DONAGHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-25 published
DONAGHY, Thomas Anthony

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DONAHUE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-08 published
RABBITTS, Larry Mark
Patricia A. RABBITTS, William and Gregory RABBITTS, Ann Maurie and Daniel STEVENS and the family of the late Larry M. RABBITTS would like to take this opportunity to extend their sincere thanks to Saint Thomas Police Chaplain Roger LANDELL for his kind prayers and ministrations. To those who sent flowers, e-mails, called at the funeral home to sign the register or sent tokens of remembrance and to their many kind Friends and neighbours for all their acts of kindness. Special thanks to Doctor John HOFHUIS and Staff at the Port Stanley Family Practice; Doctor Paula DONAHUE and Staff of the Chemotherapy Unit of Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital to the Doctors, Nurses and Staff of the London Health Sciences Centre (Victoria Campus) for their care and kindness. An expression of gratitude and appreciation for the compassion and empathy extended to the RABBITTS' family from Allan and Gary HUGHSON and their staff of Williams Funeral Home. Dad, Be at Peace. Your gentle, guiding hand on our shoulder will remain with us forever. We say goodbye with a final "pinky wave". Until we meet again. Your Loving Family

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DONAHUE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-08 published
WATSON, Paul
The family of the late Paul WATSON wish to express their gratitude to the staff at the Cancer Clinic, especially Doctor HOWSON- JAN, Dr. XENOCOSTAS, and Doctor VINCENT for the excellent care during the past 5 years. A special thank you to Connie MORRISON, Mary CHRISTIE and the nurses in the chemo room who made the visits easier for us. We acknowledge Doctor JEJE and the nurses on the 7th floor, Victoria Hospital for the excellent care given to Paul in December 2007. We appreciated the visit from Bill BESTERD, Rick DONAHUE, and John MELVIN. Thank you to Paul's colleagues at the Plumber's Union Local 593 who showed their support. Thank you to our family and Friends for the cards, masses, donations, phone calls, visits and prayers. Your thoughtfulness and kindness is appreciated. Angela Watson and Family
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DONAHUE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-05 published
CLARK, Alexander Barry " Arch"
On Wednesday, July 2, 2008, Barry succumbed to a 12 month battle with lung and brain cancer which was diagnosed in June of 2007 in Victoria, British Columbia. He was 62 years of age. Since September of 2007 when he was able to return to Saint Thomas, he has been a patient at the Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital. The wonderful team of Doctor Joel KEENLEYSIDE, Doctor Paula DONAHUE and the exceptional nurses on Units C and D prolonged his life and he was able to enjoy memorable times with family, former teachers and school chums. The family sincerely thanks the afore-mentioned and those who brightened his days with visits and outings. Barry was born in 1933 while his parents, the late Stanley and Agnes (McCALLUM) CLARK, lived in Dutton, Ontario. Shortly after his birth, the family moved to Saint Thomas where Barry attended Scott Street School and later excelled in academia, basketball and volleyball at CECI and Saint Thomas Collegiate Institute. He was fortunate to be able to attend University of Toronto on a full scholarship and graduated with a degree in Mechanical Engineering. He entered the computer field at an exciting time and most of his career as an analyst was spent with International Business Machines Corporation - in Toronto, Montreal, Saint_John, Winnipeg and Calgary. Laterally, he spent his life in beautiful Victoria. He was an avid reader, a lover of jazz and he always kept fit by working out in the gym. Barry's older siblings will hold his memory close to their hearts - Bob (Mary Ellen) CLARK of the Philadephia area, Barb (Ken) TUFF of Saint Thomas, Bill (Patti) CLARK of Toronto and Newfoundland, and Bevin CLARK of Brockville. A special cousin, Doris (Stride) ROULSTON of London, will also hold him dear. Barry's nieces and nephews will always remember him for his quiet, gentle and caring nature - Meri-Sue, Mike (Hollie,) Mark and Margaret (John CONWAY) CLARK; Paul (Karen,) Jane (Bill IDSARDI) and Peter (Shelley) TUFF, Melanie CLARK- HANSEN and Jamie CLARK. Eleanor (McCALLUM) and Don BRANCHFLOWER of Glencoe and Alice (CLARK) COOK of London are his only surviving aunts and uncle. Barry bore his illness with great stoicism and determination. Cremation has taken place (Needham Funeral Service in London) and his ashes will be interred in Cowal Cemetery with his parents and many other family relatives and ancestors, all of whom originally came to the area from Argyleshire, Scotland. A memorial service and the interment of ashes will be held at a later date. Family and Friends will be notified of arrangements. "Always in our hearts"

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DONALD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-18 published
WATSON, Lynford (DONALD)
Early morning on April 17th, 2008 Lynford (DONALD) WATSON, aged 89, passed away peacefully in his sleep leaving a large and loving family; his cherished wife Muriel, of 53 years, son Gary, daughter Dawn, sister Mavis and brother Carol. Also grandchildren Christopher, Jason, Charmaine, and Nathan; sisters-in-law Velma, Josephine and Gloria, his brother-in-law Adrian, nieces Debra, Francine and nephew Henry; his niece Doreen and nephew John; and nephew Houghton, as well as many loving extended family and Friends with a special mention to dearest Friends the Telfer family and our beloved Francine. Visitation will be held at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Friday, April 18th from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass will be held at St. Patrick's Church, 377 Oakland Avenue at Dundas Street, on Saturday morning, April 19th at 11 o'clock. Interment in Saint Peter's Cemetery. Prayers Friday afternoon at 2 o'clock. The family is graciously declining floral contributions, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or Canadian Diabetes Association would be gratefully appreciated.

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DONALD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-07 published
DONALD, Gary (November 14, 1980-July 7, 2006)
In memory of our son, brother and father. Not a day goes by that we don't think of you. You left us so suddenly 2 years ago and our lives have not been the same without you. You live on in our hearts, Always loved and memories cherished. Missed by Mom and Al, Dad, Jason and Nicole, Peter and Tracey, Haeden, Khyley and Hayley.

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DONALD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-22 published
ADAM/ADAMS, James Lorne
Suddenly at home in Toronto on Sunday, May 18, 2008 after a year long illness. Beloved husband, best friend and life partner of Peggy (née COWAN.) Lorne died just short of his 86th birthday and 60th wedding anniversary.
Wonderful father to son Jim (Julia) of St. Paul, Minnesota, and daughter Karen (Bill) HERKAMP of Cincinnati, Ohio. Cherished and devoted grandfather to Jack, Jane and James ADAM/ADAMS and Kelly and Scott HERKAMP. Brother-in-law to Muriel LISSON. Uncle and friend to Donna SVISTUNENKO, Joy GRAY/GREY- DONALD and Jim LISSON, their spouses and children.
Lorne was born in Montreal on July 10, 1922. He interrupted his studies at McGill University to serve as a navigator on a Lancaster bomber with the Royal Air Force/Royal Canadian Air Force. He graduated from McGill in 1946 and spent his entire 41 year career with C-I-L, concluding in Human Resources, having relocated from Montreal to Toronto in 1981.
Lorne's life was centered on his family and his love of sports, especially hockey and baseball. He and Peggy, both native Montrealers, raised their family and were active community members in the Town of Mount Royal. Following their move to downtown Toronto, they actively embraced life, culture and retirement travel, especially to see their grandchildren.
Lorne's good humour, wit, humility, generosity and Friendship will be lovingly remembered and deeply missed by all of his family and Friends.
A Memorial Service celebrating Lorne's life will be held at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Ave. W., on Monday, May 26 at 11: 00 a.m., followed by a reception at the church. Memorial donations may be made to Mount Sinai Hospital, the Toronto Rehabilitation Institute, or Timothy Eaton Memorial Church.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-06 published
DONALDSON, Andrew Gault " Don"
On May 5, 2008 at the Dearness Home in London Ontario, Andrew Gault "Don" DONALDSON passed away at the age of 88. Predeceased by his wife Joyce VIOLET (2002.) Dear father to Keith (Billie) and Russ (Elaine) DONALDSON. Loved by his grandchildren Jimmy (Suzanne), Jeffrey, Stephanie (Ben) McCAMMON, Dwayne, Darcy (Sheri) and Lannie (Rob). He will be missed by 7 great-grandchildren. Don was a Veteran of the 2nd World War, where he saw service in Britain, Sicily and Italy. His career, of 35 years, was spent with the Department of Agriculture in Ottawa. Cremation has taken place and there will be a private family graveside service on Friday, May 9, 2008, at Capital Memorial Gardens in Nepean, Ontario. If desired, memorial donations to the Alzheimer's Society would be appreciated by the family. Thanks to the caring staff on Forest Glen Ward at the Dearness Home. He will always be remembered as a wonderful Dad, Granddad, friend and neighbour and will be missed by all.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-28 published
DONALDSON, Sophia "Vi"
Surrounded by family on Sunday, May 25, 2008 at the age of 86. Beloved wife of the late James (1999). Loving mother of Gregory "Harry" of Calgary, Peter and his wife Pauline, Margo (SALTS,) Alan, and Shawn (METCALF) and her husband Ian MacDONALD all of Sarnia. Proud grandmother of Corry SALTS and Jessica (SALTS) Odrcich (Peter), Carrie (Garreth BALFE) and Greg DONALDSON, Wesley (Janet JACKSON,) Joseph and Laura METCALF. Dearest sister of Rose KRUPPER, Sister Josephine KOWALSKI, Ann (George) LEHTO, and Roman KOWALSKI. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sons James and Bruce and brothers Joseph, Michael and Peter KOWALSKI. A lover of music, Vi played trumpet in an all girls traveling orchestra in the 1930s and 1940s. Vi was a longtime member of Sacred Heart Catholic Women's League and volunteered with Sarnia's Meals on Wheels for many years. She will be sadly missed by her favourite cat, Gus. Vi was passionate about gardening and a talented quilter and will be most remembered as a gifted baker and pastry maker. Visitation will be held at the McKenzie and Blundy Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 431 N. Christina Street, Sarnia (519-244-3131), on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where prayers will be offered at 8: 30 p.m. Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated by Fr. Len DESJARDINS at Sacred Heart Church at 11: 30 a.m. on Friday, May 30, 2008. Cremation to follow with private family interment at Our Lady of Mercy Cemetery at a later date. As an expression of sympathy, Friends who wish may send memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, 714 Lite Street, Sarnia, N7V 1A6. Messages of condolence and memories may be left at www.mckenzieblundy.com A tree will be planted in memory of Vi DONALDSON in the McKenzie and Blundy Memorial Forest. Dedication service Sunday, September 21, 2008 at 2: 00 p.m. at the Wawanosh Wetlands Conservation Area.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-04 published
DONALDSON, Elizabeth Ann "Betty" (née STEWARD/STEWART/STUART)
Suddenly at her home in Toronto on Wednesday, January 2, 2008. Betty STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, of Toronto, age 67 years. Beloved wife and best friend of Gerald DONALDSON. Dearly loved daughter of Mrs. Jeanette STEWARD/STEWART/STUART (née VIRGIN) and her husband the late William J. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART of Almonte. Dear sister of Catharine (Lloyd) ALLINOTTE of Charleston Lake, Donald (Ruth) STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Wilma HALIBURTON (Paul) both of Almonte. Also survived by a niece and several nephews. Friends are invited to visit with the family at the C.R. Gamble Funeral Home and Chapel, 127 Church Street, Almonte, on Friday from 6: 30 to 9 p.m. and on Saturday from 12 noon until time of Service complete in the Chapel including committal at 2 p.m. Rev. Jeff DE JONGE officiating. Spring interment. Donations in memory of Betty may be made at the funeral home to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation or the charity of ones choice and would be much appreciated by her family.
Condolences and tribute: www.crgamble.com

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-04 published
DONALDSON, John Norman
Lieutenant-Commander Royal Canadian Navy (Ret'd)
Norm died peacefully at Bay Village, Sarasota, Florida on Saturday, March 1, 2008. Predeceased by his loving wife of 63 years, Kathryn (née GOODERHAM,) he will be forever missed by his son Richard (Daphne) of Mississauga and daughter Judith RUBIN (David) of Charleston, South Carolina. He was Grandad to Leslie, Fraser and Whitney DONALDSON and Kate WORD (South Carolina) and Great-grandad to Samantha and Joseph WORD. Norm was in failing health since Christmas. He fought bravely and proudly through the frustration with Parkinson's disease, which stopped him from typing letters to family and Friends in Canada, England and Scotland. A life well lived, Norm was a rare naval officer who served on land, air and sea with the Royal Canadian Navy for more than 20 years and fought overseas in World War 2 and Korea. After the Navy, he joined KPMG and later Coopers and Lybrand as a management consultant. An avid sailor with Kathryn, they spent many wonderful summers cruising Lake Ontario on Diablo and Ulysses before their trip on Quarterpatch down the Intercoastal Waterway to the warm south, unfortunately interrupted by back surgery. Norm and Kathryn retired to Sarasota and spent 20 years golfing, volunteering and enjoying life with their many Friends. Donations appreciated to the Parkinson Foundation of Canada or a charity of your choice. A Reception to celebrate Norm's life will be held in Toronto at a later date.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-28 published
DUNCAN, Gaylen Arthur
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Gaylen Arthur DUNCAN who was taken from us too early, in his 61st year, on March 26, 2008. He was the beloved husband for forty years of Arlene and proud father of Gaylen (Alison), Krista (Michael DONALDSON,) Meghan (Stefan HAAG) and Robert. He was the adoring grandfather of Avery, Taylor and Graydon. Forever remembered by his devoted mother Frances Duncan LOCKE, mother-in-law Myrtle NICHOLSON and siblings John (Helene,) Gord (Libby,) Jennifer (Greg THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON), Jamie, Diane (Michael LEUTY), Susan (Ron SCHIRLIE). He is reunited with his father Gaylen R. DUNCAN, father-in-law Robert NICHOLSON, step-father Doctor Jack LOCKE and granddaughter Caleigh. Gaylen will be fondly remembered by his 12 nieces and nephews. With our family, mourn many Friends and colleagues around the world who will remember with great respect his intelligence, sharp wit and sense of humor. Gaylen was a senior corporate executive with diversified experience in both the public and private sectors for over 30 years. His B.A. from McGill, law degree from Dalhousie and a PhD in computer law from the University of Texas were just stepping stones in his life long thirst for knowledge. Internment will take place this thanksgiving weekend in Georgeville, Quebec, where he will rest in peace at the place closest to his heart. A memorial service will be held at Eglinton St. George's United Church (35 Lytton Blvd.) on Sunday, March 30th at 2 p.m. Reception is to follow at the church. In lieu of flowers, donations to Eglinton St. George's United Church would be appreciated.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-02 published
DONALDSON, Norman S.
It's with deep sorrow we announce the passing of Norman DONALDSON. He left us peacefully on Sunday March 30th, 2008 at Saint Michaels Hospital. Born August 25th, 1929 in Motherwell, Scotland to David and Jessie DONALDSON. Beloved husband for forty-six years to his Austrian wife Marlene, father of his two devoted children, Heli and Ian, proud grandfather of Maximilian, survived by his twin brother Ronald and predeceased by his older brother Robert (1975). Norman was a loving Uncle to Carolyn, Shona, Laurie, David and Duff. After leaving High School, Norman became a Quantity Surveyor and worked for a few years in this capacity in Scotland before emigrating to Canada in 1953, where he established a successful career in his own construction business. It was here that he also helped create the significant role of 'Estimator' in the building industry and helped establish the Ontario Industry of Quantity Surveyors. Norman was an avid and passionate sportsman playing first class Rugby Football and Water Polo in Scotland. In Canada he immediately joined the Toronto Scottish Rugby Club and played into his forties. He continued as an active club member and a big contributor to the game. He also played on various overseas rugby tours for Balmy Beach and was selected for the Canadian National Team. His career in rugby was capped by being, inducted into the Ontario Rugby Hall of Fame. He embraced the early days of skiing in Ontario and was a founding member of the Craigleith Ski Club. In this capacity he aided in starting the tennis section and designed and oversaw construction of the courts. He was an avid Tennis player at both the Toronto Lawn Tennis Club and the Granite Club and always did well in many Veteran events. In recent years Norman turned his sporting energy to golf and was a member of both the Granite and Blue Mountain Golf and Country clubs. His unique humour, Scottish wit, competitiveness in all his sporting endeavours, as well as his generosity will be remembered and sorely missed by his wide circle of Friends. A memorial service to celebrate Norman's life will be held Saturday, April 5th, 10: 00 a.m. At Rosedale Presbyterian Church, 129 Mount Pleasant Road, Toronto. In lieu of flowers a donation in the name of Norman DONALDSON to Saint Michaels Hospital Foundation, Oncology Unit, 30 Bond Street, Toronto, Ontario M5B 1W8.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-15 published
GABY, Mary Louise (née McRUER)
Mum died peacefully in her own home, as was her wish, in Toronto, on April 13, 2008 in her 87th year. Her passing will leave a huge void in the lives she touched. Mary Louise was predeceased by her husband, Doctor John R. GABY and parents James Chalmers McRUER and Mary Rowena McRUER (DOW.) Beloved mother of daughters Susan (Frank TROTZ), Katherine, Daphne (Richard DONALDSON), Alison and son Robert (Anna), devoted Gran to Sarah, Anna, Sam, Kate, Leslie, Fraser, Whitney, John and James. Cherished sister of Katherine McINTYRE and John McRUER. Adored Aunt and mentor to her large 'extended' family. Her love of travel, music, art, theatre, gardening and the quest for knowledge knew no bounds. Come and join us to celebrate her life at Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto, on Friday, April 18th, 2008 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Br uce Trail Association, Timothy Eaton Memorial Church or a charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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DONALDSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-23 published
McGOVERN, Olive Margaret
Age 90 years
Passed away at Lakeridge Health Oshawa on Saturday June 21, 2008. Beloved wife of the late Percy McGOVERN. Dear mother of Margaret and Fred TIPPINS, Ross McGOVERN and Judy DONALDSON and mother-in-law to Suzanne McGOVERN. Loving grandmother of Fred TIPPINS, Mark and Andrea TIPPINS, Joanne and Victor MARTINS, Greg and Sue McGOVERN and the late Janet TIPPINS and great-grandmother of Emily, Maranda, Lydia, Kyra, Kaitlyn, Patrick and Cole. Visitation will be held at The Northcutt Elliott Funeral Home, 53 Division St. N., Bowmanville on Thursday June 26, 2008 from 10-11 a.m. followed by a Memorial Service at 11 a.m. Memorial Donations may be made to a charity of your choice.
www.northcuttelliott.com

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DONATH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-03 published
PRUSZNOWSKI, Moniek " Morris" " Max"
On Wednesday, July 2, 2008 at North York General Hospital. Moniek PRUSZNOWSKI, beloved husband of Golda. Loving father and father-in-law of Rachel and Neil NISKER, Sherry and Ronnie MANDEL, and Hilary and the late Bernie PRUSZNOWSKI. Devoted grandfather of Leah and Ran OFIR, Jessica and Jeremy DONATH, and Joshua, Matthew, Alexandra and Sami NISKER, and the late Adam PRUSZNOWSKI. At Benjamin's park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Avenue West (3 lights west of Dufferin) for service on Thursday, July 3, 2008 at 2: 30 p.m. Interment Lodzer Centre Holocaust Congregation section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Shiva 7300 Yonge Street Suite 1104. Memorial donations may be made to the Moniek and Genia Prusznowski Endowment Fund c/o The Baycrest Centre, 416-785-2875 or to Adam's Dream Fund c/o The Hospital for Sick Children, 416-813-5320.

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DONATIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-04 published
McCALLUM James " Jim" Alexander
At the Chatham Kent Health Alliance on Wednesday, April 2, 2008. James (Jim) Alexander McCallum, recently of Chatham and formerly of R.R.#1 Glencoe (Strathburn) in his 85th year. Beloved husband of the late Marjorie Elizabeth (LEWIS) McCALLUM (2006.) Cherished father of Marlys McCALLUM of Chatham, Leigh Ann and her husband Phil DONATIS of Appin, Michele McCALLUM of Glencoe. Loving grandfather of Alexander and Anthony. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Isabel and the late Ellwood EPPS of London, Lois and George NIBLOCK of Parkhill, Jessie and Stuart HOWLETT of London, Marion and the late Clarence SIMASKO of Yale, Michigan, Betty and Carl ALLISON of Smith Creek, Michigan. Also survived by his nieces and nephews and cousins. Predeceased by his parents Mahlon and Eva (STACEY) McCALLUM. Relatives and Friends will be received at the Arn Funeral Home, 193 Shackleton Street, Dutton on Sunday 2-4 and 7-9 where the funeral service will be held on Monday, April 7, 2008 at 1 p.m. Interment in Cowal-McBride Cemetery. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or St. Andrews United Church would be appreciated. E-mail condolences arnfuneralhome2@bellnet.ca

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DONE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-05 published
YAKOWENKO, Joseph William
In his 84th year, passed away Saturday, March 29, 2008, at Parkwood Hospital in London, Ontario. Joe was born in Poland in 1924 and moved to Canada when he was 5 years old. Upon graduation from Beal Technical Institute in London, Joe enlisted in the Canadian Navy. He served aboard HMCS Haida and HMCS Trentonian. In February 1945, his ship was torpedoed by a German submarine. 17 hours in the North Atlantic before being rescued must have seemed like an eternity, but it wasn't Joe's time to go; after the war he settled back in London where he married Jean DONE and raised three children. Joe worked at Leigh Metal and then Emco, as a millwright. At age 60, Joe retired. He continued his regular trips to Las Vegas and Florida, where he loved nothing more than to play the slots and walk on the beach early in the morning. After a series of strokes Joe was moved to Parkwood hospital 3 years ago where he was surrounded by other Canadian Veterans who served their country well. Joe will be sadly missed but never forgotten by his devoted wife of 60 years, Jean and his loving children, Joanne HIGMAN (Jim) and Dennis (Sue) of London, and Sharon NURSALL (Tom) of Los Angeles. Grandpa will also be missed by his five grandchildren, Jaimie and Virginia HIGMAN, Dakota YAKOWENKO, and Sam and Katie NURSALL. Predeceased by parents John and Frances YAKOWENKO and 4 sisters. Special thanks to all the wonderfully caring staff at Parkwood Hospital, 4B West. It was Joe's wish that he be cremated. A Memorial Service to Celebrate Joe's Life will be held on Tuesday, April 8, 2008, at 9: 00 a.m. in the Parkwood Hospital, Chapel of the Good Shepherd, 801 Commissioners Rd. E. (Please use parking lot #3). Evans Funeral Home, 648 Hamilton Road, (519) 451-9350, entrusted with arrangements. Online condolences can be expressed at www.evansfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Mr. YAKOWENKO.

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DONER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-03-24 published
TAILOR/TAYLOR, Thomas Elgin
At his home with his family by his side on Friday, March 21, 2008. Tom TAILOR/TAYLOR at the age of 69 years. Beloved husband of Dora (HOSKINS) TAILOR/TAYLOR and the late Frances “Frankie” (BARD) TAILOR/TAYLOR. Loved father of Laura EVANS- GRAY/GREY (Bruce GRAY/GREY) of Sidney, British Columbia; Allan TAILOR/TAYLOR (Tammy DONER) of Elmwood; Sandra BENOIT (Rob ROODENBURG) of Salt Spring Island, British Columbia; Corrina and Paula CANNING, both of Guelph. Loved son of Frances KINGSWELL of Guelph and the late Elgin TAILOR/TAYLOR and Harry KINGSWELL. Dear brother of Sharon QUARRIE of Mount Forest, Bonnie FREE of Ponsonby, David TAILOR/TAYLOR of Belwood, Larry TAILOR/TAYLOR of Georgetown, Merv KINGSWELL of Mactier and the late Billy. Always missed by his many grandchildren, nieces and nephews. Friends may call at the Gilchrist Chapel - McIntyre and Wilkie Funeral Home, One Delhi Street, Guelph (from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Monday). Service at the Gilchrist Chapel on Tuesday, March 25 at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Chris TIMM officiating. Interment Memory Gardens. Memorial contributions to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society of Canada would be appreciated. We invite you to leave your memories and donations online at: www.gilchristchapel.com

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DONER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-06 published
Wounded on the sands of Normandy, his one-day war ended on D-Day
His life was saved by a thick letter from home he had tucked into the breast pocket of his tunic. It deflected a bullet into his ribs and his arm, and he spent the rest of his life selling insurance in small-town Ontario
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Don DONER's war lasted just one day - D-Day, June 6, 1944.
The night before, he boarded a ship in Southampton on the southern coast of England. It was pitch dark, but he and the rest of the Queen's Own Rifles of Canada had practised the drill so many times they didn't need any light.
They had been in the port since June 4, waiting for the signal for the invasion of Nazi-occupied Europe. They knew the real thing was coming when breakfast arrived. "The last meal, so to speak, of the condemned," he said in a memoir written in 1982. "It was bacon and eggs - something unheard of in the army."
A storm had just passed through the area, leaving behind rough seas. Just off the French coast, he and the other men from 8 Section of 9 Platoon, "A" Company of the Queen's Own, left the mother ship, transferred to assault craft A9 and headed toward the beach at Bernieres-sur-mer. It was their bad luck to be among the first to land in Normandy on D-Day, and worse for Mr. DONER. He was second in line to enter the water, right behind his pal Corporal Hugh ROCKS.
"We were elected to be the assault section for the platoon, which meant that we would be first to leap off the assault craft, carry bangalores [long, cylindrical mines], steel ladders, wire mesh and any other material that would assist us in scaling the sea wall and blowing holes in the barbed wire," wrote Mr. DONER.
Don DONER was no gung-ho, Royal Canadian Legion cliché of a soldier. He was just a kid who joined the army at 19 and soon grew cynical about the military and the war. He often went Absent Without Leave, mostly to visit girlfriends. A good-looking young man, he found falling in love rather easy. One time, he got cold feet and backed out of an engagement to a young British woman, although he did leave the material for the wedding dress - he'd had it sent from Canada - at her front door.
Riding toward the beach that morning he felt frightened, and believed most of the young men on the landing craft were no braver. "Just a bunch of ordinary guys thrown together by fate, not mad at anybody, not wanting to die or be maimed or blinded, just wanting to live and let live," he wrote. "Had 90 per cent of us known then what we know now, there wouldn't have been a war because none of us would have been there to fight it."
They may have been scared, but it didn't stop them fighting. As their boat approached the beach, a shell destroyed another landing craft that had been advancing alongside. Their own landing craft stopped in deep water, unable to go closer. Cpl. ROCKS, who was 5 feet 5 inches and a non-swimmer, asked Mr. DONER to go first. Standing 6 feet 2 inches, Mr. DONER stepped off the boat and found the water up to his chin. Cpl. ROCKS gamely followed. Burdened by a full battle kit, ammunition and a rifle, he sank to the bottom. Mr. DONER grasped his friend's hands underwater and led him part way to the beach.
Meanwhile, enemy machine-gun bullets flew thick and fast, and artillery and mortar shells exploded all around. Wounded or killed outright, many of the Queen's Own never cleared the surf.
The soldiers had orders that if a man was hit they were to leave him until the beach was secure. Mr. DONER saw one of his Friends in the water with massive wounds. He ignored his call for help, in part because it was obvious he was close to death. In the confusion, Mr. DONER lost sight of Cpl. ROCKS. A short while later, he went back to look for him. He found him dead, shot between the eyes.
Cpl. ROCKS, a hard-rock miner from Kirkland Lake, Ontario, was 40. Probably the oldest man from the unit to be killed on the beach that day, he had lied about his age to get into the war. As a married man in what was considered a vital industry, it is unlikely he would have been conscripted.
By that time, Mr. DONER had also been wounded. As implausible as it seems, his life was saved by mail from home. A bullet aimed straight at his chest hit the corner of an envelope containing a thick letter from his sister. He had put the letter in his breast pocket, and its many folds absorbed most of the impact. The bullet deflected off a rib and ended up in his arm. He was also struck many times over by bits of shrapnel that entered other parts of his body and would, years later, set off metal detectors at airports.
The key to survival was to get out of the line of fire. All around him, soldiers furiously dug down into the sand. "Steve DE BLOIS and I set a world record for digging a slit trench, wounded or not," he wrote.
The Queen's Own Rifles had landed near Bernieres-sur-mer just after 8 a.m. The rough seas meant the tanks were late coming ashore, and the infantry landed without their support. To make matters worse, the assault craft had taken them several hundred metres away from their planned objective and set them down right in front of a strong German position that included a powerful 88-mm gun.
"They received the worst battering of any Canadian unit on D-Day crossing the beaches," said Steve Harris, director of history at the Department of National Defence, whose father, Lieutenant J.P. Harris, was wounded while landing with the same regiment. In all, 60 men of Queen's Own were killed and another 78 were wounded, the worst casualty figures of any Canadian unit on D-Day.
In spite of the strength of the German positions, the regiment more than met their objectives. "So fast did the Queen's Own move against this and other positions that when the Regiment de la Chaudiere began to land behind them 15 minutes later, the only fire on the beach was coming from snipers," wrote war correspondent Chester Wilmot in his book, The Struggle for Europe.
Medics treated Mr. DONER's wounds on the beach and he was given the job of guarding some German prisoners. Some of them spoke English and they engaged him in conversation while all around the battle raged. "I talked with a German prisoner of war who wondered, much as I did, why he was there and blamed it all on the big wheels far removed from the battle area."
Mr. DONER was shipped back to England that day. A week later, he was sent home to Canada. His one-day war was over.
Don DONER was born in a Prairie village about 100 kilometres southeast of Saskatoon, but grew up in Toronto. His mother had died giving birth to him, and soon after that the family moved east to Ontario, where his father remarried. In Toronto, he attended Northern Secondary School on Mount Pleasant Road. He spent summers at his uncle's farm near Stayner, about 70 kilometres north of the city.
He enlisted in the army in September, 1941, and trained at Camp Borden in Ontario before being shipped to England. Like many young soldiers, he was not used to strong drink and freedom, and he got into a lot of trouble. He was disciplined several times for returning late to barracks, often after spending the evening at pubs and dances.
After the war, he worked for a time at European Silk in Toronto. By 1950, he and his brother Bob had retreated to the peace and quiet of small-town life in Alliston, Ontario Together, they set up an insurance brokerage called Doner Brothers. They got married and bought houses next door to each other. Don and his wife, Josephine, had six daughters; Bob and his wife, Maxine, had six sons.
Today, Alliston is the site of a busy Honda factory, and has grown enormously, but back then it was a typical, small Ontario community. "Alliston was like Mayberry. It had one stop light and my father's office was a drop-in spot for every character in town," said his daughter, Joanna DAHLIN. " Once a month, they ran a poker game in the basement."
Late in life, Mr. DONER was contacted by George ROCKS, son of Corporal Hugh ROCKS, the man he had tried to save on D-Day. George ROCKS was 6 when his father died.
"An uncle of mine read Don DONER's name in a book on D-Day and I contacted him. Speaking to Don brought everything to a close for me, to learn just how my father died," said Mr. ROCKS. "No one in my family ever spoke much about the war. There was no celebration in our house when the war ended. I was 30 before I learned my father died on D-Day."
For his part, Mr. DONER's views of the war and his role in it changed little over the years. While he felt the conflict had a purpose, he believed senior officers did not really know what they were expecting of Canada's young men. For many years, he refused to discuss the whole rotten business, and it was not until he was in his sixties that he began to talk about his experiences.
Donald Grieve DONER was born in Simpson, Saskatchewan, on July 23, 1922. He died at Sunnybrook Veterans Hospital in Toronto, of complications from Parkinson's disease, on May 3, 2008. He was 85. He is survived by his wife, Josephine (Josie), and his daughters Joanna, Christine, Mary, Helen, Martha and Jennifer. He also leaves his half-sisters Marilyn, Kay, Nan and Dorothy. His brother Bob died in January, 1987.

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DONIHEE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-04 published
McCAULEY, Michael Garth
After a courageous battle with cancer, Michael passed away peacefully at home in his 62nd year on Saturday March 1, 2008. He was a loving husband to Linda and devoted father to Michael and Jessica. He will also be missed by his sister Geraldine FULLER and brothers Bob, Bill and Larry as well as many nieces and nephews. Michael was predeceased by his parents Robert Joseph and Janet (née DONIHEE) McCAULEY as well as his sister Maureen. Michael was born October 28 1945 in Montreal, Quebec and was the co-owner and founder of Nearly New Golf Balls Inc. He will be remembered well by his many Friends in the golf industry. Friends may call at the Scott Funeral Home at 420 Dundas St. East (west of Cawthra Rd) in Mississauga on Tuesday March 4 from 2: 00 to 4:00 p.m. and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be at St. Patrick's Catholic Church, 921 Flagship Dr., in Mississauga Wednesday March 5 at 10: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers memorial donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society.

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DONIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-10 published
DONIO, Janet Louise (née MacLACHLAN)
Jan's family wishes sadly to announce her sudden passing on Tuesday, May 6, 2008, Jan was predeceased by her parents Dugal and Bertha MacLACHLAN. She is survived by her sons Jason DONIO and (Tara ROBERTS) of Toronto, and Robyn DONIO and (Crystal INKSTER- HAWKINS) of Vancouver, and her very special granddaughter Sophia BITEZNIK of Oakville, one brother Joseph MacLACHLAN and wife Donna, and their children Erin and Greg.
In accordance with her wishes, cremation has taken place and a celebration of her life will take place later this summer.
In lieu of flowers, a donation in her memory can be made to: The Native Canadian Centre of Toronto, 16 Spadina Road, Toronto, Ontario M5R 2S7
Arrangements entrusted to Lynett Funeral Home 416-767-1176

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DONIO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-10 published
Facing fraud rap, United Way official commits suicide
Executive was confronted with evidence she embezzled at least $600,000 from a previous employer, charity's president confirms
By Timothy APPLEBY and Elizabeth CHURCH, Page A10
A senior United Way of Greater Toronto executive committed suicide last month after being confronted with evidence she embezzled at least $600,000 from a previous employer, United Way president Frances LANKIN confirmed last night.
Janet DONIO, the local United Way's vice-president for informational services and operational change management, died while under investigation for her activities at the Council of Ontario Universities, a lobby group where she worked for six years as chief information officer.
As well, Ms. DONIO's chief academic credentials - a Canadian university degree and a PhD from the United States - were found to be bogus, Ms. LANKIN said.
The irregularities were uncovered by the Deloitte and Touche accounting firm and involved the payment of funds - said to be between $600,000 and $700,000 - for services never produced, and which instead were allegedly being siphoned off by Ms. DONIO.
The story began to emerge in March after the Council of Ontario Universities hired someone to fill Ms. DONIO's old position.
"We found pretty clear evidence of fraud," said chief executive officer Paul GENEST, stressing that no other individuals appear to have been involved. Nor were any improprieties uncovered in a second Deloitte and Touche audit at the United Way, which hired Ms. DONIO in February, 2007.
The Council of Ontario Universities gets some government funds, but most of its revenue derives from levies paid by the universities it represents and it will be seeking to recoup its losses from its insurer, Mr. GENEST said.
When Deloitte and Touche began unearthing irregularities, Toronto police fraud investigators were notified, but they were awaiting completion of the audit and apparently never interviewed Ms. DONIO, Ms. LANKIN said.
On the day the United Way was told of the allegation, - May 5 - Ms. LANKIN and chief operating officer Catherine SMITH met with Ms. DONIO, 56, and told her she was being placed on a paid leave while the investigation continued.
"It was a difficult conversation," Ms. LANKIN recounted.
She and Ms. SMITH then drove Ms. DONIO home to her west-end Toronto house, where she was found dead the next day.
A coroner's report said the cause of death was "undetermined," according to a family account relayed to Ms. LANKIN.
As for Ms. DONIO's phony academic credentials - a degree from Lakehead University in Thunder Bay and a doctorate in cognitive science from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology - it appears that the Council of Ontario Universities did not check them.
Neither did the United Way, relying instead on character references from the council and another former employer, Ms. LANKIN said.
"Those credentials weren't critical to the job we hired her for, so we didn't check them."
The United Way of Greater Toronto was established in 1956 and supports a network of 200 health and social service agencies. Last year it raised a record $108.1-million.
Ms. DONIO's previous experience included a stint at TVO, as creative director of educational television, and at the Department of Indian and Northern Affairs, where she was an assistant director.
A member of the Biinjitiwaabik Zaaging Anishinaabek Band, whose home is on the shores of Lake Nipigon in Northern Ontario, Ms. DONIO is survived by two adult sons, Jason and Robyn DONIO. Her former husband, Marcel DONIO, is a justice of the peace in Thunder Bay.
Financially, Ms. DONIO's affairs appeared unremarkable at the time of her death. In February, 2006, she purchased her house in west Toronto's Junction area, for $540,000, and in January of this year she remortgaged the property for just over $523,000.
"Jan DONIO was a respected and admired member of the United Way team," the United Way said in a statement. " We grieve her loss and the difficulty faced by her family."

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DONKER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-09 published
He was 'the last of a generation of real publishers' in Canada
A wordsmith who learned the book business in New York, he moved to Toronto in search of independence, writes Sandra MARTIN. 'He wanted to make a difference, and he thought he could do it with information'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S8
An entrepreneur, a wordsmith and a fiercely independent businessman with a canny eye for real estate, Robert FITZHENRY moved to Canada from the New York publishing world in 1966 and established Fitzhenry and Whiteside. In the 1970s and 1980s, Fitz and Witz was a prominent player in the Canadian book scene, doing about $20-million in annual business, mainly by representing Harper and Row and other major U.S. publishers.
Initially, Mr. FITZHENRY was a distributor who claimed he had no interest in publishing books (known to be one of the more spectacular ways of going broke, especially in the days before wide-scale federal and provincial subsidies). Then, almost without trying, he won a couple of huge contracts to produce elementary-school, social-study materials from the province of British Columbia in the late 1960s. "He wanted to make a difference," said his daughter Sharon FITZHENRY, now president of the company, "and he thought he could do it with information."
So, he began publishing an eclectic list of non-fiction titles, mostly reference works that reflected his own fascination with words and language. F&W's first trade title, which appeared in centennial year, was Public Opinion and Canadian Identity, a statistical analysis of Canadians and their perceptions of Canada. He later published a significant series of reference books, including developing and producing several editions of the Funk and Wagnalls Canadian College Dictionary, the F&W Book of Quotations, The Canadian Thesaurus and Canadian Facts and Dates.
"Sponsoring studies on Canadian English as Bob has done for so many years is a relatively self-effacing activity with modest dividends for a publisher," J.K. (Jack) CHAMBERS, professor of linguistics at the University of Toronto, wrote in the preface to the 2001 edition of the thesaurus. "Neither his profile nor his profit margin makes Bob do it. It goes deeper than that. Bob FITZHENRY is word-struck, and always has been. His feelings are word-shaped. He published these books because he wants to read them. Those of us who are also word-struck are in his debt."
Describing Mr. FITZHENRY as "a decent guy," and "a smart businessman," bookseller Frans DONKER of the Book City chain in Toronto said of his former employer: "He was a quiet guy, definitely not a Jack McClelland, but he had influence. I think a lot of people in this industry owe him a big favour for letting them [as young kids] run divisions or offices in other parts of the country," said Mr. DONKER, himself the beneficiary of Mr. FITZHENRY's laissez-faire management style.
As a publisher, Mr. FITZHENRY "saw opportunities and went after them," said Marty CUTLER, now owner of Fairmount Books, a Markham, Ontario, wholesale and remainder operation, who worked as a sales rep for Fitzhenry and Whiteside more than 30 years ago. "He was generous, supportive, encouraging and fascinating. Here was an incredibly well-read, self-educated man, so it was very interesting to have such a smart guy, and such an interesting guy, mentor me. He was the last of a generation of real publishers and we are very lucky to have had him."
Early Years
Robert (Bob) Irvine FITZHENRY, the only son of Irvine and Margaret (LANE) FITZHENRY, was born in New York in the last year of the First World War. His sister, Ann, was born two years later. Irvine FITZHENRY, who was a travelling clock and watch salesman and repairman, had undiagnosed Huntington's disease (a genetic neurological disorder that affects movement, emotions and mental abilities) and was often mistakenly assumed to be a hopeless drunk. His daughter inherited Huntington's and died in 1961, but his son was spared.
During the Depression, and the most debilitating stages of her husband's illness, Margaret FITZHENRY supported her family by opening a pricey restaurant, Margaret Ann's Tearoom, in New Rochelle, New York Bob was the busboy.
After completing high school in New Rochelle, Mr. FITZHENRY enrolled in the University of Michigan, where he worked on the university paper, The Michigan Daily, and earned money in the summers in Florida as a tutor. He graduated in 1938 with a bachelor's degree in English and became a stringer for United Press International, working out of Columbus, Ohio. He quickly rose to chief of that United Press International branch, but quit after he was forced to witness an execution at the Ohio State Penitentiary.
He was drafted into the U.S. Army and was sent to boot camp at Fort Dix, N.J. After training, he was posted to Newport, R.I., then the enclave of many of America's richest families, serving as a sergeant on a searchlight crew watching the seas and the sky for enemy submarines and aircraft. After Pearl Harbour, he transferred to the U.S. Army Air Forces, trained in Texas as a bomber pilot and was promoted to lieutenant. The Second World War ended before he could be sent overseas.
After he was demobilized, he went to work for Harper and Brothers as a junior salesman in the southeastern United States, travelling by train and later in a car, which he named Hesperus, with trunks of books. In 1949, Mr. FITZHENRY was promoted and transferred to Chicago by his mentor, Cass Canfield (the editor and executive who brought James Thurber and E.B. White to Harper's, and one of the founders of the journal Foreign Affairs). That same year, on January 22, Mr. FITZHENRY married Hilda ANDERSON, who was what would now be called an executive assistant to a financial estate manager on Wall Street. Eventually they had three children: Sharon, Bridget (who died from a heart attack in 1987) and Hollister (Holly.) Mrs. FITZHENRY died on February 8, 2007, at the age of 91.
Mr. FITZHENRY rose to the position of vice-president of sales for Harper and Row (the company that was formed in 1962 after the merger of Harper and Brothers and Row, Peterson and Co.), but after nearly 20 years with Harper, he "was tired of working for somebody else," Sharon FITZHENRY said. He toyed with the idea of moving to Australia or buying a little newspaper in Rhode Island, but eventually settled on Canada.
A consummate animal lover, Mr. FITZHENRY wanted to bring the family pets, which included the requisite cats and dogs, a pony and a burro named Mahalia along with his household goods. Apparently, he was stopped by Canada Customs and Immigration and sent a message back to his wife in New York saying, "I can't get my ass across the border."
Fitzhenry and Whiteside
He set up Fitzhenry and Whiteside with Cecil WHITESIDE (vice-president, sales for the Musson Book Co.) in Scarborough, now part of greater Toronto. The two men knew each other because Mr. WHITESIDE had been buying Harper books from Mr. FITZHENRY for years. In the new company, which was founded on April Fool's Day, 1966, Mr. FITZHENRY managed the sales, marketing and finance (that included representing the huge Harper and Row account in Canada) while Mr. WHITESIDE was in charge of servicing orders.
From 1970 to 1974, Peter CRABTREE, now president of Crabtree Publishing, helped build a school textbook division for Fitzhenry and Whiteside. " This was new territory for 'Fitz,' Mr. CRABTREE said in an e-mail message, "because his company was centred around selling to bookstores and libraries." Nevertheless, "he threw himself into the challenge with vigour, enthusiasm, and humour" and "we spent many happy hours recalling our misadventures with departments of education across Canada, as we competed with Canada's publishing community for school adoptions."
Mr. DONKER began working for Mr. FITZHENRY as a sales rep in eastern Canada in 1971. Two years later, Mr. FITZHENRY "threw him the ball to set up a remainder division" called Beaver Books. Mr. DONKER, who was in his mid-20s and had only been in Canada (from his native Holland) for four years, is still grateful for the opportunity. "Fitz did that to many a young snip-snapper," said Mr. DONKER, "and he would seldom interfere." Every two weeks or so, they would discuss sales and "progress" but essentially Mr. DONKER was on his own "to run the division and make mistakes and learn on the job" - work experience that Mr. DONKER took with him when he founded Book City in 1976.
"You could call him eccentric," said Mr. DONKER, remembering that Mr. FITZHENRY still sent handwritten letters to authors and booksellers in the 1970s and that he once published a book on the history of the Holstein cow. The title caused great hilarity in the trade, according to Mr. DONKER, but it ended up selling more than 10,000 copies.
Sharon FITZHENRY, who was a children's librarian in Indiana, came to Toronto to work with her father in 1971, about the time her marriage broke up. She described her father as "a damn tough boss," who was "always in charge." Before starting work at F&W, Ms. FITZHENRY, who had been a heavy smoker, had been nicotine-free for two years - "Within two months I was smoking again," she said. But that was fine with her because, as she admitted, "I'm nuts about the man."
In the mid-1990s, she succeeded him as president of F&W and has since expanded the publishing program, especially in the area of children's books, with the acquisition of Stoddard Kids in 2002 and Red Deer Press in 2005.
Mr. FITZHENRY had a sharp eye for the bottom line and he tended to consider authors and freelance editors mere suppliers instead of delicate artistes in need of financial and editorial nurturing. He was also stubborn. After signing a contract with John Robert Colombo in 1973 to produce Colombo's Canadian Quotations and receiving two-thirds of the manuscript, Mr. FITZHENRY decided the book would sell better with a new title: The Fitzhenry and Whiteside Book of Canadian Quotations. An "aghast" Mr. Colombo demurred at a very chilly lunch, but Mr. FITZHENRY, who appeared to have a momentary hearing loss, was intransigent. Mr. Colombo took his book away and saw it published with great success in 1974 by Hurtig Publishers in Edmonton.
In the late 1980s, mergers and acquisitions were rocking the publishing industry. About the time that Rupert Murdoch's News Corp. acquired Harper and Row in the U.S. in 1987 and William Collins and Sons in 1990 to form HarperCollins, there was a move to establish a Canadian company called Harper, Fitzhenry and Collins. The plan was to run it out of F&W's 7,000-square-metre warehouse and office facility in Markham, which had turned into an astute real-estate purchase on Mr. FITZHENRY's part. The new company would amalgamate the Canadian agency business of both Harper and Collins and establish a Canadian-owned publishing arm called Fitzhenry that would be eligible for government book-publishing programs. The problem, according to an industry expert, was that Mr. FITZHENRY wanted to run the whole show and wasn't willing to answer to either an American or a British superior. Giving up his independence after 20 years of being his own boss was a cost he wasn't willing to consider, no matter the compensations. Consequently, the deal fell through, HarperCollins was formed in Canada and Mr. FITZHENRY lost the lucrative Harper and Row agency business that had been a very significant part of his bottom line for more than 20 years.
Final Days
Mr. FITZHENRY had a stroke in 1995 that left him paralyzed on his right side and suffering from aphasia. Showing enormous grit, he relearned some communication skills. Mr. Cutler remembers visiting him with Mr. DONKER. "We had to initiate the conversation and keep it going, but he could still listen and communicate with his eyes," Mr. Cutler said with admiration.
Another stroke, five years later, left Mr. FITZHENRY unable to swallow and drastically diminished his ability to communicate. After 2000, he was bedridden and nurtured by a feeding tube. With enormous help from his family, he was able to live in his own home, where he eventually died in his sleep.
Robert Irvine FITZHENRY was born in New York on April 10, 1918. He died in Toronto last Thursday. He was 89 and had suffered two severe strokes. Predeceased by his wife, Hilda, and his daughter Bridget, he is survived by daughters Sharon and Hollister, three grandchildren and extended family. A private family funeral will be followed by a memorial service at a later date.

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DON surnames continued to 08don002.htm