GREENSIDES o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-02-13 published
GREENSIDES, Donald
In loving memory of a dear husband, father and poppa, Donald, who passed away on February 14, 2007.
Our lives go on without you,
But nothing is the same,
We have to hide the heartache,
When someone speaks your name,
You did so many things for us,
Your heart was kind and true,
And when we needed someone,
We could always count on you
The precious years will not return
When we were all together,
But with the love within our hearts,
You will walk with us forever.
- With love, Gwen, Tammi, Heather, Paul, their spouses and families.
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GREENSIDES o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-02-13 published
GREENSIDES, Don
In memory of a special friend, Don GREENSIDES, who passed away, February 14, 2007.
Always a smile instead of a frown
Always a hand when we were down,
Always true, thoughtful and kind,
Friends are Friends if they are true,
We lost our best when we lost you.
- Don and Pat BATCHELOR.
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GREENSPAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-12 published
He was the 'king of real estate' who kick-started Toronto film festival
After retiring 'at the top of his game,' he made a trip to France and happened on Cannes and its film fête. Thus inspired, he returned home to help launch one of his own
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
A lawyer who made serious money in real-estate deals in the 1950s and 1960s, Dusty COHL was seduced by the movie business and spent the last 40 years schmoozing backers, stars and directors. Tall and lanky, with a grizzled beard and an ear-to-ear grin, and wearing his trademark black cowboy hat festooned with shiny pins and badges and outré T-shirt, he appeared to be the epitome of louche.
In fact, the film producer and co-founder of the Toronto International Film Festival was a family man who remained married for more than 50 years to the girl he met in high school. He was also a genial and supportive father figure to many fledgling producers, directors and programmers in the Canadian film business.
"He was unconventional in his ideas and his dress, but he wasn't unconventional in his living habits and his loyalties," said film and television producer Ted KOTCHEFF. "He was the very heart and soul of the Canadian film industry and the most lovable man that I have ever met, hands down," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who had known Mr. COHL "longer than anybody," dating back to summer camp in the mid-1940s.
"Dusty broke the mould of the bland, boring, polite Canadian, which was very important in the early days [of the Toronto film festival]," said public-relations consultant Helga STEPHENSON, who began working for Toronto International Film Festival in 1978 and was executive director from the mid-1980s until the early 1990s.
"With his huge sense of fun and flair, he helped a lot in getting critics and filmmakers here," she said. "Once they got here, they discovered it was a superb film festival, with an incredible audience, and that Toronto was a great place to be. But getting them here was the trick - and then he would entertain them once they were here."
Murray (Dusty) COHL was born on Euclid Street in Toronto in the same year as the stock-market crash on Wall Street. His father, Karl, was a Communist who worked as a house painter, a union organizer and, ultimately, as an insurance agent, while his mother, Lillian, sold bed linens at Eaton's, according to Brian D. Johnson in Brave Films, Wild Nights: 25 years of Festival Fever.
An only child, he attended Charles G. Fraser elementary school and Camp Naivelt (New World), a Bolshevik Jewish summer camp west of Toronto, from the age of 5. It was at camp that he shed his hated first name and acquired the nickname Dusty. Another camper, Harris Black, was called Blacky, and the kids decided that Murray COHL should be Dusty, as in coal dust.
"He was my camp counsellor," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who attended Camp Naivelt from 1943 through 1945. "He was my boyhood hero." What Mr. KOTCHEFF loved about Dusty were the same qualities that have always captured people's affections: "He was so full of good humour and intelligence, and he was a born non-conformist. Even back then, he was unconventional in his dress, which appeals to young people." Dusty let his T-shirt hang outside his shorts while the other counsellors were all tucked in.
"He had his own style," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who also has a much darker memory from those days: seeing his hero "ejected" from camp in the summer of 1945 after a "kangaroo court" found him guilty of being an "anarchist Trotskyite" - at 16. "He always saw that as a very amusing incident in his life, but that was Dusty. He was dedicated to following his own vision of things. He was an original."
After public school, he went to Harbord Collegiate from 1941 to 1947. That's where he met Joan CAIRN, although she says she knew of him from Camp Naivelt. When he asked her to dance, she felt very comfortable in his arms, and thought he might be "the one." After high school, he went to the University of Toronto, earning a bachelor of arts degree in 1950. On December 23, 1951, he and Joan married (they just celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary) and eventually had three children, Robert, Karen and Steven.
After the U of T, he entered Osgoode Hall Law School, coming first in his class one year and graduating with a law degree in 1954. For most of the next 20 years, Mr. COHL worked as a zoning and real-estate lawyer, putting together land parcels and property developments in Toronto and Florida. He was "tremendously successful," according to his close friend, film producer Barry Avrich, but retired from the business "at the top of his game" when people starting referring to him as "the king of real estate."
In 1964, he and his wife were holidaying in the south of France and she suggested they visit Cannes. By chance, they found a parking place in front of the Carlton Hotel, ordered a drink on the terrace and "saw and felt the pulse of the action" of the annual film festival, which happened to be on at the same time. "I was like a kid falling into Disneyland," he said later. It was another four years before they returned to Cannes, but, from then on, they were regulars at its film festival.
In 1973, he met William (Bill) MARSHALL, a filmmaker and communications whiz who had helped propel David Crombie into the Toronto mayor's office in 1972 and was then working as his executive assistant. Both Mr. MARSHALL and Mr. COHL have claimed credit for the idea of launching a film festival in Toronto; what is certainly true is that they both embraced the concept as enthusiastically as seals sliding down water slides.
After visiting film festivals in Berlin and Atlanta, the two men went to Cannes, where they rented a suite at the Carlton, ensconced themselves in the bar on the terrace and started schmoozing. "Dusty was the only person I knew in Canada who had actually been to Cannes in those days," Mr. MARSHALL recollected in a telephone interview.
"There were only about six of us making movies," he said. "We wanted a film festival [in Toronto] because foreign people might come and we'd get to sell our movies." Henk VAN DER KOLK (Mr. MARSHALL's partner in a company they enthusiastically called the Film Consortium of Canada) was the managing director of the festival, Mr. MARSHALL was the executive director, and Mr. COHL was "the accomplice." As such, he was to schmooze and, in Mr. MARSHALL's estimation, there was nobody better at talking, bringing people together and creating a buzz.
In October of 1976, they launched the Toronto International Film Festival at the Ontario Place Cinesphere on a budget of about $500,000, half of which was in goods and services. That first year, they wantonly courted Warren Beatty through a Toronto cousin, but he failed to show. Unexpectedly, Jeanne Moreau and Dino De Laurentiis did. And they had a bit of luck by screening Cousin, Cousine, which was later nominated for three Academy Awards.
In 1978, they defied the then-powerful but now-defunct Ontario Censor Board by showing an uncut version of In Praise of Older Women, based on Stephen Vizinczey's bestseller, and almost caused a riot by handing out 4,000 passes to a screening at a cinema that only seated 1,000. The overflow crowd engendered one of the slick-talking Mr. MARSHALL's more elusive qualifiers: "We're not oversold. We're just over-attended."
After three years, Mr. COHL and Mr. MARSHALL retreated and Wayne CLARKSON became the first of several professional managers of the burgeoning festival.
In addition to Toronto International Film Festival, which has long been one of the top film festivals in the world, Mr. COHL put his "accomplice" skills to work, co-producing feature films such as Outrageous! - based on a short story by Margaret Gibson (obituary, March 15, 2006) and starring her friend, impersonator Craig Russell - and The Circle Game. He was a consulting producer on The Last Mogul, Rush: Grace Under Pressure Tour, Guilty Pleasure, The Extraordinary World of Dominick Dunne and Bowfire and was executive producer of The Scales of Justice, which began on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in the 1980s and was aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television from 1991 to 1995. Hosted by lawyer Edward GREENSPAN, it featured docudramas based on real cases in Canadian criminal law.
Mr. COHL also worked with his cousin, rock promoter Michael COHL, famous for organizing tours for the Rolling Stones and other pop stars, on a concert series on cable television in the 1980s called First Choice Rocks. Less successfully, the two COHLs worked with basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain in an attempt to bring an National Basketball Association franchise to Toronto. "I miss him already," Michael COHL said yesterday. "He was great."
In 1990, Mr. COHL started the Floating Film Festival, an almost annual, luxury Caribbean cruise featuring films programmed by critics such as Roger Ebert, Richard Corliss and George Anthony. The Floating Film Festival combined the best elements of "the smallness of Telluride, the warmth of Toronto and the glamour of Cannes," according to Mr. COHL. It even had its own emblematic T-shirt depicting an art deco-style cruise ship flying a flag with a cowboy hat inspired by Mr. COHL's black Stetson. The 10th edition of the Floating Film Festival, which will sail from Los Angeles on February 25, is dedicated to Mr. COHL and features a tribute to actress Gena Rowlands.
Mr. COHL was also a member of the founding board of Canada's Walk of Fame, which, since its inception in 1998, has celebrated the achievements of more than 100 music, arts and sports celebrities, including Wayne Gretzky, Karen Kain, Gordon Pinsent and Kiefer Sutherland, by encasing their names in a slab of cement on the sidewalks in the entertainment district. In May of 2003, Mr. COHL was invested into the Order of Canada for "his pride in Canadian talent" and his "desire to celebrate our achievements."
Late last fall, he was diagnosed with liver cancer.
Murray (Dusty) COHL was born in Toronto on February 21, 1929. He died at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre of liver cancer on January 11, 2007. He was 78. Mr. COHL is survived by his wife, Joan, three children and five grandchildren. There will be a private family funeral followed by a public celebration of his life at a later date.

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GREENSPON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-18 published
Val ROSS, 57: Journalist And Author
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
An award-winning journalist with a lyrical style, a passion for the arts, an acute ear for dialogue and a prodigious memory for arcane details, Val ROSS was a reporter's reporter.
"She knew everyone and everything and she managed to use her sources and her knowledge to advantage, but without ever compromising her sources or cheating her readers," said Edward GREENSPON, editor-in-chief of The Globe and Mail. "She had a disarming manner, but she was tough and she wrote the truth."
While undergoing treatment for brain cancer, Ms. ROSS sent Mr. GREENSPON an e-mail urging him to expand the newspaper's coverage of native people. "You really should do this," she wrote. "Attention must be paid." And then in her typically wry way, she talked about the ravages of brain cancer by writing, "I have lost balance a lot, but I bet you always suspected I leaned to the left."
Ms. ROSS was born in Toronto on October 17, 1950, the elder child and only daughter of Erma and Jack ROSS. She went to the Institute of Child Study and Jarvis Collegiate. As talented with a brush as she was with a pen, she attended Saint Martin's School of Art in London, England, after completing high school and thought seriously about becoming a visual artist.
Nevertheless, after a year in swinging London and travelling in Europe, she returned to Canada and entered University College at the University of Toronto in 1969, graduating with a bachelor's degree in 1972. She worked briefly in urban planning and then in broadcasting at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation before building a prolific career as a freelance writer, contributing regularly to magazines such as Chatelaine, Saturday Night and Toronto Life. She was a staff writer and editor for Maclean's magazine in the late 1970s and early 1980s, before being hired as managing editor of The Globe and Mail's now defunct Toronto magazine. She spent the rest of her career at The Globe and Mail, working as publishing reporter - winning a National Newspaper Award in 1992 for critical writing - deputy editor of the Comment section, and most recently as an arts reporter concentrating on cultural institutions.
"I wanted her to go back to arts reporting," Mr. GREENSPON said yesterday, "because of her connectedness to the arts community. She brought a lot of insight, knowledge and understanding to her work."
An author as well as a journalist, she produced two children's books. The Road to There, which won the $10,000 Norma Fleck Award for Canadian Children's Non-Fiction in 2004, related the history of cartography from early sailors mapping the world to modern scientists charting the galaxies. Praising the book's dynamic quality, jury members said they were "mesmerized by how beautifully [Ms. ROSS] wove together the stories."
Two years later, Ms. ROSS published a second children's book, You Can't Read This, a history of banned and silenced literature. In reviewing the book for The Globe, Deborah Ellis, herself a prize-winning author of children's books, wrote: "The history of books and writers is a tense, often bloody one, with poets forced by mad emperors to commit suicide and translators burned at the stake by religious leaders anxious to hold on to their power. By using examples of real people facing such torments, ROSS brings that history alive for us. This is no dry textbook. It is a primer for anyone wanting to act with courage and needing to know that those acts will come with a price."
In her final book, she switched to adult non-fiction by tackling an oral history of novelist, playwright and essayist Robertson Davies. She had almost completed a draft of Robertson Davies: A Portrait in Mosaic, when she was diagnosed with brain cancer the day after her 57th birthday in October, 2007.
"Raw courage is not what we associate with writing a book," her editor Douglas Gibson said yesterday. "Yet, what I saw as Val ROSS fought brain cancer to finish her book on Robertson Davies left me shaken. It was a privilege to make what she teasingly described as 'house calls' to help her see the book through the last editing stages, and to be able to assure her just last week that the book is very good," he said. "It is made up of many voices recalling Davies; but the strongest, most memorable voice throughout is Val's."
On Friday evening she collapsed and was taken to Saint_Joseph's Hospital. Her husband and three children gathered around her hospital bed and read some of her favourite poets aloud - E.E. Cummings, William Carlos Williams, John Donne, and Gerard Manley Hopkins. Ms. ROSS, despite slurred speech from the effects of her disease, was able to finish many of the stanzas by drawing upon her formidable memory. The next morning she was transferred to Saint Michael's Hospital, where that night she underwent neurosurgery to try to give her more time with her family. Her spirit was willing, but her heart gave out.
Valerie Jacqueline ROSS was born in Toronto on October 17, 1950. She died, surrounded by her family, early in the morning of February 17, 2008, at Saint Michael's Hospital in Toronto, a mere four months after having been diagnosed with brain cancer. She was 57. Ms. ROSS leaves her husband, Morton RITTS, her children, Max, Maddie and Zoe, her mother, Erma, her brother, Philip, and her extended family. There will be a celebration of her life on Saturday, February 23, at 3 p.m. at Massey College in Toronto.

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GREENWALT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-07 published
JAMES, Gayle Marlene (née GILCHRIST)
(April 15, 1940-May 30, 2008)
Gayle Marlene Gilchrist JAMES passed away on Friday, May 30, 2008 at the age of 68 years with close family members by her side. Gayle met lymphoma and death as she lived her life; carefully researched, discussed at length and then accepted the outcome with a calm dignity and a touch of black humour. Born April 15, 1940 in rural Alberta, she attended a one room school taught by her father, high school in Castor and on to the University of Alberta (B.A. English 1962) and University of Toronto (B.S.W. 1963, M.S.W. 1966). Gayle was predeceased by her parents, Lela (GREENWALT) and Don GILCHRIST, her brother, Don, her sister, Norma, and her beloved canine, Lady. She will be missed by her brother, Garry (Elly) Victoria, British Columbia; her nieces and nephews, Debby DOBSON (Ed HALL), Becky DOBSON, Melanie DOBSON (Graeme ROCKER) all of Nova Scotia, Kim DOBSON (Ramona KRAEMER) of Ontario; Laura, Jacqueline and Nicole GILCHRIST of Victoria she will also be missed by her grand-nieces, nephews and god children, Karen, Esther, Alex, Chris, Sarah, Emily, Adam, Patrick, Zac, Linda, Ben, Erin and Sean; as well as her great-grandnephew, Nahze; honorary aunt, Jean PEETERS of Victoria, British Columbia as well as by Doctor K.W. JAMES. She started her social work career with the Alberta Child Guidance Clinic before joining the Education Clinic, Edmonton Public School Board in 1967 and then the University of Calgary, the Faculty of Social Work in Edmonton in 1975 before moving to Calgary in 1994 and retiring as Associate Professor Emeritus in 2004. While working with students with learning disabilities and their families, she developed a consummate passion for public issues that led to a life-long involvement in social advocacy and public policy. Her dedication to social work and inspirational leadership was legendary, holding many professional association positions, first as Registrar (1974-1977), President (1979-1981) and Treasurer (1996-98) of the Alberta Association of Social Workers and President of the Canadian Association of Social Workers (1981-83). Gayle's international leadership began in 1978 and was capped by being elected Canada's first President of the International Federation of Social Workers (1988-1992). She was instrumental in Canada hosting the first world social work conference in 1984 and the establishment of the International Federation of Social Workers Human Rights Commission in 1988 to advocate for missing, wrongfully detained and tortured social workers and students. Appointed by the Prime Minister to Chair the National Council of Welfare (1986-1989), she was the senior non-governmental organization delegate on the Minister of Health and Welfare's social policy mission to the Republic of China and the only woman and only non-governmental organization member of Canada's delegation to the United Nations Welfare Ministers Inter-Regional Consultation on Developmental Social Welfare in 1987. She was a founding member of the Edmonton Association for Children with Learning Disabilities, Canadian Research Institute for Law and Family, Canadian Social Work Foundation, Weiler Award Trust; long time board member of the Canadian Council of Social Development and International Council of Social Welfare, Canada; and member of Kings College Circle, University of Toronto. Her many honours included an Alberta Achievement Award (Excellence Category), Exemplary Contribution Award (Alberta Association of Social Workers), 75th Anniversary Award (University of Toronto, Faculty of Social Work), Outstanding National Service Award (Canadian Association of Social Workers), Teaching Excellence Award (University of Calgary), Arbor Award for Outstanding Volunteer Service (University of Toronto), inaugural Andrew Mouravieff-Apostol Medal (International Federation of Social Workers) and Lifetime Achievement Award (Pulse of Social Work, Calgary). Gayle was an inspiration and beloved mentor to countless students, colleagues, Friends and family. She was uncompromising in her support of students and an incisive media commentator on social policy issues. Unphased by her illness in her final years, she devoted untold hours of volunteer expert witness testimony to help victims of eugenic sterilizations win a landmark class action settlement. To paraphrase Maya Angelou, those touched by Gayle may forget her exact words or the specifics of what she did, but they will never forget how special she made them feel. A special thank you to Doctor T. Thaell, Doctor E. Liu, and to the staff at the Tom Baker Cancer Centre for the excellent care they provided to Gayle over the last seven years. A Memorial Celebration of Gayle's Life will be held at the Rozsa Centre, University of Calgary, on Monday, July 14, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. A reception will follow. Forward condolences through www.mcinnisandholloway.com. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made directly to the charity of your choice or to the Gayle Gilchrist Gold Medal Development Fund, Faculty of Social Work, University of Calgary, PF3256 2500 University Drive N.W., Calgary, Alberta, Canada T2N 1N4 Phone: (403) 220-5942 Fax: (403) 282-7269 E-mail: socialwk@ucalgary.ca In living memory of Gayle Gilchrist JAMES, a tree will be planted at Fish Creek Provincial Park by McInnis and Holloway Funeral Homes Park Memorial Chapel, 5008 Elbow Drive S.W., Calgary, Alberta Telephone: 1-800-661-1599.

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GREENWAY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-16 published
MILLER, Earl Truman
A resident of Ridgetown, Earl MILLER passed away at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance, Chatham on Friday, February 15, 2008 at the age of 88. Born in Hamilton, son of the late Harry and May GREENWAY) MILLER. Beloved husband of the late Pauline (WILKINSON) MILLER (2000.) Dear father of Tim MILLER of Ridgetown. Brother of Allen and Ruby MILLER of Caledonia, Neil and Norma MILLER of Burlington, and the late Lloyd and Connie MILLER. Brother-in-law of Ethel BROWN of Harrow and the late Roy WILKINSON Sr. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Friends will be received at the McKinlay Funeral Home, 76 Main Street East, Ridgetown on Monday, February 18, 2008 from 12: 45 p.m. until 1:30 p.m. Funeral Service will immediately follow at the Funeral Home at 1: 30 p.m. with Pastor Dwight HOLDITCH officiating. Interment in Greenwood Cemetery, Ridgetown. Donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated. Online condolences may be left at www.mckinlayfuneralhome.com

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-02-16 published
PETTENGILL Robert Elmer “Bob&rdquo
Peacefully on Valentine's Day, February 14th, 2008, at Grey Bruce Health Services Meaford. Bob PETTENGILL of Owen Sound, in his 79th year. Loving husband of Marie (née RITCHIE.) Loving father to Judy OSBORNE (Harold BUMSTEAD), Susan (Brian) JENNINGS, Brian (Sandra) PETTENGILL, and Sandi (Dennis) FRENCH. Loving stepfather of Marilyn (Doug) COURTIS, and Stephen (Margaret) GREENWOOD. Sadly missed by his 11 grandchildren and 3 great-grandchildren. Also missed by his brother Don (Dianne) CAMPBELL. Predeceased by his granddaughter Lisa FRENCH. Bob loved music, and was a member of many pipe bands over the last 50 years, playing the bass and tenor drum. Friends are invited to Tannahill Funeral Home for a celebration of Bob's life, Monday February 18th, at 2 o'clock in the chapel, with visiting 1 hour prior to service, 1 p.m. till 2 p.m. Doctor Brad CLARK officiating. Cremation has taken place. Interment Greenwood Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Owen Sound Kidney Dialysis Unit can be made through the G.B.R.H.C. Foundation, or donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-08 published
ERWIN, Edith Rose Marie (née GREENWOOD)
Aged 80, passed away May 5, 2008 after losing a brave fight, with her family by her side. Sadly, she leaves behind Bill, her beloved husband of 60 years, and her six children; Susan (Rick), Gary (Carol), Barbra (Dan), Joe, Ted (Anja) and Jack (Denise). She is also survived by 12 grandchildren and 8 great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. “The memories and the love we shared through our 60 years will remain in my heart 'til we are together again. Love, Bill” She has gone to join her mother and father Henry GREENWOOD and Rose TITLEY; and her three brothers, Martin, Albert and Stuart. In accordance with Edith's wishes, cremation has taken place through Tannahill Funeral Home and no service will be held. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Edith's memory to The Lung Association, or a charity of your choice.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-25 published
McLACHLEN, Norman Ray (July 2, 1926-April 23, 2008)
At the Dearness Home with his loving family by his side, Norm died peacefully. He is survived by his beloved wife and best friend Marion CLARKE. Devoted father to his children Bonnie GREENWOOD (John), Donna Jean HAMILTON (Mike), Norman (Sue), Murray, Dorathy COCHRANE (the late Leonard COCHRANE), Keith (Donna). Predeceased by son Robert. Dear grandfather of 18 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren. Survived by his sister Evelyn WILCOX (Cliff) and the families of his late brothers, Jack, Donald and Hugh. Predeceased by his parents James and Donna (ARMSTRONG.) Norm will be sadly missed by Marion's children, Clarke, Caralee, Holly and their families her brother Michael and sisters Jane and Cheri and their families. Visitors will be received on Sunday, Aprill 27 from 7-9 p.m. at the Westview Funeral Chapel, 709 Wonderland Road North, where the Funeral Service will be conducted on Monday, April 28 at 1 p.m. Reverend Richard GOLDEN, Melbourne United Church officiating. Interment Longwood Cemetery, Melbourne, Ontario. In Norm's memory, donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Cancer Society (London) or the Alzheimer Society.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-26 published
KERR, Margaret Jean (DOBIE)
Of Saint Thomas in her 91st year at Parkwood Hospital, London on May 24th, 2008, with her family at her side. Beloved wife of 53 years of Wilbert (1999) and the most wonderful Mother to Jim (Linda) of Fonthill and Mary (Robert) MARTIN of St. George. Cherished Grandmother of Jodie (Joel) BELLEROSE; the late Amy Kerr DICKSON/DIXON (2005;) Nicole (Chip) FOSTER; Peta (Wes) SNEEK; Katie MARTIN and Jacqueline MARTIN. Very special "GGma" to Benjamin and Spencer BELLEROSE; Paige DICKSON/DIXON; Keeley and Charlie SNEEK; Lake and Finn FOSTER. Margaret is also survived by her sister Elizabeth FISHER and sisters-in-law Georgeana DOBIE; Martha TAILOR/TAYLOR; Florence KERR Alberta KERR; Stella GREENWOOD and sister and brother-in-law Ena and Charlie BROWN. Fondly and lovingly remembered by many nieces, nephews and Friends. Margaret enjoyed her 30 year teaching career and was very proud to have given hundreds of Saint Thomas children their first experience at school as their kindergarten teacher-she was a "mother to all". She was also honoured to pilot the fist Junior Kindergarten in Saint Thomas at Arthur Voaden Secondary School in the 1970's. Margaret and Wilbert appreciated their life together and enhanced the community with their involvement in Saint Thomas - the Bambi Shop, dedicated members of Knox Presbyterian Church for over 50 years, teaching, the Seniors' Centre and various volunteer organizations. The family is extremely grateful to the kindness, caring and support of Doctor Cathy FAULDS and Doctor Cathy WALSH; Lori LATKEY and the staff at Metcalfe Gardens; the Acute Care staff at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital and the amazing nurses on the Palliative wing at Parkwood. Visitation will take place on Tuesday, May 27th from 6: 30 to 8:30 p.m. and a celebration of Margaret's life will be held at 11: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 28th. Both the visitation and service will be at Williams Funeral Home, 45 Elgin Street, Saint Thomas. Remembrances may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-04 published
CRAWFORD, Verna Helen
On Tuesday, June 3, 2008. At London Health Sciences Centre (Victoria Campus) London. Verna Helen CRAWFORD (SMITH) of Komoka in her 83rd year. Beloved wife of the late George Douglas CRAWFORD (2005.) Remembered by children Ken and Ilene CRAWFORD of Mount Brydges and Bill and Kathy GROSE of Grand Bend. Grandmother of Ken and Denise GROSE of London, Lisa and Greg MUIR of Okotoks, Alberta, Tracy and Chris FOSTER of Saint Thomas and Kristy and Dale GREENWOOD of Parkhill. Lovingly remembered by great-grandchildren Tyler, Jessica and Erin FOSTER, Cameron and Shawna GREENWOOD, Jayden, Skylar and Brandon GROSE and Mikhela and Brooklyn MUIR. Predeceased by many brothers and sisters. Visitation will be held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Thursday, June 5th from 2: 00 to 4: 00 p.m. and 7:00 p.m. to 9:00 p.m. Funeral service from the funeral home will be held on Friday, June 6th at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Archie MURRAY officiating. Interment Ivan Cemetery. Donations to Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated by the family. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Verna.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-02 published
Toronto modernist's projects married pragmatism, poetic sensibility
Award-winning university collaboration conjures an architecture both sustainable and beautiful
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
An architect who was ahead of the curve in thinking how sustainable design can be integrated in elegant architectural solutions, Adrian DICASTRI brought his love of music and culture along with his analytical skills to the art and practice of his profession.
"What a lot of people didn't realize about Adrian was his poetic sensibility," said his friend Dereck REVINGTON, another architect who described Mr. DICASTRI's major buildings as "full of colour and light and a subtle dancing rhythm."
Pragmatism had to be satisfied first, but what characterized Mr. DICASTRI's work was a luminous and lyrical modernism, Mr. REVINGTON said. "His definition of sustainability was much more complex than simply creating ecologically friendly buildings. He spoke continuously about the importance of cultural, environmental and aesthetic sustainability."
Adrian John DICASTRI was born in Victoria, the second of five sons and one daughter of architect John DICASTRI (obituary September 22, 2005) and his wife Florence Margaret (GREENWOOD,) who was always called Paddy. The family lived first in the Rockland area of Victoria - in a house his father had designed - and then in a rambling former seniors' residence close to the ocean in Oak Bay that the senior Mr. DICASTRI renovated to accommodate his large and rambunctious family.
As a boy, Adrian was the only child who showed any ability at sketching and drawing, according to his younger brother Julian. He also swam "like a porpoise" and loved being in the water, a passion he would later sustain in "landlocked Toronto" by designing and building a family cottage on Georgian Bay.
He attended St. Patrick's Elementary School and then Oak Bay junior and senior high schools, graduating in 1969. He worked in his father's architectural office for a couple of years and then, at 19, went travelling in Europe for six months.
After returning, he resumed his Friendship with Susan McDONALD, who had been a year or so behind him in high school, and entered the University of Victoria, where he studied English literature in a general arts program. A ferocious reader, he was torn in those early years between teaching and architecture. He left after two years and went travelling again, this time to Mexico and Central America. By the time he returned, he had affirmed his decision on a career in architecture. He won a place in the University of Waterloo's co-op degree program in January, 1976.
After completing nearly three years of his degree, he and Ms. McDONALD (by then his wife) moved to Toronto, where he enrolled in the architecture program at the University of Toronto. Larry RICHARDS, former dean of the faculty of architecture, remembers him as "an outstanding, leading student" who was also a very nice guy. Mr. DICASTRI graduated with a bachelor of architecture degree in 1982. son Nicholas was born in 1983 and daughter Julia in As a young architect, Mr. DICASTRI worked at Diamond and Schmitt architects in Toronto. "He was an extraordinarily focused and smart guy who was a really great critic on projects in development," said Don SCHMITT, a principal in the firm. "He was a real modernist, and rigorous in his focus on rational solutions and elegant but spare design." Mr. SCHMITT also remembered him as being relaxed and possessing a dry sense of humour, qualities that "are very important in the culture of an office."
Architect John VAN NOSTRAND hired Mr. DICASTRI in 1984. "He was interested in working in a smaller firm where he could have more direct influence," Mr. VAN NOSTRAND said. The two eventually became partners, working on some major social housing projects until government support for that market dried up in the early 1990s. They also did a number of university projects, including the revitalization of St. George Street on the University of Toronto campus.
"He was a brilliant designer and he got brilliant buildings done, but he did it in a very pragmatic way," said Mr. VAN NOSTRAND. "He had real stamina for sticking with long projects and making sure that they were finished off as well as they were started. And he was a good leader. People who worked for him respected him and wanted to make good buildings for him."
In the mid 1990s, their firm went after the contract for the Computer Science and Engineering Building at York University. Mr. DICASTRI, fascinated by the idea of creating sustainable buildings, was superb at forging connections and put together a collaboration that included Vancouver architect Peter Busby, a noted green designer.
"That building is really a reflection of Peter Busby and his West Coast thinking and Adrian DICASTRI and his practical, plain thinking and his understanding of the complexity of York University and where it could go," said architect Peter CLEWES.
The building, which has operable windows, uses "passive strategies" to maximize natural light and ventilation and decrease the need for air-conditioning. It won several awards, including the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada Governor-General's Medal in Architecture. Mr. CLEWES said it demonstrates that "it is not only the spaces within buildings that are important, but the spaces they create outside of themselves." A complex and seminal building in Mr. DICASTRI's career, it speaks to how he was beginning to think about collaboration with others and about the practicalities of creating buildings that are both sustainable and yet beautiful to live and work in. "That was a turning point for him."
Mr. CLEWES and Mr. DICASTRI, who had known each other since the 1980s, often commiserated about the capriciousness of a career in architecture - which is known as a fine vocation and a horrible profession, especially during economic downturns. They were both partners in architectural firms that were struggling to sustain themselves when Mr. DICASTRI called Mr. CLEWES in 1998 and proposed they merge practices. He cited the computer sciences building at York as an example of the kinds of things they could do together.
"It came out of the blue," Mr. CLEWES said this week - but the more he thought about it, the more he realized that "for the first time in about eight or nine years, [I felt] I could stick my head up above water and look around and say, 'This could mean something more than simply surviving.' "
The following year, Van Nostrand Dicastri and Wallman Clewes Bergman merged to form Architects Alliance. Mr. DICASTRI's strength as a strategic thinker and team builder came into play on one of the firm's significant projects, the Terrence Donnelly Centre for Cellular and Biomolecular Research at the U of T, which they did in collaboration with Stefan Behnisch Architekten in Germany. The completed building - elegant, intriguingly situated, ecologically green, technologically but subtly complicated - has won popular accolades and several design prizes, including the International Award from the Royal Institute of British Architects and the Design Excellence Award from the Ontario Association of Architects.
It was poignant that Mr. DICASTRI, at the point when his professional and family lives were happily and productively established, was diagnosed with bladder cancer in 2006. The next 15 months were a relentless struggle with surgery, chemotherapy and radiation as he fought against what proved to be an unconquerable illness. A week ago, he received a specially designed box containing individually written letters, poems and messages of esteem and affection from his colleagues at Architects Alliance. He was still well enough to read and share them with his family.
Adrian John DICASTRI was born in Victoria on September 5, 1952. He died at home in Toronto on January 29, 2008, of metastasized bladder cancer. He was 55. He is survived by wife Susan McDONALD, children Nicholas and Julia, five siblings and extended family. There will be a celebration of his life Tuesday in the Great Hall, Hart House, University of Toronto.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-18 published
MURPHY, George Edward " Ted"
Passed away on Friday, February 15, 2008 in his 81st year. Loving husband for 56 years of Barbara (nee: KELLY) of Uxbridge. Dear father of Maureen (Bob) GREENWOOD, Dan (Karen), Greg (Claudia), Ross (the late Laura,) Patrick (Sue,) Christine (Dave) BASS, Colin (Lyne), and Tom. Proud Grandfather of Andrew (Candy), Chris, Caitlin, James, Sean, Lia, Caroline, Emily, Quinn, Vaughan, Sibeal, Justin, Jonathan, Ellie, Conor, Emmett, Morgan, Michelle, Janine, Alyse, Liana, Ryan, Fraser, Karin, Sam, Duncan, and Eamon. Dear brother of Margaret DAVIES, the late Jack, Jack (the late Kay,) the late Gen POOLE (Laurie,) Jim (Sheila,) the late Win, the late Paul (Deira), and Lawrence (Catherine). Will be missed in bridge and curling circles and by his many other Friends. He had a special place in his heart for the Banh and Hingert families. He contributed generously to several family related charities. Ted lead a full life surrounded by family at his farm and cottage and enjoyed 50 years as a Chartered Accountant. We would like to thank the Uxbridge Cottage Hospital and Bloomington Cove for their kind care and support. A Visitation will be held at the Low and Low Funeral Home, 23 Main Street South, Uxbridge (905) 852-3073, on Monday, February 18, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. and on Tuesday, February 19, 2008 from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A private family mass has taken place. A memorial service will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers donations may be made in Ted's memory to the Alzheimer's Society of Durham. On-line condolences can be made at www.lowandlow.ca.

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-10 published
ASHENHURST, Robert Carl
(April 5, 1918-March 8, 2008)
Carl left us just before he celebrated his 90th birthday. Predeceased by his loving and devoted wife, Rita (née THRASHER) and by his treasured daughter, Jane (Charlie), his passing has left a hole in the hearts of his son John and his wife Brooke MILLS of Surrey, British Columbia, his daughter Lani and her husband Maurice KENNY, of Stratford, and his son Jim and his wife Lila, of Burlington. Carl is predeceased by his sister, Isabel (GREENWOOD) and her husband Al, and by his brother Robert (Bert) and his wife Thelma. Carl will be sorely missed by his grandchildren, Erin ASHENHURST, Corinn SMITH and her husband Paul, along with their daughters Hayleigh and Makenna, and by his grand_son, Rob. To his nieces and nephews, his great-nieces and nephews and their children, Carl represented a wise, generous, humourous and kind 'head of the clan' and he will be long grieved. Carl started life in Goodwood, in Uxbridge Township, Ontario and worked his first paid job at the age of 7, weeding carrots for $0.10 an hour. He was a gifted athlete, excelling particularly in hockey and lacrosse. He started working as a bookkeeper in New Brunswick at the age of 19 and worked his way up through the mining industry to top executive positions in mines such as Heath Steele Mines, Mattagami Lake Mines, Stanley Uranium and Noranda Mines. During this time he helped to raise his family and became a Chartered Accountant. He ended his employment with Noranda as Vice President, Finance. After retiring for a year or so, Carl then started working on the financing of the Blackdome Mine in British Columbia. As President and Chief Executive Officer of Blackdome Mine, he and his team built and brought the gold mine into full production in record time, a culmination of all that he had garnered in his 40+ years in the mining industry of Canada. Carl had a wide circle of close Friends and loved a game of golf, a game of cards and especially a long chin-wag. Most of all Carl loved his family both related and extended. He leaves behind many precious lessons and we absorbed those lessons by his example. Work hard. Play harder. Love hardest. Our sincere thanks to the staff on Kent at Billings Court Manor who eased his journey to the end. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street, (one block north of City Hall) Burlington (905-632-3333) on Wednesday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m., where Funeral Service will be held Thursday, March 13, 2008, at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Springcreek Cemetery, Mississauga. In lieu of flowers donations can be sent to the Alzheimer Society. www.smithsfh.com

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GREENWOOD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-10 published
ASHENHURST, Robert Carl
(April 5, 1918-March 8, 2008)
Carl left us just before he celebrated his 90th birthday. Predeceased by his loving and devoted wife, Rita (née THRASHER) and by his treasured daughter, Jane (Charlie), his passing has left a hole in the hearts of his son John and his wife Brooke MILLS of Surrey, British Columbia, his daughter Lani and her husband Maurice Kenny, of Stratford, and his son Jim and his wife Lila, of Burlington. Carl is predeceased by his sister, Isabel (GREENWOOD) and her husband Al, and by his brother Robert (Bert) and his wife Thelma. Carl will be sorely missed by his grandchildren, Erin ASHENHURST, Corinn SMITH and her husband Paul, along with their daughters Hayleigh and Makenna, and by his grand_son, Rob. To his nieces and nephews, his great-nieces and nephews and their children, Carl represented a wise, generous, humourous and kind "head of the clan" and he will be long grieved. Carl started life in Goodwood, in Uxbridge Township, Ontario and worked his first paid job at the age of 7, weeding carrots for $0.10 an hour. He was a gifted athlete, excelling particularly in hockey and lacrosse. He started working as a bookkeeper in New Brunswick at the age of 19 and worked his way up through the mining industry to top executive positions in mines such as Heath Steele Mines, Mattagami Lake Mines, Stanley Uranium and Noranda Mines. During this time he helped to raise his family and became a Chartered Accountant. He ended his employment with Noranda as Vice President, Finance. After retiring for a year or so, Carl then started working on the financing of the Blackdome Mine in British Columbia. As President and Chief Executive Officer of Blackdome Mine, he and his team built and brought the gold mine into full production in record time, a culmination of all that he had garnered in his 40+ years in the mining industry of Canada. Carl had a wide circle of close Friends and loved a game of golf, a game of cards and especially a long chin-wag. Most of all Carl loved his family both related and extended. He leaves behind many precious lessons and we absorbed those lessons by his example. Work hard. Play harder. Love hardest. Our sincere thanks to the staff on Kent at Billings Court Manor who eased his journey to the end. Visitation at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street, (one block north of City Hall) Burlington (905-632-3333) on Wednesday from 3-5 and 7-9 p.m., where Funeral Service will be held Thursday, March 13, 2008, at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Springcreek Cemetery, Mississauga. In lieu of flowers donations can be sent to the Alzheimer Society. www.smithsfh.com

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-01-28 published
HORGAN, Thomas Joseph
Peacefully at home in Kingston, on Friday, January 25, 2008. Tom is survived by Brenda (née KNIGHT) his loving wife of 46 years, his daughter Salinda and son-in-law Neil, and his “wonderful little boys” grand_sons Reid and Garret HOPKINS. Also survived by his brothers Dave (Norie) GREER/GRIER and Jim (Doreen) GREER/GRIER of Montreal, and sister Rita GREER/GRIER of Vancouver. Fondly remembered by mother-in-law Viola KNIGHT and brothers-in-law Don (Linda) KNIGHT and Dennis (Joanne) KNIGHT of Meaford, and survived by many nieces, nephews and extended family. Resting at James Reid Funeral Home, Cataraqui Chapel (1900 John Counter Boulevard). Friends will be received Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, February 2, 2008 at 10: 30 a.m. Cremation to follow. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations can be made to Canadian Cancer Society or the Cancer Centre of South Eastern Ontario at KGH would be appreciated by the family. www.jamesreidfuneralhome.com

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-05-12 published
HORGAN, Thomas Joseph
Sergeant Major (retired) Royal Canadian Dragoon
At his home in Kingston on Friday January 25, 2008 at the age of 68. Beloved husband of the former Brenda KNIGHT, loving father of Salinda and her husband Neil and sadly missed grandfather of grand_sons Reid and Garret HOPKINS. Dear brother of Dave (Norie) GREER/GRIER and Jim (Doreen) GREER/GRIER of Montreal and Rita KING of Vancouver. Predeceased by sisters Patricia Mae HORGAN of Montreal, Betty SIMPSON of Mirfield, England, and a brother Timothy HORGAN of Dublin, Ireland. Fondly remembered by mother-in-law Viola KNIGHT of Meaford and brothers-in-law Don (Linda) KNIGHT of Owen Sound and Dennis (Joanne) KNIGHT of Meaford. Also survived by many nieces and nephews and their families. A memorial funeral service, committal and interment of Tom's cremated remains, officiated by Reverend Gary PARKER, will be conducted at Lakeview Cemetery in Meaford on Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 11 a.m. A time of fellowship and further remembrances of Tom will be conducted at Christ Church Anglican in Meaford following the graveside service. As your expression of sympathy donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Cancer Centre of Southeastern Ontario at Kingston General Hospital would be appreciated and may be made through the Ferguson Funeral Home, 48 Boucher St. E., Meaford N4L 1B9 (519-538-1320) to whom arrangements have been entrusted.

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-07-12 published
JONES, Alvin Frederick
At his home on July 9, 2008. Alvin JONES of Owen Sound in his 62nd year. Loving father of Tina JONES, Theresa JONES and Jay GOW and Tracy and her husband Rob GOWAN, all of Owen Sound. Sadly missed by sister Linda and her husband Alvin FELTIS and sister Trudy and her husband Brad RINGEL, all of Owen Sound. son of Patricia JONES. Predeceased by his father Frederick JONES. Cherished grandfather of Jacob GREER/GRIER, Austin HARDERS, Mason GOW, and Cole and Tessa GOWAN. A private family service will be held. As an expression of sympathy donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-29 published
GRINEAGE, Wallace MacPherson
Age 72 a resident of Pincher Creek, Alberta passed away at his residence on February 24, 2008. He was born in Chatham Township son of the late Walter and Levitta (DUDLEY) GRINEAGE. Dear father of Ingrid WOODS of Bellville, Michigan, Michele and Blake HANDSOR of Chatham, Marlene POWELL of Golden, British Columbia, Micheal and Karen GRINEAGE of London, Melinda BUTCHER of Chatham, Mark and Lori GRINEAGE of Pincher Creek, Alberta. Dear grandfather of Denisha and Isaiah WOODS, Mathew and Aaron HANDSOR, Dayne POWELL, Tyner GRINEAGE and Keely NIXON, Jalen BUTCHER, Morgan, Dakota and Michael GRINEAGE. Also survived by sister Mavis SCOTT of Chatham Township, brother Winston and Carol GRINEAGE of Chatham Twp. brother-in-law Lawrence HANDSOR of Dover Twp. Aunts Flo GREER/GRIER and Minniebelle COLBERT of Detroit, and Donna DUDLEY of Chatham, step-children Ken and Leanne CARSON, Virginia DESORMEAU. Step-grandchildren Mackenzie, Mikaela CARSON, Cameron, Jarett and Jillian DESORMEAU. Also survived by a host of nieces, nephews, cousins and Friends. He is predeceased by a sister Melba HANDSOR and brother-in-law Dennis SCOTT. Visitors will be received at the Thomas L. DeBurger Funeral Home, 620 Cross Street, Dresden on Sunday 7-9 p.m. Cremation has taken place. The memorial service will be conducted from the chapel of the funeral home on Monday March 3, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. with Rev. Albert LAMBKIN officiating. Interment of cremains in Dresden Cemetery. Memorial contributions may be made by cheque to First Regular Baptist Church, Dresden and left at the funeral home. Online condolences and donations may be made on our website: www.deburgerfuneralhome.com

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-04-30 published
HAMILTON, Eva (formerly KERR)
At the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital on April 25, 2008 in her 92nd year. Eva, beloved wife of Daniel (Dan) Hamilton of Collingwood. Predeceased by her first husband Aubrey KERR (1992.) Dear mother of Laurene HARRINGTON (Bob) of Victoria, British Columbia, Ann HADLEY (Cyril) of London, Norma KERR of Rockwood and Stepmother of Mary and Joe HAMILTON. Grandmother of 11 and great-grandmother of 8. Survived by sisters Ester GRAHAM, Agnes HILTZ and brother Howard GREER/GRIER. Eva is predeceased by brothers Jack, Adam, William, George, Norman and Richard. Visitation was held at the Watts Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 132 River Rd East, Wasaga Beach, 705 429-1040, Sunday April 27th, 2008 from 2-4 p.m. Funeral Service was conducted in the Chapel Monday April 28, 2008 at 2 p.m. Interment Stayner Union Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Lung Association and Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.
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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.simcoe_county.nottawasaga.stayner.stayner_sun 2008-05-28 published
HAMILTON, Eva (GREER/GRIER)
Dan HAMILTON and Family would like to Thank Family and Relatives for the many cards and flowers since Eva's passing.
Thank you to the Staff and Nurses of Sunset Manor Georgian 2, where Eva and Dan have lived for the past 5 years, and for the continuing care and support of Dan. Also to the Nursing Staff of the Collingwood General and Marine Hospital for Eva's last days of care. A special Thank You to Darrin, Barbara and Max WATTS of Watts Funeral Home for their Service, Support and Care during our time of sorrow.
Eva will be forever remembered in our hearts. She was a Very Special Lady who touched our Hearts.
Lovingly Remembered by; Dan, Mary, Laura, Nick, Amy, Joe, Angie, Danny and Nickolas HAMILTON
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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-07 published
VAN BOLDEREN, Kerry Elaine (née GREER/GRIER)
(August 16, 1950-February 3, 2008)
Raised in Mississauga and a resident of Barrie since 1981, Kerry passed away Sunday at Royal Victoria Hospital in Barrie after a battle with leukemia. Kerry is survived by her husband Gary, daughters Tricia and Deborah, son Greg; her parents Harold and Mary GREER/GRIER; sisters Linda and Patricia (MOUND;) and her mother-in-law, Liz VAN SWAAY. She is predeceased by her son Graham. Friends are invited to celebrate Kerry's life with her family at an informal gathering on Saturday, February 9th, 2008, 1: 30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. at Barrie's Southshore Community Centre at 205 Lakeshore Drive (L4N 7Y9). Presentations by some of Kerry's family and Friends will be made starting at 2: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family would like you to sponsor Deborah's participation in "The Ride to Conquer Cancer" for the Princess Margaret Hospital. Donations can be made at the family gathering or online at www.conquercancer.ca. Click on Sponsor a Participant.

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-08 published
CHASTON, John Greer
(March 5, 1915-February 28, 2008)
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by the love of his family, at Lions Gate Hospital, North Vancouver, British Columbia in his 93rd year, after a brief illness. Predeceased by his parents, Leon Christopher CHASTON and Bessie GREER/GRIER of Calgary, and by his beloved younger brother Len, Royal Canadian Air Force, lost over Germany in 1942. He leaves to mourn his loving wife Helen, children Liz CHASTON, Christy McLEOD, Len CHASTON, and Martha LUTES (Ralph,) Helen's children, Peter CHAUVIN (Shelagh) and Cindy FLEMING/FLEMMING, former wife Jay JESSIMAN, and 11 grandchildren. Born and raised in Calgary, John went to work after high school for the Alberta Pacific Grain Co., and then assisted his father in his grain brokerage business. His career began when, articled to Norman Hindsley, C.A., he completed a five year Queen's University course in four years and in 1939 wrote the first Uniform Final Exam administered by the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Alberta. He won the Province of Alberta prize for highest standing. He worked following for the Osoyoos Mines Co. Ltd., then Peat, Marwick, Mitchell Co. in Portland, Oregon. The call to war brought him back to positions in Canada with the Allied War Supply Corporation in Montreal and the Canadian Pacific Railway. Enlisting in the army in 1942, John's military service took him to stations from Montreal, through Ontario, to Prince Rupert, British Columbia and finally to Vancouver. In 1946 he joined Vancouver based Pemberton Securities Ltd. as controller. In 1952 he founded the company's corporate finance department which he headed until 1971 when he was appointed President and Chief Executive Officer. In the following years he guided the company through a difficult time in the North American economy and displayed unwavering confidence in both Pemberton Securities and the capital markets as a whole. In 1975 he was elected Chairman of the Board and was Honourary Chairman when Pemberton was acquired by Dominion Securities in 1989. Not one to retire, John continued an active role in the investment business with Capital West Partners, where he maintained a presence until his final days. John's devotion to the investment business in Western Canada was matched by his passion for the game of golf. He was introduced to the sport on a course made by his father, in the vacant prairie fields adjacent to their home in Calgary. He then played at the Calgary Municipal Course, the Bowness Golf Club, and the Calgary Golf and Country Club. In 1931 he won the Alberta Junior Championship. John joined Shaughnessy Golf and Country Club in 1945 and was Club Champion 1947, 49, 50, 51. In 1953, deciding to permanently establish his home in West Vancouver, he joined Capilano Golf and Country Club. John's devotion to Capilano was expressed not only in his election to President, 1964, but in countless hours of practice and play and solicited and unsolicited advice to members and management with respect to all aspects of the game, the club, and the course itself. Those acquainted with John know that he had a comprehensive knowledge of golf's history, its mechanics, and its evolution. Whether inspired by the immortal Bobby Jones or the revolutionary Tiger Woods, his enduring goal remained the perfect swing. In his latter years he routinely 'shot his age', on one occasion recording a gross 76 at the age of 84. Of many personal highlights in the pursuit of his sport, John took great pride in marshalling three British Opens and in being a member of the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews. His memory will be invoked annually at Capilano Golf and Country Club with the awarding of the Chaston Trophy and the Wt. Officer Lionel G. Chaston Royal Canadian Air Force Memorial Cup. It would be remiss to omit that in addition to his primary interests in business and in golf, John was well known for his love of cars. In a number of trades that roughly equaled his final age, he enjoyed ownership of several very special high performance vehicles. His favourite remains known only to him. He will be greatly missed by family, by Friends, and by all who appreciated his considerable achievements, keen sense of fair play, rigorous self discipline, and his devotion to the principle 'to play the ball as it lies'. The family would like to thank Doctor Nancy Crossen, Jim Cormack, M.S.W., and the palliative care team at Lions Gate Hospital for their compassionate care on 7 West. Memorial Service to be held on Tuesday, March 18, 2008, 3 p.m. at St. Stephen's Anglican Church, 885 22nd Street, West Vancouver. Donations may be made in John's memory to the Lions Gate Hospital Foundation, North Shore Hospice, 231 East 15th Street, North Vancouver, British Columbia, V7L 2L7 www.lghfoundation.com

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GREER/GRIER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-03 published
ELMSLEY, Marguerite " Margot" (née GREER/GRIER)
29 April 1920 - 14 April 2008
Margot died peacefully in Victoria, British Columbia at Glen Warren Care Home. Margot was predeceased by her husband, C.M.R. ELMSLEY, in 1975. She is survived by her daughter Alex CARRIERE (Cyril BUBAR) of Kelowna, British Columbia, son Tony (Rose) and grandchild Stephanie of Kanata, Ontario, sisters Kathleen GREER/GRIER, Holly ROWLAND (Arthur,) Patricia MARTIN (Michael,) and her brother James GREER/GRIER, all of Victoria. Margot will be missed by her family, her nieces and nephews, their families and many Friends whose hearts she touched with her generosity and lack of malice. Margot was the daughter of Col. and Mrs. H.C. GREER/GRIER of Esquimalt, British Columbia. When her husband Tony was posted to England during World War 2 Margot joined the Canadian Red Cross Corps and served her country at Maple Leaf Club No. 2 in London looking after troops returning from the Continent. After the war she was a devoted wife and mother with happy memories of life in Washington, D.C., Appleton, Ontario and her final 27 years in Victoria, British Columbia with her sisters, their families, and her brother. A memorial will take place at Sacred Heart Church, 4040 Nelthorpe Street, on Wednesday, May 7 at 11 a.m.

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GRE surnames continued to 08gre004.htm