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"McAD" 2007 Obituary


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McADAM o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-05 published
KENNEDY, Archie William
Peacefully at Strathroy Middlesex General Hospital on Thursday, January 4th, 2007, Archie William KENNEDY of Ailsa Craig, Ontario in his 90th year. Beloved husband of the late Viola May (EEDY) KENNEDY (2001.) Dear father of Elaine and Don STEBBINS of Hensall, Jean and Allen AMOS, Shirley and Lorne MacGREGOR and Audrey McADAM all of Ailsa Craig. Dearly loved grandfather of Bill and Diane STEBBINS, Kim APPS (Mike), Jeff AMOS (Jody), Cathy TALBOT (Brian), Angela AMOS (Brandon), Amanda AMOS (Adrian), Tim MacGREGOR (Trina), Ian MacGREGOR (Susan), Pam KACZMARCZYK (Kevin) and Tammy GREGORY (Scott) and 15 great-grandchildren. Dear brother of Elaine SANDERSON of London. Predeceased by brothers Ferg, Colin and Dave. Resting at the T. Stephenson and son Funeral Home, Ailsa Craig, where the funeral service will be held on Sunday, January 7th, at 3 p.m. with Rev. Kate BALLAGH- STEEPER officiating. Interment Nairn Cemetery. Visitation 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Saturday. A Masonic Service under the auspices of Craig Lodge #574 will be held on Saturday evening at 6: 30 p.m. Donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario or the charity of choice would be appreciated. A tree will be planted in memory of Mr. Archie KENNEDY.

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McADAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-18 published
MacADAM, Hugh Gerald
Husband, father, lawyer, Cape Bretoner, decorated solder. Born February 3, 1922, in Margaree Harbour, Nova Scotia Died August 2 in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, of heart failure, aged 85.
By Margaret MacADAM, Page L12
In the last years of his life, Gerald MacADAM puzzled about the meaning of his existence and the ways in which luck and opportunity shaped his life.
Born in 1922, the 12th (and youngest child) of Colin Francis and Annie (CHISHOLM) MacADAM, Gerald spent his childhood in the town of Margaree Harbour in Cape Breton.
In his life, there was his education (and high jinks) at St. Francis Xavier University in Antigonish, Nova Scotia, and yet he graduated summa cum laude; fighting (and high jinks) in Europe during the Second World War as a lieutenant in the army; law school (and high jinks) at Dalhousie University.
Gerald was also with the legal department at Algoma Steel Inc., and did years of volunteer work for organizations in Sault Ste. Marie. He was married to Amelda MacKINNON for 52 years and was a devoted father to his son, Donald.
Gerald was first and foremost a Cape Bretoner. To him that meant a man fortunate to have been born on the Island and not on the mainland (the disparaging term for the rest of Nova Scotia).
Second, Gerald was a scholar in the tradition of many of his highland forebears. For him, the centre of his home was his library he read extensively about history, politics, philosophy and religion.
He loved nothing better than having a "discussion" with a visitor about his experiences at university, in the army, working with Sir James Dunn at Algoma Steel Inc., or his volunteer work with the Grey Sisters.
Over a glass of scotch, the visitor would be regaled with funny stories.
One of his best was about trying to move an unauthorized horse during a military convoy, having the horse trailer break down on a bridge, which held up the entire operation, being berated by the commanding officer, and giving his name as Donald MacDonald, knowing that there were so many Donald MacDonalds in the army that no one would be held responsible.
Perhaps inevitably, Gerald was a seeker. He marvelled that he survived a war when so many didn't and he struggled with the difficulties that shape all our lives. He had an inquiring mind and sought meaning in Buddhism.
It was his wish that his friend, Rev. Francis Reid, who had been an altar boy at his wedding, officiate at his funeral. Those who knew him understood that his journey was well done.
Margaret MacADAM is Gerald's niece.

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McADAM o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-21 published
Famous for his Canadian Football League 'sleeper play,' he became Ottawa's local hero
In November, 1960, he executed an unusual and dangerous manoeuvre that put the Rough Riders on the road to the Grey Cup. He turned down two National Football League teams and later entered politics
By Ron CSILLAG, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S6
November 20, 1960, Toronto's Exhibition Stadium. The Canadian Football League's Eastern Conference final was being played, with the Argonauts pitted against the Ottawa Rough Riders. It was a two-game affair, with the point total to decide the outcome. Ottawa had won the first game, 33-21, but in the second, they were trailing 20-14 in the fourth quarter. One more Toronto touchdown would send the Argos to the Grey Cup.
Then came a manoeuvre so outrageous, it was actually banned: the famous "sleeper play," in which Ottawa quarterback Ron Lancaster spotted tight end Bob SIMPSON during a player exchange that no one else noticed, least of all the Toronto defence.
Only Mr. Lancaster, who went on to become a Canadian Broadcasting Corporation sports announcer and Canadian Football League head coach, can call it: "It was kind of crazy," he recalled in a telephone interview from Hamilton. "We were in our own end. Toronto was winning. If they score again, they're gonna beat us, so we need to move the football.
"We ran a play, and getting up off the field, heading back to the huddle, I ain't got nothing to do. So I'm just kind of looking around, and Bobby's walking to the sidelines. He just sort of walked. He wasn't drawing attention to himself. It was a spontaneous thing. He just kind of had his head down, his hands on his hips, just kind of walking to the sidelines - and he stopped. Didn't do anything elaborate. Just kind of blended in.
"And I look at him and he gives me this sign. He just stands there. So I hurry up and tell 'em to snap the ball. I throw it to him and he runs [from] somewhere around our 25 down to their 25. Next play, we run it down to the 1, put it in the end zone and scored, beat 'em 21-20, won the East and went to the Grey Cup and won it."
It was a jaw-dropping play for the fans, the most famous sleeper play ever executed in the Canadian Football League - and also the last. The league outlawed it immediately. But it was typical of the kind of guy Mr. SIMPSON was: brash, bold, cheeky, fun.
A swift runner with huge, glue-like hands and impressive playing numbers, he "was as great an all-around athlete as you're going to find," Mr. Lancaster said. But he was always remembered for that play.
"Over the years, there must have been a quarter of a million fans who came up to me and said they were in Lansdowne Park [in Ottawa] and saw the sleeper play," Mr. SIMPSON once told his friend Pat MacADAM, a sports columnist for the Ottawa Sun. "I didn't have the heart to tell them the game was played in Toronto."
A native of Windsor, Ontario, Mr. SIMPSON was a year old when his father walked out on his mother. At Patterson Collegiate and later Assumption College, now federated with the University of Windsor, he excelled at basketball, football and track, running the 100-yard dash in 10 seconds flat. He played on two provincial championship basketball teams in high school before joining the famed Tillsonburg Livingstons.
He was tearing up the field for the Windsor Rockets of the Ontario Rugby Football Union when the Rough Riders snapped him up in 1950. But he was granted leave to play for Canada's basketball team at the 1952 Helsinki Olympics. He played five games but Canada was eliminated.
In his 12-year Canadian Football League career, he caught 274 passes, including a single-season career-high 47 in 1956, for a total of 6,034 yards. He scored 65 touchdowns - 12 of them defensive. The record stood until Terry Evanshan broke it in 1975. He set another record for most yards receiving in a game (258) in a 1956 contest against Toronto.
He was an Eastern division all-star eight times at four different positions - end, flying wing, running back and defensive back - and was a three-time nominee for the Schenley Award given to the league's most outstanding Canadian. He was runner-up in 1956, the year he was also nominated as the Canadian Football League's most outstanding player.
Mr. SIMPSON was inducted into the Canadian Football League Hall of Fame in 1976, the Ottawa Sports Hall of Fame in 1998 and the Windsor-Essex Sports Hall of Fame the same year.
With his skills on both sides of the line and his leadership as co-captain (with Kaye Vaughan), Ottawa won Grey Cups in 1951 and "He had these great big hands," remembered George Brancato, who played with Mr. SIMPSON in Ottawa and against him in Montreal. "He could catch the ball. He had a real soft touch. He knew the game so well. And he loved life. He enjoyed himself all the time."
He also famously turned down two offers from National Football League teams in the United States. The first came from the New York Giants, who noticed Mr. SIMPSON after they became the first National Football League team to play outside the U.S. on August 12, 1950, when they met Ottawa in a preseason exhibition game at Lansdowne Park. New York won 27-6 and wined and dined Mr. SIMPSON - unheard of for a Canadian player at the time.
The story, according to Mr. MacADAM, is that he listened to his mother, who said to him: "Do you want to be a little fish in a big pond?" and turned down the Giants. Besides, the money wasn't nearly as good as he was making in the Canadian Football League. At his peak, Mr. SIMPSON probably earned $10,000 a year.
Around the same time, he turned down an offer from the Baltimore Colts. Ottawa sportswriter Earl McRAE waxed, "Imagine: Johnny Unitas passing to Bob SIMPSON."
Mr. SIMPSON's career ended in 1962 after a car accident with a tractor that dislocated his already bashed-up hip. After retirement, he was elected to Ottawa City Council, representing Wellington Ward for two terms. "It was right after the Grey Cup in 1960 and he was the hero," retired sportswriter Gerry Redmond told The Windsor Star. "He could have been elected prime minister."
He went on to a variety of occupations. He owned a cleaning company for a time, coached a local high-school football team and worked in the Rough Riders head office as a public relations man. He bought the Locanda restaurant on Laurier Avenue from Paul Anka's family. "It was a great watering hole and restaurant but Bobby overestimated Ottawa nightlife," Mr. MacAdam wrote in the Ottawa Sun. He also "tore up one too many of his Friends' bar tabs." He opened a night spot, Club 70, his Ottawa jersey number, but it stayed empty.
Still, he never lost his outsized zest for life. "Any time Bobby SIMPSON was around, you heard him," Mr. Lancaster said. "He was just naturally loud. He was really a fun person to be around. If you were around him, I guarantee you're going to have a good time."
Mr. MacADAM had similar memories: "You could hear him coming a block away. Make that two blocks. You knew you were not going to receive a handshake. His standard greeting was a slap across the back that threatened to separate your shoulder blades. A crushing bear hug was an automatic. Bobby SIMPSON didn't just fill a room he lit it up with his infectious good humour."
He and a group of rambunctious beer-drinking buddies were institutions at the Belle Claire Hotel's bar and, when it closed, the Churchill Arms on Carling Avenue.
"Good-natured insults flew fast and furious and Bobby was the butt of a few memorable ones," Mr. MacADAM wrote. "But he had a good sense of humour and gave as good as he received."
As with many former athletes his weight ballooned, to 270 pounds. When a doctor advised that he drop to 180, Mr. Brancato exclaimed: "His bones weigh 180 pounds!"
One day, Mr. SIMPSON walked into the Arms, grinning like a Cheshire cat.
As Mr. MacADAM related, "he told us the greatest honour he had ever received" was bestowed on him at the annual Easter Seals "Timmy" event for disabled children at Maple Leaf Gardens. Traditionally, "Timmy" was carried from the back of the hall to a platform by wrestler (Whipper) Billy Watson. But Mr. Watson was recovering from surgery and the honour fell to Mr. SIMPSON.
"I never felt so proud or so humble," Mr. SIMPSON said.
For 14 years, he worked as a clerk at various liquor stores in Ottawa. In 2000, Ottawa sports fans celebrated an event billed as "No. 70 turns 70."
Did he miss playing? "Every day," said his wife, Mary. "He would have paid them to play. I don't think he ever found anything really to replace that. He just loved it."
That his glory days were long past never seemed to get him down, though. In fact, there was a Dixieland band at his funeral, playing You Gotta Be a Football Hero.
Robert Lee SIMPSON was born April 20, 1930, in Windsor, Ontario He died of cancer on November 27, 2007, in Ottawa. He was 77. He leaves his wife, Mary, daughters Lynn and Mary Leigh, sons Rob, Gary and Mark, and seven grandchildren.

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McADAMS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-19 published
McADAMS, William Francis Henderson " Bill"
Peacefully, at The Guelph General Hospital, in his 81st year on Sunday, September 16, 2007. Bill was the beloved husband of the late Nancy (2001.) Dear father of Sandra PARNELL (Terry,) Linda BYMA (Sid), Ian (Darlene) and Bruce (Nancy). Proud Papa of Laura, Mike, Rob, Jeff, Steve, Lindsay, Jackie, Michelle, Benjamin and Wyatt and Great Papa of Mikaela, Brianna and Carly. Bill was a loyal member of Fleetair Arm 143 Squad, 13 E.F.T.S. Saint_John's, Québec, as well as the Col. John McCrae Branch 234 Royal Canadian Legion and former Guelph City Councillor. Friends may call at the Gilchrist Chapel - McIntyre and Wilkie Funeral Home, One Delhi Street, Guelph (from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. Friday). Legion Service at 4: 00 p.m. Friday. Funeral Service at the Gilchrist Chapel on Saturday, September 22, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. with Pastor John VANDERSTOEP officiating. Cremation Woodlawn Memorial Park. Memorial contributions to the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. A reception will follow in the Trillium Room of the Funeral Home. We invite you to leave your memories and donations online at: www.gilchristchapel.com

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