CARFAGNINI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-01-08 published
CARFAGNINI, Anthony Raymond
Peacefully, in his 69th year, on Saturday, January 5th, 2008 at Toronto General Hospital, it is with great sadness that we announce the passing of a beloved husband, father, grandfather, and great-grandfather. Anthony (Tony) was a member of the Toronto Real Estate Board for over 25 years, and he loyally continued in the management of Carfagnini Real Estate Limited. He will be greatly missed by his devoted wife Dolores (BAGNATO) of 49 years. Sadly missed by his children Carolyn, Enrico, Raymond, and Rosemary, grandchildren Chantelle, Katey, and Anthony, and Great-grand_son Lucas. Survived by his cherished mother Ida (TRAVOLO,) mother-in-law Rose TOMAS (Bonamosso,) his sisters Carmela, Theresa, Rosemarie (Rocky), and his many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his father - Enrico CARFAGNINI January 28, 1976. Visitation will be held at Bernardo Funeral home (2960 Dufferin Street, 416-789-7661) on Tuesday, January 8th from 6 9 p.m. and Wednesday, January 9th from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Services will be held on Thursday, January 10th at 10: 30 a.m. at St. Charles Borromeo Church (811 Lawrence Avenue West, 416-787-0369, Dufferin / Lawrence). Internment to follow at Mount Hope Cemetery (305 Erskine Avenue). Many Thanks to devoted cousins and good Friends. His strength, courage, and loyalty will live on in us forever. God Bless. We will miss you Dad, very very much.

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CARGILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-03 published
Champion of culture in Canada 'epitomized the values of the NAC'
Third-generation member of famous newspaper family grew up in a lifestyle of privilege and chose the diplomatic corps over journalism. Later, he helped launch the National Arts Centre and the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S9
Passionate, romantic, a lover of culture, the high arts and beautiful women, Hamilton SOUTHAM was in many ways an 18th-century gentleman, given to quoting poetry, rereading the classic works of literature and history, attending opera, ballet and theatrical performances, and collecting paintings by modern masters. Until the end of his days, he expressed his faith in the ultimate meaning of life by quoting these lines from Milton's Samson Agonistes: "All is best, though we oft doubt, /What th' unsearchable dispose/Of highest wisdom brings about, / and ever best found in the close."/
Born into the third generation of the Southam newspaper dynasty, he grew up in a gilded world of wealth and privilege, in which winters were spent in Florida and summers in Europe and the family enclave at Big Rideau Lake near Ottawa. Fighting for his country for six years in the Second World War stiffened the public-service component of his complicated character. After working in journalism, he turned his back on the family business and opted for diplomacy in its Pearsonian heyday, serving as ambassador to Poland, among other postings. But it was his lengthy tenure in the trenches of the cultural, linguistic and nationalistic battlefields that forged his legacy as the builder and founding general director of the National Arts Centre, a visionary fundraiser and force behind the Canadian War Museum, the Canadian Battle of Normandy Foundation and the Valiants Memorial and an active contributor to many other cultural institutions.
How fitting that such a Canadian giant should die on Canada Day, said Peter Herrndorf, president of the National Arts Centre, describing Mr. SOUTHAM as a man of exquisite taste with a single-minded devotion to the arts and an incredible capacity for Friendship. "He had been for many years, well before I came here, one of my heroes and he stayed a hero though my professional life. Never did I imagine that I would not only build on Hamilton's legacy at the National Arts Centre, but also become his friend," said Mr. Herrndorf. "He became like a second dad to me, both in personal terms and very much in professional terms - and in typical dad terms, he was both wonderful in his support and tough when I wasn't living up to what he expected. It's a big loss because he epitomized the values of the National Arts Centre."
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in December, 1916, and named after an uncle who had been killed two months earlier at the Battle of the Somme. His family called him Hamilton because he had an older cousin, Gordon, who lived next door, in what amounted to a family enclave in the elite Rockliffe Park area of Ottawa. His parents' house, called Lindenelm, later became the Spanish embassy.
Hamilton's father, Wilson SOUTHAM, the oldest of six sons of William SOUTHAM (1843-1932,) the proprietor of The Hamilton Spectator and founder of the Southam newspaper empire, was the publisher of the Ottawa Citizen. Hamilton's mother, Henrietta CARGILL, was the daughter of Conservative politician Henry CARGILL, who died after collapsing on the floor of the House of Commons.
The youngest of his parents' six children, Hamilton went to Elmwood School and then Ashbury College, the private boy's school in Ottawa. In those days, French was taught as though it were a dead language, so it was years before he became bilingual. But the school did nurture his love for Latin, the classics, and poetry, which he delighted in declaiming until the end of his life. He also played Gratiano in The Merchant of Venice, "lightly with exactly the right touch of flippancy," according to drama critic Ted Devlin.
After doing summer-school classes at Glebe and Lisgar Collegiates, he entered Trinity College at the University of Toronto in 1934. He graduated with a degree in history in 1939, having taken a year out, halfway through, recovering from a serious car crash that left him with a crooked smile - a rugged distinction in a classically handsome face. After U of T, he sailed to England intending to do a master's degree in modern history at Christ Church College, Oxford. Almost as soon as he arrived, Britain declared war on Germany and he enlisted in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery.
Simultaneously, he renewed his Friendship with Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID, the daughter of a sculptor from a land-owning French family. They had met in Canada that summer through family Friends. When the hostilities commenced, she managed to make her way back to London by ship from New York because the United States was still neutral. They married in London on April 15, 1940, while he was in training. (They eventually had four children and were divorced in the late 1960s; she died in 1998.) A month after the wedding, he received his commission as a lieutenant.
Meanwhile, the 40th battery of the Canadian Field Artillery (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon SOUTHAM, had served) had mobilized for active service under Frank Keen, assistant editor of the Hamilton Spectator, as the 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton. As soon as the battalion arrived in England, Lt. SOUTHAM applied for a transfer from the British Army so that he could serve with the Canadian Forces. By the autumn of 1943, the 1st Canadian Infantry Division, which was heavily engaged in Italy, urgently needed replacements. He volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery. He fought in the battle of Ortona in December, 1943, and the final battle of Monte Cassino from April to May, 1944, and was part of the advance of the Canadian Army up through Italy and later from Marseilles northward in France. He was mentioned in dispatches for "gallant and distinguished services" and demobilized with the rank of captain.
After the war, he worked briefly for The Times of London before returning to Canada and an uneasy job as an editorial writer for the Citizen in 1946. "I couldn't write quickly enough," he said in an interview at his home in Rockliffe in 2004. "My editor would give me a subject - 500 words on such and such a subject by 3 o'clock. My instinct was to go to the parliamentary library for a week and then come back with the 500 words," he said. "I was wretched." He went to his uncle Harry SOUTHAM, then publisher of the Citizen, and said, "I can't manage to do this, so I am going to External Affairs."
He wrote the examinations and joined the department in 1948 under Lester Pearson at a time when Canada "had a role to play" and when being part of the foreign service was "riding the crest of a wave, as far as I was concerned." It was "a wonderful time," Mr. SOUTHAM said, his eyes flashing under his expressive beetle brows. "Bliss was it in that dawn to be alive, But to be young was very heaven!" he said, quoting Wordsworth.
In 1949, Mr. SOUTHAM (and his family, which now included a second son, Christopher, who is now called Abdul) was posted to Stockholm as third secretary under ambassador Tommy Stone. After nearly four years, they returned to Ottawa before being posted to Warsaw as chargé d'affaires in March, 1959. By then, the Southams had two more children, Jennifer and Michael. This posting was one of the highlights of Mr. SOUTHAM's diplomatic career because he solved the "Polish Treasures" problem.
After Germany invaded Poland on September 1, 1939, the curator of Krakow removed a number of treasures from Wawel Castle, including tapestries and the sword of state. Following a circuitous route, they ended up in museum warehouses in Ottawa, Montreal and Quebec City. After the war, Poland, then behind the Iron Curtain, requested the return of its state treasures. That was fine with the Canadian federal government, but not with Maurice Duplessis, then premier of Quebec. He refused to hand anything over to a Communist government. Amid the diplomatic fracas, "we never sent an ambassador there and they never sent an ambassador here," Mr. SOUTHAM explained.
Mr. Duplessis died in office in September, 1959, and was succeeded by Paul Sauvé, "a more rational man" who agreed to ship the treasures back, causing Poland and Canada "to unfreeze their governments and to exchange ambassadors." And so, Mr. SOUTHAM's grateful government promoted him "sur place" to the rank of ambassador in April, 1960.
In 1962, the Southams returned to Ottawa, where he was appointed head of the information division at External Affairs. He was at work one day when he received a visit from Faye Loeb of the IGA grocery chain. She wanted him to help spearhead a citizens' move to build a performing arts centre in Ottawa. Rashly, he promised to find an appropriate candidate and, if necessary, to take charge himself.
"Time ran out and Faye came back," is the way he described his assumption of the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance in 1963. At its height, the alliance included about 60 arts organizations in Ottawa. They raised enough money (about $7,000) to commission a feasibility study, which recommended both the building of a performing arts centre and the holding of an annual national festival in Ottawa. In 1964, Mr. SOUTHAM took the completed study (with its projected costs of $9-million) to his old boss Mr. Pearson, by this point prime minister, and persuaded him that the proposed building would be an ideal centennial project for the federal government.
"He thought about it for a month and then came back and said, 'We'll do it,' Mr. SOUTHAM said. "After that, it was his project and he never gave up on it." The prime minister arranged for Mr. SOUTHAM to be lent from External Affairs to Secretary of State, which appointed him co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre in February, 1964.
The decision about the architect for the new facility was left up to Mr. SOUTHAM. He recommended Fred LEBENSOLD, who had already built the Queen Elizabeth Theatre in Vancouver, had won the competition for Confederation Centre in Charlottetown, and would later build Place des Arts in Montreal. Mr. LEBENSOLD did a quick estimate of $16-million and signed on as architect. Mr. SOUTHAM was appointed inaugural director of the National Arts Centre in 1967 and oversaw the construction of Mr. LEBENSOLD's hexagonal buildings on 2.6 hectares on the banks of the Rideau River, defending vociferous criticism along the way as the costs spiralled to a final tally of more than $46-million. (By this time, Mr. SOUTHAM's first marriage had disintegrated. He married Gro MORTENSON of Oslo in 1968, with whom he had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. He and his second wife were divorced in the late 1970s, but as with all of Mr. SOUTHAM's wives, she remained on affectionate terms with him.)
The multifaceted performance centre, with three halls including the country's first professional opera house, two restaurants, two theatre companies and its own touring symphony orchestra, opened in June of 1969 with the National Ballet of Canada performing two commissioned ballets - The Queen by Grant Strate to music by Louis Applebaum, and Kraanerg by Roland Petit to music by Iannis Xenakis. The following night, when the ballet danced John Cranko's Romeo and Juliet, something went wrong with the technology in the orchestra pit. Conductor George Crum and some of his musicians slowly ascended above stage level, leading Mr. Crum to say later that it was "the only time I ever looked down on Celia Franca," who was performing as Lady Capulet. After two terms as director-general, Mr. SOUTHAM stepped down in March of 1977.
Less than a year later, after a short respite spent sailing his yacht, Mr. SOUTHAM was persuaded by secretary of state John Roberts to become chair of Festival Canada and take charge of the national celebrations on Canada Day. He was paid a dollar a year and required to appear before a Commons committee to answer questions about his mandate and budget. When some members criticized the fluently bilingual Mr. SOUTHAM for preparing a report in English - he said later that he hadn't had time to have it translated - he sent a letter resigning from his post in French to the minister. It was rejected and Mr. SOUTHAM oversaw celebrations in hundreds of communities across the country and a blow-out televised extravaganza on Parliament Hill on the theme "You and Me - Le Canada, C'est Toi et Moi." In the 1980s, Mr. SOUTHAM was a partner in Lively Arts Market Builders, a scheme to create a television channel devoted to producing and broadcasting plays, concerts, films and programs on the arts. The group received a cable television licence and launched the pay-television C Channel in January, 1983. But it failed to attract subscribers and went into receivership six months later. Rogers Cablesystems Inc. bought its pay-television licence that December for $12,500.
(The following year, Mr. SOUTHAM married for the third and final time. Marion TANTON, a French woman he had known and loved for many years, was the wife of the late Pierre CHARPENTIER, a former Canadian ambassador, and the mother of his three children. She died of cancer in May, 2005.)
In January, 1985, prime minister Brian Mulroney appointed Mr. SOUTHAM chair of the Official Residences Council, a civilian oversight group he had established amidst mounting criticism of the cost of maintaining official residences. Mr. SOUTHAM's tenure was not an easy one; there were political brawls about work done on the speaker's house in Kingsmere; on Stornoway, the residence of the opposition leader; and on both official prime ministerial residences.
His beloved National Arts Centre went through a long period of turmoil beginning in the mid-1980s, involving funding crises, a revolving series of chairs and artistic directors and a strike by the National Arts Centre orchestra, before it began to stabilize more than a decade later with the appointment in the late 1990s of David Leighton as chair of the board and Mr. Herrndorf as president and chief executive - thanks in no small part to Mr. SOUTHAM's behind-the-scenes lobbying. Early in 2000, during Mr. Herrndorf's tenure, a grateful National Arts Centre renamed its opera auditorium Southam Hall in his honour and threw a lavish party for him on his 90th birthday.
After attending the rededication of the Tomb of the Unknown Soldier on September 17, 1999, Mr. SOUTHAM met some Friends for lunch at the Rideau Club. He had been "moved" by the ceremony and by governor-general Adrienne Clarkson's "wonderful" speech, and he began thinking that the fallen soldier "should have some company on Confederation Square," rather like the "great cloud of witnesses," described by St. Paul in his epistles. Those lunchtime musings led to his final public campaign, which was realized seven years later when Governor-General Michaëlle Jean unveiled the $1.1-million Valiants Memorial. He considered the Valiants his second great project after the National Arts Centre. "Parliament Hill is full of statues of prime ministers and politicians, some of them good, some of them not good. But in Ottawa, there shouldn't just be statues of politicians," he said. "It is the capital of the country and there should be statues of the men and women who have made this country."
Aside from building monuments to others, Mr. SOUTHAM enjoyed sitting in the study of his Ottawa home, a well-proportioned, light-filled room lined with bookcases, rereading the complete works of Anthony Trollope and "contemplating three generations of reading." He had his grandfather's books on the top shelf, his father's Everyman editions on the second and his own books on the third shelf. As well, he was examining his own soul. "I have lived my life, and that which I have done may God himself make pure," he said. "I meditate and I don't compare today with yesterday. I have more important comparisons, concerning my inner life, and I have much to think about." He was an Anglican, but he "was thinking the same thoughts" as a Catholic or a Jew or a Muslim. The soul is a more important part of our being than character," he said. "It is essential."
And so he spent his last years in contemplation and in visiting with close Friends and family, enjoying life and engaged with the world around him.
On Canada Day, he was about to go for a drive with his valet when he suddenly felt tired. He lay down for a rest and quietly died.
Gordon Hamilton SOUTHAM was born in Ottawa on December 19, 1916. He died July 1, 2008, at home in Ottawa of complications from cancer. He was 91. He is survived by his second wife, Gro MORTENSON, his six children and his extended family. A private family funeral is planned followed by a memorial service at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church, Ottawa, later in July.

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CARGILL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-07 published
SOUTHAM, Gordon Hamilton
Hamilton SOUTHAM died peacefully at home on Tuesday July 1st at the age of 91. He was born in Ottawa on December 19th, 1916, the youngest child of Wilson Mills SOUTHAM and Henrietta Alberta CARGILL. After graduating from the University of Toronto with a degree in history in 1939, he abandoned his graduate studies at Christ Church College, Oxford in order to join the war effort and enrolled in the British Army as an officer cadet in the Royal Artillery winning his commission in 1940. That same year, when the Canadian Army reached Britain, he transferred to the Canadian 11th Army Field Regiment, 40th Battalion of Hamilton (in which his uncle and namesake, Gordon Hamilton, had served until he was killed in action at the battle of the Somme in 1916). In 1943, responding to an urgent call for replacements at the front, he volunteered to join the Royal Canadian Horse Artillery in Italy. He saw action at the battle of Ortona as well as the final battle of Monte Cassino and was mentioned in dispatches.
After the war he worked at the Times of London and the Ottawa Citizen before joining the Department of External Affairs in 1948. He was posted to Sweden from 1949 to 1953, and in 1959, was posted to Poland, where he served first as chargé d'affaires and later as ambassador. On his return to Ottawa in 1962 he was appointed head of the information division of External Affairs. In 1963 he assumed the leadership of the National Capital Arts Alliance, a grouping of some 60 arts organizations in Ottawa pressing for the building of a national performing arts centre. A feasibility study was commissioned and the Pearson government was persuaded to adopt the project in celebration of Canada's centennial. He was appointed co-ordinator of the National Arts Centre, in February, 1964 with the task of overseeing the construction and planning the programmes and activities of the new institution. After the National Arts Centre's opening, in 1969, he served two terms as director-general before stepping down in 1977.
Of particular note among his many activities since his retirement from the National Arts Centre are his founding and presidency of the Canadian Mediterranean Institute from 1980 to 1986 and a variety of initiatives aimed at raising public consciousness of the importance of the military in Canadian history. He was a founder of the Battle of Normandy Foundation, 1992, one of the main initiators of the new War Museum, inaugurated in 2005 and the founder and president of the Valiants Foundation, responsible for the erection of the Valiants Memorial on Confederation square, in Ottawa, inaugurated by Governor-General Michaëlle Jean in He married Jacqueline LAMBERT- DAVID in 1940 and they had four children, Peter, Abdul, Jennifer and Michael. In 1969, he married Gro MORTENSEN, and they had two children, Henrietta and Gordon. In 1981 he married Marion TANTOT, mother of Frederic, Manon and Virginie. He shared with Marion his retirement years in Grignan, France, and Ottawa. Marion died in 2005. He will be sadly missed by Gro Mortensen SOUTHAM, his children, his ten grandchildren, and his extended family and Friends. A private family funeral was held on Friday and a memorial service will be held at St. Bartholomew's Anglican Church 125 Mackay Street, Ottawa, on Sunday July 20th at 1 p.m.
If desired, donations can be made in his memory to the National Youth and Education Trust at the National Arts Center P.O. Box 1534, Stn B, Ottawa Ontario K1P 5W1.

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CARGO o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2008-06-18 published
HILL, William Kenneth
At Grey Gables, Markdale Sunday June 15, 2008, William Kenneth HILL of Markdale in his 99th year. Beloved husband of the late Eva HANNAH. Dear father of Leon HILL (Dorothy) of Belleville, Marian TRUDELL (Jerry) of Fergus, Eleanor WHITTON (Jim) of Markdale. Sadly missed by his grandchildren, great-grandchildren and extended family and many Friends. Predeceased by sister Effie HALBERT and Olive CARGO. The family will receive Friends at the May Funeral Home Markdale Thursday June 19, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where a memorial service will be held on Friday June 20 at 1 p.m. Interment of cremated remains in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, donations to Christ Anglican Church, Markdale or Grey Gables Resident's Council would be appreciated.
Page 3

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CARGOE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2008-06-17 published
HILL, William Kenneth
At Grey Gables, Markdale, Sunday, June 15, 2008, William Kenneth HILL of Markdale in his 99th year. Beloved husband of the late Eva HANNAH. Dear father of Leon HILL (Dorothy) of Belleville, Marian TRUDELL (Jerry) of Fergus, Eleanor WHITTON (Jim) of Markdale. Sadly missed by his grandchildren, great-grandchildren and extended family and many Friends. Predeceased by sisters Ellie HALBERT and Olive CARGOE. The family will receive Friends at the May Funeral Home, Markdale, Thursday from 2-4: 00 p.m. and 7-9:00 p.m., where a memorial service will be held Friday June 20th at 1: 00 p.m. Interment of cremated remains in Markdale Cemetery. If desired, donations to Christ Anglican Church, Markdale or Grey Gables Resident's Council would be appreciated.

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CARIMLOO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-03-16 published
Shootings kill one, injure five in Toronto
By Canadian Press, Sun., March 16, 2008
Toronto -- An 18-year-old man is dead and three others are in hospital after a shootout in north Toronto late Friday, police say.
Police identified the dead man as Abdikarim Ahmed ABDIKARIM, who died after emergency crews took him to hospital.
Just before 10 p.m. Friday, police say they received a number of 911 calls about shots fired near Lawrence Avenue and Dufferin Street in the city's northwest.
Officers arrived at a housing complex to find six males with gunshot wounds.
An area resident said the shootings broke out after a group of youths were "playing with their guns."
Another neighbour said the gunfight may have started after one of the youth's guns accidentally went off, which led to the other youths returning fire.
Const. Shervan CARIMLOO said officers were still investigating the shootout yesterday.

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CARIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-11 published
REISMAN, Sol Simon, O.C., LL.D.
Died in his sleep March 9, 2008 in his 89th year. Beloved husband for 65 years of Constance CARIN. Dear father of John Joseph (Brenda RUNGE), Anna Lisa (Peter KALMAN), Harriet Frances (Douglas BARRETT) and daughter-in-law Gale BLANK. Much loved grandfather of Will, Jane, and Molly REISMAN; Edie - Jane and Stephen KALMAN; Trish, Julia, Aaron and Kate BARRETT. Born in Montreal June 19, 1919 to Kolman and Manya REISMAN. Attended Baron Byng High School, McGill University (B.A., M.A.). Served overseas as Regimental Officer in World War 2 Royal Canadian Artillery, 11th, 15th and 17th Field Artillery (Troop Commander) in Italy and Holland 1942-1946. Attended the London School of Economics 1945-46. Joined the Department of Finance 1946, Director of International Economic Relations Division; Canadian Delegation to Geneva Trade and Tariff Conference 1947; World Conference on Trade and Employment, Havana, 1947-1948 Economics and Social Council, United Nations, Geneva, 1952, New York, 1953; first and following sessions of General Agreement on Tariffs and Trade 1947-1954; Assistant Director of Research, Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects 1955-1957; Assistant Deputy Minister, Department of Finance 1961-1964; Deputy Minister of Industry 1964-1968 during which time was chief architect of the Canada-U.S. Auto Pact; Secretary of the Treasury Board 1968-1970 Deputy Minister of Finance 1970-1975; received Outstanding Public Service Award, Canada, 1974; Chief Royal Commissioner to investigate Canadian Auto Industry 1978; Chief Negotiator for Canada Aboriginal Land Claims for the Western Arctic, 1983; Ambassador (Trade) and Chief Negotiator Canada-U.S. Free Trade Agreement 19851988. Honorary Doctorate, Carleton University, 1998; Honoured by the naming of the Simon Reisman Chair on Trade Policy, Carleton University, 2000. Avid salmon fisherman; was able to fish white water until July 2007; embraced reading and life-long learning; continuous observer and commentator of world current events; active participant in the Rideau Club Roundtable; always interested in people and their lives, and an unending curiosity about what made them tick social and extroverted, a dry sense of humour right up to the time of his final Computed Tomography scan; mentally sharp to the very end; unlike his reputation of being tough and hard-boiled, he was always ready to lend a hand; a most loving, inspirational, devoted, supportive, generous and loyal father and grandfather. Special thanks to Doctor Terrence RUDDY, Doctor David BERNEY, Doctor Phil JOSEPH, and the caring and supportive nurses of the Ottawa Heart Institute. Always larger than life, no words can describe how much he will be missed by his family including M'Guy. Funeral Service will be held at Temple Israel, 1301 Prince of Wales Drive, Ottawa on Wednesday March 12th, 2008 at 2 p.m. Shiva will be held at 146 Roger Road, Ottawa, on Wednesday and Thursday from 4-8 p.m. and Friday from 2-5 p.m. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the charity of your choice. Condoleances/Donations/ Tributes at: mcgarryfamily.ca 613-233-1143

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CARIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-03-15 published
When it came to achieving free trade, he was the right man for the job
As Canada's tough and pugnacious chief negotiator, he was famous for allegedly flicking cigar ash on the cherished, heirloom desk of U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S12
Doing a trade deal with the Americans in the 1980s was like trying to sign a nuclear arms pact with the Soviets during the Cold War, according to former prime minister Brian Mulroney. Getting them to the table was hard, keeping them there was worse, but inking a treaty before the deadline expired was the real trick. "You have to be very tough," Mr. Mulroney said this week.
That's why, when he got the word from U.S. President Ronald Reagan that approval to negotiate a comprehensive free-trade agreement with Canada had squeaked through the Senate Finance Committee in the fall of 1985, he knew he needed Simon REISMAN to make the case and hold the line. Mr. REISMAN, who had flirted with communism while growing up in the Jewish ghetto of Montreal during the Depression, was a fervent free-trade continentalist, who had gone eyeball to eyeball with the Americans for 40 years and was famous for allegedly having flicked his cigar ash on U.S. Treasury Secretary John Connolly's heirloom desk, a sacred piece of furniture that had once belonged to founding father Alexander Hamilton.
"He was the only person with the background, the knowledge, the skill and the toughness to do this job," Mr. Mulroney said, pointing out that Mr. REISMAN had been part of the negotiations for the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades in 1947, and Canada's chief negotiator for the Auto Pact in 1965, and a long-time senior mandarin in the federal civil service. Even so, Mr. Mulroney believed that the only way that Mr. REISMAN could succeed was if "the Americans knew he had 100-per-cent support from the prime minister on down."
Besides predictable problems with the Americans, Mr. REISMAN had difficulties on this side of the border, including an ongoing conflict with Senator Pat Carney, then the minister of international trade. She took - and expressed - great umbrage that Mr. REISMAN was not keeping her in the loop. "He wasn't a team player. He was abrasive and difficult to work with because he didn't like political direction or involvement," she said in an interview. "Even though I was the minister responsible for the negotiations he would insist he wasn't reporting to me. He was exasperating," she said, while acknowledging that he "did know the file."
A former deputy minister of finance who had taken early retirement in 1975, at least partly because he himself was exasperated with the machinations of his political masters, Mr. REISMAN was not going to kowtow to Ms. Carney, especially since he had the ear of the prime minister. After hearing Mr. REISMAN's complaints that "I'm having serious problems with the minister; she [Ms. Carney] has never negotiated an international deal," Mr. Mulroney made his move. "I installed myself as chairman of that executive cabinet committee with Simon and his team reporting directly to me."
Fuelled by his own sharp tongue and blustery manner, Mr. REISMAN also found a willing adversary in the media, especially the anti-free trade Toronto Star.
"I used to chuckle," Mr. Mulroney said, remembering uproars in the House of Commons when opposition members "would be yelling at me that he had told somebody from the Toronto Star to 'go fly a kite" or that the newspaper 'was a rag,' and they would be after me to reprimand Simon. And I was chuckling away because I was in agreement with what he said."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal the year after end of the First World War. The second of four children of Kolman, a factory worker in the rag trade, and Manya REISMAN, he went to Baron Byng High School. A very smart boy, he made it into McGill University, despite the Jewish quota, and graduated with an honours degree in economics and political science in 1941 and a master's degree (summa cum laude) the following year, all the while holding down a variety of menial jobs.
As a young man from an immigrant family during the Depression and the rise of fascism in Europe, he joined the Young Communist League, according to Stephen Clarkson and Christina McCall in The Heroic Delusion, Vol. 2 of Trudeau and Our Times. They quote a recruit to the Young Communist League who said that she took a compulsory course on The History of the Communist Party, allegedly written by Joseph Stalin, from Mr. REISMAN in 1937 and another source who claimed that he was still attending party meetings in Ottawa after the war.
Mr. REISMAN's widow said this week that her husband never joined the Communist Party, but that "he was, as a young person, left, but he couldn't have become more right wing." Many intellectuals espouse communist ideologies in their youth, but what is significant about Mr. REISMAN's early political credo, according to Prof. Clarkson, is that it "helped explain his later fanatical belief in free trade - another all-encompassing belief system."
While a student at McGill, Mr. REISMAN joined the cadet corps. He enlisted in the Royal Canadian Artillery in 1942, right after graduation and went overseas that November, a month after marrying Constance (Connie) CARIN. They had met through Friends.
"I disliked him immediately," she said. "I didn't like his forthright abrupt manner and I thought this was not the man for me, but it turned out I was wrong." She was busy the first several times he asked her out but, undaunted by these rebuffs, he told her to name a date when she would be free. She did, and so she learned about the man beneath the brusque self-confident exterior. "He always said what he thought, and he was not suited for diplomacy. He would have been a terrible failure in external affairs, but he was good where he was."
After landing in England in 1942, he served as a troop commander with the 11th, 15th, and 17th Field Artillery in the Italian campaign and finished out the war in the liberation of Holland. While waiting to be repatriated, he studied for several months at the London School of Economics. After four years overseas, he returned home in 1946 and went to Ottawa. There, he accepted the first job he was offered, in the Department of Labour, and moved later that year to the Department of Finance to work under Mitchell Sharp, in the economic policy division.
Within a few months he was working closely with John Deutsch, director of the international economic relations division, and writing speeches for Finance Minister Douglas Abbott. Mr. Deutsch wanted to take him to Geneva as secretary to a 12-man delegation working on preparations for an international trade conference scheduled for Havana, Cuba in 1947. "Either I go [with you] or we dissolve the marriage," Mrs. REISMAN told her husband, having no desire for another long-distance separation. He acquiesced "and we went on from there, for 65 years."
After a dozen years of marriage, the REISMANs had their first child, John Joseph, in 1954, followed two years later by daughter Anna Lisa. A second daughter, Harriet Frances, was born in 1959.
While Mr. REISMAN was in Havana, where delegates from nearly 60 countries met to establish what would become the General Agreement on Tariffs and Trades, he noticed that Canadian Prime Minister William Lyon Mackenzie King was especially interested in Article 24, a provision that would permit groups of nations to establish free-trade areas. Canada was facing a foreign-exchange crisis that winter, and Mr. King wanted to secure a secret free-trade deal with the U.S. as a potential solution. As it turned out, the crisis passed, Mr. King lost interest in a free-trade deal and coincidentally the U.S. Congress refused to ratify the Havana Charter. Canada, and Mr. REISMAN, would wait another 40 years to complete a continental free-trade deal.
In 1954, Mr. REISMAN was appointed director of the international economics division in the Department of Finance and was seconded the following year to serve as assistant research director on the Royal Commission on Canada's Economic Prospects under Walter Gordon, where he reportedly had no hesitation in challenging his boss's protectionist views. When Mr. Gordon was named Finance Minister in Liberal Prime Minister Lester Pearson's cabinet in 1963, Mr. REISMAN, by then an assistant deputy minister, was promoted out of Finance and into the newly created Department of Industry. As deputy minister, a post he held with great distinction from 1964 to 1968, he led the negotiations that resulted in the Automotive Products Trade Agreement being signed by Prime Minister Pearson and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson in January, 1965.
The Auto Pact removed tariffs on cars, truck, buses and automotive parts between the two countries, which greatly encouraged trade, bolstered the bottom line of the big American car manufacturers, greatly increased assembly-line jobs in Canada and lowered the cost of purchasing automobiles. By 1968, the number of cars that were manufactured in Canada and sold in the U.S. had risen from seven to 60 per cent, while 40 per cent of cars bought in Canada were made in the U.S. There were downsides: Canada didn't develop an indigenous car industry and it was restricted from negotiating similar trade pacts with other countries, such as Japan. The Auto Pact was abolished after the World Trade Organization declared it illegal in 2001, but by then the Free-Trade Agreement, negotiated by Mr. REISMAN, and the subsequent North American free-trade agreement, which added Mexico to the trading mix, had made it largely irrelevant.
Mr. REISMAN was secretary of the Treasury Board from 1968 to 1970 and deputy minister of Finance from 1970 to 1975, when he chose to take early retirement from the federal civil service at age 55. The timing was good, as the federal government had recently decided to index civil-service pensions to the consumer price index. But that wasn't the only reason Mr. REISMAN was leaving. In an interview with The Globe and Mail in December, 1974, he complained about a diminishing scope for "people of energy and a certain independence of mind" in the public service and said he longed for "another career in which there would be a chance to fly on my own wings."
He and another former deputy minister, James Grandy (obituary April 5, 2006), formed a consulting firm, Reisman and Grandy, and quickly signed up a roster of clients that included Bombardier, Power Corp., and Lockheed. A ruckus erupted in the House of Commons over the firm's dealings with Lockheed, which was in the process of negotiating a huge contract to supply airplanes to the federal government. As former public servants, it was alleged that Mr. REISMAN and Mr. Grandy were violating conflict-of-interest guidelines. We aren't lobbyists, Mr. REISMAN insisted, explaining that there was a difference between peddling influence and peddling knowledge. Or, as he said to The Globe: "Some girls dance and some girls are whores… we just dance."
As a consultant, Mr. REISMAN had a number of high-level assignments, including Royal Commissioner to investigate the auto industry in 1978 and chief negotiator for aboriginal land claims in the Western Arctic in 1983. Mrs. REISMAN says the treaty with the Inuvialuit was a highlight for her husband because it was one of the first pieces of legislation affecting aboriginals under the Charter of Rights and Freedoms.
But the biggest deal of his life materialized when Mr. Mulroney appointed him ambassador (trade negotiations) and chief negotiator for Canada of the Canada-U.S. free-trade agreement in November, 1985. "I felt he was an absolute natural for us," Mr. Mulroney said.
"I called him and said that we were going to get into this comprehensive negotiation and could he draft me a memo detailing the kind of person we would need and the challenges that person would encounter. Then Simon sent me, I think, a 35-page memorandum. As Derek Burney [his chief of staff] said, it was the longest job application he had ever seen. Simon knew I was thinking of him, but he also knew that I wanted to get the benefit of his ideas of how this should be conducted."
The two men knew each other personally from salmon fishing trips in Quebec with the likes of Paul Desmarais and John Rae of Power Corporation. "He had a great sense of humour, he was a completely honest man, he shared his views on everything… he wasn't at all devious, but he was a tough guy," said Mr. Mulroney, adding that Mr. REISMAN was "the indispensable player" in the free-trade talks. "Simon was the star. He was the one who took the free-trade concept from infancy to maturity and made it whole."
The negotiations dragged on for two years with two main stumbling blocks. The Americans were not taking the talks as seriously as the Canadians wanted until Mr. REISMAN stomped away from the negotiating table in September, 1987, in a highly publicized snit (orchestrated with Mr. Mulroney in Ottawa, Allan Gotlieb, the Canadian ambassador to Washington, and other key players). Only hours before the deadline was to lapse for signing the treaty, the Americans balked at the dispute-resolution clause, a key consideration for the Mulroney government. Once again, Mr. Mulroney says he intervened to back up his trade negotiator. He phoned James Baker [U.S. Secretary of the Treasury] and threatened to call President Reagan that night and demand to know why "you can do a deal on nuclear arms reduction with your worst enemies and you can't do a free-trade deal with your best Friends." Mr. Mulroney recalled that "Baker nearly jumped out of his skin, because he knew that Reagan would have raised holy hell on that issue immediately. That's why they came around."
Although Mr. REISMAN had slowed his pace somewhat in the last decade, he was still salmon fishing in white water in July and present at a dinner in Montreal to celebrate the 20th anniversary of the free-trade agreement in October. But the following month he fell at the Rideau Club in Ottawa and then, in January, he collapsed at his condominium in Fort Lauderdale and had to be airlifted home. He was admitted to the Heart Institute in Ottawa, where he had a pacemaker installed.
A week ago today, he was reading The Wall Street Journal and speaking on the phone with his wife before falling to sleep. Very early the next morning he lost consciousness and medical staff were unable to revive him.
"He was a larger-than-life personality," said Mrs. REISMAN, earlier this week. "The house is very quiet without him."
Sol Simon REISMAN was born in Montreal on June 19, 1919. He died in his sleep of cardiac arrest at the Heart Institute of Ottawa on Sunday, March 9, 2008. He was 88. Survived by his wife Connie, three children John Joseph (Joe), Anna Lisa and Harriet Frances. He also leaves two younger sisters, Gertrude SHAPIRO and Helen LUTTERMAN, and 10 grandchildren. He was predeceased by his older brother, Mark.

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CARIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-19 published
ESSELMENT, Mary Ann Margaret (née WILSON)
Peacefully at Bluewater Health Complex Continuing Care on Thursday, July 17, 2008, Mary Ann Margaret ESSELMENT, age 86 of Sarnia. Beloved wife of the late Wallie ESSELMENT. Loving mother of Jim, Clare, and John. Cherished grandmother of Kerry CHILDS, Kristen BEAULIEU (Richard), Kendra CAMPBELL (Alan), Mike (Jenny), Ted (Trina,) Jennifer CARIS (Kevin) and Joe. Proud great-grandmother of 15 great-grandchildren. Dear sister of Stan, Cec (Lois), Jean PATTERSON (Raymond,) Eva WALTERS (Phil.) Survived by sisters-in-law Blanche, Jean, Ellen and Greta WILSON and brother-in-law Essie/Kayo ESSELMENT (Edna.) Also survived by much-loved nieces, nephews, cousins, and Friends. Predeceased by parents Aaron and Mina WILSON and in-laws Jim and Alma ESSELMENT. Also predeceased by daughters-in-law Gail and Jane ESSELMENT. Predeceased by brothers Norm, Roy, Neil, Alec and Donald as well as sister-in-law Marion WILSON, brothers-in-law Pete SCHIEMAN and Jack ESSELMENT. Lovingly remembered by Janet MOZGA, Collie CHISHOLM and life-long friend of Florence and the late Ernie KERR. Margaret was a proud member of the Canadian Legion Auxiliary Branch 249 Alvinston for 60 years. Family and Friends will be received on Sunday, July 20, 2008, from 2: 00 to 4: 00 p.m. and from 7:00 to 9:00 p.m. at Smith Funeral Home, 1576 London Line, Sarnia. There will be an Alvinston Women's Auxiliary service held on Sunday, July 20, 2008 at 6: 45 p.m. A funeral service will be held on Monday, July 21, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. at Smith Funeral Home. Interment to follow in Warwick Cemetery. Sympathy may be expressed through donations to the Canadian Cancer Society. Memories and condolences may be sent online at www.smithfuneralhome.ca

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CARL o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-26 published
LUCAS, Morley Ernest
Peacefully at the Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital on Saturday, May 24 2008, Morley Ernest LUCAS, born December 31, 1924 in Houghton Township, formerly of Courtland, passed away at the age of 83 years. Predeceased by his loving wife Eva ROBINSON (2001.) Kind, gentle and loving father to his daughter Judy Bernice DEMETER and her husband Richard of Aylmer. Amazing grandfather to his grandchildren Lucas H. DEMETER of Waterloo, Kalina M. DEMETER of Aylmer. Survived by his sisters Marion BOUK of Simcoe, Madeline RAYMOND and her husband Cleo of Simcoe, sister-in-law Fern LUCAS of Courtland and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his parents Arthur and Laurintha LUCAS, brothers Murray and Melbourne LUCAS, sisters Myrtle STEPHENS, Mildred TORRANCE and Muriel CARL, brothers-in-law Walter BOUK and Bill CARL. The family will receive Friends and neighbours at Ostrander's Funeral Home 43 Bidwell St. Tillsonburg (519) 842-5221 on Tuesday, May 27, 2008 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service for Morley will be held in Ostrander's Funeral Home Chapel on Wednesday, May 28, 2008 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Tillsonburg Cemetery. At the family's request memorial donations (payable by cheque) may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation, Tillsonburg District Memorial Hospital or a charity of your choice. Personal condolences may be made at www.ostrandersfuneralhome.com

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CARLAW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-05-07 published
LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH, William Lindsay
(September 5, 1926-May 4, 2008)
William Lindsay LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH (Bill,) passed away peacefully, with family by his side on Sunday May 4th, 2008 at Saint Mary's Hospital in Kitchener, after a long struggle with Inclusion Body Myositis. Beloved husband and best friend of Barbara Ann LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH for over 55 years, loving and devoted father of Thomas B. LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH, his wife Carol of Stittsville, and granddaughters Victoria and Rebecca, daughter Lindsay A. LACKIE of Cambridge and grandchildren, Jeffrey, Virginia Kate and fiancé Rob BOOTH, Andrew and Ian, and daughter Kate D. LEACH/LEECH/LEITCH of Toronto. Favourite uncle to Stephen and A. Ryder (Sandy) KINSMAN of Montreal and Suzanne CARLAW of Midhurst. He was predeceased by his sister, Aubrey Ellen KINSMAN and great niece Victoria KINSMAN of Montreal. Growing up in Montreal he was an avid skier, golfer, squash player and all time 'Tinkerer' (he claimed he could 'fix' anything). He graduated from University of Toronto where he met Barbara. He worked for many years with Cabot Carbon of Canada, in Toronto and upon retiring, moved to Kitchener Waterloo. He was a dedicated volunteer at Community Care Access Centre and sat on many committees at Luther Village on the Park. The family would like to acknowledge the extraordinary kindness and professional care he received during his stay at Saint Mary's Hospital. At Bill's request, there will be a quiet immediate family only service, followed by visitation on Thursday May 8th, 2008 from 7-9 p.m. at Erb and Good Family Funeral Home, 171 King Street South, Waterloo 519-745-8445. A celebration of his life will take place in Toronto near the end of May. Details will be posted in the Globe and Mail prior to. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Saint Mary's Hospital or Sleeping Children Around the World.

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CARLDERWOOD o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-05-21 published
GAHAN, Judith Gahan
Peacefully at Meadowcroft Retirement Home and formerly of the Gainsborough Retirement Home on Monday, May 19, 2008 in her 73rd year. Loved daughter of the late Keith and Margaret GAHAN. Dear sister of Joan CARLDERWOOD and the late Janis YOUNG. Judy will be sadly missed by her 7 nieces and nephews. Friends may call on Thursday from 7 to 9 p.m. at the James A. Harris Funeral Home, 220 Saint_James Street at Richmond. Funeral services will be private. Cremation with interment in Omagh Cemetery, Oakville. Memorial contributions to the Salvation Army or the Canadian Cancer Society would be gratefully acknowledged.

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CARLEBACH o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-06-28 published
GLICK, Doctor Daniel
On Friday, June 27, 2008 at his home. Daniel GLICK, beloved husband of Maralyn. Loving father and father-in-law of Jordan and Rona, Eliot and Gudiya, and the late Ira. Dear brother of Earl, Neila CARLEBACH, and the late Norman and Srul. Devoted grandfather of Hava, Kaile, and Z'ev. A graveside service will be held on Sunday, June 29th at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Beth Tikvah Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery (Dufferin north of Major Mackenize). Shiva 199 Old Forest Hill Road. Memorial donations may be made to Temmy Latner Centre for Palliative Care at Mt. Sinai Hospital at 416 586-4800 ext. 7884.

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CARLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2008-07-22 published
TOOLE, John L.
95, passed away July 14, 2008. He was born February 16, 1913 in London, Ontario Canada. John lived most of his working years in Montreal and retired at age 65 years after a very accomplished career at Canadian National Railway as a Vice President and Chairman of C.N. Investment. At retirement, John moved to Ormand Beach and later Jacksonville. John was very active in golf both on the course having played into his late eighties and off-the-course on the executive of golf clubs in both Montreal and Ormand Beach. He is predeceased by his wife Elaine Patricia TOOLE who he married in 1943; brother, Grant TOOLE; sister, Marion WOOD; Father, Wade TOOLE and Mother, Mable LEARY; brother-in-law, Kenneth Augustine CALLEN; sister in-law, Bernice CALLEN. Family members include his nieces, Martha Mary TOOLE, Sarah CARLEY- TOOLE, Cherie Ann SPITZE and Mary Margaret CALLEN; nephews, Matthew TOOLE and Sean Charles CALLEN; great-nieces, Mary Jane DANIS, Sarah DANIS, Carol DANIS and Rebecca DANIS.
Private family services will be held.
Arrangement by Hardage-Giddens Funeral Home, 1701 Beach Blvd., Jacksonville, Florida 32250 (904-249-2374).

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CARLISLE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2008-01-23 published
Anna May NOBLE
In loving memory of Anna May NOBLE, September 9, 1909 - January 20, 2008, who died peacefully at the Manitoulin Health Centre on Sunday morning at the age of 98. Predeceased by husband Donald NOBLE (1988.) Loved mother of Anne HOUSTON (husband Gary) of Almonte, Noreen PARKINSON (Blake SAINT_JACQUES) of Little Current, son-in-law Wesley PARKINSON (predeceased.) Cherished grandmother of Heather LANG (Glenn KUBIAN,) Lianne LANG (Jason STEVENS), Rob HOUSTON (Nathaly), Kelly PARKINSON (predeceased), Darren PARKINSON. Special great grandmother of Erin and Haley KUBIAN, Anna STEVENS, Mackenzie and Wade HOUSTON. Dear sister of Willard and wife Sadie CARLISLE (both predeceased,) Evelyn (predeceased) and husband Ken MURRAY. Remembered by nieces and nephews. Family and Friends will gather to celebrate Anna's life at 11 am on Thursday, January 24, 2008 at Island Funeral Home. Reverend Faye STEVENS officiating.

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CARLOS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-04 published
DESA, Jonathan Joseph " Jon"
Suddenly on Wednesday, July 2, 2008. Jonathan Joseph (Jon) DESA of Strathroy in his 18th year. Cherished son of John and Lisa DESA. Dear brother of Monique and Mackenzie. Loved grand_son of Joseph and Louisa ATAIDE and Delfim and Sameira DESA and great-grand_son of Isabel SILVEIRA. Nephew of David and Annabella MacEDO. Mike and Paula PONTE, Anna and Joe FERREIRA and Hilda DESA and cousin of Jeffery and Megan FERREIRA, Nicholas and Spencer MacEDO and Noah and Lucas PONTE. Visitation will be held at Denning Bros. Funeral Home, Strathroy on Friday, July 4 from 5-9 p.m. A Mass of Christian Burial will be held at All Saints Roman Catholic Church, Strathroy on Saturday, July 5 at 11 a.m. with Fr. Lucio COUTO officiating and Fr. Luiz CARLOS, Fr. Nelson CABRAL and Fr. Jim MOCKLER assisting. Interment in All Saints Cemetery. A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Jonathan.

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CARLOS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2008-07-26 published
DESA, Jonathan Joseph
The family of the late Jonathan Joseph DESA with to express their heartfelt appreciation to all those who acknowledged the sudden and tragic passing of their son. We are truly touched by the generous outpouring of love and support from family, Friends, Holy Cross Catholic Secondary School community, and the community as a whole. Words cannot express our gratitude for the many acts of kindness sympathy cards, memorial donations, mass cards, funeral home visits, beautiful floral tributes, home visits, phone calls and gifts of food that were brought to our homes, funeral home, and the Portuguese Canadian Club. We were especially moved by the overwhelming presence of those who walked along side us in honoring Jonathan's memories at the funeral. We were sincerely grateful to those who made the funeral a beautiful celebration of his life; namely Fr. LUCIO and co-celebrants Fr. Luiz CARLOS, Fr. MOKLER and Fr. MURPHY; musicians, vocalists, and the Youth Choir; the organizers who ensured that those who could not be with us in the main church, were still able to see the Mass via video feed. The professionalism and guidance provided by the staff of Denning Bros. Funeral Home and the Portuguese Canadian Club were also greatly appreciated. A heartfelt thank you to the courageous, caring, and efficient staff of the Strathroy Caradoc Police Department, Thames Valley Emergency Medical Services, and the Emergency Staff at the Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital. Many thanks to all the pallbearers for their strength and support in our times of sadness. To all the youth who made the memorial site and the wonderful photo collage for our family, we thank you for the memories and you sincere concern for our families. We were very blessed with the short life of Jonathan. He has forever enriched and touched our lives, and for all those who enriched and touched his life. We Thank You. Our lives will forever be touched by all your kindness. God Bless. John and Lisa DESA and daughters Monique and Mackenzie DESA.

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CAR surnames continued to 08car003.htm