DER o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2008-01-18 published
LOCKING, Howard Elgie
Howard Elgie LOCKING passed away peacefully in Hanover, at the age of 80.
He is survived by his loving wife Stella LOCKING. Loved father to daughters Sharion and her husband Carl SEARLE of Kitchener and Linda and her husband Wallace MILLER of Elmwood. Father of Julia VAN DER AA and husband John of Mitchell, Fred LOCKING and his wife Bonnie of Arthur, Percy LOCKING, Donna and Cathy. Stepfather to Sheila HOFFMAN and Don HOFFMAN. Loving and proud Papa of Carey and her husband Chris BRUBACHER of Moorefield and Karen and her husband Jamie RAFTIS of Moorefield. Grandfather of Derek CHERREY, Tanya POL; Nicholas LOCKING, Mark LOCKING and Kristopher LOCKING Brenda MILLER of Hanover and Tammy and her husband Todd HARRIS of Owen Sound. Loved "Big-Papa" to his great-grandchildren Brooklyn COPLAND and Zackary BRUBACHER. Great-grandfather to Savannah, Daria and Cohen POL; Audric CHERREY and Cameron, Emily and Gabrielle HARRIS. Remembered by sister, Leona HERMAN of Hanover. Will be missed by Shirley and Wayne LACKENBAUER of Kitchener. Predeceased by his siblings Melvin, Roy, Hazel and Verna and one daughter, Shearle, and grand_son Dan MILLER.
Howard was born in Hanover on March 4, 1927, being one of six children of George and Annie (NEWTON) LOCKING. He loved animals and outside of farming spent his younger years in trucking and construction business. He was an avid horse lover, owning many, and was a familiar face around the local racetracks.
A time of remembrance will be held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover on Friday, January 18, 2008 from 10 a.m. until the time of a Memorial Service at 11 a.m. Cremation has taken place. Interment in Hanover Cemetery.
In Howard's memory, expressions of sympathy to the Humane Society, Heart and Stroke Foundation or Cancer Society were appreciated.

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DER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-02-18 published
STEEGHS, Johanna " Jeannette" W. (née VANLIER)
Peacefully at Riverview Gardens, Chatham, on Saturday February 16, 2008, Johanna "Jeannette" W. STEEGHS, age 93, of Chatham, beloved wife of the late Martin STEEGHS (1974.) Born in Helden, Holland in 1915, daughter of the late Regina TRIENEKENS and Gerardus VANLIER. Loving mother of Nellie VAN DER VENNE (Adrian) of Leamington, Gerda BUZAN (Karlo) of Melbourne, Agnes LAMERS (Willie) Blenheim, Martin STEEGHS (Regina) Whitby, Mia SADDINGTON (Hal) of Chatham, John STEEGHS (Colette,) Anita STEEGHS of Port Bruce and Jeannette ROACH (Ron) of Ottawa. Sadly missed by 21 grandchildren and 15 great-grandchildren, 4 step-grandchildren and 2 step-great-grandchildren. Also sadly missed by a son-in-law Louis VAN DEN BOGAART, by 4 sisters and one brother and by many relatives in Holland. She is predeceased by a daughter Gina VAN DEN BOGAART (2006,) 2 grandchildren; Kelley ROACH (1990) and Shawna ROACH (1986) and one brother in 1988. Friends and relatives may call at the Hinnegan-Peseski Funeral Home, 156 William St. S. Chatham from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Tuesday February 19, 2008 where Parish Prayers will be offered on Tuesday at 7 pm.. Mass of the Resurrection will be celebrated on Wednesday February 20, 2008 at 10 a.m. in St. Ursula's Church. Burial will be in St. Matthews Cemetery, Alvinston Ontario. Donations to the Charity of your choice would be appreciated. Online condolences welcomed at www.peseski.com

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DER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-07 published
HORTON, Nelly (née VAN DER TOORN)
Peacefully, in the loving arms of her husband, after a heroic four year battle with cancer, on Saturday, April 5, 2008 at Parkwood Hospital, Nelly HORTON (née VAN DER TOORN) passed away in her 59th year. Loving wife and best friend of Rick for 42 years. Loving mother of Laura PLANK and her husband Rob, Tammy HORTON and Dane ARN. Cherished Nana of Sydney. Will be greatly missed by Baylee, Belle and Mr. Magoo. Nelly will be sadly missed by many family and Friends both in Canada and Holland. Predeceased by her loving mother Joan VAN DER TOORN (2006.) Friends will be received at Forest Lawn Memorial Chapel, 1997 Dundas Street East (at Wavell), for visitation on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday, April 10, 2008 at 1 p.m. (with visitation one hour prior). Interment to follow at Forest Lawn Memorial Gardens. In memory, donations to the London Regional Cancer Program would be greatly appreciated. A special thank you from the family to Doctor Mark VINCENT, Connie MORRISSON and Carol WATSON for their care and compassion.

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DER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-04-29 published
SLATER, Reginald W.N. "Reg"
Peacefully at the Wildwood Care Centre, Saint Marys on Sunday, April 27, 2008. Reginald W.N. (Reg) SLATER age 98 years, formerly of Lakeside. Beloved husband of Margaret (NEEVE) SLATER. Loving father of Nancy MUIR and husband John BAK of Lakeside, Linda SHARMAN and husband Rick of Kitchener, Paul SLATER of Lakeside, Janet SLATER and Peter George of London, Mary VAN DER PRYT and husband Robert of Dublin. Proud grandfather of Brian, Marie, Lisa (Shawn), Jennifer (Jason), Laura (Joshua) and great-grandchildren Abilene, Zachory, Emily and Alex. Dear brother-in-law of Bessie MILLS of Lakeside. Predeceased by his parents William SLATER and the former Eleanor KING, a son-in-law John MUIR, seven brothers and four sisters. Resting at the L.A. Ball Funeral Chapel, 7 Water St. N., Saint Marys on Tuesday from 7-9 p.m. There will be a visitation on Wednesday, April 30, 2008 from 10 a.m. until the time of the funeral service at 11 a.m. with Pastor Richard HRYNIW officiating. Interment in Saint Marys Cemetery. Donations to the charity of choice would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Online condolences may be sent to www.ballfc.ca.

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DER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-07 published
BLOOM, Lyda A. (SINCLAIR)
Formerly of R.R.#3 Bothwell and St. Andrews Residence, Chatham, passed away peacefully at the Village Nursing Home, Ridgetown on Thursday June 5, 2008 at the age of 105. Beloved wife of the late Wm. BLOOM (1968.) Loving mother of Dorothy DARK and her late husband Raymond of Ridgetown, Mary Louise BUTLER and her husband Lee of London, Marjorie HAWTHORNE and her husband Jim of R.R.#2 Blenheim, John BLOOM and his wife Shirley of R.R.#3 Bothwell. Loving grandmother of Brenda WRIGHT, Robert BLOOM, Cathy SMITH, Kim NETO, Carolyn VAN DER PAELT, Brian BUTLER, Karen ANDERSON, Trudy BUTLER, Jim HAWTHORNE Jr., Michael HAWTHORNE, Mark HAWTHORNE, and Rob HAWTHORNE. Sadly missed by 24 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by grand_sons Lyle DARK (1980,) Gary DARK (1987,) a sister Edna McGILLIVRAY (1999,) and brothers Leonard SINCLAIR (1939,) Walter SINCLAIR (1979) and James SINCLAIR (1998.) Also survived by several nieces and nephews. The Bloom family will receive Friends at the Badder and Robinson Funeral Home, 211 Elm Street, Bothwell on Sunday June 8, 2008 from 12: 30 p.m. until the time of the funeral service at 2: 30 p.m. with Rev. Annalee KERR of the Bothwell United Church officiating. Interment McLean Cemetery. Donations may be made at the funeral home by cheque to the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance Magnetic Resonance Imager Campaign or the Bothwell United Church. Online condolences and donations may be left at our website www.badderfuneralhome.com. "A tree will be planted in memory of Lyda BLOOM in the Bladder and Robinson Memorial Forest, Mosa Twp."

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DER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-20 published
VAN DER ARK, Pieternella " Nellie"
Peacefully at Parkwood Hospital on Wednesday, June 18th, 2008 Pieternella "Nellie" in her 82nd year. Predeceased by husband Frans. Dear mother of Peet, Marianne, Jeanette, Paulina, Margreet, Nico and Petra. Will be sadly missed by several grandchildren and great-grandchildren. Survived by brother Cees (Elizabeth) and sister-in-law Attie, as well as siblings in Holland. Friends may call at the Elliott-Madill Komoka Chapel on Saturday, June 21st from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. where the funeral service will be held at 1 p.m. with Rev. Don KEENLISIDE officiating. Interment Sacred Heart Cemetery, Mount Brydges.

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DER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-12 published
He was the 'king of real estate' who kick-started Toronto film festival
After retiring 'at the top of his game,' he made a trip to France and happened on Cannes and its film fête. Thus inspired, he returned home to help launch one of his own
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S10
A lawyer who made serious money in real-estate deals in the 1950s and 1960s, Dusty COHL was seduced by the movie business and spent the last 40 years schmoozing backers, stars and directors. Tall and lanky, with a grizzled beard and an ear-to-ear grin, and wearing his trademark black cowboy hat festooned with shiny pins and badges and outré T-shirt, he appeared to be the epitome of louche.
In fact, the film producer and co-founder of the Toronto International Film Festival was a family man who remained married for more than 50 years to the girl he met in high school. He was also a genial and supportive father figure to many fledgling producers, directors and programmers in the Canadian film business.
"He was unconventional in his ideas and his dress, but he wasn't unconventional in his living habits and his loyalties," said film and television producer Ted KOTCHEFF. "He was the very heart and soul of the Canadian film industry and the most lovable man that I have ever met, hands down," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who had known Mr. COHL "longer than anybody," dating back to summer camp in the mid-1940s.
"Dusty broke the mould of the bland, boring, polite Canadian, which was very important in the early days [of the Toronto film festival]," said public-relations consultant Helga STEPHENSON, who began working for Toronto International Film Festival in 1978 and was executive director from the mid-1980s until the early 1990s.
"With his huge sense of fun and flair, he helped a lot in getting critics and filmmakers here," she said. "Once they got here, they discovered it was a superb film festival, with an incredible audience, and that Toronto was a great place to be. But getting them here was the trick - and then he would entertain them once they were here."
Murray (Dusty) COHL was born on Euclid Street in Toronto in the same year as the stock-market crash on Wall Street. His father, Karl, was a Communist who worked as a house painter, a union organizer and, ultimately, as an insurance agent, while his mother, Lillian, sold bed linens at Eaton's, according to Brian D. Johnson in Brave Films, Wild Nights: 25 years of Festival Fever.
An only child, he attended Charles G. Fraser elementary school and Camp Naivelt (New World), a Bolshevik Jewish summer camp west of Toronto, from the age of 5. It was at camp that he shed his hated first name and acquired the nickname Dusty. Another camper, Harris Black, was called Blacky, and the kids decided that Murray COHL should be Dusty, as in coal dust.
"He was my camp counsellor," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who attended Camp Naivelt from 1943 through 1945. "He was my boyhood hero." What Mr. KOTCHEFF loved about Dusty were the same qualities that have always captured people's affections: "He was so full of good humour and intelligence, and he was a born non-conformist. Even back then, he was unconventional in his dress, which appeals to young people." Dusty let his T-shirt hang outside his shorts while the other counsellors were all tucked in.
"He had his own style," said Mr. KOTCHEFF, who also has a much darker memory from those days: seeing his hero "ejected" from camp in the summer of 1945 after a "kangaroo court" found him guilty of being an "anarchist Trotskyite" - at 16. "He always saw that as a very amusing incident in his life, but that was Dusty. He was dedicated to following his own vision of things. He was an original."
After public school, he went to Harbord Collegiate from 1941 to 1947. That's where he met Joan CAIRN, although she says she knew of him from Camp Naivelt. When he asked her to dance, she felt very comfortable in his arms, and thought he might be "the one." After high school, he went to the University of Toronto, earning a bachelor of arts degree in 1950. On December 23, 1951, he and Joan married (they just celebrated their 56th wedding anniversary) and eventually had three children, Robert, Karen and Steven.
After the U of T, he entered Osgoode Hall Law School, coming first in his class one year and graduating with a law degree in 1954. For most of the next 20 years, Mr. COHL worked as a zoning and real-estate lawyer, putting together land parcels and property developments in Toronto and Florida. He was "tremendously successful," according to his close friend, film producer Barry Avrich, but retired from the business "at the top of his game" when people starting referring to him as "the king of real estate."
In 1964, he and his wife were holidaying in the south of France and she suggested they visit Cannes. By chance, they found a parking place in front of the Carlton Hotel, ordered a drink on the terrace and "saw and felt the pulse of the action" of the annual film festival, which happened to be on at the same time. "I was like a kid falling into Disneyland," he said later. It was another four years before they returned to Cannes, but, from then on, they were regulars at its film festival.
In 1973, he met William (Bill) MARSHALL, a filmmaker and communications whiz who had helped propel David Crombie into the Toronto mayor's office in 1972 and was then working as his executive assistant. Both Mr. MARSHALL and Mr. COHL have claimed credit for the idea of launching a film festival in Toronto; what is certainly true is that they both embraced the concept as enthusiastically as seals sliding down water slides.
After visiting film festivals in Berlin and Atlanta, the two men went to Cannes, where they rented a suite at the Carlton, ensconced themselves in the bar on the terrace and started schmoozing. "Dusty was the only person I knew in Canada who had actually been to Cannes in those days," Mr. MARSHALL recollected in a telephone interview.
"There were only about six of us making movies," he said. "We wanted a film festival [in Toronto] because foreign people might come and we'd get to sell our movies." Henk VAN DER KOLK (Mr. MARSHALL's partner in a company they enthusiastically called the Film Consortium of Canada) was the managing director of the festival, Mr. MARSHALL was the executive director, and Mr. COHL was "the accomplice." As such, he was to schmooze and, in Mr. MARSHALL's estimation, there was nobody better at talking, bringing people together and creating a buzz.
In October of 1976, they launched the Toronto International Film Festival at the Ontario Place Cinesphere on a budget of about $500,000, half of which was in goods and services. That first year, they wantonly courted Warren Beatty through a Toronto cousin, but he failed to show. Unexpectedly, Jeanne Moreau and Dino De Laurentiis did. And they had a bit of luck by screening Cousin, Cousine, which was later nominated for three Academy Awards.
In 1978, they defied the then-powerful but now-defunct Ontario Censor Board by showing an uncut version of In Praise of Older Women, based on Stephen Vizinczey's bestseller, and almost caused a riot by handing out 4,000 passes to a screening at a cinema that only seated 1,000. The overflow crowd engendered one of the slick-talking Mr. MARSHALL's more elusive qualifiers: "We're not oversold. We're just over-attended."
After three years, Mr. COHL and Mr. MARSHALL retreated and Wayne CLARKSON became the first of several professional managers of the burgeoning festival.
In addition to Toronto International Film Festival, which has long been one of the top film festivals in the world, Mr. COHL put his "accomplice" skills to work, co-producing feature films such as Outrageous! - based on a short story by Margaret Gibson (obituary, March 15, 2006) and starring her friend, impersonator Craig Russell - and The Circle Game. He was a consulting producer on The Last Mogul, Rush: Grace Under Pressure Tour, Guilty Pleasure, The Extraordinary World of Dominick Dunne and Bowfire and was executive producer of The Scales of Justice, which began on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio in the 1980s and was aired on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television from 1991 to 1995. Hosted by lawyer Edward GREENSPAN, it featured docudramas based on real cases in Canadian criminal law.
Mr. COHL also worked with his cousin, rock promoter Michael COHL, famous for organizing tours for the Rolling Stones and other pop stars, on a concert series on cable television in the 1980s called First Choice Rocks. Less successfully, the two COHLs worked with basketball legend Wilt Chamberlain in an attempt to bring an National Basketball Association franchise to Toronto. "I miss him already," Michael COHL said yesterday. "He was great."
In 1990, Mr. COHL started the Floating Film Festival, an almost annual, luxury Caribbean cruise featuring films programmed by critics such as Roger Ebert, Richard Corliss and George Anthony. The Floating Film Festival combined the best elements of "the smallness of Telluride, the warmth of Toronto and the glamour of Cannes," according to Mr. COHL. It even had its own emblematic T-shirt depicting an art deco-style cruise ship flying a flag with a cowboy hat inspired by Mr. COHL's black Stetson. The 10th edition of the Floating Film Festival, which will sail from Los Angeles on February 25, is dedicated to Mr. COHL and features a tribute to actress Gena Rowlands.
Mr. COHL was also a member of the founding board of Canada's Walk of Fame, which, since its inception in 1998, has celebrated the achievements of more than 100 music, arts and sports celebrities, including Wayne Gretzky, Karen Kain, Gordon Pinsent and Kiefer Sutherland, by encasing their names in a slab of cement on the sidewalks in the entertainment district. In May of 2003, Mr. COHL was invested into the Order of Canada for "his pride in Canadian talent" and his "desire to celebrate our achievements."
Late last fall, he was diagnosed with liver cancer.
Murray (Dusty) COHL was born in Toronto on February 21, 1929. He died at Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre of liver cancer on January 11, 2007. He was 78. Mr. COHL is survived by his wife, Joan, three children and five grandchildren. There will be a private family funeral followed by a public celebration of his life at a later date.

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DER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-12 published
DE HAAS, Josef " Johan" Christiaan
Passed away at Etobicoke General Hospital, on Sunday, May 11, 2008 in his 82nd year. Born in Hengelo, The Netherlands, on November 10th, 1926. Survived by his sister Ali VAN DER VEER (Jan;) sister-in-law Dini, niece Lya (Jan), nephew Niels (Gehe) and extended families. Predeceased by his first wife Johannna ZANDWYK (née SUKEL,) sons Michael ZANDWYK and Kasey ZANDWYK-DE HAAS; and great-grand_son Kristiaan HENN. Survived by daughter-in-law Doreen ZANDWYK-DE HAAS; grandchildren Grant (Robin,) Tracy and Kristiaan (Laura) great-grandchildren Kalob, Kegan, Kayden and Rebycka. Survived by his cherished wife Dorothy MILLER (née BURNHAM,) children Stuart (Karen) MILLER and Valerie (Tony) RODRIGUES; grandchildren Ariane, Alexander and Avalina. Josef will be greatly missed by family and Friends. Visitation at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W. (at Windermere, east of Jane subway), on Wednesday, May 14 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service will be held in the Chapel on Thursday, May 15, 2008 at 3 o'clock. Cremation to follow. Interment Mount Pleasant Mausoleum at a later date. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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DER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-07 published
JAN DEN BOER, Evert (April 27, 1912-July 5, 2008)
It is with deep sadness that we, the family of Evert JAN DEN BOER, announce his passing at his home on Saturday, July 5, 2008. Evert is survived by his wife Selma, and his sister Marguerta in Barendrecht, Holland. Predeceased by wife Maria VAN DER SCHOOR. He will be forever missed by son Tonny and wife Linda, daughter Jacomina, and step-daughter Deanna and daughter-in-law, Vera DEN BOER. Predeceased by his beloved son John who passed away on November 30, 1997. His grandchildren Heather, Jon, Helen, Andrea and husband Stefan, David and wife Melissa, Aaron and wife Jennifer, Jason, Lauren, Liam and Caitlin. Evert also leaves behind six great-grandchildren, Sydney (Heather), Nathan and Hannah (Andrea), Emily and Oliver (David), Sydney and Montanna (Helen), and Aiden (Aaron). Brother-in-law to Jean and Junior LOVEYS and uncle to Lorie and Brian. Oom Eef to Theo, Cobi and Piet and their children Carola and Frans and Carola's son Shaquielle in Holland. Evert was a true gentleman, a man of integrity who lived his life with much dignity, honour and respect. Evert had a distinguished career as a founding member of the Canadian Society of Club Managers and a member of the Club Managers Association of America. His last 16 years before retirement were spent as General Manager of Scarboro Golf and Country Club. At Scarboro he was well respected for his devoted ser vice to the members. Family and Friends will be received at the 'Scarborough Chapel' of McDougall and Brown, 2900 Kingston Road (east of St. Clair Ave. E.) 416-267-4656 on Tuesday, July 8 from 6-9 p.m. A funeral service will be held for Evert in the Chapel on Wednesday, July 9 at 1 p.m. Interment at Resthaven Memorial Gardens.

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DERANGO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2008-03-15 published
FOLLIOTT, Natalie (née DERANGO)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Natalie after a courageous fight with ovarian cancer on March 13, 2008 at Toronto General Hospital with her loving family at her side. She will be greatly missed by John, her husband and best friend for 28 years, her cherished sons Matthew and Michael, and her extended family. She was born December 21, 1957 in Rende, Italy, the cherished daughter of the late Enrico and the late Rosa DERANGO. She is survived by her loving siblings Frank DERANGO (Rena,) Oletta BRETTONE (Arturo), Anna FARACE (John), Eva ALBERGA (Tony), Carlo DERANGO (Joyce), Delia DERANGO (Edward) and Timina SCARMATO (Frank), nieces and nephews Anthony, Marie (Joe), Rick (Vicki), (late) John, Angela, Lucy, Tony (Helen), Rosina, Adam, David (Sabrina), Ashley, Marta, and Julian and her many great-nephews and nieces. She will be greatly missed by her in-laws Wendy HAMILTON (Tom,) Bill FOLLIOTT (Sandy,) Betsy MALLANY (John) and Larry FOLLIOTT (Linda.) She was a loving aunt to Jay (Lea,) Tammy (Franco,) Brian (Shannon), Kim, John Paul, Crystal, Robert, Sydney and Amy and will also be missed by her great-nephews and nieces. Natalie will be fondly remembered for her great courage, love of family, passion for gardening and her wonderful outlook on life. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 3-8 p.m. on Saturday, March 15 and from 3-8 p.m. on Sunday, March 16. Mass of Christian Burial will be held on Monday, March 17 at 10: 30 o'clock in Holy Rosary Roman Catholic Church, 354 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto. If desired, donations may be made to Ovarian Cancer Canada, 101-145 Front Street East, Toronto, Ontario, M5A 1E3. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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DERBY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-10 published
DERBY, Agnes
In loving memory of my Special Flower of the Forest, My Wife our Mother, Grandmother and Great-Grandmother, Agnes DERBY, who passed away on the 10th July 1998. Too Precious, To ever be Forgotten. Sadly missed and Remembered by Husband Hugh and Families.

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DERBY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-04-10 published
DERBY, Ralph Smyth, B.A., B.Paed.
Director Of Education Emeritus
Died peacefully on Sunday, April 6, 2008 in his 95th year. Beloved husband of Gwendolyn GAUKRODGER, his wife of 67 years. Fondly remembered by his son, Doctor Ian DERBY and his wife, Sue. Survived by his sister-in-law, Alice GAUKRODGER of Toronto. Predeceased by his brothers, sisters and parents, Albert and Olive DERBY. Ralph DERBY came to the Sault in 1952 as the Director of Education at the time the city was entering the great educational adventure that was to continue for the next two decades. It was a time of tremendous growth in population and rapidly increasing birth rate, known as the post war baby boom. It was an age of great expectation, challenge, exploration, opportunity, new ideas and demands. It was a time when education was urgently in need of progressive and sagacious leadership. In 1952 qualifications for a Director of Education were stringent. Both teaching and supervisory experience in elementary and secondary levels were required as well as an Inspector's certificate. Mr. DERBY was the Board's first choice and trustees were very gratified to learn he had accepted their request to come to Sault Ste. Marie. Mr. DERBY received his B.A. Degree from Queen's University and further qualifications from the University of Toronto. He began his career in a one room public school in the eastern Ontario village of Bishop's Mills in the depression years. He became an elementary school principal and later taught and become a principal in the secondary level. He was President of Northern Ontario Inspectors' Association and of the Ontario School Inspectors' Association. He served as an officer in the Armed Services in the Second World War. The wisdom of the Board's judgement was exemplified throughout the many years he was in our city during the time of unprecedented expansion. His leadership was Provincially outstanding as the student enrolment grew from 5,500 to nearly 18,000, and the number of schools from 14 to 49. The continuing advances in curriculum and teaching methods kept abreast of economic, scientific, and social progress. His ability to analyse the ever changing educational ideas and plans, to be progressive while still retaining the proven traditional benefits, to balance the academic with vocational student needs and desires, and to maintain a high standard of proficiency, was of inestimable value to our city. Mr. DERBY demonstrated many other characteristics so very important to our community and students, such as a fine sense of fairness, honesty, dignity, compassion, diplomacy, perseverance, good humour, sincerity and the ability to inspire confidence. He will be remembered for these by those who had the privilege of working with him. Mr. DERBY was untiring in his efforts to obtain tertiary education for the Sault. He was instrumental in introducing Technical Night Classes and Adult Education programs. He took a leading role in both the early and later efforts to obtain the Sault College and Algoma University. He was also active in community and social affairs. He was a past President of the Rotary Club. The Rotary Club awarded him with membership in the Paul Harris Fellowship for outstanding contribution to the Club and to the Community. He was an Elder and a choir member in his church, St. Andrew's United. The family would like to extend their sincere thanks to the many caregivers who assisted Ralph. A Memorial Service will be held in St. Andrew's United Church on Saturday, April 12 at 3 p.m. conducted by the Rev. Philip D. MILLER. In lieu of flowers, if it is desired, a gift may be given in Ralph's memory to the Memorial Fund of St. Andrew's United Church, 712 Wellington Street East, Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario. P6A 2M7. (Arrangements entrusted to the Arthur Funeral Home, 759-2522). www.mem.com

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DERBYSHIRE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-31 published
BOYD, Richard Norman, M.D., F.R.C.S.
(June 5, 1944-March 29, 2008)
It is with overwhelming grief that the family of Doctor Richard BOYD announces his death at age 63 on Saturday, March 29, 2008 after a heart attack and a stroke. Rick took his last breath held lovingly by his family and close Friends Doctor Frank DEMARCO and Doctor Tom ELSDON. Rick deeply loved, and was loved by, his wife of nearly 40 years, Jane (JOHNSTON,) and cherished his sons David Richard and Andrew Macartney. Rick adored his beautiful 'daughters' Kristen (SKINNER) and Lindsay (GRAY/GREY.) He was predeceased by his loving parents Doctor Norman and Barbara BOYD, and father-in-law Robert 'Mac' JOHNSTON. He will be profoundly missed by his mother-in-law Olive JOHNSTON. Left to mourn are his sisters Judy MANNING, Mary HOPKINS (Ed DAVEY) and Heather MUNRO (Bob,) his aunt Dorothy SEARLE, brother and sister-in-laws Dick and Jane JOHNSTON, cousins, nieces and nephews, and a legion of Friends. He was predeceased by his loyal Bichon Frises, Bijoux and Beaumont. Doctor BOYD graduated from the University Of Western Ontario Medical School in 1968. He obtained his Specialist Fellowship in Urology from the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons in 1976, and has since then practiced Urological Surgery in Windsor. He previously served as Chief of Surgery, and was currently head of Urology, at the Windsor Regional Hospital. He was one of the founders of the prostate cancer Bracytherapy programme at the Windsor Regional Cancer Centre. In recent years he has also served the community as a Provincial Coroner for Essex County. Rick was a member of the Alpha Kappa Kappa medical fraternity. An athlete, Rick ran 27 marathons around the world with a personal best of 2: 48 in Chicago. He curled in the Ontario Medical Association bonspiels, and was an avid golfer and scholar of golf history. He was a member of the Donald Ross Society. He was currently the very proud President of Essex Golf and Country Club. Rick was a skilled clinician and diagnostician, and a gentle man who exhibited great kindness to his patients. He had twinkling blue eyes, a mischievous smile and a wonderfully wicked sense of humour. Rick's prize orchids are especially beautiful this spring. Our family thanks the medical community, both doctors and nurses, who supported Rick in area hospitals over the years, and especially Ruth Anne PIETTE and Staci LEMIEUX who loyally kept his office organized in spite of him. We thank the doctors and nurses at Windsor Regional and Hotel Dieu Grace Hospitals who so valiantly tried to save him: Doctor Rob WOODALL, Doctor Anthony GLANZ, Doctor Hash PATEL, Doctor Natalie MALUS and Doctor Balraj JHAWAR, who over five difficult days demonstrated extraordinary skill, as well as great compassion and love to our family. Thank you to Carol DERBYSHIRE and Steve BRENNAN from the Hospice of Windsor; Pat BEST, Paula DEEHAN- SCHMIDT and Chaplain Joyce JARDIN from Hotel Dieu Grace Hospital; Kim VAN ALLEN and Bishop Bob BENNETT from All Saints' Church; and our community for enveloping our family in love and prayers as we ran with Rick on his last marathon. Always one to put others first, and ever the healer, Rick has made four gifts of life. His two corneas will go to enhance sight, and, ironically the "perfect urologist kidneys" will give life and hope to two patients. In order to give back to our community which Rick so loved, we ask that in lieu of flowers, donations be made to organizations that were so a part of his life: Hospice of Windsor for care of men with prostate cancer; All Saints' Anglican Church; Windsor Regional Hospital for a Cystoscopy suite; Windsor Regional Cancer Centre for the Prostate Brachytherapy Program; and Essex Golf and Country Club for a croquet pitch and garden in his name. Visiting will be held at the Walter D. Kelly Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 1969 Wyandotte St. E. On Monday and Tuesday from 1-4 p.m. and 5-8 p.m. The Funeral Service will be held at All Saints' Anglican Church, 330 City Hall Square on Wednesday, April 2, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Online condolences and audio messages may be left at www.mem.com

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DERDAELE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-15 published
FARQUHAR, Alexander James
Alexander James FARQUHAR, native of Brooklyn, Hants County, son of the late Judge Hiram Smith FARQUHAR and Eva Mary DIMOCK, died at home in Halifax on Sunday, March 9, 2008, in his 82nd year. Married for 57 years, he leaves his beloved wife Glennis, brother Hugh (Claudette DERDAELE,) children Alec (Kathleen McDONNELL,) James (Liliane SAYEGH,) Sarah (Randy SUTHERLAND,) Megan (David GRAVES), Donald (Kathryn MYERS), Anaya (Donald CARRIER) and Katherine (Robert LALONDE,) thirteen grandchildren, two great-grandchildren, and many cousins, nieces, nephews, in-laws and Friends. After first pursuing postgraduate study in physical education at Springfield College, Massachusetts, Alex felt and responded to a call to the ministry, enrolling at Pine Hill Divinity Hall, Halifax, Nova Scotia. While serving on a student mission field in rural Saskatchewan, he met Glennis LAMB, of Wawota, Saskatchewan, and they were subsequently married in 1950. After ordination in the United Church of Canada in 1951, Alex was called to a succession of pastorates in Nova Scotia (Lockeport, Baddeck, Sydney River, and St. Matthew's, Halifax), Ontario (First-St. Andrew's, London) and Quebec (St. Andrew's-Dominion Douglas, Westmount), before bringing his ministry to a close at Zion United Church, Liverpool, Nova Scotia in 1991. As a pastor, Alex was deeply devoted to his parishioners, serving them faithfully and with a profound sense of privilege. The words of Psalm 16: 6 held for him a special significance: 'The lines have fallen unto me in pleasant places yea, I have a goodly heritage'. Known and respected widely for his insightful and scholarly sermons - some of which were included in such published collections as 'Outstanding Sermons from Canadian Pulpits' (Evergreen Press, 1966) - Alex was invited on many occasions to preach at churches across North America and to address various conferences, student convocations and other assemblies. He also represented the United Church in international events pertaining to the Reformed Wing of the World Church, including the 1961 Kirchentag in Berlin, the 1962 Japan Evangelism Project of the U.S. National Council of Churches, and the 1970 dedication of the National Presbyterian Church in Washington, D.C. As a member of the United Church Committee on Christian Faith, in 1968 Alex helped to craft the United Church Creed, and as a member of the Committee on Church Union in the 1970's, he participated in conversations then being held between the United Church and the Church of England. During the 1980's, Alex served as President of the Montreal InterFaith Task Force on the Liberation of Soviet Jewry and in recognition of his leadership in this cause, he was presented with an Award of Merit at the 1992 Plenary Assembly of the Canadian Jewish Congress. In 2005, Alex was named Pine Hill's distinguished alumnus of the year. Throughout his life, Alex was passionate about sports and during his early years, he was an outstanding varsity athlete who excelled at track, basketball and football. He was named captain of Dalhousie University's football team in 1945. His summers in youth were occupied with baseball, as he played with the Halifax Saint Mary's softball and baseball teams (provincial runner-ups) and later with teams in Pictou, Lockeport, Shelburne, Nova Scotia and Lampman, Saskatchewan. Alex coached the Lockeport High School girls' basketball team to two Nova Scotia championships in the early 1950's, and concluded his own athletic career in 1958 as a member of the Cape Breton All Stars Maritime Basketball Champions. A funeral service will be held in Edgewood-Oxford United Church, 3055 Connaught Ave., Halifax, on Saturday, March 15, 2008, 10 a.m., followed by a reception at the Atlantic Funeral Homes. A brief committal service will be held in Newport United Church, Brooklyn, Hants Co. the same afternoon at 3 p.m., prior to interment at the Riverview Haven cemetery. Any who are moved to honour Alex's memory with a gift are gratefully encouraged to consider a contribution in his name to the church or charity of their choice, or to Dalhousie University (the Hiram and Eva Farquhar Bursary for students in the School of Social Work, or the Doctor James W. Reid Lectureship in Medical Humanities). The family extends a heartfelt thanks to all who participated in Alex's care. On-line condolences may be made at: www.atlanticfuneralhomes.com

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DERKS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-07-23 published
Hank DERKS
In Loving Memory of Hank Derks, 68 years. Sunday, July 20th, 2008 at the
Sudbury Regional Hospital - Saint Joseph's Health Centre. Beloved husband of Pam (Bull) Derks.
Loving father of Anne and Jim Furchner, Mike Derks, Janet Derks, Patty
and Darrin Guenette, Tara and Greg Coleman. Cherished grandfather of
Lisa, Laura and Charles Furchner, Krystyn, Alexandra and Emily Derks,
Tyler Saarela, Dean Leroy, Maddison and Kylie Guenette, Brett Cox. Dear
son of Henrica and Anton Derks. Dear son-in-law of Beatrice Bull. Dear
brother of Frances Van Oort (husband Josep) and Anne Philion. Dear uncle
of loving nieces and nephews. Sadly missed by Joanne Derks. Resting at
the Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral
Service in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Thursday, July 24th, 2008 at 11 am.
Cremation at the Park Lawn Crematorium.

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DERKS o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-07-30 published
Hank DERKS
In Loving Memory of Hank Derks, 68 years. Sunday, July 20th, 2008 at the
Sudbury Regional Hospital - Saint Joseph's Health Centre. Beloved husband of Pam (Bull) Derks.
Loving father of Anne and Jim Furchner, Mike Derks, Janet Derks, Patty
and Darrin Guenette, Tara and Greg Coleman. Cherished grandfather of
Lisa, Laura and Charles Furchner, Krystyn, Alexandra and Emily Derks,
Tyler Saarela, Dean Leroy, Maddison and Kylie Guenette, Brett Cox. Dear
son of Henrica and Anton Derks. Dear son-in-law of Beatrice Bull. Dear
brother of Frances Van Oort (husband Josep) and Anne Philion. Dear uncle
of loving nieces and nephews. Sadly missed by Joanne Derks. Rested at the
Jackson and Barnard Funeral Home, 233 Larch Street, Sudbury. Funeral Service
in the R.J. Barnard Chapel, Thursday, July 24th, 2008 at 11 am. Cremation
at the Park Lawn Crematorium.

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DERKS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-12 published
VAN DYK, Jacobus Johannes "Jac" Willems
At home, surrounded by the love of his family, on Friday, May 9, 2008, Jacobus Johannes "Jac" Willems VAN DYK in his 82nd year. Beloved husband of Johanna "Anne" Willems VAN DYK. Dear father of Fred WILLEMSVANDYK (Lynne,) of Sarnia, Ken WILLEMSVANDYK (Terry) and Carol Ann WILLEMSVANDYK- BRANT, both of London. Loving Grandpa (Opa) to all his grandchildren and his one great-grandchild. Brother of Mies VAN HEES of Holland, and brother-in-law of William VANOS of Forest and Piet JANS of Holland. Predeceased by his brothers and sisters Gerrit WILLEMSVANDYK, Johanna VANOS of Forest, Toni DERKS, Jan WILLEMSVANDYK and Marta JANS, all in Holland. Visitors will be received in the O'Neil Funeral Home, 350 William St. on Tuesday from 2: 00-4:00 and 7:00-9:00 p.m. The Funeral Mass will be celebrated in St. Andrew the Apostle Church (1 Fallon Lane at Huron) on Wednesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Saint Peter's Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to Saint_Joseph's Health Care Centre Foundation or the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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DERKSEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-18 published
DYCK, Robert Edwin
On Sunday, March 16, 2008, peacefully at home surrounded by his family, Robert Edwin DYCK went home to be with the Lord in his 64th year. He was the beloved husband of Ruth (KERSEY) and the loving father of Katherine and Jonathan McCLELLAND of Deep Brook, Nova Scotia, Marvin and Heather DYCK of Cambridge, Ontario and Kevin DYCK of Toronto, Ontario. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Caleb and Seth McCLELLAND and Ryan and Amy DYCK, whom he dearly loved. He is survived by his sister Gwen LEBOEUF of Tecumseh and predeceased by his parents John and Helen DYCK and sister Lorene. The visitation will be held at Gilpin Funeral Chapel, in Forest, Ontario on Wednesday, March 19th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral will be held at Lake Shore Gospel Hall, Lambton Shores, Ontario on Thursday, March 20th at 11: 00 a.m. with Marvin DERKSEN officiating. The interment will be at Ravenswood Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or Gospel Trust Canada. Online condolences can be made at www.gilpinfuneralchapel.com.

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DERKSEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-19 published
DYCK, Robert Edwin
On Sunday, March 16, 2008, peacefully at home surrounded by his family, Robert Edwin DYCK went home to be with the Lord in his 64th year. He was the beloved husband of Ruth (KERSEY) and the loving father of Katherine and Jonathan McCLELLAND of Deep Brook, Nova Scotia, Marvin and Heather DYCK of Cambridge, Ontario and Kevin DYCK of Toronto, Ontario. He will be greatly missed by his grandchildren Caleb and Seth McCLELLAND and Ryan and Amy DYCK, whom he dearly loved. He is survived by his sister Gwen LEBOEUF of Tecumseh and predeceased by his parents John and Helen DYCK and sister Lorene. The visitation will be held at Gilpin Funeral Chapel, in Forest, Ontario on Wednesday, March 19th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral will be held at Lake Shore Gospel Hall, Lambton Shores, Ontario on Thursday, March 20th at 11: 00 a.m. with Marvin DERKSEN officiating. The interment will be at Ravenswood Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations may be made to the Canadian Cancer Society or Gospel Trust Canada. Online condolences can be made at www.gilpinfuneralchapel.com.

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DERKZEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-06-16 published
BANNISTER, Stuart James
Tragically as the result of a car accident on Friday, June 13th, 2008, Stuart James BANNISTER, age 29 of Grand Bend. Sadly missed by his mother Mary Jeffrey and her husband Jim CHEVALIER, and his father Gordon BANNISTER and his wife Tran Tu THUY. Loved by his grandmother Irma BANNISTER. Missed by his brother Kurt BANNISTER and his partner Lauren ALEXANDER. Nephew to Ruth and Gord PHIPPS, Tom BANNISTER and Shirley OICKLE, Pat O'CONNELLY, Bill JEFFREY, Steve and Ann O'LEARY, Joan and Aldo ROTONDI. Cousin to Jody and Erik DERKZEN, Jill and Ian LEGG, Hillary and John O'DONNELL, Heather O'LEARY, Mia ROTONDI, John and Karen PHIPPS, Greg PHIPPS, Kelli IRWIN, Amy ROBERTS, Matthew ROBERTS, Kevin and Cathy LOISELLE and Kerri LOISELLE. Many good Friends including Patrick SCHLEGAL. Predeceased by his grandparents Ralph and Eileen JEFFREY and grandfather Lorne BANNISTER, also by his uncle Ralph BANNISTER. Stuart was the joy of his mother's life, an avid Gamer and Book Reader. He will be sadly missed by his Friends and family. A Celebration of Stuart's live will be held in the chapel of the D.J. Robb Funeral Home, (102 N. Victoria Street, Sarnia 519-336-6042) on Thursday, June 19th, 2008 from 11: 00 a.m. Cremation to follow. Friends and relatives may visit with the family at the funeral home on Wednesday evening from the hours of 6: 00 p.m. to 8:00 p.m. Donations in memory of Stuart's life can be made to N.O.R.M.L. or to Sick Kids Hospital or to the charity of your choice. (cheques only please). Messages of condolence may be sent to the family through djrobbfh@ebtech.net

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DERMER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-25 published
DERMER, Jerry, M.B.A., Ph.D., P.Eng.
(December 26, l941-January 23, 2008)
After a long and courageous battle with lymphoma, Jerry passed away at Scarborough General Hospital with his family at his bedside. Predeceased by his parents Simon and Molly DERMER of Ottawa, he was the beloved husband and best friend of Anita (née LAMBERTI,) the cherished father and mentor of Simon and Benjamin, and the dear brother of Bob DERMER. He will be greatly missed by many cousins in Canada and the U.S. as well as by the whole Lamberti family.
For more than 25 years Jerry was a well-respected professor at the Schulich School of Business at York University, and previously taught at the University of Illinois, University of Toronto and M.I.T. He also taught thousands of students both in Canada and abroad in executive seminars and government training programmes.
A funeral service will be held at The Simple Alternative, 275 Lesmill Rd. (Don Mills) at 4: 00 p.m., Sunday, January 27, with visitation one half-hour prior. Friends, family, students and colleagues are invited to call on the family (25 Cobham Cres.) on Monday January 28 or Wednesday January 30 from 2: 00 to 4:00 or 7:00 to 9: 00 p.m.
Memorial donations can be made to the oncology unit of either Scarborough General Hospital, (416) 431-8130 or Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre (4l6) 967-8628, or to the Canadian National Institute for the Blind (4l6) 486-2500.

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DEROCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-26 published
Uncompromising, transformative professor nurtured students and grudges across borders
Abused as a child in England, he arranged passage to Canada and built a successful but peripatetic academic career
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Pomp, circumstance and hooded academic gowns were the order of the day when York University celebrated its 40th anniversary in March, 1999. Among the invited guests was John R. SEELEY, the university's first professor of sociology, and a former friend and colleague of inaugural president Murray ROSS.
"What are you doing here?" a clearly affronted Prof. ROSS demanded when Prof. SEELEY, who had travelled from his home in California, arrived at the reception. "I was invited," Prof. SEELEY replied. Enraged, Prof. ROSS threw his gown across the room and stomped out and had to be persuaded to return, according to some of the other guests in attendance.
Prof. ROSS was not alone in his antipathy to Prof. SEELEY, an elfin-like man of diminutive stature (5 foot 4 at a stretch) but outsized moral and intellectual presence. His maddening refusal to compromise personal ethical standards led to his abrupt departure from teaching positions at several universities. Senior bureaucrats at two Ontario universities vetoed decisions to hire him despite his reputation as a top sociologist who eventually had more than 400 publications, including Crestwood Heights: A North American Suburb, Community Chest: A Case Study in Philanthropy, and a collection of psychological essays, The Americanization of the Unconscious.
But the same qualities that frightened administrators and branded him a troublemaker often made him a transformative influence. His capacity for listening, his respect for the individual and his ability to nurture ideas and people, especially children and young adults, made him a moral beacon for many.
"He was more important in my life than either of my parents," criminal lawyer Clayton RUBY said in an interview.
"He picked up everything I was concerned about before I'd finished the sentence and replied, as always, with astute, sensitive advice," said journalist Rick SALUTIN, who, like Mr. RUBY, was a student at York in the early 1960s. "I have no idea what I'll do for advice without him."
Prof. SEELEY grew up physically and emotionally abused in England, experiences that shaped his academic interests as a sociologist, his therapeutic approach as a psychoanalyst and his world view as a citizen.
"It was pretty plain to those of us who knew him that his traumatic and terrible childhood gave birth to a lifelong commitment to treating children well, respecting them as people and honouring their right to be free from abuse," his son Ron said. "The way that he started out being treated as a child, without any recognition of who he was, made him thirsty for knowledge and made him recognize the importance of the emotional nurturing of children."
John Ronald SEELEY was born in the Hampstead area of London in 1913, the second of four sons, to Emil FRIEDEBERG, a German businessman who was a principal in a European commodities firm centred in Antwerp. His mother, Lilly SEELEY, was a wealthy Edwardian society woman who may have been mentally ill. The family probably took her last name because of anti-German sentiment during the First World War.
Young John was beaten and abandoned for long stretches by his mother. After his father died when John was 8, he was sent to a boarding school in Heidelberg, Germany, where he was the youngest pupil by far and unable to speak the language. At 12, he was brought back to England and sent to another boarding school, where the headmaster taught him practical life skills and encouraged him to read, to think for himself and to take pride in his intellectual abilities. John was 15 when he saw what was probably an ad offering passage to Canada and the prospect of land for those willing to work as farm labourers for a specified period of time.
Seeing this as a way to escape his mother, John arranged his passage and worked as a farm labourer for three years, and, with the help of a local Presbyterian minister, completed his high-school education. He moved to Toronto in 1931 and found work as a printer's devil at a graphic arts firm called Rolf Clark Stone. Eventually, he worked his way up to export manager and into the affections of secretary Margaret Mary DEROCHER. Mr. SEELEY left in 1940 to study at the University of Chicago, where he earned a bachelor's degree. He returned to Toronto in 1942, enlisted in the army as a second lieutenant and eventually worked his way up to staff captain. He didn't fight overseas, although he was shipped to London on a short-term project that included a progressive attempt to deal with what we now call post-traumatic stress syndrome and postwar planning for veterans.
In 1943, he and Ms. DEROCHER married in Toronto. Between 1944 and 1955, they had four sons: John, David, Ronald and Peter. After demobilization, he returned to the University of Chicago and began work on his doctorate in sociology. He returned to Toronto in 1949 without having completed his dissertation and took a job as executive director of what is now the Canadian Mental Health Association.
He was also teaching part-time in the psychiatry and sociology departments of the University of Toronto, separate departments that he believed for the rest of his life should be combined. These were also the years when he was researching social mores in Toronto's Forest Hill Village, then studying fundraising methods in Indiana. The SEELEYs moved back to Toronto in late 1956 and he took a job as director of research for what is now the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health. That same year, Crestwood Heights was published by the University of Toronto Press. The book, based on his five-year study of Forest Hill (the area was not named), described men working extremely hard to maintain a luxurious lifestyle, wives trained to support their husbands by cultivating social connections, and children inculcated with the same mores so they, too, would learn to value social prestige and wealth. It was a hugely influential book. The following year, the University of Toronto published Community Chest, an examination of organized fundraising in Indianapolis and community perceptions of its effectiveness.
While teaching at the U of T, Prof. SEELEY became friendly with Dr. ROSS, a professor of social work. They talked about the issues of the day, including new approaches to education, given the huge wave of children born after the Second World War who were approaching university age. Many of them felt entitled to higher education and wanted a voice in what and how they were taught. In the preface to The New University (a collection of his speeches that amounted to a draft plan for York University,) Prof. ROSS emphasized the beneficial effects of the more intimate setting of a liberal arts college, acknowledging his debt to Prof. SEELEY for "reading, and commenting on, many of these speeches in their original form."
After Prof. ROSS was named the inaugural president of York in 1959, he invited Prof. SEELEY to join him there as professor of sociology. Within three years, the two men were bitterly and publicly estranged, essentially over the institution's size and nature. By 1963, 10 of the 43-member faculty had resigned, several out of dissatisfaction with Prof. ROSS's leadership and what they felt was muddled thinking and misplaced priorities in turning the university into a massive educational factory. Historian Michiel Horn, author of a forthcoming history of York University, and political scientist Denis SMITH, who served as the university's first registrar, both stated in interviews that amid the challenge to find faculty, establish a curriculum and educate students, Prof. ROSS had a tendency to say what he thought people wanted to hear.
As the relationship soured, Prof. SEELEY arranged to be a visiting professor in the sociology department at Brandeis University for the 1963-64 academic year. While teaching at Brandeis, he resigned from York. The following year, he was a visiting fellow at California's Stanford University, and returned to Brandeis in 1965 as chair of the sociology department. Within a short time, he was at odds with the administration over his political activism against the Vietnam War. He objected vociferously to the university sharing students' personal information (including grades) with the Selective Service System, which administered the military draft.
For most of the next decade, Prof. SEELEY moved his family back and forth across the United States as he took up what invariably turned into short-term appointments at a variety of institutions, including the Center for the Study of Democratic Institutions, a liberal think tank founded by educational philosopher Robert Hutchins in Santa Barbara, California. This didn't last long, as Prof. Hutchins reorganized the centre two years later after a philosophical and economic parting of the ways that saw many fellows depart, including Prof. SEELEY, and others join, including Alexander Comfort, later the author of The Joy of Sex, and Stanford biologist Paul R. Ehrlich, author of The Population Bomb.
Prof. SEELEY yearned to return to Canada, especially Toronto, but his dissident political activity and fractious reputation apparently mitigated against formal invitations. He was a "lightening rod," said Ron SEELEY. "He was just too hot for many people in staid institutions to handle."
Nevertheless, he was offered a faculty position in the sociology department at the University of Toronto in May, 1974, which was overruled by senior administrators. Then, a search committee from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education chose him to fill a sociology department vacancy, but this, too, was vetoed by a senior executive after education minister Thomas Wells telephoned Ontario Institute for Studies in Education director Robert Jackson to pass on negative comments about Prof. SEELEY. Amid student and faculty protests, The Globe and Mail wrote an editorial asking whether Mr. Wells had improperly influenced the decision.
Prof. SEELEY, by then 61, finished his academic career at Charles Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles as a professor of sociology. He finally received his doctorate (philosophy - social sciences) from International College on January 15, 1975. At 65, he retired and began a new career as a psychoanalyst in private practice under a supervising analyst.
In his last years, he became a devout member of his local Episcopal Church and maintained Friendships with family and Friends.
"It was a wonderful experience to be his child," Ron SEELEY said. "The breadth of his knowledge and his intellect were amazing. It was interesting as he was ill and passing - you could feel all of what he had distributed around the world coming back toward him in letters, visits and phone calls, and so many of them said the same thing: that he had touched their lives in a way that nobody else had and that he was like a father to them."
John Ronald SEELEY was born in London on February 21, 1913. He died at Saint_John's Hospital in Santa Monica, California., on December 16, 2007, after a short illness. He was 94. Predeceased by his wife and his siblings, he is survived by four sons, six grandchildren and extended family.

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DEROCHER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-02-23 published
GEORGE, Wells Douglas, B.Sc., M.B.A., P.Eng.
Passed away peacefully surrounded by his family at the Toronto General Hospital on Friday, February 22, 2008 at age 80 years. Beloved husband and best friend of Deborah POWELL- WELLS. Predeceased by his first wife Mary Louise. Loving father of Antoinette WELLS, Melinda WELLS- DEROCHER and her husband Larry, Catherine McCANSE and her husband Kenny, Kevin WELLS and his wife Julia SCOTT- WELLS, and Joel WELLS. Dear grandfather of Montana and Spencer McCANSE, Kyle and Grayson WELLS, and Mary-Beth DEROCHER. Dear brother of Doreen WELLS and the late Patricia WELLS. He will be sadly missed and remembered by his brother-in-law Philip POWELL and his wife Ruth and their children Gregory, Amanda and Katelyn, sister-in-law Cynthia VARDY and her husband Tom and their children William and Eric. Doug leaves many Friends and will always be remembered by all who knew him. He had a long and distinguished career that allowed him to touch many lives. The family wishes to thank the staff at the Toronto General, Princess Margaret and Saint Michael's Hospitals for the exceptional care and support. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor Street, W at Windermere, east of the Jane subway, from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. on Sunday. A Service of Remembrance will be held in the chapel on Monday, February 25, 2008 at 1 p.m. It was Doug's wish that donations be made to the Salvation Army.

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DER surnames continued to 08der002.htm