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"TER" 2007 Obituary


TERESA  TERNOEY  TERPSTRA  TERRACE  TERREAULT  TERRIS  TERRY  TERRYBERRY 

TERESA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-01 published
PATTERSON, William " Bill"
(Partner in ADD Capital Corp.)
Suddenly on Friday, September 28, 2007 in his 62nd year. Bill beloved husband of Dyanne and the late Terry. Dear father of Bill and his wife Julie, Jeff and his partner Jason, Krista, and stepfather of Kolin and Christopher. Loving grandfather of Elise TERESA. Dear brother of Peg FRYER, and Marjorie RAMAGE. Friends will be received at the Dixon-Garland Funeral Home, 166 Main Street N. (Markham Road) Markham on Tuesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service in the chapel on Wednesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment Highland Hills Cemetery. In Lieu of flowers, donations to the Heart and Stroke foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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TERNOEY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-09 published
DREW, Ronald Martin
Peacefully at Woodstock General Hospital on Monday, January 8, 2007, Ronald Martin DREW of Woodstock in his 73rd year. Beloved husband and best friend of Shirley for 47 years. Loving father of Brent DREW (Kim) of Ailsa Craig, Ontario, Sherri DREW- OCHAL (Peter OCHAL) of Brampton, and Scott DREW (Sandy) of London. Grandpa of Brandon DREW, Damien DREW and Matthew OCHAL. Brother of Doctor Derwood DREW (Yvonne) of Ottawa and brother-in-law of Jack TERNOEY (Anna) of Blenheim, Patricia ENNETT (Larry) of Dresden, Jim TERNOEY (Marlene) of Blenheim, and the late Cindy PILBEAM. Also remembered by several nieces and nephews. Ron was a longtime employee of Union Gas. Friends will be received at the Smith-LeRoy Funeral Home, 69 Wellington Street North, Woodstock on Thursday, 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Parish prayers at the funeral home Thursday afternoon at 4: 00 p.m. Funeral Mass at Holy Trinity Catholic Parish, 904 Dundas Street, Woodstock on Friday, January 12, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. with Father Chris GEVAERT as celebrant. Cremation. Interment at Saint Mary Catholic Cemetery. If desired, memorial donations to the Woodstock Hospital Foundation or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario would be appreciated. Smith-LeRoy, (519) 537-3611. Personal condolences may be sent at www.smithleroy.com

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TERPSTRA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-23 published
Brantford student dies during wave pool visit
By Canadian Press, Sat., June 23, 2007
Brantford -- Camilia TERPSTRA of Brantford was full of delight before her sudden death in a Kitchener water park Wednesday.
The 11-year-old student and her classmates were enjoying a class trip to Bingeman Park, where she was found unconscious in a wave pool.
"She was so happy to be there -- she was grinning from ear to ear," her mother, Judy TERPSTRA, said Thursday.
Camilia, who would have celebrated her 12th birthday on June 30, was pulled from wave pool at around 12: 30 p.m. A post-mortem conducted Thursday in Hamilton indicated she apparently drowned, although police said they will proceed with toxicology tests.
Waterloo Regional Police detectives continued to interview witnesses: Thursday. They expect to be at the girl's school today to continue with interviews and to talk to grieving students.
Early Thursday, police were reluctant to refer to Camilia's death as a drowning until the post-mortem was complete. In the evening, a news release said the autopsy showed the cause of death was consistent with drowning and police had found no signs of foul play.
Camilia's mother said it's unlikely she will ever know exactly what happened, but she believes it was "just a freak accident."
Camilia was remembered fondly by classmates and staff on Thursday as students stopped by a prayer table set up for them to remember Camilia and dropped handmade sympathy cards into a box.
The Brant Haldimand Norfolk Catholic District School Board had liturgical workers, school chaplains and social workers on hand at the school through the day.
A funeral mass will be celebrated at St. Pius X Roman Catholic Church today at 10 a.m. with interment at St. Patrick's Cemetery in Caledonia.

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TERPSTRA o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-13 published
Boater feared drowned
The Strathroy man's wife saw him slip under the water in Balsam Lake, Ontario Provincial Police say.
By April KEMICK, Sun Media, Fri., July 13, 2007
Thrown from a sailboat on the waters of a Lindsay-area lake, the last thing Justin SIPLE saw before he disappeared under the waves was the face of his young wife.
The Strathroy father of two wasn't wearing a life-jacket when he, his wife, daughter and a family friend were tossed from the boat Wednesday night.
Yesterday, SIPLE, 29, was the focus of a search on Balsam Lake, largest of the Kawartha lakes, north of Lindsay.
Ontario Provincial Police officers, divers, emergency workers and volunteers have scoured the lake, but with little hope of finding SIPLE alive.
"The conditions on the lake were horrendous" when SIPLE was tossed into high waves amid heavy rain, Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Mark WOLFE said yesterday.
A string of boating deaths has prompted police and water safety advocates to call for increased use of life-jackets.
"If people wore a life-jacket when they boat, just like they put a seatbelt on when they drive, chances are the number of drownings would be reduced dramatically," said Barbara Byers, a director with the Lifesaving Society.
SIPLE's young wife, who was wearing a life-jacket when she was thrown from the five-metre boat, along with the couple's two-year-old daughter and the family friend, tried desperately to keep her husband afloat in the choppy waters, said WOLFE, of Kawartha Lakes Ontario Provincial Police.
But the conditions were too strong even for SIPLE, a stocky army reservist. Within minutes he disappeared, WOLFE said.
"The last (his wife) saw him, he was slipping under the water."
SIPLE's wife, daughter and a family friend were rescued by a passing boater, he said.
All had life-jackets, he said.
Yesterday, a fourth jacket -- stowed aboard for SIPLE, but not worn -- washed ashore.
The law doesn't require boaters wear life-jackets -- only that there be one aboard for every boater. Still,
Only a life-jacket could have saved SIPLE's life, said WOLFE.
"It wouldn't have mattered if he was the greatest swimmer," "He couldn't have manoeuvred that lake (Wednesday) night."
Last year, 80 per cent of boating related fatalities in Ontario Provincial Police-patrolled waters occurred when people weren't wearing life-jackets or personal flotation devices, said Ontario Provincial Police marine co-ordinator Sgt. Bob MINIELLY.
At least 60 per cent of this year's deaths also involved people not wearing life-jackets or flotation devices, he said.
SIPLE, a corporal with the 31 Combat Engineering Regiment out of Saint Thomas, was father to a four-month-old boy as well as his two-year-old daughter.
Pictures on SIPLE's online Facebook page portray a doting dad and proud reservist.
He was an "amazing husband," according to a passage on his wife's Facebook page.
SIPLE had been a reservist with the 31 Brigade for seven years, said Lt. James TERPSTRA, a brigade spokesperson.
"Our thoughts and prayers go out to his family and Friends," he said.
Police have pinpointed the area where the boat overturned and will scour it "every day until we find him," said WOLFE.
The search continues today.

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TERRACE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-07 published
Pioneer filmmaker turned hard-hitting social issues into popular television
He returned from naval duty in the Second World War to pioneer such shows as Wojeck, writes Sandra MARTIN, and to set standards for 'what an archetypal Canadian drama series ought to be'
By Sandra MARTIN, Page S11
Forty years ago, when John Vernon as Wojeck and Gordon Pinsent as Quentin Jurgens, M.P., were upholding Canadian attributes of social justice on the country's black-and-white television sets, Ron WEYMAN was in his golden age at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Television drama. A visual artist and a navy veteran who had seen H.M.S. Hood go down and landed at Omaha Beach in the D-Day invasion of Normandy, Mr. WEYMAN learned to make documentaries at the National Film Board and to shoot film on location by watching Italian directors Vittorio De Sica and Roberto Rossellini in action. That's the cultural baggage Mr. WEYMAN brought to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation-television in the mid-1950s. Within a decade, he had persuaded the corporation to shift from videotape to film and to send directors out of the studios and into the streets so that they could use real locations in home-grown stories that reflected contemporary social issues. And he had put Wojeck, a short-lived but stellar dramatic series, into the imaginations of viewers.
One early fan was Ivan Fecan, president and Chief Executive Officer of CTVglobemedia. Back in 1966, when Wojeck premiered, he was a 12-year-old boy. "In Wojeck, I saw performances and stories and images of Toronto in a way that I had never seen before and, frankly, rarely afterward. It made a huge impression on me," he said in a telephone interview this week. Of Mr. WEYMAN, he said, "I didn't know him well personally, but I was a huge fan of his work. He was the real deal, the real ground-breaker in Canadian drama, and I don't think he ever got enough credit for what he proved could be done."
A little more than 20 years later, when Mr. Fecan was program chief at Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, he hauled six Wojeck episodes out of the vaults and put them back on the air. Mr. Fecan still thinks that Mr. WEYMAN's work sets the standard for "what an archetypal Canadian drama series ought to be today."
Ronald Charles Tosh WEYMAN was the third son of four children of Margaret (POTTS) and Joshua WEYMAN, a machinist. He was born in England in the middle of the First World War. The family immigrated to St. Catharines, Ontario, in 1923 because Mr. WEYMAN's older brother Charles had settled there. Within a few years, the WEYMANs had moved to the Danforth area of Toronto, where Ron attended Danforth and East York Collegiates. When the Depression hit and Ron had to leave school to help out financially, he took on a variety of jobs, including working as a tea taster.
As soon as he had some money in his pockets, he bought a small boat and taught himself to sail. He was also very interested in painting and acting and, with his younger sister (broadcaster and sculptor Rita Greer ALLEN,) became part of a local theatrical group that swirled around Dora Mavor Moore. Through these connections, Ron met University of Toronto undergraduates Alison (Ashy) Alford and her older sister Giovanna (Vanna), the daughters of John Alford, who was the founding chair of the university's fine arts department.
After the Second World War broke out in 1939, Mr. WEYMAN enlisted in the Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve. Despite his lack of formal education, he was in the first group of Royal Canadian Navy Volunteer Reserve recruits who were seconded to the Royal Navy for officer training. About the time that France was falling and Dunkirk was being evacuated, Sub-Lieutenant WEYMAN was qualifying as a specialist with anti-submarine detection equipment.
Among other ships, he was the only Canadian to serve on H.M.S. Achates as part of the escort-destroyer group attending on the battlecruiser Hood when she was sunk in 10 minutes by the German capital ship Bismarck with the loss of all but three hands during the Battle of the Denmark Strait on May 24, 1941.
After Achates hit a mine on the Murmansk run, with the loss of half its company, SLt. WEYMAN joined H.M.C.S. St. Croix on convoy escort duty in the North Atlantic during some of the most treacherous U-boat engagements of the war. He and Ashy were married in October, 1941, while he was home on leave. About 16 months later, when he was overseas again, she died in her sleep -- probably of an epileptic seizure.
As the balance finally shifted in the war, he was promoted to first lieutenant on a landing ship, tank (LST) and responsible for getting what he called a "floating radar palace" on Omaha Beach in June, 1944. Subsequently, he received a promotion to lieutenant commander and a new assignment: command of an LST bound for Southeast Asia, where he was to lead Indian troops onto the beaches of Malaya and Burma. Before he could see action, the Americans dropped the atomic bomb on Hiroshima and Nagasaki and the Japanese surrendered. In describing his war service, he said he "was mined once, torpedoed once and got sunk a third time."
Life was not all battle stations. He had continued to paint on his various vessels and while on leave in London contributed some canvasses to an exhibition of Canadian War Art at The National Gallery in London. One of his paintings, U-Boat Attack, was purchased by The National Gallery in Ottawa. Another dozen works (five paintings and seven drawings) now belong to the Canadian War Museum.
After he was demobilized in Halifax, Mr. WEYMAN wanted to become a serious painter and headed to Ottawa to consult with a curator at The National Gallery. That same weekend, he encountered Sydney Newman of the fledgling National Film Board, who suggested he try film instead. By chance, Nick Reed had just come back from Greece with the film footage that would later be used in the film Out of the Ruins. He took Mr. WEYMAN on as an assistant, and when Mr. Reed returned to his home in South Carolina, he inherited the film. "I was hooked," he wrote later.
He was also becoming hooked on his sister-in-law, Vanna. Her husband, John TERRACE, a bomber pilot in the U.S. Army Air Force, had been shot down over Magdeburg, Germany, in 1944 and was missing in action for two years until his death was finally confirmed. She and Mr. WEYMAN became close because of their bereavements and their mutual interest in the visual arts. They married on June 28, 1947, and eventually had five children: Cindy, Jenny, John (Tiki), Peter (Bay) and James.
Mr. WEYMAN worked for the National Film Board from 1946 to 1953. He made more than 20 films, including After Prison, What?, which won the prize for best theatrical film at the Canadian Film Festival in 1951, and The Safety Supervisor, which earned a first award at the Venice Film Festival in 1952. After seven years, he quit to freelance in Italy, the ancestral home of many in his wife's family. While they were abroad, he wrote and filmed eight documentaries in Italy and the Middle East for the National Film Board and the United Nations, learning how to shoot film on location rather than in studio, a skill that he brought back to Canada and to the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, where he began working in 1954 under Robert ALLEN, who was the head of television drama and the scriptwriter/accountant who had married Mr. WEYMAN's younger sister Rita.
His lasting contribution began in the 1962-63 season with his invention of The Serial, a program that presented Canadian novels on film and tape and employed Canadian actors, directors, writers and producers. It was on The Serial that Mr. WEYMAN produced dramatizations of Thomas Raddall's The Wings of the Night, Morley Callaghan's More Joy in Heaven and the pilots that would become Wojeck, Quentin Durgens, M.P. and Hatch's Mill, working with such directors as Paul Almond, David Gardner and later Daryl Duke.
Tell Them The Streets Are Dancing, based on the files of Doctor Morton Shulman, was written by Philip Hersch and starred John Vernon (obituary February 4, 2005), Bruno Gerussi and Patricia Collins. The plot pitted a crusading big-city coroner investigating the deaths of five Italian construction workers against their greedy bosses and corrupt government inspectors. Audiences loved it and Mr. WEYMAN quickly commissioned enough scripts from Mr. Hersch to run 10 episodes the next season, staring Mr. Vernon as Wojeck. As a model, Wojeck (which ran from 1966 to 1968) was the forerunner of NBC's Quincy, M.E., and Canadian Broadcasting Corporation's Da Vinci's Inquest.
The series, which used the WEYMANs' own home as the set for Wojeck's house, attracted 2,900,000 viewers with an overall audience enjoyment of 80 and climbed into the top 10 of most popular shows when sold to Britain. Another pilot, Mr. Member of Parliament, starring Gordon Pinsent as a naive and conscientious politician, and directed by Mr. Gardner, became the hit series Quentin Durgens, M.P.
Both programs brought hard-hitting contemporary social issues (abortion, suicide, abuse of power) into dramatic stories played out in locations that Canadians recognized as part of their own worlds. But none of it lasted, for the same reasons that have beleaguered so many other "golden ages" in Canada's cultural history: a lack of money, vision and commitment. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation couldn't commit to a third season of Wojeck or promise steady employment to the actors, directors and producers, so they all followed the jobs and the money to Los Angeles. Even Mr. WEYMAN toyed with moving to California.
In a brief to Canadian Broadcasting Corporation management in April, 1970, a frustrated Mr. WEYMAN complained that a vacuum existed between the policy planners and the drama producers that "threatens the future of Canadian Broadcasting Corporation drama" and "the survival of our community of talent." He insisted that "a given volume of production is essential on a continuing basis, if we hope to maintain a healthy climate in which talent can survive" and he outlined the various measures he thought should be taken, including training and letting people make mistakes in regional and local productions rather than on the network, where the new writer or new director "falls on his face in front of millions of people" while the public and the critics "quite properly" wonder "if we know what it is we are doing."
He continued to make drama at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in the 1970s with shows such as Corwin, The Manipulators, Welcome Stranger, The Albertans and a dramatization of Margaret Laurence's novel The Fire Dwellers, but nothing exceeded the audience rapport he had achieved a decade earlier with Wojeck. "The tragedy is that he got sidetracked," Mr. Fecan said. "He could have gone on to do so much more, but he never got the chance and consequently he didn't get the credit he deserved for what he did."
After he retired from the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in 1980, Mr. WEYMAN turned back to painting and to writing screenplays and a new form: novels. He borrowed Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's famous fictional character Sherlock Holmes and created new adventures for him after his presumed death at the Reichenbach Falls in the Swiss Alps in The Adventure of the Final Problem. Instead of mouldering in his grave, the famous sleuth was flitting about Canada from 1891 to 1894 at the behest of Queen Victoria's son, the Prince of Wales and later Edward VII. At least that was the story Mr. WEYMAN spun in his trilogy, Sherlock Holmes and the Ultimate Disguise, Sherlock Holmes and the Case of the Mark of the Beast and Sherlock Holmes Travels in the Canadian West. He also wrote In Love and War: A Memoir, a vivid account of his romantic and naval experiences in the Second World War. As well, he directed the occasional film, learned to play classical guitar and travelled.
About four years ago, Mr. WEYMAN suffered a stroke that left him paralyzed on one side and unable to speak or to feed himself. Late last month, sensing the end was near, his family took him to a farmhouse northwest of Toronto that he and Vanna had bought in 1964, the fount of so many happy family occasions. "Every time we left the farm, he would say, 'Goodbye, this place,' " she said in an interview this week. That's where he died, two days before they would have celebrated their 60th wedding anniversary.
Ronald Charles Tosh WEYMAN was born in Erdith, Kent, on December 13, 1915. He died near Flesherton, Ontario, on June 26, 2007. He was 91. He is survived by his wife Vanna, five children, 11 grandchildren, his sister Rita and extended family. A celebration of his life will be held tomorrow at the Arts and Letters Club, 14 Elm Street, Toronto.

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TERREAULT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-25 published
MacWHIRTER, Gavin Basil " Ian"
Born the 16th of April 1937 in New Richmond, Quebec. Died peacefully with family around him on Monday, July 23, 2007. Beloved husband of Greta MEYER. Dear father of Shelley (Peter ROONEY,) Brent (Sharon TERREAULT) and Scott (Tara.) Loving grandfather of Clay and Cole. Also survived by his brothers Doug and George and his sisters Marguerite and Mary. Resting at the J.P. MacKimmie Funeral Home, 96 Village Street, Arundel, Quebec (Laurentian Lodge #81). Visitation Thursday, July 26th from 7-9 p.m. Funeral service Friday, July 27, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. at the Brookdale United Church, 475 Chemin Brookdale, Brookdale, Quebec Reception to follow in Bonne Entente room at Boileau Town Hall. In lieu of flowers, Ian has asked that memorial donations be sent to the Aurele Godin Memorial Fund (Namur Intermediate School student bursaries) or to the Brookdale United Church.

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TERRIS o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-02 published
BAKER, John K. " Jack"
Of Lambeth, passed away Sunday December 31, 2006 at Parkwood Hospital in London. Jack was born 74 years ago in Markdale to the late Marabel HALBERT (1995) and Harry BAKER (1980.) He is survived by his wonderful and loving wife Patricia " Pat" BAKER (GANDER) along with sons Garry BAKER and Pam of London and Jerry BAKER of Vancouver. Grandfather will be missed by a special granddaughter Melissa. Also surviving are sister-in-laws Glenda VERMEERSCH of Kitchener and Shannon McKILLOP of Blenheim and a brother-in-law Don GANDER and Kim of Blenheim. Old Friends will remember Jack from his days when he owned and operated the family variety store "Baker's Red and White" in Cedar Springs. Jack continued to work in Retail Management for over thirty years for "Mac's" in a number of locations including Sarnia, Saint Thomas, Union, Mildmay, Tavistock and Preston. Friends will be received for visiting at the Blenheim Community Funeral Home, 60 Stanley Street, Blenheim on Wednesday, January 3, 2007 from 7: 00-9:00 p.m. A Funeral Service for Jack will be conducted from the funeral home on Thursday January 4, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. with the Rev. Bill TERRIS of the Blenheim Baptist Church officiating. Interment will follow in Evergreen Cemetery, Blenheim. Friends wishing to make a memorial donation in memory of Jack are asked to consider either the London Regional Cancer Centre or the Salvation Army. Donations can be arranged by visiting or calling the Blenheim Community Funeral Home, (519) 676-9200. Online condolences may be left at www.blenheimcommunityfuneralhome.com

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TERRY o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-12 published
STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, John William
Of Blenheim and formerly of South Harwich Township (where he farmed before his retirement) passed away on Wednesday, January 10, 2007 at the Chatham-Kent Health Alliance. Born in Harwich Township 86 years ago son of the late William J. STEWARD/STEWART/STUART and Ethel ALLISON. Beloved husband of 63 years to the former Helen HUFFMAN. Dear brother of Margaret (Mrs. Verne LEE) of Blenheim and brother-in-law of Jack and his wife Mildred HUFFMAN of Harwich. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Georgia TERRY, brothers Ernest and Verne STEWARD/STEWART/STUART, niece Ethel RICHARDSON. Resting at the J.L. Ford Funeral Home in Blenheim for visitation on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. and where a funeral service will be held on Saturday at 1: 30 p.m. with Pastor Ed NICOL officiating. Interment will be in Evergreen Cemetery. Memorials to the Fourth Line United Church Memorial Fund or Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated.

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TERRY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
GOODERHAM, James Buchanan
Born April 26, 1917, James passed away peacefully at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital in Burlington on August 28, 2007 at the age of 90. Beloved husband of Angelene (née BASILII) GOODERHAM and former husband of Margaret GOODERHAM. Loving father of Ann Elizabeth GOODERHAM- SAMAKESE (Joseph SAMAKESE) of Burlington, David Leys GOODERHAM (Kathryn) of Oakville and Sandra Gooderham TERRY (Stephen TERRY) of Whitby. Cherished grandfather of Holly-Ann and Joseph James GOODERHAM- SAMAKESE, Christopher and Mark GOODERHAM, Stuart Gooderham SMITH (Alexandra), Jennifer Smith SILLS (Chad SILLS) and great-grandfather of Ethan SMITH and Morgan, Braiden, Victoria, Brooklyn and Owen SILLS. son of the late John Leys GOODERHAM and Beryl Olive BUCHANAN, Jim is also predeceased by his brother Peter Buchanan GOODERHAM and his wife Mary, all of Toronto. He is also survived by his brothers- and sisters-in-law; Olvido BASILII (Lou), the late Lena BASILII, Domenic "Nick" BASILII (Verda), Rinaldo "Ron" BASILII (Jacqui), Jose DUMONT (Claude), Ida FITZPATRICK (the late John,) Gina SECA (Johnny) and Deno BASILLII. Jim also leaves behind many nieces, nephews and cousins. Cremation has taken place. Visitation will be held at Smith's Funeral Home, 485 Brant Street (one block north of City Hall), Burlington (905-632-3333) on Saturday, September 29, 2007 from 12 noon until time of the Service of Remembrance in the Chapel at 1 p.m. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate donations to the charity of your choice. www.smithsfh.com

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TERRYBERRY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-10 published
WEAVER, Wilfred Charles
Suddenly in Durham on Sunday, July 8, 2007. “Wilf” Weaver of R.R.#3, Durham in his 80th year. Husband of the late Margaret (née GREEN.) Loving partner of Pauline MacGILLIVRAY. Loved father of Scott (Bonnie) of Bassanno, Alberta, Brenda (Chris) WHEELER of R.R.#3, Durham and the late Cathy CALDWELL. Dear brother of Robert (Marie) of Ingersoll, Barbara (Allan) BALL of Embro and Pat JOHNSON of Tavistock. Wilf will be sadly missed by grandchildren Stephan and Stacey CALDWELL, Ryan and Tyler WEAVER, Adam WHEELER and Krista ELLEY and great-grandchildren Shelby CALDWELL, Katie and Courtney TERRYBERRY, Kirstin and Xzyler WEAVER, Sydney, Branden and Tyson WHEELER and Hayley ELLEY. Predeceased by his sister Betty LUNN. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Wednesday from 7-9 p.m. and Thursday from 1-1: 45 p.m. Funeral Service will be held in the Funeral Home Chapel at 2 p.m. Thursday, July 12, 2007. Interment Durham Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Lung Association would be appreciated. All members of the Masonic Lodge are requested to attend a memorial service for their late brother in the Funeral Home at 6: 30 on Wednesday evening.

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