canadian embassy in Mexico under ambassador Arthur Irwin, a former editor of Maclean's, director of the National Film Board and the husband of poet P.K. Page. The posting - Mr. PEARSON describes his duties in Anecdotage as part academic, part consular and part diplomatic - lasted until the summer of 1964. By the time they returned to Ottawa, their fifth child had been born, they had learned to speak Spanish, and Mr. PEARSON's father was prime minister.
For the next three years, he worked in Ottawa in the United Nations Division of External Affairs. He went twice to New York as an adviser to the Canadian delegation but was mainly engaged in helping to shape our policies on peacekeeping. These were the years when the Americans under Lyndon Johnson were becoming heavily involved in the un-winnable Vietnam War.
After Lester PEARSON retired from politics in 1968, Geoffrey took a leave to arrange his father's papers and to work with Norman Robertson and G.S. Murray on a historical study of Canadian foreign policy. In the summer of 1969, the Pearsons were off again, this time to New Delhi, where he served until 1972 as deputy high commissioner. During his tenure, India invaded East Pakistan - which led to the establishment of Bangladesh - and conducted what it called a "peaceful" nuclear test. After his posting ended, Mr. PEARSON spent the 1972-73 academic year in Vancouver as a visiting professor at the University of British Columbia.
From 1973 to 1980, the Pearsons were back in Ottawa, where Geoffrey was in charge of the policy analysis group at External Affairs, then director-general of the United Nations Division of External Affairs. He was also heavily involved in the posthumous completion of his father's memoirs - Lester PEARSON had died of cancer in December of 1972 - and in the planning for the Lester B. Pearson College of the Pacific, one of 12 United World Colleges around the globe.
While at the United Nations bureau, he had a hand in drafting the speech that Pierre Trudeau delivered in the General Assembly on May 26, 1978, outlining a strategy to suffocate the arms race by "depriving" it "of the oxygen on which it feeds" by, among other things, prohibiting the production of fissionable material. That call was eventually incorporated in the first resolution passed by the General Assembly on that subject.
About this time, Mr. PEARSON was shifted again, so he could work directly under external affairs minister Donald Jamieson as adviser on disarmament and arms control affairs. In an interview with The Globe, Mr. PEARSON said: "The Canadian people are not up in arms (no pun intended), but there is more interest than there was before," referring to the priority that Mr. Trudeau had placed on increasing Canadian efforts to curb international arsenals of nuclear and conventional arms.
In June of 1980 (less than a year after the Soviet Union had invaded Afghanistan), Mr. Trudeau named him ambassador to Moscow, an appointment that Mr. PEARSON, then 53, described as a total surprise. After postings in Paris, Mexico City and New Delhi, he spoke Spanish and French, but he had never studied Russian. Mr. PEARSON's commitment to peace and disarmament and his background and expertise earned by working for North Atlantic Treaty Organization and the United Nations were far more significant than language skills to a prime minister interested in carving an international legacy for himself as a peacemaker. As Mr. PEARSON quipped at the time: "There's no sense sending someone to Moscow who's an expert on trade."
He was recalled to Ottawa in the fall of 1983 to serve as Mr. Trudeau's special representative on arms control. After Mr. Trudeau resigned as prime minister in 1984, Mr. PEARSON launched an international peace initiative that he hoped would defuse the Cold War between Washington and Moscow. The plan included proposals for a summit of the five nuclear powers, a renewed and strengthened non-proliferation treaty, a ban on high-altitude, anti-satellite weapons and restrictions on the mobility of intercontinental missile launchers.
While Mr. Trudeau liaised personally with the British and Commonwealth countries, he asked Mr. PEARSON to sell the proposal to Chinese and Soviet leaders. The Moscow initiative was hampered by the prolonged ill-health of Soviet leader Yuri Andropov, who was hospitalized after suffering renal failure in February of 1983. In February of 1984, Mr. Trudeau met Mr. Andropov's successor, Konstantin Chernenko, for a brief and inconclusive discussion. That year, the Soviets boycotted the Summer Games in Los Angeles, at least partly in retaliation for the U.S.-led boycott of the Moscow Games four years earlier.
Mr. PEARSON resigned from External Affairs in 1985, after more than 30 years service, and accepted an appointment as inaugural executive director of the Canadian Institute for International Peace and Security, a think tank on disarmament and security issues that was established with $1.5-million in start-up funds from the federal government. He held the post for more than four years.
Mr. PEARSON wrote a book about the early years of his father's career, Seize the Day: Lester B. Pearson and Crisis Diplomacy, which was published in 1993. John English, reviewing it for The Globe, described the book as "clearly written" and "as much a tract for our times as a history of postwar Canadian diplomacy." According to Mr. English: "What [Geoffrey] PEARSON admires in his father's generation and times is the creativeness of Canadian diplomacy and the fundamental commitment to the United Nations as a symbol of moral leadership and a place for diplomatic opportunity. That generation 'seized the day' in dangerous times, and the world and Canada were better for it."
In 2000, Mr. PEARSON was made an officer of the Order of Canada, the country's highest civilian honour, a designation that had been established in 1967 when his father was prime minister. He spent his last years in Ottawa with his wife, working on Anecdotage with the help of his daughter Hilary. At his 80th birthday party last summer - he didn't like celebrating himself on Christmas Day - he gave each member of his family a copy of his version of his life.
Geoffrey Arthur Holland PEARSON was born in Toronto on December 25, 1927. He died in his sleep at his Ottawa home on March 18, 2008. He was 80. Mr. PEARSON is survived by his wife, retired senator Landon PEARSON, and by their children Hilary, Katharine, Anne, Michael and Patricia. He also leaves his younger sister, Patricia Hannah, and 12 grandchildren. A service to celebrate his life will be held at St. Bartholomew's Church in Ottawa on April 12.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-24 published
Man arrested in Hamilton stabbing death
By James BRADSHAW and Caroline ALPHONSO with files from The Canadian Press, Page A9
Hamilton police have charged a 22-year-old man with the stabbing death of Chris MILLER, also 22, at a stag and doe after-party in the city's east end early Saturday.
Police arrested Robert BALDWIN at his home at 9: 30 p.m. Saturday and charged him with second-degree murder, attempted murder and aggravated assault. Mr. BALDWIN is expected to appear in court this morning.
Police say more arrests are expected.
Mr. MILLER reportedly suffered stab wounds to his neck at approximately 4: 20 a.m. Two other men were stabbed and are listed in stable condition after suffering non-life-threatening injuries.
The three victims were among 35 to 40 people who left a stag and doe party at a nearby Royal Canadian Legion banquet hall and went to 239 Weir St. North, where the attacks allegedly occurred.
Neighbour Kevin PELLETIER, 45, said he heard people return to the house around 2 a.m. Saturday. He saw people getting out of three cars. And then around 4: 30, he heard a woman screaming, "Someone's cut in the neck, call an ambulance."
Mr. PELLETIER, who has lived on the street for 17 years, said a couple in their 30s live in the home with their three children. There have been a few incidents on other streets around him, but not on his, he said.
"I think the neighbours are pretty shocked that it happened," he said.
Another neighbour, Ted MARTIN, said he came out at 5: 30 Saturday morning to find police cruisers on the street. "It's just one of those parties that got out of hand, I guess," he said.
A man who answered the phone at 239 Weir St. declined comment.
Mr. MILLER aspired to be a high school teacher but had to interrupt his studies in English literature at Brock University because he could no longer pay the tuition, according to friend Justin BRIDGEMAN. Instead, he had moved back in with his father in Hamilton and taken a factory job to earn money. Mr. MILLER's mother died while he was a child, and Friends say his father and younger sister are in shock.
"Chris was a quiet and really intelligent guy who loved camping in Algonquin Park with us," Mr. BRIDGEMAN said.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-29 published
Career nurse served in pioneering wartime plastic surgery unit
With the rank of lieutenant nursing sister in the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, she sailed for Britain during the Battle of the Atlantic to tend burn victims and the wounded. She continued nursing until 1986
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Margery (Bunny) Cambon QUAIL, a woman of resolute good cheer, was one of the stalwart Canadian nurses to cross the treacherous, enemy-infested Atlantic waters during the Second World War. She worked with plastic surgeons in hospitals in southwest England to care for badly burned pilots and civilians wounded in German bombing raids.
"I am quite sure that her experience as a nurse in England, caring for a great many very badly injured victims of war, led her to conclude that she would never, ever, feel sorry for herself, no matter whatever happened to her. And that is exactly how she lived her life," wrote Austen CAMBON, her brother, in an e-mail tribute.
She came from a military family. Her father, George CAMBON, was a Scottish immigrant who played in several orchestras in the eastern United States before crossing the border and joining the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery Band in Kingston, Ontario That is where he met and married Lucy DUFFIELD, whose father was a colonel in the Royal Ulster Rifles and had been garrison commander in Jamaica before bringing his family to Canada in the early years of the last century. Soon after their marriage, the CAMBONs moved to Quebec City. He was a professional musician in the regimental band of the Royal 22nd Regiment under the command of future governor-general Georges VANIER.
Margery, the eldest of four children, was born in the final year of the First World War. She once explained that "my mother was called Bunny and she called me Bunny," but others say she was given the name because she had large ears, a trait inherited from the DUFFIELD side of the family. Noreen was born in 1919, Ken in 1923 and Austen in 1932.
The CAMBONs lived on Cartier Avenue near Battlefields Park in Quebec City. Margery went to nearby St. George's School and then Commissioner's High School, graduating in 1936. She trained at Jeffery Hale Hospital, graduating in 1939. On February 8, 1940, five months after Canada declared war on Germany, she enlisted in the nursing service of the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps, which embraced the three branches of the military: navy, army and air force. Given that the army was bred in her bones, she elected to serve as a commissioned army officer with the rank of lieutenant nursing sister.
Along with another nurse from Quebec City, she made her way to Halifax in December of 1940, according to a short memoir she provided for The Military Nurses of Canada: Recollections of Canadian Military Nurses, edited by E.A. Landells. By the time they arrived in Halifax, their ship had already sailed, so the two single women boarded a mail ship - which she later joked had plenty of males - and crossed the ocean in the days before the advent of full escort convoys. "It took 11 days" and it was "cold and miserable," she told Wilma BLOKHUIS of the Oakville Beaver in September of 1991.
In England, she was a reinforcement for the 15th Canadian General Hospital at Bramshott, Surrey, which had been established with officers and staff in June of 1940. Dorothy Macham, who had graduated from Women's College Hospital School of Nursing in Toronto in 1932 and had joined the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps shortly after the war began, was already there. When Stewart Gordon, one of the earliest Canadian plastic surgeons, set up a plastic surgery unit in November of 1941 at Rooksdown House, Park Prewett Hospital, near Basingstoke, Hampshire, he took Lt. CAMBON and Lt. Macham with him.
The work was harrowing, but there was also time for fun and Friendships and, for Lt. CAMBON, the chance to own and ride her first bicycle. Rationing meant that cars were mostly reserved for military and official use, and buses were scarce in the countryside. While she rarely talked after the war about the horrors she had seen as a nurse, she did tell her children how she had always wanted a bike when she was growing up in Quebec City, but her parents were too poor to indulge her fancy.
Six months after Lt. CAMBON enlisted, her younger brother Ken (obituary March 17, 2007) joined up, lying about his age to enlist in the Royal Rifles of Canada in July of 1940, just before his 17th birthday. His regiment was shipped to Hong Kong to defend the British colony in an ill-fated stand against the Japanese. After the Canadian, British and Hong Kong regiments surrendered on Christmas Day, 1941, he was taken prisoner and spent the next 44 months in horrific conditions in Japanese PoW camps, including, as a final torture, helping to dig a huge pit late in the war to serve as a mass grave for himself and his fellow prisoners if the feared Allied invasion occurred. His family knew he was missing, but it was a long time before they had official word.
Meantime, Lt. CAMBON's younger sister, Noreen, had finished high school in Quebec City and moved to Hamilton to train as a nurse. When she learned that Ken had been captured by the Japanese, she quit nursing school and joined the Royal Canadian Air Force, Women's Division. Trained as a radar specialist, she was stationed in Newfoundland, then in Britain, where she sometimes met up with her older sister. After the war, she trained as a nurse.
That left only the youngest CAMBON in Quebec City. "I was only about 7 years old when my brother and my two sisters left home to serve in World War Two," said Austen. "Their absence serving our country abroad for the next five years meant that I really did not get to know them… until very much later on."
In May of 1943, Lt. CAMBON's unit moved to the Basingstoke Neurological and Plastic Surgery Hospital in Hackwood Park, on the estate of Lord Camrose, with Lt. Macham as the "in charge" nurse. The two Canadian nurses had become close Friends and, when Lt. Macham was invited to Buckingham Palace in 1945 to receive the Royal Red Cross Medal for her services during the war, she invited Lt. CAMBON to accompany her.
It was also at Basingstoke that Lt. CAMBON met her future husband, Sergeant John QUAIL. He was from Winnipeg and had gone overseas as a motorcycle instructor with the Canadian Provost Corps, a company of military police made up of volunteers from the Royal Canadian Mounted Police. By all accounts, Sgt. QUAIL was a bit of a lad, a carefree adventurer more interested in a good time than in treading the straight and narrow. He broke his wrist in a motorcycle accident and ended up on Lt. CAMBON's ward. "He took a fancy to me," as she described it later. "We met over a bedpan" is the way he liked to tell the tale.
They were married on December 11, 1943, in St. Stephen's Church in Twickenham, Surrey. Her uncle, John DUFFIELD, who had been a chaplain in the First World War and had then become a canon in the Church of England, officiated.
By this stage of the war, small contingents of Canadian nurses were serving on the continent and Lt. CAMBON wanted to join them. As a married woman, however, she was refused permission to cross the Channel. "They had made this ruling that you could not go if you were married because they had too many girls becoming pregnant who had got married," she told the Oakville Beaver in 1991. "It was a bit of a hassle sending them home, and all that jazz."
In September of 1945, the QUAILs returned to Canada. She and Noreen were both still in uniform when their emaciated brother stepped off a train in Quebec City, finally home from the war. She had last seen him when he was 16. "When Ken left, he was just a little guy, he was always kind of short, and I couldn't believe how much he had grown even though he was malnourished," Margery QUAIL told the Oakville Beaver. "He would have been much bigger had he had proper food," she said, ever the nurse. "It was a great thing to see him back alive."
The QUAILs settled in Toronto. In the next five years, Ms. QUAIL had three babies - Susan, Judi and Charlie - each about two years apart in age, followed after a gap of six years by David in 1957. As Mr. QUAIL pursued various ventures from Vancouver to Toronto, from starting a natural-sponge enterprise to selling paint and cars to operating a tractor trailer across the country, Ms. QUAIL was the moral and financial backbone of the family, raising the children and working as a nurse at Vancouver General Hospital, and at Oakville Trafalgar Memorial Hospital. She finally agreed to retire from nursing in 1986, at 68.
About five years ago, Ms. QUAIL began to have memory problems, similar to the dementia issues that affected Noreen and Ken, who died of Alzheimer's disease a year ago. She and her husband continued to live at home until she had a bad fall in 2003. They moved into a retirement home in Oakville and remained together until Mr. QUAIL died of prostate cancer in January of 2004. By last summer, Ms. QUAIL had lost her hearing. After breaking her hip in a second fall, she moved, in August, into a veterans home named in honour of her wartime nursing colleague, Dorothy Macham, where she celebrated her 90th birthday a month ago with family, Friends and a glass or two of white wine.
Margery Cambon QUAIL was born in Quebec City on February 15, 1918. She died of complications from dementia at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre in Toronto on March 21, 2008. She was 90. Predeceased by her husband, John, and brother Kenneth CAMBON, Ms. QUAIL is survived by her children Susan, Judi, Charles and David. She also leaves her sister Noreen and brother Austen, plus seven grandchildren.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-05 published
Man charged in girl's death remanded in custody
By Timothy APPLEBY, Page A12
A 20-year-old Cornwall man charged with the first-degree murder of a five-year-old girl appeared briefly in court yesterday and was remanded in custody in Ottawa pending a further court appearance next Wednesday.
Shane HALEY was arrested without incident at his Cornwall home a few hours after Alissa MARTIN- TRAVERS was found slain early Thursday in the small, beige downtown Cumberland Street house she shared with her mother and baby sister. Mr. HALEY was "a remote acquaintance" of Alissa's mother, Stephanie MARTIN, Cornwall Police Chief Dan PARKINSON said.
An autopsy was under way yesterday at the Centre of Forensic Sciences in Toronto.
Police have said only that there were "obvious signs of trauma" to her body, and while no motive has been disclosed, she is not believed to have been sexually assaulted.
Several items were seized when Mr. HALEY was arrested.
Ms. MARTIN is not a suspect in her daughter's death and no other suspects are being sought, Chief PARKINSON said.
It was the first homicide in Cornwall since 2005, when there were three, and it has left the city of 46,000 in a state of shock and disbelief, police spokesman Blake PAQUIN said yesterday.
"It's very traumatizing for the family, for the community and for the police."
Outside the MARTIN- TRAVERS home, still sealed off yesterday with yellow crime-scene tape, a stream of sympathizers continued to leave teddy bears, flowers and brief messages.
Police were summoned to the home Thursday at about 1: 30 a.m., when Ms. MARTIN called 911. Mr. HALEY was arrested and charged in midafternoon on the same day.
"They knew each other in a casual relationship," Mr. PAQUIN said of the bereaved mother and the accused, whom he described as "a person living in the neighbourhood."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-08 published
Beryl PLUMPTRE: 99
She Headed Trudeau's Anti-Inflation Board
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
Toronto -- An economist by training, an activist by nature and feisty to the core, Beryl PLUMPTRE, O.C., was the national president of the Consumers' Association of Canada, a member of the Economic Council of Canada and, notably, Liberal prime minister Pierre Trudeau's appointee to head the Food Prices Review Board in 1973- although she refused to report to the government of the day and insisted on speaking directly to the people of Canada. She also served as vice-chair of the Anti-Inflation Board and was a long-time volunteer with non-profit organizations including the Vanier Institute of the Family and the Kidney Foundation of Canada.
She was Australian by birth and met her late husband, economist and diplomat A.F. Wynne PLUMPTRE, at Cambridge University, where she was a student of John Maynard Keynes in the 1930s. Mrs. PLUMPTRE, who was 99, died surrounded by family in her home in Rockcliffe, the Ottawa enclave where she had served as reeve for several years.
A full obituary is forthcoming

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-09 published
JURCZYNSKI, Isabella Glenn
Peacefully on Sunday, April 6, 2008 in her 89th year. Beloved wife of the late Zbigniew John JURCZYNSKI. Dear mother of Christopher and Andrew (Jane CRISPIN.) Loving grandmother of Charlie, Alexander, Emma, Isabella and William. Cherished aunt of Kathy O'BRIEN, Glenn MARTIN and Debbie BORBRIDGE. Friends are invited to visit the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa on Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. A Funeral Mass will be held on Friday at St. Hyacinth Roman Catholic Church, 201 LeBreton Street North at 10 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Hospice at May Court would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-10 published
Trudeau's anti-inflation watchdog was a Nader of the True North
Forthright, opinionated, blunt and self-confident, she took on Ottawa on her own terms and triumphed during the Egg-gate scandal of 1974. 'No one,' she said, 'looks out for the consumer'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Beryl PLUMPTRE - her name conjures images of a headmistress at a jolly girls boarding school from the 1930s, the kind of woman who wore lisle stockings and sensible shoes and tolerated no nonsense. In truth, the only aspect that the elegantly coiffed and garbed Mrs. PLUMPTRE shared with that caricature was her antipathy to nonsense wherever she found it - in government, the media, marketing boards and, especially, in the pronouncements of her nemesis, agriculture minister Eugene Whelan.
She was named Canadian newsmaker of the year in 1975, a considerable feat for a woman who hailed from Australia and who, until she was appointed chair of the Food Prices Review Board at the age of 64, had spent most of her adult life as a homemaker and a volunteer.
Her topping of the newsworthy polls coincided with her tenure on the government payroll, a tenure that had seen her ridiculed for the size of her salary - this was before the term "employment equity" had been conceived - her mandate and her effectiveness.
In an editorial in August of 1973, The Globe and Mail demanded rhetorically: "What in heaven's name possessed the Government to pick Mrs. PLUMPTRE for this job. Did it never intend the board to be anything more than what an opposition member of Parliament called it some months ago - a half-baked sham?"
A little more than two years later, The Globe allowed that she "has not turned out the way we [or the government] thought she was going to turn out." The editorial went on to praise her for attacking federal and provincial government ineptitude with regard to rising consumer prices and inflation, and called for the federal government to extend her term by another two years.
As sometimes happens, the government of the day failed to heed this august advice and rolled the Food Prices Review Board into a new agency, the Anti-Inflation Board, headed by Jean-Luc Pépin, with Mrs. PLUMPTRE as vice-chair. Nobody challenged Mr. Pepin's $55,000 salary. As for Mrs. PLUMPTRE, she refused an inflationary increase from the $40,000 she had negotiated three years earlier.
The person who never changed his mind about Mrs. PLUMPTRE was her old foe, Eugene Whelan. As agriculture minister in Pierre Trudeau's Liberal government, he represented farmers and favoured marketing boards, while Mrs. PLUMPTRE advocated for cheaper food for consumers, and wanted marketing boards dismantled to encourage competition. "She was a snob," Mr. Whelan insisted in a telephone interview this week, saying she looked down on him because he was a farmer. "As much as I disagreed with her and her outlook on people and society, she was not dumb," he allowed before lapsing into a rant about how people should be more concerned about the price of energy than the cost of food.
Beryl Alyce ROUCHE was born in Melbourne, Australia, at the end of 1908, the younger child and only daughter of Edward Charles and Alyce (née) ROUCHE. Her father was in the lumber business her mother, a homemaker, was prone to periods of ill health. Beryl, who was educated at Presbyterian Ladies College, is said to have acquired her initial interest in economics from her older brother, Alan. After high school, she attended the University of Melbourne, graduating with a bachelor of commerce degree in For the next two years, she worked for the Bank of New South Wales. After she won a scholarship to Cambridge University, the bank granted her a two-year leave of absence - a doubly huge feat for a woman in those days. She arrived in England in 1936 to study economics at a time when John Maynard Keynes was teaching at the university and about to publish his pivotal work, The General Theory of Employment, Interest and Money.
She had more than economics on her mind after meeting Arthur Fitzwalter (Wynne) PLUMPTRE, a graduate student in economics from Toronto. They became engaged, but Ms. ROUCHE was called home to Australia by a family crisis (involving difficulties in her parents' marriage or in her mother's health or, more likely, in both.) Mr. PLUMPTRE finished his degree and, after a back-and-forth correspondence with his beloved, he made the lengthy journey to Australia to claim his bride. They were married on May 21, They travelled to Canada because Mr. PLUMPTRE had an academic appointment at the University of Toronto. The PLUMPTREs and their children - Barbara (1941) and Timothy (1943) - lived in Washington during the Second World War because he was on the staff of the Canadian embassy. He was director of the Washington division of the Wartime Prices and Trade Board and a delegate to international monetary and financial conferences that were instrumental in the establishment of the United Nations. They later lived in Paris while he worked for North Atlantic Treaty Organization.
In the late 1940s, they spent two years in Toronto, where Mr. PLUMPTRE worked as associate editor of Saturday Night magazine, before moving to Ottawa as head of the economic division of what was then called the Department of External Affairs. He went to the Ministry of Finance in 1954 as an assistant deputy minister and executive director of the International Monetary Fund.
These were the years when Mrs. PLUMPTRE was preoccupied with raising her children and supporting her husband's career as he rose through the diplomatic and financial ranks of the federal civil service. Nevertheless, she worked briefly as a research officer for the Wartime Prices and Trade Board and later as an economic consultant to the Tariff Board and the Royal Commission on Coasting Trade.
She was a committed volunteer for organizations such as the Children's Aid Society, the Family Service Agency, the Canadian Welfare Council and especially the Consumer's Association of Canada. During the five years she served as president, from 1961 to 1966, she developed a national profile as a no-nonsense and ferocious advocate, sort of Ralph Nader of the True North.
Barbara remembers helping out her busy mother by doing the grocery shopping with her father, and bringing home sausages larded with fat for dinner. Outraged by the substandard sausages, Mrs. PLUMPTRE later confronted the shoddy producer, waving the offending specimens and demanding higher standards.
Mrs. PLUMPTRE's advocacy helped press the Trudeau government to establish the Department of Consumer and Corporate Affairs, making Canada one of the first nations to give a seat at the cabinet table to consumers alongside the interests of agriculture, industry, mines and other producer groups. Ron Basford was the inaugural minister.
Her husband retired as assistant deputy finance minister in 1965, two years after he was passed over for the deputy's job in favour of Robert Bryce, who had also studied at Cambridge under John Maynard Keynes. Mr. PLUMPTRE then became the second principal of Scarborough College, a satellite campus that had been established at the University of Toronto in 1964. Mrs. PLUMPTRE moved into Miller Lash House with her husband on the Scarborough campus and took on the considerable duties expected of the principal's wife while completing the last year of her mandate as Consumer's Association of Canada president.
In 1968, she was appointed president of the Vanier Institute of the Family, a non-profit agency that had been created with a $6-million endowment from the federal government. The institute was modelled on recommendations from the proceedings of the Canadian Conference of the Family, which had been organized by Georges Vanier and his wife, Pauline, at Rideau Hall in 1964 during his tenure as governor-general. She succeeded neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield. At the time, she was a member of the Economic Council of Canada, the Ontario Economic Council and the Consumer's Association of Canada, which had just changed its name to the Canadian Consumer Council. Not surprisingly, given her consumer advocacy roots, she insisted that the focus of the Vanier Institute "must be thoroughly in touch with family life of all kinds, not the ideal of the family, but the reality of the family as people live it."
The PLUMPTREs moved back to Ottawa in 1972 when his term as principal ended, as coincidentally did hers at the Vanier Institute. But she was not out of the public eye for long: Mr. Trudeau appointed her chair of the Food Prices Review Board in May of 1973. She was 64.
In announcing the appointment, Herb Gray, then minister of consumer affairs, stressed that the board would be independent and have the power to summon witnesses: and require them to give evidence under oath. Other members included Gordon Burton, an agricultural economist and rancher from Alberta; Louis Lorrain, executive vice-president of the United Paper Workers International from Quebec; Evelyn Root, a journalist from British Columbia; and W. Grant Thompson, a chartered accountant from Nova Scotia. The board's job was to monitor food prices, conduct investigations of unusual price increases, and produce quarterly reports and make them publicly available. Responding to a question at a press conference, she said that recommendations would be submitted to the public and consumers affairs minister. "Then it is up to the public. That's where the power lies."
In the beginning, she withstood attacks in the House of Commons, even from the party that had appointed her. "We could hire a preacher cheaper," a Liberal member of Parliament mused in June of 1973, proposing prayer as a more effective means to lowering food prices. The New Democrats wanted her fired and the board abolished. Gradually, though, as she hammered away at price inflation and produced quarterly reports, her credibility increased. As she observed: "The Department of Agriculture looks out for the producers, trade and commerce looks out for the processors, but no one looks out for the consumer."
And then there was Egg-gate, the rotten-egg scandal of 1974. The Department of Agriculture, headed by Mr. Whelan, established the Canadian Egg Marketing Agency to set provincial production quotas and prices. The farmers got higher prices, but consumers had to absorb those increases. Egg production grew rapidly, but egg consumption went down, at least partly because of cost, and the agency itself soon ran into trouble, racking up a $10-million debt.
By the end of September of 1974, food inspectors had decreed that some 28 million eggs stored in warehouses were rotten and needed to be destroyed. The wastage, which agriculture officials tried to minimize, prompted a public showdown between Mrs. PLUMPTRE, who was waging battle on behalf of consumers, and Mr. Whelan, who was supporting the egg producers. The controversy changed public and press attitudes about Mrs. PLUMPTRE. From a scapegoat, she had become a champion, and there were calls to extend her mandate.
Nevertheless, Mr. Trudeau terminated the Food Prices Review Board, set up the Anti-Inflation Board and invited Mrs. PLUMPTRE to serve under Mr. Pépin. She refused the job at first, but was persuaded by consumer affairs minister André Ouellet to change her mind. No matter how cynically the government had acted in appointing her to the Food Prices Review Board in 1973, it now wanted her on the Anti-Inflation Board because of the credibility she had built up with the public.
After only eight months at the Anti-Inflation Board, she announced her resignation, citing personal reasons. Her husband, who had been diagnosed with a form of skin cancer in 1960, was very ill, and she had only agreed to work at the Anti-Inflation Board long enough to see it and its policies established. Wynne died in A little more than a year later, she accepted an invitation to sit on the board of Dominion Stores. "You're not going to suggest I've sold out just because I'm on the payroll of a food chain," she said in an interview with the Toronto Star in May of 1978 after her appointment was announced. "I was on the payroll of the government and you wouldn't say then I sold out. I'll tell you the government didn't think so, anyway." And that - forthright, opinionated and self-confident - was Mrs. PLUMPTRE. To ensure the reporter got the message, she added: "I'm a professional person and I get paid for giving professional advice - but what I get paid as a director is not going to make me a millionaire."
She also served on the boards of Canada Life, Canada Permanent Trust and Hollinger, the company that Conrad Black once controlled. She told her son she resigned from Hollinger because, as a director, she didn't feel she was getting enough information about the company's operations and plans.
Having been a high-profile public appointee, she finally sought public office in local politics as the reeve of Rockcliffe Park, a position she held from 1978 to 1985.
She spent her last years gardening, bird watching and keeping an eye on public and consumer affairs.
Beryl Alyce PLUMPTRE was born in Melbourne, Australia, on December 27, 1908. She died of pneumonia at home in Rockcliffe Park, Ottawa, on April 4, 2008. She was 99. Predeceased by her husband, Wynne, she is survived by her children Barbara and Tim. She also leaves several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-16 published
OSMASTON, Dorothy Florence " Dobbie"
(October 16, 1917-April 12, 2008)
After a long, creative and generous life. Beloved mother of Marianne KING-WILSON (Dr. Roger GOULD), Parry Sound, Pamela KING- WILSON and Susan KING- WILSON (Charles VIGNEAULT) in British Columbia, and James KING- WILSON (Karen CLARKE) in England. Loving grandmother of James O'TOOLE (Kylie MARTIN) in Australia, Robert O'TOOLE (Tina) in British Columbia; and Stephen and Peter VIGNEAULT in British Columbia. Fond great-grandmother of three. Dear sister of Stephen, Shirley (Margaret), and the late Ronald and Pamela. Loving aunt of ten. Fondly remembered by Norma KING- WILSON and John KING- WILSON. Memorial in the Logan Chapel, Parry Sound, on Friday, April 18. Visitation at 1, service at 2 p.m. 1-800-265-2218. If desired, donation details on Logan website. "Leave each place better than you found it," was Dobbie's motto. She has. Online condolences:
www.logansfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-17 published
Ontario New Democratic Party leader turned province into a three-party political system
A politician who was remarkably deficient in ego, he took over with a caucus so small that he held 18 portfolios, yet 'was never, ever, set back.' He put cause before ambition and twice stepped aside for others
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
In a political career that spanned three decades and as many premiers (Leslie Frost, John Robarts and William Davis), Donald C. MacDONALD never despaired that his social democratic convictions would ultimately prevail. "I am, by nature, an optimist - an 'incorrigible optimist' according to my Friends," he confided in his aptly named memoirs, The Happy Warrior.
"Whenever we were defeated, he always found a moral victory," said former politician Stephen Lewis, who succeeded Mr. MacDONALD as leader of Ontario's New Democratic Party. "Whenever we made progress by inches, he saw a socialist sweep. He was never, ever, set back."
As a politician, Mr. MacDONALD was that most extraordinary of creatures, a man without an overweening ego. He put the cause before his own ambition, working as an organizer for the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation under David Lewis, stepping down from the New Democratic Party leadership to make way for Stephen Lewis in 1970 and then resigning from York South, the seat he had held for 27 years, to ease Bob Rae's transition from federal to provincial politics.
How he would respond to Mr. Rae's current political incarnation is harder to gauge. "For Donald, it would have been inexplicable. It would have hurt him deeply," said Mr. Lewis. "He would not have understood how somebody who was schooled at the feet of Tommy Douglas, Stanley Knowles and David Lewis, and who then became premier of the province as a New Democrat, could make the jump [to the Liberal Party]. He would have been quite taken aback."
"He was very disappointed, but, directly contrary to what some people have said, it never affected our personal relationship. He never expressed any bitterness to me," said Mr. Rae, speaking from the lobby of the House of Commons in Ottawa. "He understood that I had reached a different point in my life and that I simply disagreed with the idea that one could only be a progressive inside the New Democratic Party. I also felt that a real change was taking place because the Harris-Harper takeover of [the Progressive Conservative] parties provincially and federally changed the dynamics of politics - and I continue to believe that very strongly."
Many of us wander through life changing jobs and searching for our true vocation. Not Mr. MacDONALD. He set his sights on a career in politics as a teenager and determined the route he would follow to achieve his goal. "I can recall vividly an occasion in Grade 10," he wrote in his memoirs, "when each member of the class had to deliver a speech on what they intended to do upon graduation. Some were uncertain, but not me: school teaching was to be the stepping stone, while doing undergraduate work, to weekly journalism, in pursuit of the goal of politics."
The only question: Which party? His parents were apolitical and, as a young man, he leaned towards the Progressive Conservatives, if only as a personal tilt away from the Liberals, who dominated federal politics. It was life, and what he saw of it during the Depression and the Second World War, that determined his political stripe as a social democrat.
"Although philosophically misguided, he was nonetheless a predominant figure in the legislature," said his old political foe, William Davis, Ontario premier from 1971 to 1985. "He was a great debater and very knowledgeable with respect to the rules of the House. I think he was respected by his own caucus, and - I can only speak for myself - I even had a certain degree of affection for him. He put the issues of the day and the issues of his party before any personal ambition of his own… and he kept the party active, and provided leadership in the House and he certainly added to the ongoing debate about Confederation."
"He was the anchor and encyclopedia of Ontario's political life - not just in the Frost years, but in the Robarts years," said Mr. Lewis. "And at times, because there were so few Co-Operative Commonwealth Federationers and New Democratic Partyers in the legislature, he handled every portfolio himself."
On that, he and Mr. Rae remain in complete agreement. "His great characteristic was his optimism and his sheer durability. He was a tremendous generalist in his knowledge of public policy and in his dedication to the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation and the New Democratic Party," said Mr. Rae. "He was a very dedicated, ebullient, hard-working guy - quite remarkable."
Donald Cameron MacDONALD was born in Cranbrook, British Columbia, on December 7, 1913, the eldest of eight children to Charles Pirie and Gertrude Annie (JENNINGS) MacDONALD.
Charles, who was of Scottish ancestry, had left the family farm on the Tullochgorum Road near Ormstown, south of Montreal, for the West. After several years and jobs, his father persuaded him to come back and till the family soil. Young Donald went to nearby Ormstown High School, graduating in 1931. He took teacher training at Macdonald College in Ste-Anne-de-Bellevue, graduating in 1932 as the Depression deepened.
His first job was in a country school near Shawville, Quebec, teaching pupils from all seven elementary grades. After five years, he had worked his way up to a high school in Sherbrooke, where he also coached hockey, football and basketball, while taking extramural university courses for an undergraduate degree from Queen's University. It took him six years and $1,875, including the cost of actually living in Kingston and going to class in his senior year so that he could graduate in 1938 with an honours degree in history, politics and economics.
That year was pivotal as training for a political career. He wrote a column for the student newspaper, sat on the executive of the debating union and was a delegate from Queen's at the founding of the Canadian Student Union in Winnipeg. He also won a fellowship to do graduate work and caught the eye of a man named Arthur Newell, who hired him as a travelling lecturer in Britain and the United States to promote Anglo-American understanding.
After completing his master's thesis in March, 1939, Mr. MacDONALD embarked on a cross-country tour to gauge the state of the Canadian nation, made a quick trip back to Queen's to write his final exams and then sailed for England to travel and speak to audiences in Britain and on the continent. The war scuttled plans for an American tour, so he was sent back across Canada, earning enough to wipe out his university debts. Turning his back on teaching, Mr. MacDONALD sought the next rung on his self-styled career ladder - journalism. He landed a job first as a proofreader on The Gazette in Montreal and then on the education and consular beats.
In February, 1942, he left the newspaper, joined the Royal Canadian Navy and married Simone BOURCHEIX, a young woman he had met at the inaugural Canadian Student Union conference in Winnipeg in 1938. By chance, they met again in 1942 at adjoining tables during a Montreal lecture on French translation. Six months later, they were engaged and, after a weekend wedding and a two-day honeymoon, he was training to be a wireless operator in St-Hyacinthe while his bride taught school in Montreal.
Instead of going overseas, he was promoted to sub-lieutenant and sent to Ottawa to work as the secretary to a top-secret communications committee deciphering signals from enemy submarines. (That summer he also purchased, for $25, a sustaining membership in the Co-operative Commonwealth Federation, a left-leaning Canadian political party that had been founded in 1932.) Within two years of joining the navy, he was made founding editor of Canada Digest, a monthly compendium of news and features that was circulated to Canadian military personnel overseas.
From print, he moved to radio as the chairman of Servicemen's Forum. Working with Robert G. Allen, later the executive producer of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation drama, he went to a different military base every week in Canada (and abroad, after the Germans surrendered in 1945), chose a panel of three vocal servicemen and launched a free-wheeling discussion on topics such as postwar employment, housing or education. He had three lasting memories from these days: inspecting the "rubble heap" of the former Reich Chancellery in Berlin; observing the trial of Irma Grese, the sadistic concentration camp guard who was reputed to have made lampshades out of human skin and then hanged in December, 1945 and the exhuming of mass graves in the forests outside Celle in central Germany.
After being demobilized, Mr. MacDONALD and his wife settled in Ottawa, where, in May of 1946, he accepted an invitation from David Lewis, federal secretary of the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation, to work at the party's national office. "It was the most important decision of my political life," he wrote in his memoirs, "a culmination of all that had gone before, and the gateway to what was to follow." For several years, he travelled the country as federal treasurer and organizer, drumming up financial and electoral support for the party while Mrs. MacDONALD kept house and took the major role in raising their three young children, Sandra, Joy and Brian.
When Ted Jolliffe resigned as Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation leader in Ontario, after having lost the Toronto riding of York South in the 1951 provincial election, Mr. MacDONALD was invited to switch gears from international and national affairs to provincial ones. He knew the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation could not achieve national prominence without a strong presence in one of the central provinces. Besides, if nothing else, winning the leadership of the Ontario party would curtail his incessant travelling.
At the convention in November, 1953, Mr. MacDONALD came out ahead of the other contenders, Fred Young and Andrew Brewin, on the second ballot. As leader, he was hobbled for nearly two years by not having a seat in the legislature, a situation he rectified in the 1955 provincial election, when he won the Toronto riding of York South. His three-member caucus was so small that he was the designated critic of 18 different government ministries.
"His work habits were prodigious," said Stephen Lewis. "He churned out press release after press release at his old typewriter in an astonishing effort at enlightening the province about the issues. And because he was so good on his feet and so effective in the house, it is quite remarkable, that sitting with one or two colleagues, he was effectively the opposition. It was a performance unlike any other that I can think of in Ontario's political life."
Although he never became premier, never even became leader of the Official Opposition, Mr. MacDONALD turned Ontario into a three-party political system, oversaw the transition of the Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation into the New Democratic Party in 1961 and achieved his biggest electoral victory in 1967, when the party's standings rose from eight to 20 seats and its share of the popular vote rose from 16 to 26 per cent.
Three years later, the party thought it could smell success with a younger and more charismatic leader. Having laid the bedrock for 15 years, Mr. MacDONALD stepped down as leader to make way for Stephen Lewis, the son of his old Co-Operative Commonwealth Federation colleague.
"I have always struggled with that in my life, whether it was premature, and yet Donald handled it with such grace," said Mr. Lewis. "We sat in the legislature together after I was leader. We were very, very close colleagues, working harmoniously and effectively, largely because Donald was so incredibly devoted and kind. Even though I know it always hurts when you relinquish a leadership and would have preferred not to, he was the soul of comradeship and was constantly and consistently helpful and engaged."
In the 1975 election, Mr. Lewis ran a powerful campaign on a platform of rent control and workplace safety and won enough seats to form the Official Opposition in a Tory minority government led by Mr. Davis. The party's fortunes faltered two years later. The New Democratic Party was reduced to 33 seats and the Liberals became the Official Opposition. A year later, a frustrated Mr. Lewis resigned as leader of the party and as an member of provincial parliament. Michael Cassidy succeeded him in 1978, only to resign in 1982.
Mr. MacDONALD persuaded Bob Rae to run for the leadership - "he was a hard man to say no to," said Mr. Rae. Mr. MacDONALD didn't want Mr. Rae to be a leader without a seat in the legislature, as he, himself, had been in the early 1950s, so he offered up his own riding when nobody else in the party was willing to make the sacrifice. Mr. Rae won York South in a by-election in 1982 and, eight years later, became the 21st premier of Ontario and the only New Democratic Party politician to serve as a provincial premier east of Manitoba. The party was routed in the 1995 election and Mr. Rae subsequently resigned as leader, gave up his seat and quit the party.
Mr. MacDONALD was 69 when he retired from provincial politics in 1982. Among other activities, he served as chair of the Ontario Election Finances Commission, as president of York Community Services (the province's first community health centre, which he was instrumental in founding) and later as president of the Learning Enrichment Foundation. He taught political science at York and Ryerson universities, edited a textbook on Ontario politics and wrote his memoirs.
Donald Cameron MacDONALD was born in Cranbrook, British Columbia, on December 7, 1913. He died in hospital in Toronto of heart failure, after a short illness, on March 8, 2008. He was 94. He is survived by Simone, his wife of 66 years, three children, six grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
A public celebration of his life will be held in The Great Hall, Hart House, at the University of Toronto on May 7, 2008, at 4: 30 p.m.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-21 published
ROBINSON, John " Jack"
(Veteran World War 2; Retired Accountant with TransCanada Pipelines Retired Chairman Toronto Chapter, Society of Management Accountants of Ontario; Member Toronto District Bee Keepers Association Member Peel Lodge Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons No. 468, Caledon East; Member Weston Lions Club)
Suddenly at Humber River Regional Hospital, Church Street Site, Weston on Sunday, April 20, 2008, Jack ROBINSON, Weston, in his 89th year, beloved husband of the late Lorna Vivian MARTIN. Dear father of Cheryl ROBINSON, Toronto. Loving grandfather of Dilan. Dear brother of the late Kenneth ROBINSON, Caledon East. Dear brother-in-law and friend of Bertha ROBINSON. Uncle of the late Ruth ROBINSON. The family will receive their Friends at the Egan Funeral Home, 203 Queen Street S. (Hwy. 50), Bolton (905-857-2213) Tuesday afternoon 2-4 and evening 7-9 o'clock. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Wednesday morning, April 23 at 11 o'clock. Interment Glendale Memorial Gardens, Etobicoke. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario. Condolences for the family may be offered at www.eganfuneralhome.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-26 published
FAUST, Frank H.
Frank H. FAUST, born in Newark, New Jersey on March 14, 1911, died in Oakville, Ontario on April 24, 2008.
A graduate of the University of Western Ontario, with a B. Sc. Degree in Chemistry, Frank's professional life was with his father's Company Yokum Faust Chemicals in London.
After the sale of Yokum Faust Chemicals to a national firm, Frank and his family relocated to Montreal, Quebec for several years and then to Oakville, Ontario.
Predeceased by his wife of nearly 60 years, Mildred C. FAUST, he is survived by his three children: Francia STEVENS (John) in Naples, Florida, Tom FAUST (Judy) in Oakville, Ontario, Mari-Ellen MARTIN (Joe) in Vancouver, British Columbia; his grandchildren: Derek JOHANNSON (Anne) in Baltimore, Maryland; Leslie SIMMONS (Scott) in Wilmington, North Carolina; Stephen FAUST (Julia) in Uxbridge, Ontario; Heather FAUST- MAZUREK (Robert) in Santa Cruz, California; and Joseph, Jason and Jeremy MARTIN in Vancouver, British Columbia. He is survived by nine great-grandchildren and four step-grandchildren. He is survived by his brother Tom FAUST (Julia) of Oakville, Ontario and Freeport, Bahamas and sister Erdyne KILLINGSWORTH in London, Ontario.
Funeral Service will be held on Monday, April 28th, 2008 at The Oakview Funeral Home Chapel at 56 Lakeshore Road West (one block East of Kerr Street), Oakville 905-842-2252 at 10 a.m.
A parishioner of Saint Michael's in London, St. Malachy's in Montreal and St. Andrew's in Oakville. Frank will be interred at Saint Peter's Cemetery in London, Ontario.
In lieu of flowers, donations to The Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
ELMSLEY, Marguerite " Margot" (née GREER/GRIER)
29 April 1920 - 14 April 2008
Margot died peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia at Glen Warren Care Home. Margot was predeceased by her husband, C.M.R. ELMSLEY, in 1975. She is survived by her daughter Alex CARRIERE (Cyril BUBAR) of Kelowna, British Columbia, son Tony (Rose) and grandchild Stephanie of Kanata, Ontario, sisters Kathleen GREER/GRIER, Holly ROWLAND (Arthur,) Patricia MARTIN (Michael,) and her brother James GREER/GRIER, all of Victoria. Margot will be missed by her family, her nieces and nephews, their families and many Friends whose hearts she touched with her generosity and lack of malice. Margot was the daughter of Col. and Mrs. H.C. GREER/GRIER of Esquimalt, British Columbia. When her husband Tony was posted to England during World War 2 Margot joined the Canadian Red Cross Corps and served her country at Maple Leaf Club No. 2 in London looking after troops returning from the Continent. After the war she was a devoted wife and mother with happy memories of life in Washington, D.C., Appleton, Ontario and her final 27 years in Victoria, British Columbia with her sisters, their families, and her brother. A memorial will take place at Sacred Heart Church, 4040 Nelthorpe Street, on Wednesday, May 7 at 11 a.m.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
The war hero who returned home to help forge a booming Ontario
As executive director of an Ontario Hydro task force, he drew on all the skills he had accumulated as a soldier, a design engineer, a dean in an academic bureaucracy and a consultant to government
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Although he never held public office, Richard (Dick) DILLON was very much involved in the so-called London mafia that surrounded and supported lawyer and politician John Robarts, who was premier of Ontario from 1961-1971. Mostly they were, like Mr. Robarts, veterans of the Second World War, graduates of the University of Western Ontario, and lawyers, engineers and businessmen who supported the Progressive Conservative Party.
In the late 1960s, there was a feeling in Ontario that government was growing too fast and becoming both too powerful and too cumbersome. There's nothing unusual in that sentiment, of course, or the notion that the solution lies in public-private partnerships and a reorganization of the civil service. What is slightly unusual is that Mr. Robarts, himself, in the dying days of his administration, actually did something about it by establishing Ontario's Committee on Government Productivity. Ontario Hydro was such a powerful entity that it was given its own sub-committee with the mandate to examine ways that it might decentralize some of its operations, based on the Hydro Quebec model.
Mr. Robarts wanted Dick DILLON to run Task Force Hydro. When the appointment came before cabinet, it was questioned by Leslie Rowntree, minister of financial and commercial affairs. "He could be a little bit stuffy," said Darcy McKeough, who was then minister of municipal affairs.
"We are wondering who this Richard M. Dillion is?" Mr. Rowntree asked archly, according to Mr. McKeough. To which Mr. Robarts replied: "He is the dean of engineering at the University of Western Ontario, he is the past president of The London Club, he is a past church warden at Bishop Cronyn Church and he is a past president of the Progressive Conservative Association. Is there anything else you would like to know, Mr. Rowntree?"
Clearly that was enough information for Mr. Rowntree, for the appointment was duly made, but there was much more that Mr. Robarts could have said about Mr. DILLON - holder of the Military Cross for bravery during the war, professional engineer with a gold medal from University of Western Ontario and a graduate degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, among other attributes. What Mr. Robarts couldn't know, back in 1970, was the complex role that Mr. DILLON would later play as a deputy minister, volunteer, and facilitator of bilingual education.
Born in Simcoe, Ontario on August 4, 1920, Richard Maurice DILLON was the eldest of five children of Brigadier Marmaduke Murray DILLON and his wife Muriel (née HICKS.) His father was a soldier and an engineer who won the Military Cross early in 1918 for "conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty" as an officer of the 1st Battalion, Canadian Machine Gun corps.
The DILLONs settled in London, Ontario, where Richard went to local elementary schools and then London South Collegiate Institute. As the son of a military family, he was encouraged to join the army. He became a signaler in the Canadian Fusiliers when he was 15 and received his commission as a second lieutenant in the Canadian Officer's Training Corps in 1938 when he was a first-year student at University of Western Ontario. He withdrew from university a year later to enlist in the Canadian Active Service Force after Canada declared war on Germany in September, 1939.
He joined The Royal Canadian Regiment in England in June, 1941. He was in command of a bren-gun carrier platoon in the Allied invasion of Sicily that began on July 10, 1943, with both amphibious and airborne landings. Essentially, the Italians resisted the invasion by retreating. The Germans would not be so compliant further up the boot.
It was later that same month that Capt. DILLON, like his father before him, earned the Military Cross for distinguished and meritorious service in battle. On July 23, 1943, two companies of The Royal Canadian Regiment were ordered to skirt the town of Assoro, under cover of darkness and attack it from the rear. Nothing went according to plan: The commanding officer was killed, communications broke down and Capt. DILLON, with a section of carriers, was instrumental in re-establishing contact with the beleaguered forward companies, which were in disarray. According to his Military Cross citation, he "led the carriers skillfully across difficult rocky and mountainous country during daylight under constant observed enemy artillery, mortar and machine gun fire, and through enemy patrols, contacted the forward Companies and carried out his mission. The officer displayed leadership and outstanding devotion to duty in carrying out his difficult mission." The citation is signed by, among others, Field Marshal Bernard Law Montgomery, commander of the Eighth Army.
Subsequently, he was given command of "A" Company and was wounded on Christmas Day, 1943 when a grenade exploded beside him during the battle of Ortona, a ferocious close-combat battle between German paratroops and the 1st Canadian Infantry Division. He was evacuated first to England and then to Canada and spent the rest of the war teaching at the Army Staff College in Kingston, Ontario Permanently deaf in his right ear, he would occasionally scratch pieces of shrapnel from his scalp for the rest of his life.
Throughout the war he had been corresponding with Elizabeth DEMPSEY, a young woman he had met at University of Western Ontario in 1938. She was engaged to a friend of his, and the three of them palled around. Both men went overseas, but only Mr. DILLON came back. He and Miss DEMPSEY were married in London, Ontario, on April 21, 1945.
He returned to University of Western Ontario to complete his interrupted undergraduate education and graduated in 1948 with an honours degree in mathematics and the gold medal. He and his wife then moved to Cambridge, Massachusetts., where Kelly, the first of the DILLONs' three daughters, was born and Mr. DILLON acquired a masters of science degree in civil engineering in 1950 at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
They returned to Canada where Mr. DILLON worked briefly for Dominion Bridge in Toronto before settling in London, Ontario That's where daughters Ann and Katherine (Kate) were born and where Mr. DILLON joined M.M. Dillon and Co. (now Dillon Consulting), a firm of consulting engineers that had been founded in January, 1946, by his father and a colleague and fellow veteran, George HUMPHRIES. Besides working in his father's firm as a design engineer, and later as a partner and director, Mr. DILLON also continued his military career as a reservist.
He rejoined the Canadian Fusiliers as a company commander in 1946 and when it affiliated with The Royal Canadian Regiment in November, 1954, he took command of the London and Oxford Fusiliers (3rd Battalion, The Royal Canadian Regiment). Two years later, he retired to the supplementary reserve. Ann DILLON remembered her father's peacetime military career in the eulogy she delivered at his funeral by describing how "he would line up his three girls, shiny fresh from their baths and in their pj's and do his parade inspection," on Monday nights before he headed out, in his uniform, for his weekly commitment to the militia.
"He would prod us here and there with his swagger stick and bark out orders - shoulders back chest out… his final order was usually 'wipe that smile off your face' which produced huge laughter and, which as far as I know, never made it into the military lexicon," she said.
Monday-night drill was very different from the semi-annual Vimy dinners that were always held on Fridays at the Legion because, on Saturday mornings, Ms. DILLON said of her parents "you approached their bedroom at your peril: a toss-up between being overcome with the fumes or deafened by the snoring." As the years passed, the snoring, unimpeded by marital admonitions, probably grew louder, as Mrs. DILLON's hearing began to fail as well.
After nearly a decade working in his father's firm of consulting engineers, including serving on the advisory committee to establish an Engineering Department at University of Western Ontario, Mr. DILLON was asked to become the first dean of the Faculty of Engineering Science. It was 1960 and he was 40. In Western's First Century, by John Gwynne-Timothy, Mr. DILLON was commended for his "energetic direction" as dean in upping the quality of the undergraduate program, developing a graduate and research program and enhancing links with "the wider working world of industry and business."
Those links included serving as a project officer on the Science Research and Development Committee for the Royal Commission on Government Organization (the Glassco Commission), which recommended a decentralized organizational model for the federal government. He also went on a three-month Colombo Plan (a framework for bi-lateral aid and technical assistance that came out of a Commonwealth Conference of Foreign Ministers in Ceylon in 1950) mission in 1963 to Thailand to advise the government on engineering education.
From 1965-67, he was a member of the Ontario Advisory Committee on Confederation, which was set up by Premier Robarts to advise the government on issues such as bilingualism and multiculturalism vis-à-vis the other provinces (especially Quebec) and the federal government. After finishing this assignment, Mr. DILLON was seconded in 1970, from his position as engineering dean at University of Western Ontario, to become the executive director of the Task Force Hydro Committee on Government Productivity, a task that required all of the skills he had accumulated as a wartime soldier, a design engineer, an aspirational dean in the academic bureaucracy and a consultant to government.
To help Mr. DILLON penetrate Hydro's monolithic culture, Mr. Robarts arranged for him to attend the meetings of the Hydro Electric Power Commission, "which was highly unusual [for an outsider]," said Mr. McKeough. "George Gathercole, who was the chair, would hold forth at great length and finally say, 'Is there anything anybody else would like to say?' To which one of the other commissioners would dutifully reply, 'No, George, you have said it all.' " And so the meeting would end, but the tale lived on in Mr. DILLON's retelling.
From the task force, Mr. DILLON was appointed deputy in Mr. McKeough's Ministry of Energy in 1973. Mr. McKeough, a younger but stalwart member of the London mafia, knew Mr. DILLON well. "He was a very bright person and an engineer and understood energy and was a fan of Candu [a pressurized heavy-water reactor] and he knew the inside of Hydro because of the task force."
In 1976, Mr. DILLON moved from Energy to Resources Development and then to Municipal Affairs and Housing before leaving the civil service in 1982 to go back into business as a founding partner of Alafin Consultants. Nevertheless, business was only part of his life for the next 15 years, which was largely devoted to volunteer work, to building dubiously road and sea-worthy vehicles with his grandchildren and to serving his regiment. He was appointed Honorary Lieutenant Colonel of the 4th Battalion, the Royal Canadian Regiment, a rank he held from 1986 to 1993 and then promoted to Colonel of the Regiment (of The Royal Canadian Regiment), an honorary position he held from 1993 to 1997.
The Confederation debates of the 1960s and 1970s and the rise of the Parti Québécois, which Rene Levesque led to power in the Quebec provincial election in 1976, created linguistic aspirations and prompted conciliatory gestures in Ontario. One of them involved Mr. DILLON and Richard Schmeelk, a wealthy American banker who had represented Salomon Brothers in Ontario since the mid 1950s. After retiring as a senior executive from Salomon in 1986, Mr. Schmeelk established the Schmeelk Canada Fellowship to create a better understanding between English and French-Canadians. The idea, which percolated at a dinner with Mr. McKeough, John Turner and Mr. Schmeelk, was to have students from University of Western Ontario and Laval University in Quebec City study at each other's institutions. The initial capitalization of $1-million dollars has more than doubled over the years and the program has expanded to include the University of Calgary in Alberta and the University of Montreal in Quebec. Mr. DILLON was executive secretary from 1995 to 2001. "Dick was the guy who handled all the heavy duty [lifting] over the years and made a great contribution to the scholarship," said Mr. Schmeelk. "He went to all the meetings and did a great job and was a great friend over the years."
In the late 1990s, Mr. DILLON began to suffer from memory problems. "My father was a wonderful dancer," said his daughter Kelly MEIGHEN. "He taught the three of us how to dance, and I can remember thinking at my 50th birthday party [in November, 1999], that he no longer knew how to dance."
Mrs. DILLON cared for her husband at home until finally, when he could no longer recognize his loved ones and even a walk in the garden could frighten him, she allowed him to be moved into the veteran's wing at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on November 8, 2006. Eighteen months later, two days after the DILLONs' 63rd wedding anniversary, he died there, surrounded by his family.
About an hour later, the chaplain and some of the nurses on duty came into Mr. DILLON's room at Sunnybrook. "The Chaplain read some passages and said a prayer," said Ms. MEIGHEN. " Then she looked at my mother and said: 'On behalf of the people of Canada I want to thank you and your husband for his service to the country and for the freedom we enjoy today.' And then, they placed the flag over his body," said Ms. MEIGHEN. "It was such a lovely gesture that we were stunned."
Richard Maurice DILLON, CM, MC, was born on August 4, 1920 in Simcoe, Ontario He died of complications from Alzheimer's Disease on April 23, 2008. He was 87. Mr. DILLON is survived by his wife, Elizabeth, his three daughters, and his seven grandchildren. Predeceased by his brother, John, he also leaves sisters Shelagh and Diana and his brother, Michael, and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-07 published
HEANS, Kenneth Walter
Suddenly on Monday, May 5, 2008 in his 91st year. Born in New Brunswick on June 26, 1917, Ken led an active life of military service, work in the volunteer and public sectors as well as hours of volunteerism. Ken enlisted with the Corps of Military Staff Clerks Canadian Army in 1940, rising to the rank of Major. He served overseas with the 23rd Self-Propelled Regiment Royal Canadian Artillery with the 4th Canadian Division and was wounded in action just one week prior to the termination of hostilities. Ken continued to serve in the armed forces both at home and abroad. From 1955 to 1956, he was in Vietnam with the Truce Commission of the United Nations. This was followed by postings in New Brunswick, Petawawa and Fort Churchill. In addition to a number of medals already received, he was awarded The Canadian Forces Declaration and Bar prior to his retirement from the Armed Forces in 1976, with the designation and rank of Major. Ken was proud to follow in the footsteps of his father's distinguished Masonic careers, beginning with his initiation into St. Andrew's Lodge Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons No. 569 in Ottawa in 1954. He was Past Master, Zetland Lodge Ancient, Free and Accepted Masons No. 326 G.R.C. (now Zetland Wilson Lodge A.F.& a.m. No. 86 G.R.C.) and served the office of Worshipful Master 1974 and 2000. Ken celebrated fifty years, a member of the Masonic fraternity in 2004. He was an active member of Ancient and Accepted Scottish Rite of Freemasonry of Canada; appointed Director First Aid, Valley of Toronto 2003. He served as member of First Aid Team Moore Sovereign Consistory, Hamilton, Ontario from 1998 to 2003. Ken was coroneted Honorary Inspector General 33° A. and A.S.R. September 2007. He was also an active member of York Rite Freemasonry: member, Victoria Chapter No. 205 Royal Arch Masons. Founding member and original First Principal, Fort Prince of Wales Chapter No 20 Royal Arch Masons, Province of Manitoba; appointed Very Excellent Companion in 1964. He was the Royal and Select Master, The Council of Cryptic Rite Masons of Canada and Knights Templar, Ottawa Preceptory No. 32 Member Red Cross of Constantine, Holy Land Conclave No. 3, The Masonic and Military Orders of the Knights of the Red Cross of Constantine, KHS and Saint_John the Evangelist Grand Imperial Conclave of Canada. Ken was a dedicated volunteer with Saint_John Ambulance where he achieved the rank of Commander of the Order of Saint_John. He also volunteered for years with the Heart and Stroke Foundation - one of the first cardio-pulmonary resuscitation instructor-trainers in Ontario. Ken is predeceased by his wives, Mary Anita MARTIN and Helen Orr SMITH; daughter, Elizabeth PARKINSON and grand_son, Darrell HEANS. He is survived by his sisters, Helen HAMILTON, Elizabeth MacFARLANE and Mildred STEEVES; his son, Donald (Florette) and their children, Derek and Veronica, and great-grandchildren James HEANS, Jesse HEANS, Jacob DESAULNIERS, Nolan CURRIE and Wesley CURRIE, Andrew PARKINSON (Lesley), Daphne CLARK (Kyle) and Rachel LOVELL (John;) great-great-grandchildren, Steven Elton, Trevor Kenneth, Melissa Meghan, Miranda Lyn, Katie Elizabeth and Jacob Darwin. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. on Friday, May 9. A Masonic Service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, May 10 at 10: 30 a.m. followed by the Funeral Service at 11 o'clock. Cremation. Reception to follow. If desired, the family requests donations be made to Saint_John Ambulance, the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-27 published
HUNT, Joseph Edgar " Ed" (1925-2008)
Passed away on May 20, at Humber River Regional Hospital, Toronto. Born in Mabou, (Cape Breton) he was the youngest son of the late Fred and Ethel (EMBREE) HUNT. Beloved husband of Janet Ann (SINCLAIR) for over 49 years and dearly loved father of Norma Jean SANDERSON and Graham HUNT (Lara) and Grampy to grand_sons Billy and Jeffrey SANDERSON, step-grand_son Jacob BEST, and step-granddaughter Rachel ELSTON. He was predeceased by sister, Gertrude MARTIN; brother, George HUNT; sister, Ella CAMERON, and infant brother, James Arthur HUNT. A graduate of Mount Allison University, University of Toronto (B.A.Sc.), and University of Pennsylvania (M.B.A. - Wharton School of Business). Ed began his professional career as a chemical engineer with petrochemical companies such as Shell and Naugatuck Chemical, and entered the computer services industry in the mid 1960's as a Marketing Manager with Sperry Univac/ Unysis, Apollo Computer and Hewlett Packard. Upon retirement he continued his active involvement in St. Luke's United Church and became an active member of the Kiwanis Club of Islington. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W. (between Kipling and Islington Aves.) on Thursday, May 29, 2008 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Service of Remembrance will be held at St. Luke's United Church, 516 The Kingsway, Etobicoke, on Friday, May 30, 2008 at 2 o'clock. If desired, donations to the Islington Kiwanis Club or a charity of your choice would be appreciated by the family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-30 published
MIKALACHKI, Alexander (1933-2008)
Professor Emeritus, Ivey School Of Business University Of Western Ontario
On Tuesday, May 27, 2008 after struggling valiantly with Lewy Body Dementia. Beloved husband of Dorothy (MARTIN). Loved by his daughter, Jodi, his sons, Sandy (Nicole SPRIET,) and Rob (Lisa TREMAINE,) and by his five grandchildren, Brooke, Kelsey, Kristen, Owen and Keira. Al's life revolved around his family, his vocation, and his athletic activities. He began his long association with the Ivey Business School (then known as the Western Business School) as a student in the MBA program, where he won the gold medal. He went on to earn a PhD from Western, the first person to be granted a PhD in Business from a Canadian University. As a professor in the Ivey School, he was honoured with the Edward G. Pleva Award for Excellence in Teaching. He was also inducted into the Sports Hall of Fame at Concordia University, where he obtained his undergraduate degree, primarily for his achievements as a basketball player. Even approaching the later stages of his disease, he was still playing basketball regularly. Cremation has taken place. Visitation will be held on Friday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the memorial service will be conducted on Saturday, May 31st, 2008, at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Al's memory to the Richard Ivey School of Business, 1151 Richmond Street North, London, Ontario, N6A 3K7.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-09 published
Sherrill CHEDA: 72
Feminist Activist Electrified Library Work In Canada
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Sherrill CHEDA, a feminist librarian, arts administrator and cultural activist, died of complications from acute leukemia at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto early Saturday morning. She was 72.
Ms. CHEDA, born in a small town in Indiana, earned her master's in library science at the University of Indiana. Opposed to the Vietnam War, she immigrated to Canada in 1967 with her two sons and her then-partner, Michael CHEDA, a draft dodger.
While working as a librarian in the Toronto area, she joined forces with Phyllis YAFFE and Barbara CLUBB, two like-minded feminist librarians and founded the newsletter, Emergency! Librarian, a compendium of book reviews, news and opinion that electrified the library profession in Canada.
A Canadian cultural nationalist, Ms. CHEDA later worked as an administrator for the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association, the Ontario Arts Council and the Ontario government.
She was a columnist for Chatelaine under editor Doris Anderson and was one of the founders of the New Feminists in the early 1970s.
She leaves her husband, Karl JAFFARY, a lawyer and former Toronto politician, sons Marc and Andrew, two stepchildren, six grandchildren and her extended family. The funeral will be held on Wednesday at 4. p.m. at Humphrey Funeral Home on Bayview Avenue in Toronto.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-13 published
Author was 'one of the finest writers Canada has produced'
Long-time University of Western Ontario professor played with form, voice and space on the page, the airwaves and the stage. He rarely strayed from his regional roots
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S7
Imagine a totally creative person - poet, playwright, short-story writer, painter, pianist. That was James REANEY, one of our most diverse and prolific artists, a man whose virtuosity extended from theatrical workshops with children to literary scholarship in the academy. He played with form, voice and space on the page, the airwaves and the stage. Like Alice Munro, he rarely strayed from his physical roots in Southwestern Ontario, the source of his inspiration.
"James REANEY did not fit any of the usual Canadian literary moulds, which was one of the best things about him. He was a mould-maker," said literary scholar Germaine Warkentin, the editor of several critical volumes of his poetry and prose. Praising him as "one of the finest writers Canada has produced," Prof. Warkentin said: "He had an immense range - poetry both highly literary and very simple, plays that any company could put on, whether professional or community, opera librettos, and (early on) dazzling short stories that upset a literary applecart that needed upsetting."
Margaret Atwood says he "was a true original," who was very "playful, inventive, musical and theatrical." She still remembers seeing him perform his early work, One Man Masque, when she was an undergraduate at the University of Toronto in the late 1950s. "It was never to be forgotten by anybody who saw it," she said. "The first half was life and the second half death and, in order to make the transition, he climbed into a coffin and came out wearing goggles, furry driver's gloves and carrying a blue flashlight. It was one of the strange, surreal moments of theatre," she added - perhaps unnecessarily.
"In the late 19th century and through our own time, poetry got lost in a march toward realism and prose," said Don Rubin, founding editor of the Canadian Theatre Review and Director of York University's Graduate Program in Theatre Studies. "James REANEY was one of those few Western artists of the modern period - T.S. Eliot was another - who sought to bring poetry back into the theatre. Neither he nor Eliot succeeded, but what a glorious war REANEY fought for the art in Canada.
"His Donnellys trilogy is a mammoth achievement and one of the major building blocks of the post-Centennial theatre in this country," said Prof. Rubin. "It proved that poetry really did have a place on our stages and it proved to REANEY himself that he actually had a place on our stages as well."
James (Jamie) Crerar REANEY was born on a farm in South Easthope near Stratford, Ontario, in the middle 1920s. He was the only son of James Nesbitt REANEY and Elizabeth (née CRERAR) REANEY. An imaginative and solitary child who believed that "metaphor is reality," he absorbed the landscape, history and social networks of Southwestern Ontario and made them central to his work. As a child, he attended Elmhurst School, a country school near his home, and studied piano with Cora B. Ahrens, one of first music teachers to travel around Perth County giving lessons.
His parents separated and his mother remarried and had two other children. It may have been his step-father who first told him, when he was 10, the legend of the Black Donnellys, the Irish immigrants who were massacred in their farmhouse near Lucan in 1880. This reimagined story inspired his famous trilogy of plays in the 1970s.
For high school, he went to Stratford Vocational Institute in nearby Stratford, entering in the year that the Second World War began and graduating the same month the Allies invaded Normandy. When asked why he began to write drama, Prof. REANEY responded that the impetus could have been "anything from a neurotic compulsion to bore my community, to a healthy desire to do something that my town could focus on, to things hidden deep in childhood like toys, cardboard cut-out theatres in popcorn boxes and Christmas stockings, and so on." In fact, he wrote his first play in high school because it was expected of him - "they had a tradition of producing plays."
He moved to Toronto in September, 1944, to study English literature at the University of Toronto, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1948 and a master's degree the following year. At university, he became involved in performance and writing and Friendships with other literary and artistic types, including the anthologist Robert Weaver, the poet Colleen THIBAUDEAU, and the musician and composer John Beckwith, a lifelong friend and frequent collaborator. They later wrote four operas together, and many other works in which Prof. Beckwith set Prof. REANEY's words to music.
"What I found working with him was that he always understood musically what I was talking about, whereas a lot of writers don't," said Prof. Beckwith. "He had a musical approach and was very interested in opera literature, so it wasn't like starting from square one."
The poet Earle Birney met him in the late 1940s at a party and was enough taken by the experience that he noted: "He was still a varsity sophomore, but a very unusual one. I've never forgotten the impression he made on me that evening - a small packet of firecrackers set alight, he went sizzling and leaping mischievously from one guest to another, an excited child popping adult questions, bounding into the kitchen and back to the hall, and continually exploding with ideas, images and emotions. I thought him a marvellously inventive Ariel, and still do."
At U of T, he was strongly influenced by Northrop Frye and Fearful Symmetry, his book on the poetry of William Blake, which was published in 1947. Even as an undergraduate, he was already writing poetry and short stories. The first brought him acclaim, the second notoriety. He was only 23 when he won the Governor-General's Award in 1949 for his first collection of poems, The Red Heart. A collage in which a young man tries to reconcile his childhood memories with the harsh and often incomprehensible world of experience, the volume contains 42 poems, written during his university days, including The School Globe, in which the poet pictures himself holding the "wrecked blue cardboard pumpkin" with its lines of latitude and longitude, and laments the loss of the "fair fields and lands" of his childhood. Here is how it ends: "If I raise my hand/ No tall teacher will demand/ What I want./ But if someone in authority/ Were here, I'd say/ Give me this old world back/ Whose husk I clasp/ And I'll give you in exchange/ The great sad real one/ That's filled/ Not with a child's remembered and pleasant skies/ But with blood, pus, death, stepmothers, and lies./"
The year before, he had published a short story, The Box Social in the Undergrad, the student magazine at University College. The story, which is told from the point of view of Sylvia, a young woman from a small community who has been impregnated and abandoned by a local hero, has a surprising and disturbing payback ending. When The Box Social, with its bold (for the times) messages about illegitimate stillborn babies, was republished in New Liberty, it ignited a firestorm of protest, including inflammatory letters from 800 subscribers. The furor doused his prospects of becoming editor of Undergrad.
The Bully, another short story he wrote about this time (contrasting the etiquette rituals in high school with the pecking order in a chicken coop), was included in an anthology edited by his friend Robert Weaver in the late 1950s. Margaret Atwood read it as an undergraduate at the University of Toronto and later included it in The New Oxford Book of Canadian Short Stories, which she edited with Mr. Weaver in 1987. In her introduction, Ms. Atwood suggested that Prof. REANEY anticipated what came to be called Southern Ontario Gothic, a group of writers including Alice Munro, Robertson Davies, Timothy Findley, Jane Urquhart and Barbara Gowdy, who inhabit a literary landscape whose "main features were defined earlier by James REANEY." As for Prof. REANEY's influence on her own work, she said simply: "Without The Bully, my fiction would have followed other paths. If there are such things as 'key' reading experiences, The Bully was certainly one of mine."
After university, he travelled in France and then accepted at job teaching at the University of Manitoba, a position he held for a decade, from 1950-1960. He married his classmate Colleen THIBAUDEAU on her birthday, December 29, 1951. They had three children, James (1952), John (born in 1954; died of meningitis in 1966) and Susan (1959), and combined family life and artistic enterprise. As a poet she has published several volumes including The Martha Landscapes, The Artemesia Book and The Patricia Album.
In the late 1950s, Prof. REANEY took a two-year sabbatical to return to the University of Toronto to complete his doctoral dissertation on The Influence of Spenser on Yeats under Northrop Frye, receiving his degree in 1958, the same year that he published his second volume of poetry, A Suit of Nettles. That book, which earned his second Governor-General's Award, drew upon his academic work and echoed Spenser's The Shepheardes Calendar. Being himself, however, he set his dozen pastoral ecologues, one for each calendar month, in Southwestern Ontario and wrote from the perspective of barnyard geese living through their life cycle from birth to slaughter at Christmas time. The poems, which combine a variety of poetic forms from allegorical to graphic, show him at his quirky, inventive best.
The REANEYs returned to his creative heartland in 1960 when he accepted an academic position at the University of Western Ontario in London. The following decade was a kaleidoscope of literary activity. In 1962, he published Twelve Letters to a Small Town, a collection of a dozen lyric poems in which the poet recreates the geography and social psychology of his home town of Stratford, Ontario, in the era of the 1930s and 1940s in a mythological form.
Living in London, teaching at the university, married to a poet, surrounded by his own children, he began writing plays and books for young people, creating and printing his own literary magazine, Alphabet, on the iconography of the imagination, writing operas and collaborating on setting his poems to music with his friend, composer John Beckwith. He also began working in the theatre with Prof. Beckwith's then wife, Pamela Terry. She organized a public reading of A Suit of Nettles, and persuaded him to write The Killdeer, which she then directed at Toronto's Coach House Theatre. Reviews were mixed after the opening on January 13, 1960. Mavor Moore lauded it in The Telegram as a turning point in Canadian dramatic history, while Nathan Cohen dismissed it as "a desperately bad play" in The Star. Nevertheless, it won a prize at the Dominion Drama Festival.
Prof. REANEY was experimenting with music, form, dialogue and myth and creating his own way of expressing them. Night-blooming Cereus and One-man Masque, which showed both the gentle pastoral side of Prof. REANEY and the sardonic darker side of his sensibility, ran as a double bill in 1960 and were published in The Killdeer and Other Plays in 1963. The plays and his book of poetry Twelve Letters to a Small Town combined to earn him his third Governor-General's award that year. Other plays followed: The Easter Egg; The Sun and the Moon; three marionette plays (Apple Butter, Little Red-Riding Hood and Aladdin and the Magic Lamp); Listen to the Wind, which he also directed; and Colours in the Dark, which premiered at the Avon Theatre at the Stratford Festival. He also developed the Listener's Workshop and began working with child and adult actors.
Having escaped from this swirl of creative activity to spend a sabbatical year with his family in Victoria, about as far from his creative landscape as he could go in Canada, Prof. REANEY began writing The Donnelly Trilogy. The three plays, Sticks and Stones, The St. Nicholas Hotel, Wm. Donnelly, Prop., and Handcuffs, form the pinnacle of Prof. REANEY's work for the theatre. They went through an extensive workshop process before they were premiered at Tarragon Theatre in Toronto between 1973 and 1975 in productions directed by Keith Turnbull. They revolve around a feud which began in Tipperary in Ireland, was transplanted to Canada and culminated in the murders of James Donnelly and five members of his family near Lucan, Ontario. The material, which incorporated kin, revenge, rural Ontario, myth, and the possibility of reworking established views of innocence and guilt, was rich ore for Prof. REANEY. The middle play, St. Nicholas Hotel, won the Chalmers Award for best Canadian Play in 1974, while the trilogy is listed by the Oxford Dictionary of Plays as among the 1,000 most significant plays of all time.
He never stopped writing, painting and creating. His final books of poetry were Performance Poems (1990) and Souwesto Home (2005). The Champlain Society published The Donnelly Documents: An Ontario Vendetta, edited and with an introduction by Prof. REANEY in 2004. Only this spring, the McMichael Gallery in Kleinberg, Ontario, mounted The Iconography of the Imagination, more than 50 landscapes, sketches and drawings that he had made between the 1940s and the mid-1990s.
About five years ago, he was diagnosed with kidney disease. He began having dialysis and eventually needed more medical care than he could receive at home. Nevertheless, he kept on writing, painting and editing, often with the help of Friends and colleagues. Even in his last months, he was able "to make sounds and try to shape them" on an electric keyboard, according to his son James. And while the doctors said he had dementia, Prof. REANEY was able to communicate with his family, even in his final days - making a scowl, for example, when asked to create an image in response to the name Nathan Cohen.
James REANEY, O.C. PhD, F.R.S.C., was born near Stratford, Ontario, on September 1, 1926. He died at Marian Villa, Mount Hope Centre in London, Ontario, on June 11, 2008. He was 81, and had been suffering from kidney disease and dementia. He is survived by Colleen THIBAUDEAU, his wife of more than 50 years, his children James and Susan, two granddaughters, his two step-siblings and his extended family. A celebration of his life will be held at Robinson Memorial United Church in London on Sat. June 14.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-14 published
Double shooting shakes gun-weary Toronto
Two 25-year-old men killed downtown; carjacking suspected
By Timothy APPLEBY and Jamie KOMARNICKI with reports from Sarah BOESVELD and Matthew CAMPBELL, Page A1
Toronto -- It was just after midnight yesterday when Alan DUDECK's cellphone rang, bearing the worst tidings a parent could hear: His son, Oliver MARTIN, and his son's lifelong friend Dylan ELLIS had just been shot.
The two young men had been heading home from a friend's apartment after watching a basketball game, and the frantic call came from a close friend of Mr. MARTIN.
"He said, 'Get down to St. Mike's [hospital] right away,' Mr. DUDECK recounted.
Mr. MARTIN worked for a prestigious investment firm. Mr. ELLIS was a photographer. Both were 25, with university degrees. And both, it seemed, had a shining future. Instead, both perished in an apparently random hail of bullets, leaving their families in shock.
"Pretty rough, pretty rough," Mr. DUDECK said.
Even in a city where gun killings have become familiar - yesterday's shootings bring Toronto's homicide count for the year to 25 - the double slaying, perhaps the result of an abortive carjacking, was unusual.
As police struggled to reconstruct the events west of the city's entertainment district, Detective Sergeant Gary GIROUX of the homicide squad stressed that from all appearances, neither Mr. ELLIS nor Mr. MARTIN was involved in crime.
"Both young men were loved by their families, they have a great deal of support, and as you can imagine, both families are devastated," he said.
"These two victims were not at all known - I repeat, not at all known - to the Toronto police or any police agency in Canada." The only police record of either stems from when one of them lost his passport about five years ago, another homicide investigator said.
A 911 call came in at 12: 08 a.m. yesterday to the 14 Division police station.
Mr. ELLIS and Mr. MARTIN were found in the front seat of a Range Rover that belongs to Mr. ELLIS's stepfather, outside a friend's condo where they had been watching a basketball game on television. Both were wearing seat belts and the car's engine was running, police said.
Despite paramedics' efforts, both were pronounced dead on arrival at Saint Michael's Hospital.
In the back seat of the Range Rover was a female friend who survived the attack and who is the homicide squad's key witness.
"It may well be the shooter didn't see her and that's why she's alive," Mr. DUDECK said. "We don't know."
All three had been watching the Boston Celtics pull off a comeback win against the Los Angeles Lakers in the National Basketball Association playoffs.
For several hours, the car was parked outside the condo, and the three departed at around midnight. They briefly returned for what Det. Sgt. GIROUX described as "a very innocent reason&hellip they were expecting someone to come out for a very brief moment."
Instead, they were accosted by the gunman.
"I'd say the shooting took place within seconds," Det. Sgt. GIROUX said. "He may have only been targeting the males in the front seat, but they were certainly in my opinion targeted."
Multiple shots were fired - at least eight, judging by shell-casing markers on the street yesterday - killing the two young men and damaging the interior of the Range Rover.
After speaking to the traumatized young woman, Det. Sgt. GIROUX said the shootings may have been part of an abortive car jacking, and that - for reasons he did not divulge - the killer appeared familiar with the area.
"We're certainly alive to the fact that this was a very expensive, high-end vehicle and I'm looking at it as a marketable thing to steal."
Another police source suggested the violence could have erupted from something as simple as an exchange of angry words.
One witness report said a young black male in a white shirt was seen fleeing the crime scene on a bicycle. Another offered a similar description, but said the man sped away in a blue car.
Under scrutiny, meanwhile, was an array of closed-circuit video footage from buildings near the crime scene.
A friend of the victims who was at Thursday night's gathering said she and other attendees were traumatized by the shooting.
Police swiftly cordoned off the area with yellow tape, and yesterday afternoon, the Range Rover was still being examined by forensic experts.
The car was parked immediately outside 798 Richmond St. West, an upscale, five-year-old rental high-rise, surrounded by townhouses. The area comprises a mix of new money and old, a few blocks west of the downtown entertainment district.
Just metres north is a vibrant section of Queen Street West, and on all sides are older brick homes, some of Victorian vintage.
"There's a sense of community; my house has been broken into, but I do usually feel safe walking along the streets late at night," said long-time resident Maria BARABASH, who lives a block east of the crime scene on Richmond Street.
"But this is a little bit too close to home."
So too for the families of the victims.
About 30 people gathered on the lawn of Mr. ELLIS's parents' home in the upscale Rosedale neighbourhood. Some hugged, while others stood around or sat on the lawn in shock.
Tears in his eyes, a young man demanded that reporters respect the family's privacy and leave the street and its million-dollar homes and expensive cars.
Lauren WILKINS, a friend of Mr. MARTIN and Mr. ELLIS, said yesterday the two men were "just wonderful people."
A few blocks away at Mr. OLIVER's home, family members from the East Coast began filtering into the big, ivy-clad brick house, hugging and exchanging condolences.
Mr. MARTIN lived downtown in a house he shared with his sisters.
He graduated with a bachelor of commerce degree from Concordia University's John Molson School of Business. He joined Russell Investments Canada last year and quickly made his mark as a friendly young man poised to take the financial world by storm, said company president Irshaad AHMAD.
"He was the person walking around the office always making Friends. He just made a really tremendous impact."
Mr. MARTIN and Mr. ELLIS had known each other since they were in Grade 1 in Toronto's Brown Junior Public School.
From Toronto, the pair headed for Quebec - Mr. MARTIN attending Concordia University while Mr. ELLIS pursued his passion for photography at Dawson College.
Mr. ELLIS was a thoughtful photographer with an eye for detail, his former mentor said.
"His style was a bit more urban, a bit more shadowy," recalled Laurel Breidon, co-ordinator of the college's commercial photography program.
"Not the bright, clean, happy stuff - a little funky, had a little edge to it."
Mourners set up a candle-lit shrine last night outside the building where Mr. MARTIN and Mr. ELLIS were shot. About 20 bouquets of flowers had been laid against the wall and three candles illuminated a sign taped to the building that reads "May you rest in peace Dylan and Oliver."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-16 published
MARTIN, Richard Burns Oliver
(June 30, 1982-June 12, 2008)
Oliver MARTIN A beautiful soul in a flourishing and contributing young man was tragically extinguished on the night of June 12, 2008. Born and raised in central Toronto, Oliver leaves Susan, the loving mother of her 'baby boy', his cherished sisters Georgina, Sydney and Ally, step-father Alan DUDECK, father Richard MARTIN in Nova Scotia and many saddened family members and Friends in Toronto and Prince Edward Island, including his grandmother Olave MacDONALD in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island. Oliver's character was a composite of caring for others, maintaining life-long Friendships and family connections, and an enthusiastic energy in his developing career. He was determined to make the most of what life can yield when effort is expended, whether in the office, a social context or on the sports field. Oliver followed his high school studies with a B.Comm. from the John Molson School of Business at Concordia University in Montreal. He was subsequently employed in the financial services sector, for the past year as an Associate at Russell Investments and was pursuing his Chartered Financial Analyst designation. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) from 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday, June 17 and 7-9 p.m. Wednesday, June 18. A Memorial Service will be held at 1: 30 p.m. on Thursday, June 19 in the Rosedale Presbyterian Church, 129 Mt. Pleasant Rd. The family will be establishing a fitting use of funds in Oliver's name. Information about contributions to honour him to follow. Flowers gratefully declined. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com 'sleep little darling, do not cry and I will sing a lullaby'

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-17 published
STOKREEF, Hendrik Bart " Henk"
He died peacefully at home with his family by his side on Saturday June 14, 2008 at the age of 80. Beloved husband of Carol for 52 years. Dear father of John (Nicola), Peter (Melinda) and Margot (Michael MARTIN.) Cherished grandfather of Madeleine, Sarah, Luke, John, Mikey, Arthur, Rob and Steve. Brother of Jan and Lydeke both of the Netherlands. Henk was born in the Netherlands. He studied at Trinity College at the University of Toronto. He served as an Anglican parish priest and also taught at Niagara District Secondary School. He was also a very proud Canadian.
Cremation has taken place. A memorial Service for Henk will be held at Saint Mark's Anglican Church (41 Byron Street, Niagara-on-the-Lake) on Thursday June 19th, 2008 at 11 o'clock. Scattering of Henk's remains will follow the service in the church cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Stephen Lewis Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to the Niagara-On-The-Lake Chapel of the Morgan Funeral Homes 415 Regent Street.
Online guest register www.morganfuneral.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-18 published
STOKREEF, Hendrik Bart " Henk"
He died peacefully at home with his family by his side on Saturday June 14, 2008 at the age of 80. Beloved husband of Carol for 52 years. Dear father of John (Nicola), Peter (Melinda) and Margot (Michael MARTIN.) Cherished grandfather of Madeleine, Sarah, Luke, John, Mikey, Arthur, Rob and Steve. Brother of Jan and Lydeke both of the Netherlands. Henk was born in the Netherlands. He studied at Trinity College at the University of Toronto. He served as an Anglican parish priest and also taught at Niagara District Secondary School. He was also a very proud Canadian.
Cremation has taken place. A memorial Service for Henk will be held at Saint Mark's Anglican Church (41 Byron Street, Niagara-on-the-Lake) on Thursday June 19th, 2008 at 11 o'clock. Scattering of Henk's remains will follow the service in the church cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to The Stephen Lewis Foundation. Arrangements entrusted to the Niagara-on-the-Lake Chapel of the Morgan Funeral Homes 415 Regent Street.
Online guest register www.morganfuneral.com

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-19 published
Family, Friends mourn loss of 'gentle spirit'
Music, memories grace celebration of 25-year-old shooting victim's short but full life
By Sarah BOESVELD, Page A11
Friends and family used music and memories yesterday to say goodbye to Dylan ELLIS, a young man lauded as a fiercely devoted friend, brother and son at his memorial service yesterday.
A pencil sketch of a grinning Mr. ELLIS rested amid a smattering of framed photos at the sanctuary of Rosedale United Church during the memorial service.
A photo slideshow depicted the 25-year-old Mr. ELLIS and his Friends at play. Stories shared by 16 of Mr. ELLIS's loved ones drew periodic laughter from the nearly 500 guests crammed into the pews and hallways of the church.
Mr. ELLIS was shot dead early Friday morning while waiting in a Range Rover for a friend to return a set of keys. His best friend, Oliver MARTIN, 25, was also fatally shot and will be remembered in a service this afternoon.
The violent crime shook the city and surprised many who struggle to understand why the young men from Rosedale were killed in a brand of crime associated with neighbourhoods much different from their own.
Mourners heard yesterday that Mr. ELLIS's favourite food was a plain bagel soaked in Tabasco sauce. His favourite place to be was with the Friends he loved like family.
Friend Graham SMITH imagined Mr. ELLIS up in heaven "with his right arm around Jimi Hendrix and his left around his long-time crush, Audrey Hepburn."
Cody ELLIS sobbed as he described his older brother and fellow guitar player as a role model and best friend.
"You taught me how to be a good person," he said, addressing his brother directly.
Akasha ELLIS remembered his little brother's sparkling eyes and his calm, yet energetic, presence in their family.
Mr. ELLIS's girlfriend, Caitlin BROWN, said the last thing he told her was that he wanted them to grow old together.
"I wanted that more than anything," Ms. BROWN said through tears. "Your gentle spirit was taken from us in such a violent way."
The circumstances of Mr. ELLIS's death were rarely mentioned in the service.
Friends and family hunched in the pews in front of a sanctuary adorned by a weathered pair of shoes and a scuffed surfboard. A white electric guitar was plugged into an amplifier, as if waiting to be played.
A recording of Foxglove, an acoustic Bruce Cockburn song, serenaded the crowd as they sat in silence exchanging hugs and wiping away tears while watching a video slideshow featuring a smiling Mr. ELLIS.
The tricks behind his mischievous grin were also talked and laughed about during the service. Long-time friend Ben McPHEE remembered Mr. ELLIS for his playful demeanour. He recalled a paint fight instigated by Mr. ELLIS one summer when he was working as a house painter.
"I think it's safe to say every girl that met him had a crush on him," said Katie PETRIW, a close friend of Mr. ELLIS's sister, Kiri. "And if you didn't it was because the girl next to you had."
She recalled how Mr. ELLIS used to chase her around his house with a forkful of tuna after discovering she loathed the smell, taste and touch of the stuff.
A lone can of tuna rested at the scene of the crime yesterday. The sidewalk outside the condominium at Richmond and Niagara Streets where the two men were gunned down is still lined with flowers and notes, now starting to brown and wilt in the sun. A police command post and flyers begging for information also remain.
Residents of the complex held a community meeting last night to discuss how to tackle the recent violence in and around their neighbourhood.
Police have ruled nothing out and are still digging for clues while they consider a YouTube campaign and a reward posting to help find the suspect, described as a black man with a light complexion who rode away on a bike.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-20 published
Shooting victim loved to laugh
Mourners packing church hear of young investment banker's humour, perseverance
By Sarah BOESVELD, Page A16
One week after she witnessed the slaying of Oliver MARTIN and Dylan ELLIS outside a friend's condominium, Mr. MARTIN's girlfriend attended his memorial service at Rosedale Presbyterian Church yesterday in a flood of tears.
She was the backseat passenger in the Mr. ELLIS's Range Rover, the two young men in the front, when someone came by the vehicle at 12: 08 a.m. last Friday and fired the fatal shots.
Investigators released two YouTube videos yesterday asking anyone with tips to come forward. One of the videos features the notes, flowers and photos left outside the condo at Richmond and Niagara Streets. In the other, lead investigator Toronto police Detective Sergeant Gary Giroux appeals to the public for help solving the slayings. Propped up by a friend, Mr. MARTIN's girlfriend sobbed as she left the sanctuary, walking past the people who had meant the world to him.
The church was packed with about 200 mourners and just as many were standing on the damp lawn outside where they could hear the service over loudspeakers. There were stories celebrating Mr. MARTIN's dry wit, mischievous nature and devotion to his Friends and family.
It was a scene much like Mr. ELLIS's memorial service on Wednesday.
The crowd laughed through their tears as Mr. MARTIN's family and a pack of about six of his Friends, simply dubbed "the boys," shared stories.
Mr. MARTIN's mother and stepfather, Susan and Alan DUDECK, sat in the front pews among members of their extended family, many of whom had arrived from the East Coast. His father, Richard MARTIN, also attended.
Oliver MARTIN's three older sisters, each introducing herself as his favourite, took turns sharing memories of their brother. One of the sisters, Ally, said he was naturally lucky, winning small lotteries and scooping up poker chips at weekly tournaments with Friends.
"But Oliver didn't believe in luck, he believed in perseverance," she said, choking over her words.
She mentioned Mr. MARTIN's lifelong struggle with anxiety and dyslexia and how he overcame them and graduated from university. He finished a chartered financial analyst exam little more than a week before he was killed.
She called him a natural philosopher who often pondered life's big questions. He was also passionate about his career as an investment banker and about partying with his many pals.
"Nobody was able to converse and tell stories the way he did," one friend said. "He created a brotherhood amongst his Friends."
Jordan PELOSI looked over the tearful crowd as he spoke about his friend.
"In truth we're going about this all wrong. Oliver loved to laugh. He loved life, with that beautiful smile and that beautiful spirit. And most of all, he loved all of us," he said.
"And I'll tell you, if he was here right now to see all this sadness, he would walk down each and every aisle and give each and every one of us a bitch slap, possibly followed by some name calling just to set us straight."
Rev. William MacLELLAN comforted mourners as he read a passage from the Bible traditionally reserved for weddings "Love is patient. Love is kind. …"
Mr. MARTIN's eldest sister, Georgie, said he would have wanted everyone to continue onward and keep his spirit in their hearts.
"I don't feel like he's gone. He's with me in every step I take. I will continue to push forward; I will keep you in my memories always."
The family has created the Oliver Martin Memorial Trust Fund and encourages donations to any branch of TD Canada Trust to transit number 1967 and account number 5003122.
They also sent out a message thanking the public for its condolences and support: "During this tragedy, our experience has been that the City of Toronto is a place of good."

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-21 published
Activist librarian made a difference in publishing, literature and the arts
'Feminist and peacenik' challenged the status quo, launched the journal Emergency Librarian and helped stabilize Canada's magazine industry. 'Her principles were so much a part of her life'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
'The times they are a-changin,' Bob Dylan sang in 1964 in a song that captured the upsurge of political and social upheaval as a generation of mostly privileged boomers came of age, questioning all manner of establishment authority. Protests against poverty, racism and the Vietnam War grabbed the headlines, but second-wave feminism was also in full throttle in the United States. Betty Friedan's The Feminine Mystique, which argued that housework and childrearing were not the only ways to be fulfilled as a woman, had kick-started the movement after its publication in 1963. In Canada, Doris Anderson (obituary March 3, 2007), who had become editor of Chatelaine in 1956, was offering her readers thoughtful and provocative articles about all sorts of taboo topics, such as abortion and contraception, and was urging women to take off their aprons and run for public office.
Fast forward almost a decade to Winnipeg. Early in 1973, Harry Easton, the city's chief librarian and president of the Canadian Library Association, asked two young librarians, Phyllis YAFFE and Barbara CLUBB, to organize the theme day at the annual Canadian Library Association conference, which was to be held that June in Sackville, New Brunswick They took on the unpaid task, but they gave their own feminist twist to the theme, "Librarians: beginning, middle and end of career." Specifically, they focused on female librarians and why it was that men held virtually all of the executive positions in a profession in which women occupied the vast majority of jobs.
Needing a speaker, they phoned broadcaster Barbara Frum at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, who declined; then Doris Anderson, who also demurred, but who recommended Sherrill CHEDA, an ardent feminist and the chief librarian at Seneca College in Toronto. That is how Ms. CHEDA came to deliver a keynote address entitled That Special Little Mechanism, referring to the appendage that men carry between their legs.
Delivered by a tiny powerhouse of a woman slightly over five feet tall, who was barely visible above a massive podium that tended to skitter across the stage, the speech was a knock out. Studded with anecdotes and statistics, it not only articulated the reality that many female librarians lived, but it acquired a legitimacy because of the forum in which it was delivered - the profession's annual conference.
"It was shocking," Ms. YAFFE, now vice-chairwoman of the board of Ryerson University and former Chief Executive Officer of Alliance Atlantis, said in a telephone interview. "Nobody asked questions like that." Afterwards, the triumvirate of Ms. CHEDA, Ms. YAFFE and Ms. CLUBB (now the chief librarian of the City of Ottawa) sat on the lawn and plotted their next move: The launch of the oddly titled journal Emergency Librarian, a compendium of book reviews, news, and information infused with feminist voices from the alternative press and radical librarians.
Ms. CHEDA and Ms. YAFFE (who moved to Toronto in September, 1973 and was hired by Ms. CHEDA as a reference librarian at Seneca College) organized the editorial in meetings after work at Ms. CHEDA's kitchen table while Ms. CLUBB maintained the subscription lists in Winnipeg. "Getting information to people was so empowering. We had a social purpose," said Ms. YAFFE who became lifelong Friends with Ms. CHEDA. " She was loyal and caring and inspiring because her principles were so much a part of her life. She was a feminist and a peacenik and absolutely against prejudice of any kind."
Sherrill SCHNEIDER was born in the mid-1930s in Osgood, Indiana, a small town in the American Midwest between Indianapolis and Cincinnati. Her father, Abraham (Abe) SCHNEIDER, was a Russian Jew from Kiev who had walked across Ukraine to Hamburg with his mother and two siblings to escape the pogroms following the Russian revolution. His ultimate destination was Indiana, where his father had settled. That's where Abe SCHNEIDER met and married Myrtle STOUT, the descendant of early Protestant settlers on the eastern coast of the United States. Sherrill was the eldest of their four children.
Over the years Abe SCHNEIDER ran both a shoe and a dry-goods store before going into the scrap-metal business with his father, a business that continues to thrive. Sherrill, who was the valedictorian of her high school, was the first person in her family to go to university. She went briefly to Hanover College, a small private Presbyterian College, in 1954, and then entered the University of Indiana in Bloomington the following September.
Her plan was to become an academic, but the male head of the English department discouraged her dreams by saying dismissively that studying for a doctorate would be a waste of time because she was probably going to get married and have babies. She fulfilled that prediction by marrying a fellow student named Noël PERRY in June, 1958, just after she graduated with a bachelor's degree. While he completed his undergraduate degree she entered the master's program in library science - which, along with teaching and nursing, was then an acceptable occupation for ambitious women. By September, 1959, three months and three courses short of acquiring her library degree, she had moved to San Francisco where her husband had found a job with Social Security, and had produced her first son, Marc (named after the artist Marc Chagall).
The family moved to Baltimore in 1962, where their second son, Andrew, was born that May. Four months later, Ms. CHEDA began working in the history and social-sciences department of the Enoch Pratt Free Library. She earned $4,000 a year and was advised that if she wanted to succeed she should wear pearls and white gloves to work and use Jacqueline Kennedy as a role model. A year later the library gave her a leave of absence to complete her MLS at Indiana University. Thereafter, she and her family moved back to San Francisco where she worked as a librarian at San Francisco State College. Along with her husband, she became involved with the growing resistance to the Vietnam War.
The Perrys' marriage fell apart in 1966 in San Francisco during the era of love and peace. She subsequently moved across the border to Vancouver with her children and her new partner, Michael CHEDA, a draft dodger. She worked in the libraries of the University of British Columbia and Simon Fraser University. They married in 1969, about the time he moved to Toronto to take a job with CFTO television in Markham. She followed with her children several months later and began working at the library of the Indian and Eskimo Association, and then as chief librarian at Seneca College. Her marriage to Mr. CHEDA broke up in about 1975.
Having grown totally frustrated by the lack of professional opportunities and the inequitable share of household responsibilities that she shouldered, Ms. CHEDA became a member of the New Feminists, a group that had split from the Toronto Women's Liberation Movement in April, 1969, over ideological differences. Although she had enthusiastically embraced feminism and the concept of women supporting and loving other women, she did draw some lines. Arriving at a feminist consciousness-raising session in a church basement, Ms. CHEDA was given a mirror and invited to get better acquainted with her vagina. "Give me a break," Ms. CHEDA whispered to her friend Shelagh Wilkinson, who had also declined the mirror on the grounds that, as a trained nurse and midwife, she had seen more then enough vaginas.
Nobody seems to remember exactly how Ms. CHEDA met Ms. Anderson at Chatelaine, but they probably connected in 1972 when Ms. CHEDA began trying to express her feminist ideas in print. They had many common interests, not least of which was the challenge of trying to raise independent sons in a patriarchal society.
Nine months after her Sackville speech, Ms. CHEDA dropped her second feminist shoe when she published the article How to Raise Liberated Children in Chatelaine in March, 1974. Described as a practical parent's guide, the article itemized how her sons were expected to make their own lunches, get themselves around town, make dinner once a week and do laundry and other household tasks. There was an outraged response from many readers, but Ms. CHEDA and Ms. Anderson were not deterred. Another article, On The Way to Liberation: One housewife-mother-librarian's personal and painful journey from martyr mom to liberated person, appeared six months later. About this time, Ms. CHEDA became the expert fielding questions from readers in a monthly advice column, Ask A Feminist.
As for her own kids, they grew up in a household that embraced peace activists, feminists and gay couples. Her son Marc, now a research administrator in the faculty of medicine at the University of Toronto, says that he didn't really have much choice about doing his share of the housework (unlike his Friends, whose mothers made their beds and prepared their lunches), but he had a lot of freedom. His mother was always willing to talk to him "about major things going on in her life, like the life-changing thing that happened after my stepfather moved out. We had a real heart-to-heart, so it wasn't like I never had input," he said. "We were consulted, and we were consulted at a very early age."
Contributing to a magazine such as Chatelaine is a lot easier than running one, especially a start-up operation like Emergency Librarian. Because Ms. CHEDA knew nothing about the mechanics of publishing magazines, she joined an organization called the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association in the mid-1970s and was soon elected to its board of directors. Eventually, probably in 1979 or 1980, she was asked to take on the job of executive director of the floundering, nearly bankrupt group. Even though it meant working for a lower salary and giving up the pension and other benefits she had at Seneca, Ms. CHEDA accepted the challenge.
As an arts administrator she applied the organizational, research and management skills she had learned as a librarian. She travelled across the country by train and bus, sleeping on sofas in the homes of Canadian Periodical Publishers Association members to rally enthusiasm for the floundering organization. Within a year she had turned it around; then she began developing a distribution system that actually helped Canadian magazines reach their subscribers and improve their business prospects.
In the mid-1970s, Ms. CHEDA met lawyer Karl JAFFARY, a former alderman for the old city of Toronto. Also interested in the arts and involved with the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association, Mr. JAFFARY acted for her when she sued the now defunct Weekend magazine on December 17, 1977, for "outing" her as a lesbian in an article called Gay in the Seventies. She won a libel settlement of $5,000 which Mr. JAFFARY advised her to use as a down payment on a rental house in the east end of the city. Over the years they became close Friends. He was drawn to her for "the things that everybody liked about her - she would not take shit from anybody." He admired her independent spirit and her intellect and shared her passions for books, the arts - especially little theatre companies - and organizations dedicated to promoting social justice. They married on May 30, 1987, a union that by all accounts was extremely happy.
By then Ms. CHEDA had left the Canadian Periodical Publishers Association, worked for four years as registrar at the Ontario Arts Council and had shifted, in 1986, to the Culture and Communications Branch of the Ontario government. "With her dynamism, drive and creativity, she put together the Ontario Publishing Centre in the fall of 1991 to help the book and magazine publishing industry in a very bad economic time," said cultural bureaucrat Jim Polk, who was hired to work under Ms. CHEDA on the book side. "Sherrill was very wily and inventive in working with the structure and very demanding of her staff, but in a good way," he said. Before a change of government and the dismantling of the centre in 1995, it gave out nearly $15-million in support money to help book and magazine publishers computerize and modernize their supply and marketing systems. "She intended to make a difference in literature and the arts, and she did," said Mr. Polk.
After a few miserable years in the mid- to late 1990s, dismantling many of the programs she had helped create, Ms. CHEDA took early retirement from the Ontario government. For the last several years she and Mr. JAFFARY travelled, went to the theatre, read books and relished Ms. CHEDA's talents as a gourmet cook. In November, 2004, Ms. CHEDA suffered a stroke which immobilized her left side. She responded well to treatment, although she was left with a slight limp. Besides being an informal reference source for Friends and families about essential books, restaurants, plays and trips, she was one of four guest editors, along with Sally Armstrong, Michele Landsberg and Shelagh Wilkinson, of a special volume of Canadian Woman Studies entitled Celebrating Doris Anderson, which was published in December 2007.
Late last month, Ms. CHEDA developed persistent flu-like symptoms. A blood test led to a diagnosis of acute adult leukemia. The next day she suffered a terminal stroke, which gave her family its second terrible shock in as many days.
Sherrill CHEDA was born in Osgood, Indiana, on February 15, 1936. She died at Princess Margaret Hospital in Toronto of complications from acute leukemia early on the morning of June 7, 2008. She was 72. Ms. CHEDA leaves her husband, Karl JAFFARY, and her sons Marc and Andrew. She also leaves her grandchildren Kate, Isabella, Desiree and Michael, her father Abe SCHNEIDER, her three siblings and her extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-03 published
Champion of culture in Canada 'epitomized the values of the NAC'
Third-generation member of famous newspaper family grew up in a lifestyle of privilege and chose the diplomatic corps over journalism. Later, he helped launch the National Arts Centre and the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
Passionate, romantic, a lover of culture, the high arts and beautiful women, Hamilton SOUTHAM was in many ways an 18th-century gentleman, given to quoting poetry, rereading the classic works of literature and history, attending opera, ballet and theatrical performances, and collecting paintings by modern masters. Until the end of his days, he expressed his faith in the ultimate meaning of life by quoting these lines from Milton's Samson Agonistes: "All is best, though we oft doubt, /What th' unsearchable dispose/Of highest wisdom brings about, / and ever best found in the close."/
Born into the third generation of the Southam newspaper dynasty, he grew up in a gilded world of wealth and privilege, in which winters were spent in Florida and summers in Europe and the family enclave at Big Rideau Lake near Ottawa. Fighting for his country for six years in the Second World War stiffened the public-service component of his complicated character. After working in journalism, he turned his back on the family business and opted for diplomacy in its Pearsonian heyday, serving as ambassador to Poland, among other postings. But it was his lengthy tenure in the trenches of the cultural, linguistic and nationalistic battlefields that forged his legacy as the builder and founding general director of the National Arts Centre, a visionary fundraiser and force behind the Canadian War Museum, the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation and the Valiants Memorial and an active contributor to many other cultural institutions.
How fitting that such a Canadian giant should die on Canada Day, said Peter Herrndorf, president of the National Arts Centre, describing Mr. SOUTHAM as a man of exquisite taste with a single-minded devotion to the arts and an incredible capacity for Friendship. "He had been for many years, well before I came here, one of my heroes and he stayed a hero though my professional life. Never did I imagine that I would not only build on Hamilton's legacy at the National Arts Centre, but also become his friend," said Mr. Herrndorf. "He became like a second dad to me, both in personal terms and very much in professional terms - and in typical dad terms, he was both wonderful in his support and tough when I wasn't living up to what he expected. It's a big loss because he epitomized the values of the National Arts Centre."
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in December, 1916, and named after an uncle who had been killed two months earlier at the Battle of the Somme. His family called him Hamilton because he had an older cousin, Gordon, who lived next door, in what amounted to a family enclave in the elite Rockliffe Park area of Ottawa. His parents' house, called Lindenelm, later became the Spanish embassy.
Hamilton's father, Wilson SOUTHAM, the oldest of six sons of William SOUTHAM (1843-1932,) the proprietor of The Hamilton Spectator and founder of the Southam newspaper empire, was the publisher of the Ottawa Citizen. Hamilton's mother, Henrietta CARGILL, was the daughter of Conservative politician Henry CARGILL, who died after collapsing on the floor of the House of Commons.
The youngest of his parents' six children, Hamilton went to Elmwood School and then Ashbury College, the private boy's school in Ottawa. In those days, French was taught as though it were a dead language, so it was years before he became bilingual. But the school did nurture his love for Latin, the classics, and poetry, which he delighted in declaiming until the end of his life. He also played Gratiano in The Merchant of Venice, "lightly with exactly the right touch of flippancy," according to drama critic Ted Devlin.
After doing summer-school classes at Glebe and Lisgar Collegiates, he entered Trinity College at the University of Toronto in 1934. He graduated with a degree in history in 1939, having taken a year out, halfway through, recovering from a serious car crash that left him with a crooked smile - a rugged distinction in a classically handsome face. After U of T, he sailed to England intending to do a master's degree in modern history at Christ Church College, Oxford. Almost as soon as he arrived, Britain declared war on Germany and he enlisted in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery.
Simultaneously, he renewed his Friendship with Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID, the daughter of a sculptor from a land-owning French family. They had met in Canada that summer through family Friends. When the hostilities commenced, she managed to make her way back to London by ship from New York because the United States was still neutral. They married in London on April 15, 1940, while he was in training. (They eventually had four children and were divorced in the late 1960s; she died in 1998.) A month after the wedding, he received his commission as a lieutenant.
Meanwhile, the 40th battery of the Canadian Field Artillery (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon SOUTHAM, had served) had mobilized for active service under Frank Keen, assistant editor of the Hamilton Spectator, as the 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton. As soon as the battalion arrived in England, Lt. SOUTHAM applied for a transfer from the British Army so that he could serve with the Canadian Forces. By the autumn of 1943, the 1st Canadian Infantry Division, which was heavily engaged in Italy, urgently needed replacements. He volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. He fought in the battle of Ortona in December, 1943, and the final battle of Monte Cassino from April to May, 1944, and was part of the advance of the Canadian Army up through Italy and later from Marseilles northward in France. He was mentioned in dispatches for "gallant and distinguished services" and demobilized with the rank of captain.
After the war, he worked briefly for The Times of London before returning to Canada and an uneasy job as an editorial writer for the Citizen in 1946. "I couldn't write quickly enough," he said in an interview at his home in Rockliffe in 2004. "My editor would give me a subject - 500 words on such and such a subject by 3 o'clock. My instinct was to go to the parliamentary library for a week and then come back with the 500 words," he said. "I was wretched." He went to his uncle Harry SOUTHAM, then publisher of the Citizen, and said, "I can't manage to do this, so I am going to External Affairs."
He wrote the examinations and joined the department in 1948 under Lester Pearson at a time when Canada "had a role to play" and when being part of the foreign service was "riding the crest of a wave, as far as I was concerned." It was "a wonderful time," Mr. SOUTHAM said, his eyes flashing under his expressive beetle brows. "Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very heaven!" he said, quoting Wordsworth.
In 1949, Mr. SOUTHAM (and his family, which now included a second son, Christopher, who is now called Abdul) was posted to Stockholm as third secretary under ambassador Tommy Stone. After nearly four years, they returned to Ottawa before being posted to Warsaw as chargé d'affaires in March, 1959. By then, the Southams had two more children, Jennifer and Michael. This posting was one of the highlights of Mr. SOUTHAM's diplomatic career because he solved the "Polish Treasures" problem.
After Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, the curator of Krakow removed a number of treasures from Wawel Castle, including tapestries and the sword of state. Following a circuitous route, they ended up in museum warehouses in Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec City. After the war, Poland, then behind the Iron Curtain, requested the return of its state treasures. That was fine with the Canadian federal government, but not with Maurice Duplessis, then premier of Quebec. He refused to hand anything over to a Communist government. Amid the diplomatic fracas, "we never sent an ambassador there and they never sent an ambassador here," Mr. SOUTHAM explained.
Mr. Duplessis died in office in September, 1959, and was succeeded by Paul Sauvé, "a more rational man" who agreed to ship the treasures back, causing Poland and Canada "to unfreeze their governments and to exchange ambassadors." And so, Mr. SOUTHAM's grateful government promoted him "sur place" to the rank of ambassador in April, 1960.
In 1962, the Southams returned to Ottawa, where he was appointed head of the information division at External Affairs. He was at work one day when he received a visit from Faye Loeb of the IGA grocery chain. She wanted him to help spearhead a citizens' move to build a performing arts centre in Ottawa. Rashly, he promised to find an appropriate candidate and, if necessary, to take charge himself.
"Time ran out and Faye came back," is the way he described his assumption of the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance in 1963. At its height, the alliance included about 60 arts organizations in Ottawa. They raised enough money (about $7,000) to commission a feasibility study, which recommended both the building of a performing arts centre and the holding of an annual national festival in Ottawa. In 1964, Mr. SOUTHAM took the completed study (with its projected costs of $9-million) to his old boss Mr. Pearson, by this point prime minister, and persuaded him that the proposed building would be an ideal centennial project for the federal government.
"He thought about it for a month and then came back and said, 'We'll do it,' Mr. SOUTHAM said. "After that, it was his project and he never gave up on it." The prime minister arranged for Mr. SOUTHAM to be lent from External Affairs to Secretary of State, which appointed him co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre in February, 1964.
The decision about the architect for the new facility was left up to Mr. SOUTHAM. He recommended Fred LEBENSOLD, who had already built the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver, had won the competition for Confederation Centre in Charlottetown, and would later build Place des Arts in Montreal. Mr. LEBENSOLD did a quick estimate of $16-million and signed on as architect. Mr. SOUTHAM was appointed inaugural director of the National Arts Centre in 1967 and oversaw the construction of Mr. LEBENSOLD's hexagonal buildings on 2.6 hectares on the banks of the Rideau River, defending vociferous criticism along the way as the costs spiralled to a final tally of more than $46-million. (By this time, Mr. SOUTHAM's first marriage had disintegrated. He married Gro MORTENSON of Oslo in 1968, with whom he had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. He and his second wife were divorced in the late 1970s, but as with all of Mr. SOUTHAM's wives, she remained on affectionate terms with him.)
The multifaceted performance centre, with three halls including the country's first professional opera house, two restaurants, two theatre companies and its own touring symphony orchestra, opened in June of 1969 with the National Ballet of Canada performing two commissioned ballets - The Queen by Grant Strate to music by Louis Applebaum, and Kraanerg by Roland Petit to music by Iannis Xenakis. The following night, when the ballet danced John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, something went wrong with the technology in the orchestra pit. Conductor George Crum and some of his musicians slowly ascended above stage level, leading Mr. Crum to say later that it was "the only time I ever looked down on Celia Franca," who was performing as Lady Capulet. After two terms as director-general, Mr. SOUTHAM stepped down in March of 1977.
Less than a year later, after a short respite spent sailing his yacht, Mr. SOUTHAM was persuaded by secretary of state John Roberts to become chair of Festival Canada and take charge of the national celebrations on Canada Day. He was paid a dollar a year and required to appear before a Commons committee to answer questions about his mandate and budget. When some members criticized the fluently bilingual Mr. SOUTHAM for preparing a report in English - he said later that he hadn't had time to have it translated - he sent a letter resigning from his post in French to the minister. It was rejected and Mr. SOUTHAM oversaw celebrations in hundreds of communities across the country and a blow-out televised extravaganza on Parliament Hill on the theme "You and Me - Le Canada, C'est Toi et Moi." In the 1980s, Mr. SOUTHAM was a partner in Lively Arts Market Builders, a scheme to create a television channel devoted to producing and broadcasting plays, concerts, films and programs on the arts. The group received a cable television licence and launched the pay-television C Channel in January, 1983. But it failed to attract subscribers and went into receivership six months later. Rogers Cablesystems Inc. bought its pay-television licence that December for $12,500.
(The following year, Mr. SOUTHAM married for the third and final time. Marion TANTON, a French woman he had known and loved for many years, was the wife of the late Pierre CHARPENTIER, a former Canadian ambassador, and the mother of his three children. She died of cancer in May, 2005.)
In January, 1985, prime minister Brian Mulroney appointed Mr. SOUTHAM chair of the Official Residences Council, a civilian oversight group he had established amidst mounting criticism of the cost of maintaining official residences. Mr. SOUTHAM's tenure was not an easy one; there were political brawls about work done on the speaker's house in Kingsmere; on Stornoway, the residence of the opposition leader; and on both official prime ministerial residences.
His beloved National Arts Centre went through a long period of turmoil beginning in the mid-1980s, involving funding crises, a revolving series of chairs and artistic directors and a strike by the National Arts Centre orchestra, before it began to stabilize more than a decade later with the appointment in the late 1990s of David Leighton as chair of the board and Mr. Herrndorf as president and chief executive - thanks in no small part to Mr. SOUTHAM's behind-the-scenes lobbying. Early in 2000, during Mr. Herrndorf's tenure, a grateful National Arts Centre renamed its opera auditorium Southam Hall in his honour and threw a lavish party for him on his 90th birthday.
After attending the rededication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on September 17, 1999, Mr. SOUTHAM met some Friends for lunch at the Rideau Club. He had been "moved" by the ceremony and by governor-general Adrienne Clarkson's "wonderful" speech, and he began thinking that the fallen soldier "should have some company on Confederation Square," rather like the "great cloud of witnesses," described by St. Paul in his epistles. Those lunchtime musings led to his final public campaign, which was realized seven years later when Governor-General Michaëlle Jean unveiled the $1.1-million Valiants Memorial. He considered the Valiants his second great project after the National Arts Centre. "Parliament Hill is full of statues of prime ministers and politicians, some of them good, some of them not good. But in Ottawa, there shouldn't just be statues of politicians," he said. "It is the capital of the country and there should be statues of the men and women who have made this country."
Aside from building monuments to others, Mr. SOUTHAM enjoyed sitting in the study of his Ottawa home, a well-proportioned, light-filled room lined with bookcases, rereading the complete works of Anthony Trollope and "contemplating three generations of reading." He had his grandfather's books on the top shelf, his father's Everyman editions on the second and his own books on the third shelf. As well, he was examining his own soul. "I have lived my life, and that which I have done may God himself make pure," he said. "I meditate and I don't compare today with yesterday. I have more important comparisons, concerning my inner life, and I have much to think about." He was an Anglican, but he "was thinking the same thoughts" as a Catholic or a Jew or a Muslim. The soul is a more important part of our being than character," he said. "It is essential."
And so he spent his last years in contemplation and in visiting with close Friends and family, enjoying life and engaged with the world around him.
On Canada Day, he was about to go for a drive with his valet when he suddenly felt tired. He lay down for a rest and quietly died.
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in Ottawa on December 19, 1916. He died July 1, 2008, at home in Ottawa of complications from cancer. He was 91. He is survived by his second wife, Gro MORTENSON, his six children and his extended family. A private family funeral is planned followed by a memorial service at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, Ottawa, later in July.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-05 published
TITCOMBE, Doctor Emerson P.
(March 29, 1919-July 3, 2008)
After a full life of service to his Lord and his fellowman, Doctor Emerson TITCOMBE of Thornbury, passed away on July 3, 2008. His life was truly a life of serving and self-sacrifice. Upon graduating from Toronto Medical School in 1943, he served as a captain in the Army Medical Corps. He and his beloved wife Elizabeth established his medical practice in Thornbury in 1946 where he served his community until his retirement in 1989. He served as Provincial Coroner in addition to his busy practice. Medicine was not merely a profession for him; it was a calling to a life of service to others. He was a lifelong member and deacon of the Thornbury First Baptist Church. He leaves behind to mourn his passing and celebrate his life his beloved wife Elizabeth, his children Nancy BALL of Uxbridge, Peter TITCOMBE of Burlington, and Margaret VANDERWERF of Ottawa; his grandchildren: Marina BALL, Steven BALL, Dennis TITCOMBE, Paul TITCOMBE, Derrick VANDERWERF, and Phillip VANDERWERF; and great-grandchild Addison TITCOMBE. He will be fondly remembered by his brother Clarence of Beaverton and his sister Edith MARTIN of Vancouver. Funeral services will be conducted at the First Baptist Church, Bruce Street South in Thornbury, on Monday, July 7, 2008 at 1: 30 p.m. with interment to follow at Thornbury-Clarksburg Union Cemetery. There will be no public visitation. Family will receive Friends in the fellowship hall of the church following the interment services where they will share in a time of refreshment and further remembrances of Emerson. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Meaford General Hospital Foundation or the Thornbury First Baptist Church would be appreciated and may be made through Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, Box 556, Thornbury, Ontario N0H 2P0 (519-599-2718), to whom arrangements have been entrusted. Gone to a better place!

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-10 published
Member of Legislative Assembly and mayor of Yellowknife built consensus and unity in Northwest Territories
With a personality as big as Northwest Territories, he used persuasion to find a seat for Northerners at the constitutional table and to include native people in diamond-mining projects
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
If ever a man meshed with a time and a place, it was Michael BALLANTYNE, a traveller who roamed the world's troubled spots and then made his mark in Yellowknife as mayor, territorial politician and executive at the Diavik Diamond Mine during a dynamic political and human-rights era. He was an active participant in the evolution of responsible government in the Northwest Territories, the settling of land claims, and the creation of Nunavut as a separate territory with its own political administration.
He was a Paul Bunyanesque figure, complete with black beard and booming voice. A towering 6 feet 6 inches in his socks, with an equally impressive girth, he weighed in at about 250 pounds and had a personality as big as Northwest Territories. Instead of wielding an axe, he used his persuasive tongue and expansive empathy to build consensus among disparate stakeholders. "He loved what he did," said his wife, Penny BALLANTYNE. " The more complex the problem, the more excited he got. He liked nothing better than something that seemed to have no solution and then he would figure it out."
"He was a politician who reached out to everyone," said Dennis Patterson, premier of Northwest Territories from 1987 to 1991, mentioning Mr. BALLANTYNE's "pivotal" role in settling land claims and in building a society in which aboriginal and non-natives could participate fully in public affairs. "He believed in inclusive politics and he was a friend to all, even in a climate of mistrust of the capital and a climate of fear that Yellowknife residents would do everything they could to undermine the self-determination aspirations of the Inuit [in what is now Nunavut]."
Along the way, as mayor of Yellowknife, Mr. BALLANTYNE convinced The Globe and Mail to act as chief fundraiser for the Northern Arts and Cultural Centre, the only fully equipped live performance theatre in Northwest Territories, and to spend a bundle air freighting in copies of the newspaper long before on-line editions made it possible to read the paper anywhere. "It cost us, but it made them all feel good," said former Globe publisher Roy MEGARRY.
"He was a take-charge guy, very vocal, incredibly friendly, bursting with life and enthused about everything," said Mr. MEGARRY. "He was a great, great Canadian, and a warm human being with great concern for the rest of humanity. He exhibited that not just in Vietnam and in Cambodia, but also in the territories, where there is a lot of poverty, especially among the native population.
"He devoted his life to doing the things that really counted and had meaning in this world and not enough people are aware of him."
Michael Alan BALLANTYNE, who was born in Toronto in the last year of the Second World War, was the eldest of five sons in a military family. His father, Ernest Alan BALLANTYNE, was a military engineer and his mother, Barbara Joyce (née STEVENS,) was a nurse. He grew up living the itinerant life of a military brat, attending many schools - three in one year was the record - throughout Canada, and on postings to the United States and Germany. He graduated from Laurentian High School in Ottawa and enrolled in political science at Carleton University. In 1963, he was tired of political theory and eager for realpolitik. As he told an interviewer 20 years later, "I was convinced I was at a university full of wimps in a nation of turkeys who never looked beyond their noses at the world around them."
At 18, he headed to the southern United States to join the civil-rights movement and help register black voters in rural Alabama. As a "white" sympathizer, he was badly beaten and had his nose broken by police, was thrown in jail, and told "you aren't in Canada now, boy." That was his "big awakening," according to his wife, Penny BALLANTYNE, about "how lucky we have it in Canada and how little we know about the reality of other people's struggle." Later that summer, he went north to join Martin Luther King's march on Washington and was in the throng at the Lincoln Memorial on August 28, 1963, when the Baptist minister let his voice ring out with the words "I have a dream."
For much of the next decade, Mr. BALLANTYNE travelled and worked around the world in Africa, South America, Europe and Asia. He took a break in 1969 and went to Yellowknife in the Northwest Territories to visit his parents, who had settled there after his father had retired as a colonel from the army and taken on the job as inaugural director of industry in the territorial government. He found a job building houses in the boom that followed Yellowknife's designation as the capital of Northwest Territories in 1967.
By the end of a year, Mr. BALLANTYNE had enough money to head off again. Wherever he went, political upheaval seemed to find him. As the Vietnam War ground on, he worked for Save the Children in Cambodia and Vietnam, and travelled up the mighty Mekong River, arriving in Phnom Penh, the capital of Cambodia, as it fell to Pol Pot and the Khmer Rouge in April, 1975.
He brought searing images of poverty, child soldiers and war zones back to Yellowknife in 1976 where he found a job driving a front loader in The Giant Mine and soon became active in the Canadian Aluminum Smelter and Allied Workers, the union representing the workers at the mine. Working on the executive of Canadian Aluminum Smelter and Allied Workers whetted his appetite for politics and he ran successfully for Yellowknife city council in 1978.
As a neophyte politician, Mr. BALLANTYNE's style resonated with young people, but he also created a bridge with older, more traditional politicians. After travelling the world, he had found his métier in the North, the place "where you come to live out all your fantasies," as he told an interviewer a decade later.
"Mike was always attracted to what he called the 'interesting edges' of life," according to John Parker, commissioner of Northwest Territories from 1979 to 1989. "He liked people and events and he saw in the territories developing government, and developing populations and developing industry. He was a great people person."
In 1980, the mayor of Yellowknife retired and Mr. BALLANTYNE easily won the election to succeed him. An ebullient booster of his adopted town, he not only persuaded The Globe to steamroller a fundraising campaign for Northern Arts and Cultural Centre, he talked the territorial government into donating the slated-for-demolition gymnasium, including heating and maintenance costs, of the Sir John Franklin Territorial High School as the foundation of the new theatre complex.
After two terms as mayor, Mr. BALLANTYNE was elected a member of the Legislative Assembly for Yellowknife North, a seat he held for the next 12 years. The political system in Northwest Territories is built on a consensus model rather than an adversarial party system. Individuals run for office in a territorial election, and then the winners vote by secret ballot to select a cabinet from among themselves. After two years in the assembly, Mr. BALLANTYNE's fellow Member of Legislative Assemblys selected him for cabinet, where he served in a number of portfolios, including finance and justice, during "a very complex geo-political" time when the territorial government was a virtual "United Nations" of diverse interests and nationalities, according to former premier Dennis Patterson. " Making our government work fell to Mike BALLANTYNE because he was government house leader. He was the guy who sniffed the air with ordinary Member of Legislative Assemblys, established links with the all powerful committees, and became the intelligence, the adviser, the catalyst and the advocate of compromise to make sure that consensus government worked."
He was justice minister during the Meech Lake era. An accord was reached in June, 1987, between Prime Minister Brian Mulroney and the premiers of the 10 provinces, but many Northerners, including Mr. BALLANTYNE, objected to clauses in the proposed treaty that gave provinces, but not territories, a veto over Senate reform and the creation of new provinces, and denied Northwest Territories residents the opportunity to sit in the Senate or on the Supreme Court. He argued that these provisions made Northerners "second-class citizens" and violated their equality rights under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms, and he mounted a legal challenge against the federal government. The case came to naught when the provincial legislatures failed to ratify the accord, but Mr. BALLANTYNE emphatically brought the interests of the North to the constitutional table. He didn't do his own networking connections any harm, either.
"He was very astute, very good at consensus-building and identifying common interests," said John Vertes, senior judge of the Supreme Court of Northwest Territories. The two men met in the late 1970s when Mr. Vertes was a young lawyer and Mr. BALLANTYNE was a member of the Yellowknife city council. Once met, never forgotten, but their biggest professional link came when Mr. BALLANTYNE was minister of justice in the 1980s.
At that time, Northwest Territories included what would become Nunavut, so it was a vast jurisdiction about one-third the size of Canada with a small, but diverse and remotely located population. Residents spoke 11 officially recognized languages. The courts were based in Yellowknife, the capital and only city, and travelled out to remote communities to hold criminal trials and to hear cases, but many elders were precluded from serving on juries in trials affecting their own communities because they did not speak either English or French. Mr. BALLANTYNE negotiated an amendment to the legislation governing juries in Northwest Territories, said Mr. Justice Vertes, to allow an aboriginal speaker (with the help of specially trained court interpreters) to serve on a jury, even if he or she didn't speak either of the two official languages. This innovation expanded the jury pool, made it possible to hold trials in isolated native communities, allowed locals to participate in the process and inevitably engendered a greater understanding of how the justice system functions. "This is unique in the Western world," said Mr. Vertes. "They don't do this in Australia, or in New Zealand, where Maori is an official language."
Also in the middle eighties, Mr. BALLANTYNE met and married Penny AUMOND. Both had been married before. Together, they reared three children, Erin, Alexandra and Nicholas. As a couple, the BALLANTYNEs were a striking physical contrast because she was more than a foot shorter. "I may be 5 feet 3, but I was the only one who could sit him down and read him the riot act," she said.
Having told his wife that he was going to choose his exit, he became Speaker in 1991 (the same year that Nellie Cournoyer became the first female premier of Northwest Territories) and left politics two years later. He never became premier, primarily because he represented the urban riding of Yellowknife (Northwest Territories's only city) and in the buildup to the creation of Nunavut, the unofficial consensus was that the premier should both be aboriginal and from a non-urban riding in the eastern part of the territory. Analysts might conclude that, for once, Mr. BALLANTYNE was the wrong man in the wrong place at the wrong time, but a more likely explanation is that he was more interested in political evolution than in clawing at power for its own sake.
Coincidentally, there was another issue brewing in the North that called out for his skill set: managing the competing interests surrounding the discovery of rich diamond deposits in the Northwest Territories in 1991, a discovery that has turned Canada into one of the world's top producers of quality and politically "clean" diamonds. He joined Aber (now Harry Winston Diamonds) as vice-president Northwest Territories, with a mandate to oversee the construction of the Diavik Diamond Mine, which opened in 2003, and to liaise with the federal and territorial governments and native groups over mineral and subsidiary rights. "We really needed a senior person in Yellowknife who could meet head to head with the president of the operating company and he stood out as the kind of guy who could do this," said George Parker, former Northwest Territories commissioner and now a director of Aber. "His familiarity with the territorial government and with the federal agencies based in Yellowknife were also very important factors. It was in Aber's interest that the project proceed smoothly and obeyed the rules and engaged Northern people, in particular aboriginal people, and it was necessary for us to have a really strong spokesman." From 2002 to 2005, Mr. BALLANTYNE also held an appointment as vice-president of Laurelton Diamonds (a subsidiary of Tiffany and Company) to establish a diamond-cutting and polishing plant in Yellowknife, so that the mine could support a secondary industry in the North.
Mr. BALLANTYNE turned 55 in February, 2000. After a glowing medical checkup, he took his family on their "first-ever" winter holiday in Barbados. That's where he developed flu-like symptoms. Within the month, he was in a coma in hospital in Edmonton, waiting for a liver transplant. He had probably harboured a dormant form of hepatitis since his travelling days, which had suddenly turned voracious. "Miraculously," says Penny BALLANTYNE, he was given a donor liver. The new liver kept him from dying, but it was not in perfect condition and so life became a struggle to stay healthy. They bought and renovated an old house in Victoria, where Ms. BALLANTYNE lived with their nearly grown children and found a job as city manager while Mr. BALLANTYNE commuted to Yellowknife and kept promising to retire.
He was in Victoria's Royal Jubilee Hospital for about a month this May and then he was transported by air ambulance to the University of Alberta in Edmonton. The doctors were talking encouragingly about a second liver transplant when he had a massive internal hemorrhage. Although the doctors in the Intensive Care Unit did their utmost - he'd always insisted he wanted extraordinary measures - he knew there were no more miracles. "He always told me, 'I'm not afraid to die. If I have to go, I've had a great life and I've had eight years that were a bonus,' said Ms. BALLANTYNE. "He looked at each of us, squeezed our hands and he just relaxed."
Michael Alan BALLANTYNE was born February 27, 1945, in Toronto. He died June 19, 2008, at the University of Alberta Hospital in Edmonton, Alberta. He was 63. He is survived by his wife Penny, his three children, one grandchild and his extended family.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-21 published
AIR, Florence Alyce (née MARTIN)
The family is saddened to announce the passing of Florence AIR at the South Muskoka Memorial Hospital, Bracebridge, while vacationing on Lake Rosseau, on Thursday, July 17, 2008. Beloved wife for 53 wonderful years of Sandy. Loving mother of Cindy and her companion David. Sadly missed by her faithful pet dog Coby. Predeceased by her grand_son Christopher Kevin, parents Will and Lily MARTIN, brother Bill (World War 2) and sisters Dolly and Joyce. Survived by her sister Eileen PENA of Florida. Also remembered by her nieces Valerie and her son Eric, Lori (Roy) and their son Alec, Elaine and her daughters Courttney and Chaynell, Marilyn and her children Shane, Saun and Lisa; Beverly, Marco and Romona and nephews Billy, Teddy and John; sister-in-law of Betty and her husband Carl, John and his wife Mary, Fred, and Mary AIR, (Peter - deceased) and their families. Also predeceased by George and Ann AIR. Fondly remembered by many longstanding Friends, including the ladies from the Whitby Dunlops. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy. 10 North of Queen Elizabeth Way), from 7-9 p.m. on Wednesday. Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, July 24, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-23 published
She turned the Gardiner Museum into a glittering, priceless gem
With the help of her wealthy stockbroker husband, she transformed a hobby into a great ceramics collection, and then built a museum to house it all opposite Toronto's Royal Ontario Museum
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
Museum founder and philanthropist Helen GARDINER had three lives: before George, during George, and after George. The George was George Ryerson GARDINER, a business integrator, Harvard MBA and stockbroker who founded Gardiner Group Capital, the country's first discount brokerage, and was president of the Toronto Stock Exchange.
Generally considered a business genius, he was a pioneer in the oil-and-gas business, opened the first airport hotel in Canada, was a key player in bringing Kentucky Fried Chicken north of the 49th parallel, established Gardiner Farms, the racing stable and breeding farm, and was one of the original members of the syndicate that owned Northern Dancer. "He didn't start with nothing," a former business associate said, "but he multiplied it many times over."
Ms. GARDINER, by contrast, came from humble circumstances, and was a single parent working as a secretary in Mr. GARDINER's brokerage firm when they met. With Mr. GARDINER's support, she became a mature student at York University and took the decorative arts course at Christie's in London, England. Having acquired professional expertise - her impeccable eye for quality was innate - she and her husband amassed a huge and very valuable collection of porcelain and earthenware, then built a museum to house it.
Nevertheless, he was always the public face and voice of the Gardiner Museum. After Mr. GARDINER died in December, 1997, she emerged as a fundraiser, philanthropist and connoisseur who transformed the Gardiner from a mausoleum for a private collection into a dynamic, innovative and internationally prized museum. She also developed her own interests in the National Ballet School and other art forms such as opera, becoming so fond of Wagner's Ring Cycle that she was known as a "Ring" addict.
"The Gardiner Museum was her No. 1 passion, but the National Ballet School was a close second," said Margaret McCain, former chair of the board of the National Ballet School and former lieutenant-governor of New Brunswick.
"Helen had moral integrity and she also had a lot of fortitude," said Ms. McCain, describing her friend as fun with a wonderful laugh and a complete lack of pretension. "She was grounded and she was able to hold on to her own identity even if she was in George's shadow for a long time. There was a strength there and I used to say, 'You are your own person, kind and gentle, but strong inside.' "
Tony ARRELL, a former Chief Executive Officer of Gardiner Watson and a director of Gardiner Group Capital said: "When you have a tree growing under a big tree, the big tree shades the little tree, but when you take the big tree out, the little tree can grow up - and that is what has been happening with Helen. She has proven to be a stronger character with a greater ability than many people thought," he said. "There has been a lot more to Helen GARDINER in the last 10 years than we ever knew before."
Helen Elizabeth McMINN was born in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, the year before the Second World War began. Her father Charles was a carpenter at one of the gold mines, while her mother Helen was a homemaker. The McMinns moved south to Toronto, where Mr. McMINN worked for General Electric at its Davenport Works until he retired. Their two children, Helen and Bob, went to high school in Toronto, and then Bob joined the military. Helen's daughter Lindy BARROW, who was born in 1958, lived with her grandparents until she was 10 while Ms. McMINN, a single parent, worked at various jobs in advertising and as a legal secretary to support her daughter and save enough money to provide a home for them both.
In the second half of the 1960s, she met George GARDINER when she was hired as a secretary at Gardiner Watson, the stock brokerage that he and a partner had founded just after the Second World War. At the time, she was in her late 20s and Mr. GARDINER (who was known to enjoy, discreetly, the company of beautiful women) was in his early 50s, married and the father of three children. Not long before, in July, 1965, his formidable father Percy, a financier, had died of a heart attack. This death may have liberated Mr. GARDINER, who had had a fractious relationship with his father and had always felt the need to show that he could be even more successful in business.
"He once said that Helen was the first person that he laid eyes on as he was coming out from under this oppression that he had been under for so many years," according to Gretchen ROSS, a long-time friend. Their relationship led to the breakup of Mr. GARDINER's marriage.
In the mid-1970s, they moved into a house on Old Forest Hill Road in Toronto. He bought the property, razed the existing house and built a new one with lead-lined walls - he had acute hearing and didn't want to be disturbed by the neighbours. Mr. GARDINER and his first wife had bought some pre-Colombian earthenware in South America, and he decided that he and Ms. McMINN should "collect something unique to make our house look lived in," she said later. He wanted it to have "quality, individuality and his personal stamp." Naively, as she later admitted, they hit on ceramics.
Two years later, inflation was escalating. Mr. GARDINER, an astute and thrifty businessman, read an article asserting that Chinese and European porcelain were outperforming stocks, bonds and real estate, and he decided it was time to turn their hobby into an investment. Helen, who had been studying as a mature student at York University since 1974, switched tacks and went to London in 1978 to take Christie's Fine Arts Course. A year later, she was both an expert and a qualified dealer who could buy ceramics at wholesale prices.
Their first mature purchase was a hand-painted, highly decorated yellow tea-and-chocolate service made in 1740 by Meissen, the earliest factory in Europe to produce hard-paste porcelain. On the advice of a Sotheby's porcelain expert, Helen had gone to see the 50-piece set, complete with its original leather travelling case, at Winifred Williams Antiques on Bury Street in London. She persuaded Mr. GARDINER to look at the Meissen service and to meet dealer Robert Williams. Without telling her, he bought the service. And so the Gardiners began their long association with Mr. Williams and transformed themselves into serious collectors. As she said later, "Bob taught me how to really look at things. He was generous with his knowledge and showed me how to identify artists and factories by the distinctive characteristics of their work."
From Meissen, the couple began accumulating works made by Du Paquier, the second factory in Europe to produce hard-paste porcelain in the 18th century, and pieces called Hausmaler, a term used to describe ceramics decorated by studio artists who painted or redecorated porcelain produced by factories such as Meissen or Du Paquier. As always, they kept a judicious eye on their passions and their bottom line, collecting Du Paquier because it was undervalued, and Hausmaler for its variety, eccentric charm and the stories about subterfuge, espionage and larceny swirling around the pieces - how artists "acquired" undecorated wares from the studios that employed them and then painted them with their own designs.
During her Christie's course in London, Helen was seduced by the lush sensual colours and painterly decoration of Italian Maiolica. She took Mr. GARDINER to see the Maiolica collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in South Kensington and he too was entranced. Encouraged by a lull in the market for Maiolica, Mr. GARDINER began buying at auction or through their retinue of international dealers.
By the early 1980s, the Gardiners - they had married on July 11, 1981, at least a dozen years after they first met - were running out of display and storage room in their home. With the help of entertainment lawyer and ceramics collector Aaron MILRAD, the determined and persuasive Mr. GARDINER set about acquiring the land and the political approvals to establish his own museum. In 1981, the Ontario government, led by premier Bill Davis, unanimously passed Bill 183 to create The George R. Gardiner Museum of Ceramic Art as an independent, public institution. Doctor Murray Ross helped the Gardiners acquire a tennis court on the east side of Queen's Park, directly opposite the Royal Ontario Museum, from the University of Toronto. Mr. GARDINER paid $500,000 to lease the land for 99 years.
Three years later, architect Keith WAGLAND and designer Robert MEIKELJOHN's $6-million building was ready. The George R. Gardiner Museum, showcasing some 3,000 objets valued at between $16-million and $25-million from the Gardiners' personal collection, officially opened on Saturday, March 3, 1984, with an additional $2.5-million operating grant from its benefactors to celebrate the occasion.
Initially, the Gardiners were as naive about operating a museum as they had been about ceramics. They didn't have nearly enough staff, went through three directors in their first year and underestimated their operating and exhibition costs. After unsuccessfully petitioning the Liberal provincial government for more money, the museum was advised by premier David Peterson to merge with the Royal Ontario Museum in 1987. "I have learned it is very, very difficult to compete with other museums," Mr. GARDINER, a man known for his independence, said at an emotional press conference called to announce the merger.
"The government decided we needed the Royal Ontario Museum's management expertise," Ms. GARDINER told The Globe in 2006. But it wasn't always a comfortable relationship. For an independent museum to be put under the control of another much larger one was akin to an adult daughter moving back into her parents' house with her children after a messy divorce.
The Royal Ontario Museum saw the Gardiner as an adjunct, housing yet another of its many collections, but the Gardiner longed to flex its curatorial wings. Mr. GARDINER, who was succeeded as chair of the board by his wife in 1994, bought back the museum's independence with a $15-million endowment (raising his investment in his own museum to about $50-million). It was announced in January, 1997, just 11 months before Mr. GARDINER died of complications from arthritis and heart disease.
The strain of caring for her husband in his last years when he was ill and "difficult" and dealing with his estate after his death made her so nervous that her throat muscles tightened up and she had trouble speaking above a whisper, Ms. Ross said. It was only recently that doctors found a solution - periodic shots of Botox and a regime of throat exercises - that enabled Ms. GARDINER to speak normally again.
In the decade of her widowhood, Ms. GARDINER threw herself into the museum and into the National Ballet School, where she had sat on the board since 1990. "She invested a lot more than money - she invested herself in the life of the school and the lives of the students," said Ms. McCain. "She took on a student and stayed with that student and became a mentor and a guide and a friend."
Under Ms. GARDINER's direction, the museum built up its membership lists again and stretched beyond the personal vision of its founders. The Gardiner began accepting other collections, such as Doctor Hans Syz's German porcelain and Murray and Ann Bell's trove of Chinese blue-and-white porcelain. It expanded its mandate to include modern and contemporary pieces from collectors, such as Mr. MILRAD, and began organizing exhibitions of work by living artists.
Ms. GARDINER was chair until 1999 and vice-chair for the next two years, during which time the museum received a Lieutenant-Governor's Award for the Arts for building private sector and community support, showing fiscal responsibility and expanding its audience (from 20,000 to 60,000 visitors annually), using pottery classes for children and exhibitions such as Maya Universe, Miro: Playing with Fire and Harlequin Unmasked. In 2002, she accepted the position of honorary chair and led the museum's fundraising and expansion campaign to raise $12.8-million from the private sector, in addition to $6-million in grants from the Ontario and Canadian governments.
The museum closed from 2004 to 2006 for a nearly $20-million renovation undertaken by Kuwabara, Payne, McKenna and Blumberg Architects. The renovation added a glass-encased third floor, restaurant and roof terraces, increased exhibition space by 50 per cent, added a research library and expanded the museum shop and the basement studio to accommodate artists in residence and more pottery classes.
"In the last 10 years, she started to develop her own interests and her own ability to reach out for things that she would never have looked at before. And then she got sick," said Mr. MILRAD, vice-chair of the board. "She had an integrity that was recognized and it is going to be extremely difficult for us to raise the kind of money that she was able to raise through her contacts and her own strength of character."
Falling terminally ill was a shock to Ms. GARDINER, who had always planned to live well into her 90s, just as her mother has done. In the first week of May, she was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. After seeking treatment at Johns Hopkins in Baltimore, Ms. GARDINER began a rigorous course of chemotherapy. But she soon decided to suspend treatment, since it wasn't working and it was making her feel very ill. Instead, she let "nature take its course," as she told her Friends and family.
Helen Elizabeth GARDINER, C.M., was born in Kirkland Lake, Ontario, on July 18, 1938. She died of pancreatic cancer at the family farm in Caledon East on July 22, 2008. She was 70. Predeceased by husband George GARDINER, she is survived by daughter Lindy BARROW, mother Helen McMINN, brother Bob McMINN and extended family.
The funeral will take place on Monday, July 28, at 11 a.m. in Toronto's Saint_James Cathedral.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-26 published
FAYE, Rev. Lawrence James, C.S.B.
Died peacefully at Providence Health Care Centre, Toronto, July 25, 2008, after a long illness. Father FAYE, son of William and Catharine (MARTIN) FAYE, was born in Toronto, Ontario on October 6, 1915. He received his primary education at Saint Michael's School on Bond Street and graduated from De la Salle "Oaklands" in 1935. He entered the St. Basil's Novitiate and professed his first vows August 15, 1943. Following his novitiate year, Larry, as he became known in the Basilian Community, went to Assumption College, Windsor, Ontario, graduating with a B.A. After four years of theological studies at St. Basil's Seminary, he was ordained to the priesthood on June 29, 1950.
Father Larry then taught English and Mathematics in Basilian high schools in Windsor, Saskatoon, and Toronto, and helped with the sports program in each of these schools. In the summers he took courses in Counselling and Guidance at Notre Dame University, South Bend, Indiana, where he was awarded a Master of Arts degree in 1969. Father FAYE continued at Notre Dame taking doctoral courses in Counselling Psychology. For his internship and Dissertation requirements Larry spent two years at Saint Thomas University in Houston, teaching Psychology and offering therapeutic counselling for students. In 1971 he returned to Notre Dame and was awarded his Ph. D. degree in Counselling Psychology. He pursued post- doctoral studies at C.G. Jung Institute in Houston and later in Zurich, Switzerland.
From 1974 to 1979 Larry worked a Psychotherapist at Southdown in Toronto, taught Pastoral Counselling at the Toronto School of Theology and worked in the department of Psychology of Saint Michael's Hospital. In 1983, he moved to Saint Michael's College School and became the national director of The Marian Movement of Priests for English-speaking Canada.
When Father FAYE's health began to fail in the year 2000, he retired to Anglin House, Toronto. In 2004 he was admitted to Providence Health Care Centre. Father FAYE was a wonderful conversationalist and a good storyteller. He was loved and admired by both his confreres and students. He is survived by two brothers, Francis and Gordon and several nieces and nephews. Fr. Larry is predeceased by brothers Martin, Edward, Alfred, Howard, John and sisters Helen, Irene and Vivian. There will be a Vigil Service on Monday, July 28, 2008 at 7: 30 p.m., at the Cardinal Flahiff Basilian Centre chapel, 95 Saint_Joseph Street, Toronto with viewing in the afternoon from 2-5 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be in the Basilian plot at Holy Cross Cemetery, Thornhill. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to the Basilian Fathers Retirement Fund, 95 Saint_Joseph Street, Toronto, Ontario M5S 3C2.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-10 published
MARTIN, Isobel May
Peacefully at Extendicare Guildwood, Toronto on Friday, March 7, 2008. Isobel, in her 95th year, beloved wife of the late Richard. Loving mother of Clark (Helen), Diane (Wally) and Lorraine (Don). Dear grandmother of Robert, Craig and the late Danny, Jamie and Clifford. Great-grandmother to Paul. Sadly missed by her niece Alison, her dear friend Millie and all her Friends at Extendicare Guildwood. Family and Friends are invited to the Giffen-Mack Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 4115 Lawrence Ave. E. (one block west of Kingston Rd.), 416-281-6800 for visitation on Monday from 7-9 p.m. and Tuesday 10-11 a.m. A complete funeral service will be held in the Chapel on Tuesday at 11 a.m. Reception to follow at the funeral home. A private family service will be held at Glendale Memorial Gardens. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-11 published
MARTIN, Beryl G.
Peacefully after a brief illness on Saturday, March 8, 2008 at Saint_Joseph's Health Centre in her 95th year. Loving wife and best friend of Glenn W. MARTIN for 64 years. Devoted mother of Paul and his wife Cindy and Mary WILKINSON and her husband Stephen. Proud grandma of Kathryn and Alexander. Dear sister of Norma HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas St. W., Etobicoke, (between Islington and Kipling Aves.) on Wednesday from 5-9 p.m. Funeral Service in the Chapel on Thursday, March 13, 2008 at 11 a.m. Private family interment Salem Cemetery.

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MARTIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-07-25 published
MARTIN, Mae
Gone to be with her Lord and Saviour on Wednesday, July 23, 2008 peacefully with Dorothy and Vivienne at her bedside. Mae was born in Ireland and will be missed by her niece and family in New Jersey, Ireland and England and also by her numerous Friends across Canada and Ireland. Funeral Mass will be held at St. Catherine of Siena Church, 2340 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (just N of The Queensway) on Saturday, July 26, 2008 at 9: 30 a.m. Cremation to follow with Mae's ashes being returned to Ireland and laid to rest with her parents in Co. Cavan. At Mae's request there will be no visitation. A reception will follow the Mass at the Turner and Porter "Peel" Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10 N of Queen Elizabeth Way). For those who wish, memorial donations may be made to a charity of your choice.

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