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"TEM" 2007 Obituary


TEMES  TEMPLE  TEMPLETON  TEMPLIN 

TEMES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
EPSTEIN, Maurice
In his 100th year, at home after a long and difficult struggle, on Sunday, Occtober 28, 2007. Predeceased by his dear wife Esther. Beloved father and father-in-law of Jean and Arnie VERTLIEB and Philip and Joyce EPSTEIN. Dear grandfather of Tamara and Andrew TEMES, Alana VERTLIEB and Steven KASTNER, Geoffrey VERTLIEB, David and Michelle EPSTEIN, Deborah EPSTEIN and Aaron FRANKS and Sara and Mark ARNSTEIN. Beloved great-grandfather of Bayley and Maxwell TEMES, Jeremie, Joshua, and Jamie FRANKS, and Ryan and Jake ARNSTEIN. Service at Steeles Memorial Chapel (350 Steeles Avenue West), on Tuesday, October 30th at 12 p.m. The family expresses its deepest thanks to Dell, Gemma and Reg for their devoted and loving care. Donations to the Soldiers of Israel Fund will be appreciated.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-06 published
HODGE, Harry Raymond
At the Grey Bruce Health Services in Owen Sound, after a brief and courageous battle with cancer on Sunday. November 04, 2007. Harry HODGE of Tara, formerly of the municipality of Kincardine, (the former Bruce township), in his 73rd year. Survived by his wife, Barbara (née SHEWFELT.) Beloved father of Greg of Desboro, Michael (Shelley) of Owen Sound, and Debbie ROSS (Richard) of Sauble Beach. Devoted grandfather of Meagan and Brittany HODGE, Kirsten and Jacob ROSS. Brother of Betty TEMPLE of Alberta. Brother-in-law of Linda TURCOTTE of Ajax, and Jim SHEWFELT (Mary Jo) of Kincardine. Also survived by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sisters Frances, Marion, Eva and brothers Clarence, Ivan and Bill. Friends may call at Paul H. Eagleson Funeral Home in Tara on Wednesday from 2: 00 to 4:00 and 7:00 to 9:00 p.m.. The Funeral Service will be held in the chapel on Thursday November 8, 2007 at 11 a.m. Interment of ashes in Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. In lieu of flowers, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, the Grey Bruce Health Services Foundation of the charity of your choice would be appreciated. Condolences may be expressed online at www.paulheaglesonfuneralhome.ca

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-08 published
TEMPLE, Marion (née CARROLL)
Of Extendicare, Port Stanley, formerly of Saint Thomas, passed away at the Saint Thomas-Elgin General Hospital on Saturday, January 6, 2007, in her 91st year. Beloved wife of the late Oscar TEMPLE (1992.) Dearly loved mother of Shirley FUGARD of Kincardine, Mary INSLEY and her husband William of London, Robert TEMPLE and his wife Carol of R.R.#1, Saint Thomas, Murray TEMPLE of California, and the late Harold TEMPLE (his wife Colleen of Saint Thomas.) Dear sister of Dorothy McNEA of Saint Thomas, Harold CARROLL and his wife Marg of R.R.#5, Saint Thomas, late Margaret CARROLL and late Jim CARROLL. Also survived by 18 grandchildren, a number of great-grandchildren, 5 great-great-grandchildren and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by a great-grand_son, Mitchell Temple MEDHURST. Born in Middlemarch, Ontario, December 28, 1916, she was the daughter of the late Arthur and Jean (WHITE/WHYTE) CARROLL. Mrs. TEMPLE was a former employee of Singer Controls and Essex Wire, Saint Thomas. She attended Port Stanley United Church and formerly attended the Saint Thomas Christian Church (Disciples of Christ). She was an avid euchre player. Friends will be received at the Sifton Funeral Home, 118 Wellington Street, Saint Thomas on Tuesday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held Wednesday at 11: 00 a.m. Interment in Elmdale Memorial Park. Memorial donations to the Canadian Diabetes Association or the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Ontario gratefully acknowledged.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-21 published
SMITH, Charles F.
Peacefully in Toronto on July 18, 2007 at age 89, after a short illness. Born in North Bay, Ontario on March 2, 1918 into a vibrant family of 10, he was a sixth-generation Canadian. During the depression, Charles found work in northern Ontario as a rail gang crewmember, logger, mine clerk, warehouse-man, and assayer. During the Second World War, he served as an aircraft rigger, mainly in Kingston, Ontario. In 1941, Charles married his lifelong love Constance. After the war, he returned to school to complete his high school diploma, and engineering and Master of Science degrees in Metallurgy at Queens University, finishing as class President in 1949. Charles began his career at Barber Tool and Die in Hamilton, but soon moved to Sperry Vickers, a world leader in hydraulics. He founded the Canadian division in 1955, Vickers' first international business. In 1966, Charles and Connie moved to England where he was Managing Director (European Division) for Vickers and then Vice President Europe of Sperry Vickers. In 1977, he moved to the head office in Detroit as Vice President of Business Development and Government Affairs. Charles retired in 1980 and returned to Toronto to their cherished home at 14 Kingsway Crescent in the Kingsway. For the last few years, he lived on Lake Ontario at Palace Place. Charles was a dedicated volunteer, most notably with the Etobicoke Rotary Club, which awarded him a Paul Harris Fellowship in recognition of his hard work. Other pursuits included ocean racing in Europe, such as the Royal Yacht Club Fastnet Race; and tracing the family roots which led to the publication of a memoir, I Remember, I Remember. He loved his family, home, cottage, and Friends. Charles is predeceased by his beloved wife of 64 years, Constance Charlotte SMITH. Loving father of Patricia HILLMER and Michael SMITH and his wife Laura TEMPLE- SMITH. Treasured grandfather of Michael HILLMER and his wife Melinda and Charlotte and Roddy SMITH. Dear brother of Phil SMITH, Kay WILLIAMS, Mabel MITCHELL, and Lois SCHMIDT and predeceased by Harold SMITH, Grace STEED, Chester SMITH, Don SMITH and Keith SMITH. The family would like to thank the staff of the Saint_Joseph's Health Centre Palliative Care Unit for their compassionate care. Friends and relatives are invited to attend a Memorial Service at the Old Mill Inn Chapel, 21 Old Mill Road, Toronto, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, July 28. Reception to follow immediately. If desired, donations may be made to The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Arrangements by Turner and Porter, Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke. (416) 231-2283.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-25 published
SMITH, Charles F.
Peacefully in Toronto on July 18, 2007 at age 89, after a short illness. Born in North Bay, Ontario on March 2, 1918 into a vibrant family of 10, he was a sixth-generation Canadian. During the depression, Charles found work in northern Ontario as a rail gang crew member, logger, mine clerk, warehouse-man, and assayer. During the Second World War, he served as an aircraft rigger, mainly in Kingston, Ontario. In 1941, Charles married his lifelong love Constance. After the war, he returned to school to complete his high school diploma, and engineering and Master of Science degrees in Metallurgy at Queens University, finishing as class President in 1949. Charles began his career at Barber Tool and Die in Hamilton, but soon moved to Sperry Vickers, a world leader in hydraulics. He founded the Canadian division in 1955, Vickers' first international business. In 1966, Charles and Connie moved to England where he was Managing Director (European Division) for Vickers and then Vice President Europe of Sperry Vickers. In 1977, he moved to the head office in Detroit as Vice President of Business Development and Government Affairs. Charles retired in 1980 and returned to Toronto to their cherished home at 14 Kingsway Crescent in the Kingsway. For the last few years, he lived on Lake Ontario at Palace Place. Charles was a dedicated volunteer, most notably with the Etobicoke Rotary Club, which awarded him a Paul Harris Fellowship in recognition of his hard work. Other pursuits included ocean racing in Europe, such as the Royal Yacht Club Fastnet Race; and tracing the family roots which led to the publication of a memoir, I Remember, I Remember. He loved his family, home, cottage, and Friends. Charles is predeceased by his beloved wife of 64 years, Constance Charlotte SMITH. Loving father of Patricia HILLMER and Michael SMITH and his wife Laura TEMPLE- SMITH. Treasured grandfather of Michael HILLMER and his wife Melinda and Charlotte and Roddy SMITH. Dear brother of Phil SMITH, Kay WILLIAMS, Mabel MITCHELL, and Lois SCHMIDT and predeceased by Harold SMITH, Grace STEED, Chester SMITH, Don SMITH and Keith SMITH. The family would like to thank the staff of the Saint_Joseph's Health Centre Palliative Care Unit for their compassionate care. Friends and relatives are invited to attend a Memorial Service at the Old Mill Inn Chapel, 21 Old Mill Road, Toronto, at 1 p.m. on Saturday, July 28. Reception to follow immediately. If desired, donations may be made to The Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada. Arrangements by Turner and Porter, Butler Chapel, 4933 Dundas Street West, Etobicoke. (416) 231-2283.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-24 published
Pilot was one of the first to fly bombing missions against Germany
Already in the Royal Air Force when the war started, he finished two tours of duty in 15 months before being sent to Canada to train air crews. Years later, he sold real estate in Toronto
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
When the Second World War broke out in 1939, Toby BASKETT was already one of the Royal Air Force's most seasoned operational pilots. Flying dangerously slow and obsolete aircraft, he was among the first to bomb Germany.
He was also among the first to be decorated. In September, 1940, he won a Distinguished Flying Cross for piloting a Handley Page Hampden bomber on a daring raid against a German industrial target. One of his fellow officers, Air Commodore John MITCHELL, described it as "an extraordinary raid on the Dortmund-Ems Canal, at a very low level, destroying lock gates on this all-important artery for German industry."
Flight Lieutenant BASKETT was involved in at least four raids on the canal that year. Later in the war, the canal and its dam were successfully attacked by more advanced Lancaster bombers using a special bouncing bomb that was portrayed in the film The Dam Busters.
The early raids were flown by much smaller bombers just after the fall of France, a time when Britain stood alone in Europe against Germany. Mr. BASKETT flew mostly twin-engine Hampdens, which, along with the Whitley and Wellington bombers, was all that the overstretched Royal Air Force could muster against German targets. With the Battle of Britain raging, fighters were needed for defence, so the missions went without benefit of escorts.
Their opponent, the Luftwaffe, was the world's most modern air force and flew at full strength, with the result that about half of the 1,400 Hampdens built were lost to flak and German fighters. It was also a tricky aircraft to fly and many went down in accidents.
"The Hampden was a death trap," Mr. MITCHELL said from his home in Lymington, England. "There was a narrow fuselage and the crew sat one behind the other. It was almost impossible for one pilot to take over from another."
The Hampden also laid mines in ports and canals in Europe. In his logbook, Mr. BASKETT records "gardening," a code word for laying mines. He laid ordnance (the "vegetable") in Dutch and French ports and in the Kiel Canal, a strategic waterway that links the Baltic with the North Sea.
Mine laying was hazardous work because the planes had to fly slow and low - 150 metres or less - making them easy targets. He was also involved in trying to thwart the German invasion of Norway in April, 1940. "Ordered to attack enemy battleship off coast of Norway," he wrote in his logbook. "Unable to locate target."
Mr. BASKETT's other targets included German air bases and at least one town. In 1974, he read a book about bombing missions during the early part of the war and it occurred to him that he might have been the first. He contacted the Royal Air Force Historical Branch and sent details of one particular raid.
"On May 11th, 1940, I took off from Royal Air Force Hemswell in Hampden L.4109 of No. 61 Squadron, 5 Group, to bomb the Cross Roads in Munchen-Gladbach," Mr. BASKETT wrote, adding how the flight took four hours and 45 minutes. "I wonder if your records confirm that I had the doubtful privilege of being the first Royal Air Force type to drop a bomb on German soil in the war?"
The reply, when it came, said the first attack was on the German island of Sylt on March 19, 1940. Nominal in nature, it was in retaliation for German bombs that fell on the Orkney Islands in Scotland. The first raid "against industrial targets" took place May 10, 1940, the night the Germans invaded France and just a few short hours before Mr. BASKETT lifted off for his target, a manufacturing centre in Westphalia now known as Moenchengladbach.
Code words are sprinkled through his logs. Another entry mentioned "testing George" - Steve Harris, chief historian for the Department of National Defence in Ottawa, explained this meant Mr. BASKETT was experimenting with an automatic pilot. Mr. BASKETT was later stationed at Goderich, Ontario, the site of some top-secret Royal Air Force testing.
"Goderich was where a lot of research was going on with secret technology, on things such as advanced navigation," said Ted Barris, author of Behind the Glory: Canada's Role in the Allied Air War.
In 1942, all Hampdens were withdrawn from bombing duty and transferred to Coastal Command, where they were assigned to patrol shorelines and search for submarines. Many of the bombers were sent to Canada for use in training and were flown by four Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons - two examples still survive, the most complete of which is at the Canadian Museum of Flight in Langley, British Columbia As well, about 150 Hampdens were built at plants in Quebec and Ontario.
Much of Toby BASKETT's life reads like a trip through the last days of the British Empire. Born in England, he soon went to India, where his father was working in the police force. He was sent home to boarding school at Bedford School, near Bambridge. His father died while he was at school and the family moved to Australia.
After working at many jobs, including sheep farming and gold mining in New Guinea, Mr. BASKETT returned to England to learn how to fly. In 1936, he took a short-service commission in the Royal Air Force, expecting to remain for just three years. When Germany invaded Poland in 1939, he stayed on.
His fighting war was over by the end of 1940, however. That December, he sailed to Halifax on a troop ship. He served as a staff pilot at a Royal Air Force training base at Port Albert, on the shore of Lake Huron near Goderich, Ontario The unit had been transferred there from Kent, England, and later became part of the Commonwealth Air Training Plan.
"The location of the base must have been a political decision," said Mr. MITCHELL, who was also based there. "The weather was terrible with snowstorms coming in from the lake."
Other assignments in Canada included a posting to Nova Scotia, where he trained pilots to fly the Hudson bomber in anti-submarine patrols, and to Boucherville, Quebec, where he gave instruction on the Catalina flying boat. "They needed pilots with fighting experience to pass on their knowledge to the new pilots," Mr. Barris said.
It was in Canada that Mr. BASKETT met his wife, Vivian TEMPLE. She was a Red Cross volunteer during the war and they met at a dance. Their daughter, Lynne BODDY, said that during their courtship, her father would fly over her mother's Muskoka cottage and drop messages in bottles. At their wedding, Royal Air Force officers acted as ushers and Mr. MITCHELL stood up as best man.
At the end of 1944, the couple left Canada for the Bahamas. Mr. BASKETT was posted to Nassau, where he served as commanding officer of an Royal Air Force Transport Command base that was used to train pilots on Dakotas, the military version of the Douglas DC-3. At the time, the governor of the Bahamas was the Duke of Windsor, who had given up the British throne in 1936 to marry Wallis Simpson. "Mother was pregnant and lost the baby. She had a note from the Duchess expressing her condolences," said Lynne BODDY.
In August of 1945, Mr. BASKETT returned to Canada to work at Transport Command at Dorval airport, outside Montreal. He returned to England on the Queen Mary in October.
When the war ended, he left the Royal Air Force and worked in Jamaica for a couple of years as manager of British South American Airways, a short-lived airline that operated civilian versions of wartime bombers. In 1947, he rejoined the Royal Air Force and served in a number of global hot spots, including Kenya and Egypt.
In 1957, he left the Royal Air Force again and moved to Toronto, where he went to work selling real estate for Martin and Meredith. He took a while adjusting to a calm, middle-class life in Canada, but loved visiting Georgian Bay on Lake Huron. He also did wood carving and sketching, and kept a cartoon diary.
Toby BASKETT was born Cyril Alexander BASKETT at Bedford, England, on September 19, 1911. He died of pneumonia in Toronto on June 24, 2007. He was 95. He is survived by wife Vivian and daughter Lynne. He also leaves brother Geoffrey.

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TEMPLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
HERZ, Herman Carl
95 years young, died October 27th, 2007, in Toronto, after a long and prosperous life. Born July 23, 1912 in Elmira, Ontario, he went to a one room grade school learning German as his primary language. In 1929, Herm moved to Toronto, entering the College of Engineering (Mining) at the University of Toronto, graduating in 1933. He joined the Ventures Mining Company which took him to Malartic, Quebec. It was here, where after marrying Isabelle in 1935, he brought his new bride to her first home, a room above the assay office. In 1957, he moved his family back to Toronto where he worked for Falconbridge Nickel Mines until his retirement in 1967. He is remembered for his keen mind, his fondness for Chopin, the multitude of prize winning roses on Blythwood, but mostly, for his gentle loving and kindness as a father and husband. Surviving are his beloved wife of 72 years, Isabelle Margaret TEMPLE of Toronto; son William David of Toronto, Ontario, daughter Marion Louise of Phoenix, Arizona., and eight grandchildren, David, Robert, Lauren, Taryn, Vanessa HERZ of Toronto; Christopher, Gregory, Rebecca KENDALL and great-grandchild, Asher William of Phoenix. Funeral services will be held at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 31, at Dresinger Funeral Home in Elmira. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Toronto Hospital for Sick Children. Dad, may you dance in heaven, may the roses be sweeter, and the Symphony like none other. We love you.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
Bruce SMITH, Broadcaster (1919-2006)
Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio pioneer who was heard on Toronto airwaves for more than 30 years made his mark in 1947 on the milestone morning show, Toast and Jamboree
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S9
Toronto -- Bruce SMITH was a morning man who for many years was the autocratic ruler of his own radio program on Canadian Broadcasting Corporation in Toronto. He chose his own music, and preferred popular tunes of the day rather than the marshal music favoured by Canadian Broadcasting Corporation brass at the time, and even banned certain advertisements, back in the days when Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio ran commercials.
"I ran it lock stock and barrel," Mr. SMITH boasted to Blake KIRBY of The Globe and Mail in 1971. "I selected all the music, wrote and read many of the commercials and allowed what sponsors I wanted, which didn't include beer and cigarettes. That was quite an authority. I just assumed it and nobody objected."
His freedom didn't last forever. Producers gradually wrested control from Mr. SMITH, though his strong personality and success in the ratings meant he had more power than most of them put together.
Mr. SMITH also had a kind of whimsy that is almost unheard of today, but was then common among such fellow broadcasters as Allan McFee and Max Ferguson. For good measure, Mr. SMITH invented a character called Brewster the Rooster, who was introduced to listeners by barnyard sound effects that were followed by a rant done in Brewster's special voice. "Brewster the Rooster was my alter ego," Mr. SMITH once told a reporter. "He became a character through which I could make socially valid points."
Brewster the Rooster proved to be popular with the audience. One day, they lost the tape of Brewster's trademark cock-a-doodle-do and Mr. SMITH reported Brewster had broken his leg skiing and was recuperating at Sunnybrook Hospital. The news of the fictional bird's accident attracted many phone calls and get well cards from listeners.
For many years, Mr. SMITH battled for ratings supremacy with Wally CROUTER of CFRB radio. At the time, the morning radio dial was crowded with the likes of Pierre BERTON, and Charles TEMPLETON on CKEY.
Bruce SMITH grew up in Sault Ste. Marie, Ontario, where his father was a foreman at the local steel plant. He was a brilliant student and served as president of the student council. When he was 15, he decided he would like to work at CJIC, the local radio station. It had just opened and he marched in and announced he was the man to read newscasts. They gave him a job doing it on weekends.
The following year, young Bruce graduated from high school, but for the time he remained stuck at home. His mother thought he was too young to go to university and made him take a second year of Grade 13. He wrote and passed exams in every subject offered, except Spanish.
While in high school, he was chosen as one of the Canadians to represent the country at the coronation of George VI in 1937. He travelled to London and attended the ceremony in Westminster Abbey.
Shortly after his return home, he was finally allowed to go to the University of Toronto. He graduated in law, which was an undergraduate degree at the time, and served as assistant sports editor of The Varsity, the school paper. During that time, he also wrote a column on college sports for The Globe and Mail. He was in the officer's training plan and joined the army in 1941. He trained in Canada with the signals corps, went to England and landed in France soon after D-Day.
His unit, the South Saskatchewan Regiment, fought in France, Holland and Germany. After the war, he stayed on as a broadcaster to work for the army's radio station and to transmit on British Broadcasting Corporation wavelengths. He didn't leave England until late 1946, long after most Canadians had gone home.
By then, most of his fellow law graduates were well along in their careers, so he decided to take a teacher's certificate. He taught for three months at Danforth Technical School in Toronto before taking his first permanent job in radio at CHUM. One of his fellow announcers was Monty Hall, who went on to be the host of the long-running U.S. television game show, Let's Make a Deal. Mr. SMITH worked at CHUM for a little more than a year before joining the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. At first, he did mundane jobs, such as being the booth announcer, reading out such things as the call letters, station breaks and shorter newscasts.
He got a break when it turned out the morning man had trouble getting up on time. On July 19, 1948, Bruce SMITH became the new morning man and quickly made the program his own. "I even picked a Toronto hit parade to play every Friday. There was really no hit parade in 1950."
Bruce SMITH's morning show was known as Toast and Jamboree, and no other Canadian Broadcasting Corporation Radio program in Toronto had more listeners. It even outperformed such U. S imports broadcast by the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation as Don McNeil's Breakfast Club, which ran at 9 a.m., and Ma Perkins, a popular daily soap opera.
Toast and Jamboree made him a household name in Southern Ontario. Despite that, he remained a modest man and was never a prima donna. People who worked with him recall him as being as friendly in person as he was on the air.
"I was a starry-eyed kid and didn't know what Bruce looked like, though I knew his voice," recalled traffic reporter, Jim CURRAN, of his first day at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. "When he said 'Welcome, Jim,' his voice had the same warmth as it did on the radio."
After 23 years doing the morning program, Bruce SMITH was edged out in favour of a younger man, Alex TREBEK, who went on to become the host of Jeopardy, another U.S. game show. In news reports at the time, Mr. SMITH put on a brave face and said how getting up that early wasn't natural, but his colleagues believe he would much rather have kept working the morning shift.
After that, he worked on an afternoon program called The Bruce Smith Show. One of his habits before going to work was to head down to the harbour and check out which ships were in. Later, he became president of the Toronto Marine Historical Society.
Mary McFAYDEN was a producer of his afternoon program for two years. She recalled that on September 2, 1977, they were broadcasting live from the Canadian National Exhibition when a plane practising for the air show suddenly crashed into Lake Ontario. It was a Second World War Fairey Firefly and the pilot was killed. Until that moment, the program offered interviews, live music and other light fare, and then the veteran Mr. SMITH swung into action.
"He showed all his skills as a broadcaster, switching from covering a fair to covering a plane crash. We didn't know much, but he was able to cover it and change the tone without missing a beat," recalled Ms. McFAYDEN.
In 1978, Mr. SMITH decided to retire before someone at the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation decided he needed a push. "He didn't want someone coming and telling him it was time to go," said his son, Kim. "He left at the top."
Bruce SMITH was not yet 60 when he left broadcasting. He never went back to it -- even part-time. Instead, he developed a number of sidelines during 28 years of retirement. He became part owner of a curling club, which he ran as well as competing there, and followed his interest in shipping by taking trips as a passenger on lakers that plied the Great Lakes.
He and his wife, Beth, travelled frequently until she became ill. For 10 years, he devoted himself to taking care of her.
Bruce Arnold SMITH was born on August 22, 1919. He died on December 26, 2006, in Hamilton, Ontario He was 87. Mr. SMITH suffered from a rare type of blood cancer and had been ill for only a few weeks. He is survived by his four children, Kim, Cam, Kirk and Ann Elise. His wife, Beth, died in 1999.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-02 published
TEMPLETON, Edna M.J.,
Passed away October 27, 2007 following an 8-month battle with breast cancer. She died peacefully and without any pain at home in Thornhill with family, just one month before her 69th birthday. Edna, mother of Karen and Ivan and spouse of Frank BUNN, was a mathematician, computer programmer and scientist, an avid gardener and energetic tennis player whose warm and caring nature touched everyone she met. She enjoyed challenges and learning new skills - whether building electronics and furniture, windsurfing, Scuba diving, sewing clothes, landscaping, or (somewhat more reluctantly) house restoration. We will miss the long walks, bicycle rides, hiking, skiing, swimming, dinners with family and Friends, and quiet talks. Edna will be greatly missed by all who knew her. Family and Friends are invited to join us in a celebration of her life at the memorial gathering at Heintzman House in Thornhill, 135 Bay Thorn Drive, Saturday November 3rd from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m.

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TEMPLETON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-12 published
PERRY, Charles G.
Peacefully at home, with family at his side, Charlie ('Chas') left to join his beloved wife, Mary Jane, who left exactly four years earlier. Charlie's positive, love-of-life spirit will live on with his children, Janet and Doug (& Lesley), Grandchildren, Tommy and Robyn, Siblings, Norma ORGILL (& Herb/ Bobcaygeon,) Joyce TEMPLETON (& Brian/ Midland,) Peter PERRY (& Judy/ Collingwood.) Charlie was genuine, friendly and welcoming to all. He was forever loyal and giving in every way: to his wife and family, to his country (World War 2 Veteran), in his successful business life and his volunteering (eg. Red Cross), to the countless charities he supported, and to the many great Friends he met while living across Canada, the country he loved. Trust and integrity were his foundation, fun and life experiences with his family and Friends were his great pleasures. His optimism and determination in his battle with cancer was truly inspirational and he was able to make others around him smile and laugh in even the most difficult times. A tremendously successful and meaningful life lived. A memorial service for family and Friends will be held on Sat., December 15th at 10: 30 a.m. at Leaside United Church (822 Millwood Rd. Toronto) followed by a reception. Visitation will be held at Bedford Funeral Home (159 Eglinton Ave West) Fri., December 14, from 2-4 and 6-8 p.m. If desired, donations could be made to Lung Cancer Canada (416.785.3439 or 1.888.445.4403) or, in view of the time of year and in keeping with Charlie's concern for those less fortunate, the Daily Bread Food Bank (416.203.0050).

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TEMPLIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
QUESNELLE, Amy Catherine (née TEMPLIN)
Passed away peacefully, surrounded by the love of her family on Tuesday, October 23, 2007 at Lisaard House, Cambridge at the age of 41.
Beloved wife of John QUESNELLE; loving mother of Matthew, Scott and Sydney. Dear daughter of Elizabeth (née MORRISON) TEMPLIN of Kitchener and her late husband Peter and daughter-in-law of Bernard and Helen QUESNELLE of Sudbury. Dear sister of John Templin of Whitby, Martha and her husband Stephen WENN of Waterloo, Sarah and her husband Stephen QUANZ, of Kitchener, Jane and her husband David ALBERS of Calgary, brother-in-law, Peter QUESNELLE and wife Linda of Waterloo, sisters-in-law Rita WILSON and Susan QUESNELLE of Calgary and Cathy QUESNELLE of Halifax. Amy will be fondly remembered by many nieces and nephews.
Predeceased by her brother Timothy (1956), sister-in-law Mary BARK- TEMPLIN (1991,) brother-in-law Doug WILSON (2006,) and sister-in-law Lee TEMPLIN (2007.)
Amy was employed by Bell Canada for many years but still had plenty of time for her real passion which was her children. She also found time to tend to her gardens, work on her scrapbooks, and play the occasional round of golf.
Amy's family will receive relatives and Friends on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. at the Henry Walser Funeral Home, 507 Frederick Street, Kitchener, 519-749-8467 and on Saturday from 10-10: 45 a.m. at Parkminster United Church, 275 Erb St. E., Waterloo. A celebration of Amy's life will take place at 11 a.m. on Saturday, October 27, 2007 at Parkminster United Church, Rev. Keith HAGERMAN officiating.
Cremation has taken place. Internment will take place in the family plot at Belsyde Cemetery, Fergus.
In Amy's memory, donations may be made to the family trust fund or Lisaard House. Please call the funeral home for details.
The family would like to express their gratitude for the overwhelming support and assistance from family, Friends, relatives, and strangers over the past three years. Special thanks to the Dr.'s and staff at the Grand River Regional Cancer Centre, Community Care Access Centre in-home care staff, and the staff at Lisaard House.
Visit www.henrywalser.com for Amy's memorial.

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