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"SPR" 2007 Obituary


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SPRAGG o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-01-10 published
ELLIOT/ELLIOTT, Rev. Dr. Mark Adam
At his residence with the love and support of his family and Friends Monday evening January 8, 2007. Rev. Dr. Mark ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of R.R.#1, Wiarton in his 51st year. Loving husband of Maureen ELLIOT/ELLIOTT (née KONING.) Loved father of Josh of Port Elgin and his companion Lori HEATHERINGTON of Wiarton, Kristen ELLIOT/ELLIOTT and her husband Ian MUNROE of Woodbridge and Joel of Toronto. Dear son of Joy ELLIOT/ELLIOTT of Chatham. Dear brother of Barrie and his wife Stella of Holmesville and Sharlene and her husband John COWAN of Chatham. Dear son-in-law of Jim and Joan KONING of Chatham. Dear brother-in-law of Lynne and her husband Daryl HOVEY of New Hamburg and Rick KONING and his wife Dar of Mississauga. Lovingly remembered by several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by his father Edgar and one brother Philp. Mark was the Pastor of Frank Street Baptist Church, Wiarton. Friends may call at the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Thursday from 2 to 4 and 7 to 9 p.m. A Celebration of Mark's life will be conducted from the Shallow Lake Community Church Friday morning at 11: 00 a.m. with Pastor Allan SPRAGG officiating. Memorial contributions to Frank Street Baptist Church, Wiarton would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Mark by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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SPRAGG o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-01 published
Battle of Britain fighter pilot won DFC twice and a rare DSO
Having learned to fly at the Montreal Flying Club, he joined the Royal Canadian Air Force along with many other members after Canada entered the Second World War. He was soon in the thick of the action
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S11
Knowlton, Quebec -- Wing Commander Dal RUSSELL was one of the last surviving Canadian pilots who fought in the Battle of Britain, and one of most highly decorated Canadian fliers of the Second World War.
He was a 23-year-old pilot officer when he started flying Hurricanes with No. 1 Royal Canadian Air Force Squadron (later known as Royal Canadian Air Force 401 Squadron) on August 19, 1940. By the end of September, 1940, he had destroyed more than five German aircraft.
After several of his victories he sent telegrams home to his parents in Montreal. "Tommy [Flying Officer Thomas Little of Montreal] and I got our first Dornier," said part of a 27-word telegram. In mid-September another said: "Cigarettes and food arrived. Many Thanks. Got my third Hun yesterday. Heinkel bomber. Love to all."
In almost every telegram sent home he asked for cigarettes, food and, in one case, a sleeping bag. Every telegram, press clipping and letter that arrived were kept in scrapbooks by his sister Jane. When she went overseas to join her two brothers, their mother took over the record-keeping.
The reality of battle was much less cheery than the telegrams. Wing Commander RUSSELL later described the fear and danger of aerial combat: "When you are in the thick of a fight at 20,000 feet, and travelling at a speed of 400 miles per hour through a sky filled with hostile aircraft, you haven't time to think about much but keeping the other fellow off your tail, avoiding a collision and getting a German within the reach of your eight machine guns. You try to draw a bead on him and watch out behind you at the same time. Your mouth is as dry as cotton somehow, and the palms of your hands are dripping wet."
His ground crew nicknamed him Deadeye Dick for the number of German bombers and fighters he was credited with damaging or destroying. They painted the legend "Ace of Spades" on his Hurricane for luck. Like many allied fighter pilots, he was certain he shot down or damaged more planes than he was given credit for.
"Claimed two shot down and four badly damaged. But I am quite sure we got five in all. Yesterday, August 28th, we were told that our bag was three shot down, and three disabled; so that is a good start anyway," he wrote in a letter home.
A handsome man, he featured in a Canadian Press story about a visit to his base on September 26, 1940, by Air Marshal Billy Bishop, the First World War flying ace. The reporter described him, though did not mention him by name, after he landed during an inspection of the base.
"Air Marshal Bishop examined one of the Hurricanes which was in the scrap. An even dozen holes and scars on its propeller and fuselage showed its pilot, a blond curly-haired youth [Mr. RUSSEL], had been in the bomber's bullet stream."
By the end of October, 1939, the British, Canadian and Polish pilots had won the Battle of Britain and forced German to cancel its plans of invasion. The squadron had destroyed and damaged more than 70 aircraft, while losing 16 Hurricanes and three pilots.
Mr. RUSSELL was a certified war hero, the first of three Royal Canadian Air Force officers to be awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross. To Ottawa, that made him more valuable as a walking recruiting poster, so they brought him home for a tour of cities and towns.
"See and hear about the Royal Air Force from One of Them," read a poster for a meeting on August 9, 1941, that charged admission to raise money for the war effort. Flight Officer RUSSEL, DFC, was the star speaker. He also wrote articles for newspapers.
Along with his propaganda efforts he was training for a special mission with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Promoted to the rank of squadron leader, Mr. RUSSELL was in command of a secret mission to prepare pilots in flying U.S. P40 Kittyhawks. After initial training in Ottawa, and in Camp Borden north of Toronto, they moved to a base at Sea Island near Vancouver.
After that, the squadron was transferred to bases in Alaska, but for some unknown reason Mr. RUSSELL did not accompany them. His letters home at the time reflect bitterness about not being sent on one of the few missions in the war in which Canadian fighter pilots were pitted against the Japanese.
Instead, he soon found himself back in Europe, this time flying Spitfires. Many of his missions were spent escorting bombers and in 1943 he won a second Distinguished Flying Cross. The award came shortly after his promotion to Wing Commander. "This officer as Wing Leader has led his wing on a large number of escort sorties without the loss of single bomber to enemy fighters," the citation said. "The high praise earned by the wing for its skill is largely due to the great devotion to duty and ability displayed by Wing Commander RUSSEL."
In April of 1944, he requested a demotion to squadron leader so that he could fly combat mission in the invasion of France, which everyone knew was coming. As a wing commander he would likely have been assigned to a desk.
On D-Day, June 6, 1944, he flew many missions over Normandy but, as it happened, the Luftwaffe was almost entirely absent. In all, he spent eight hours in the air doing sweeps of the beaches to protect troops. He wrote home of watching the fighting on the ground: "The tank battles are quite amazing… a job I would hate to have. They looked like a bunch of ants crawling around, hiding between the hedges and trees and suddenly opening fire with devastating effect on some poor Hun that happened along."
Four days later, he flew to a forward airfield in France and became the first Spitfire pilot to land in recaptured France. "First Spit pilot to make successful landing in France," read the entry in his logbook for June 10, 1944.
Less than a month later, at the peak of the fighting in Normandy, he was again made a wing commander and put in charge of No 126 wing. A large unit comprised of four Royal Canadian Air Force squadrons, the promotion meant he was more or less grounded.
"I will be doing very little flying, which will please you both, I am sure," he wrote to his parents, who by that time were also worrying about his brother, Hugh, also an Royal Canadian Air Force fighter pilot.
Even so, he still managed to go on three missions in September and seven in October. An entry in his logbook on October 4, 1944, describes a victory by his pilots against a German jet, the Me 262. "401 Squadron destroyed the first jet job ME 262 in the Royal Air Force."
In late 1944, he was awarded a Distinguished Service Order, a rare distinction medal for an Royal Canadian Air Force officer. "In recent intensive air operations the squadrons under the command of Wing Commander RUSSELL have completed a large number of sorties," the citation read. "Within a period of three days a very large number of enemy transport vehicles were attacked, of which 127 were set on fire and a bigger number were damaged. In addition, four hostile aircraft were destroyed and seventeen tanks and nineteen other armoured vehicles were damaged. By his masterly leadership, sound judgment and fine fighting qualities, Wing Commander RUSSELL played a good part in the success achieved. His example inspired all."
June of 1944 was also a month of tragedy for the RUSSELL family. They received word that Hugh RUSSELL had been killed in an encounter with German fighters. In 1945, Dal RUSSELL returned to Canada and by the end of the year he had left the Royal Canadian Air Force and was working in a sales job.
Dal RUSSELL was born in Toronto but moved to Montreal when he was eight months old. His father's family ran Russel Steel, while his mother, Mary LABATT, was from the famous family of brewers. In Montreal, he attended Selwyn House and then went to boarding school at Trinity College School in Port Hope, Ontario, where he proved to better at football and hockey than at algebra. (Years later, when he was awarded the DFC in the Battle of Britain, the school declared a half-day holiday in his honour.)
After graduating, he went back to Montreal where he got a job and took up flying. He joined the Montreal Flying Club and learned on a Gipsy Moth biplane at the Carterville Airport.
Canada declared war on Germany on September 10, 1939. It was a Sunday, and Mr. RUSSELL was home for the weekend visiting his parents. He and most of the other members of the Montreal Flying Club joined the Royal Canadian Air Force by the end of the week. Mr. RUSSELL enlisted on Friday, September 15.
They were soon in Britain, flying Canadian-made Hurricanes. "We became so used to our Hurricanes that they were very nearly part of us," he told a reporter at the time. "We flew by instinct, without consciously handling the controls."
In all, he flew 286 operational sorties in three tours of duty. He was never shot down and the most notable damage he suffered was to the canopy of his Hurricane. Curiously, it had been hit by spent shell casings from the machine guns of a fellow Royal Canadian Air Force pilot.
Along with his two DFCs and the DSO Mr. RUSSELL was awarded France's Croix de Guerre with Silver Star, the Order of Orange-Nassau with Swords from the Netherlands and the Czechoslovak War Cross.
After returning home, he worked for Sperry Gyroscope in Montreal and served as a director of Labatt Breweries. In the 1960s, he and his wife Lorraine bought a shop called Heaney's, an upscale linen store. They later expanded the business and opened a shop in Toronto.
After retiring in the mid-1980s Mr. RUSSELL and his wife spent a great deal of time at their farm in Dorset, Vt. He practised fly-fishing on a pond stocked with trout in preparation for salmon fishing expeditions. He was invited to hunt by Friends, but after returning from the war he never again liked shooting. He also gave up flying, having found recreational aviation too expensive for his tastes.
In the 1990s he and his wife settled in Knowlton in Quebec's Eastern Townships.
Blair Dalzel RUSSELL was born in Toronto on December 9, 1916. He died after a stroke in Knowlton, Quebec, on November 20, 2007. He was 90. He leaves his children, Diana, Blair and Charles.
He also leaves three Canadian Battle of Britain pilots: Robert Barton of New Westminster, British Columbia; John Stewart Hart of Naramata, British Columbia; and Henry SPRAGG of Dundas, Ontario

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SPRAGUE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-23 published
WARD, Audrey L. " Long" (née SLADE)
Suddenly at her home in Owen Sound on Saturday, July 21, 2007. Audrey L. WARD (née SLADE) in her 82nd year. Dear companion of Ron McBRIDE. Loving mother of Julie (Ted) ANDERSON of Owen Sound and Brenda HEAD (Ernie BRISTOW) of Clarksburg. She will be sadly missed by eight grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; step-children Nancy (Don) AKINS, Shelly (Bev) BUCKTON, Jim (Mary) SPRAGUE and Danny SPRAGUE; seven step-grandchildren and three step-great-grandchildren. Also survived by her sister Edith (Elmer) GALBRAITH of Orillia and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by three sisters and two brothers. At Audrey's wishes, cremation has taken place and a private family gathering will be held. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to Grey Bruce Cremation and Burial Services 519-371-8507.

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SPRAGUE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-24 published
WARD, Audrey L. " Long" (née SLADE)
Suddenly at her home in Owen Sound on Saturday, July 21, 2007. Audrey L. Ward (née SLADE) in her 82nd year. Predeceased by longtime companion Chester SPRAGUE. Dear friend of Ron McBRIDE. Loving mother of Julie (Ted) ANDERSON of Owen Sound and Brenda HEAD (Ernie BRISTOW) of Clarksburg. She will be sadly missed by eight grandchildren; seven great-grandchildren; step-children Nancy (Don) AKINS, Shelly (Bev) BUCKTON, Jim (Mary) SPRAGUE and Danny SPRAGUE; seven step-grandchildren and three step-great-grandchildren. Also survived by her sister Edith (Elmer) GALBRAITH of Orillia and several nieces and nephews. Predeceased by three sisters and two brothers. At Audrey's wishes, cremation has taken place and a private family gathering will be held. Memorial donations to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Diabetes Association would be appreciated by the family. Arrangements entrusted to Grey Bruce Cremation and Burial Services 519-371-8507.

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SPRAGUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-05 published
MacPHERSON, Louise Hilton
Died peacefully on November 2, 2007 at the Intensive Care Unit of McMaster Medical Centre, Hamilton, after a sudden illness, with her children at her side. Her spirit is now reunited with her beloved, late husband W. Douglas MacPHERSON but will be dearly missed by Anne (and Ted) FARLEY of Guelph, Ian (and Wendy) MacPHERSON of Prince Edward County, her sister, Suzanne HILTON of Arlington, Massachusetts, her sister-in-law Joan GORDON of Burlington, cousin Harriet (and Henry) SPRAGUE of Dundas, her grandchildren, Laura (and Chris) RATCLIFFE, Alice (and Tim) BLYDE, James FARLEY, Sandy and Patrick MacPHERSON, her great-grandchild, Hannah RATCLIFFE, her extended family and her many Friends.
A memorial service will be held at Central Presbyterian Church, 165 Charlton Avenue West, Hamilton, on Friday, November 9, 2007 at 2 p.m. Flowers are gratefully declined. In lieu thereof, donations to Central Presbyterian Church or the McMaster Medical Centre Intensive Care Unit would be greatly appreciated by the family.

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SPRAGUE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-28 published
SPRAGUE, Jean Mary
Quietly at the Guelph General Hospital on December 27, 2007 in her 82nd year. Jean dedicated her life as a loving wife, mother and grand mother. Jean will be forever remembered by her loving husband of 60 years, Ron SPRAGUE, her two sons Todd (Lynne) SPRAGUE of Mendham, New Jersey and Blair SPRAGUE of Aurora, grand children Sean, Caitlin, Molly, Caleigh, Timothy and Andrew. Jean was predeceased by her sister Ruth BROWN. She will also be sadly missed by her many Friends. Resting at the Gilbert MacIntyre and son Funeral Home "Hart Chapel", 1099 Gordon Street, Guelph where Jean's family will receive Friends for memorial visitation on Sunday, December 30, 2007 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society (Cards are available at the funeral home 519-821-5077 or send condolences at (www.gilbertmacintyreandson.com)

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SPRING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-13 published
DANN, Clifford Milton
After three philosophic years at Castleview-Wychwood Towers, Cliff died peacefully, at Toronto General Hospital on New Year's Eve 2006, at the age of 81. son of Olive (née BRASIER) and nephew of Lillian MONSON, Cliff never tired of remembering his glory days on the football and basketball teams at Humberside Collegiate. Along with spectator sports, he loved golf, cards, games, television, jazz and a good cup of coffee. With a work life beginning with Air Canada (then Trans Canada Airlines) and ending with Harrison and Blackburn Real Estate, Cliff always had time for his wide circle of Friends and anyone who pulled up a chair. Although dementia and Parkinson's Disease curtailed his activities in his last years, he never lost his enthusiasm for the visits from his daughter Cynthia (Dann BEARDSLEY) and his treasured grandchildren Rachel, Amelia and Max. "Grandpa" was extremely proud of them all but remained dismayed that they played piano better than they played golf. He enjoyed sports discussions with his son-in-law Jay INGRAM and conversations with his Friends, especially Frances STRETTON, Lou TICKINS and Royal COPELAND, and his cousin Pat GAVED of Guernsey, Channel Islands. Special thanks to Jill HALLAM at Castleview-Wychwood Towers and Doctor Melanie SPRING, Doctor Tony LEE, Lisa, Cecilia, Kayan, Lovelynn, Mike, Jackie, Judy, Linda and Pat of Toronto General Hospital's 13th floor. A memorial service will be held Saturday, January 13 at the Lynett Funeral Home, 3299 Dundas Street West, Toronto. Visitation at 2 p.m. will be followed by a chapel service at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Hospital for Sick Children Foundation -- IBD Research Program 525 University Avenue, Toronto M5G 2L3; or to the Toronto All-Star Big Band 3820 Bloor Street West, Toronto M9B 1K8.

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SPRING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
HODKINSON, John Stanley
Peacefully at Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital, on Thursday, June 14, 2007, at the age of 84. Beloved husband of Elizabeth "Beth" HODKINSON (née SPRING.) Loving father of John HODKINSON and his partner Vanda of Toronto, Spring WATSON of Orillia, June WRIGHT and her husband Tod of Burlington, Anne WAGGONER of Orillia and Lisa DIETZ and her husband Bob of Milwaukee. Cherished Grandfather of eleven grandchildren. Dear brother of the late Sidney HODKINSON. A Memorial Service will be held at Port Nelson United Church, 3132 South Drive (at Rossmore), Burlington on Thursday, June 21, 2007 at 3 p.m. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Smith's Funeral Home, Burlington (905-632-3333). If desired, expressions of sympathy to Port Nelson United Church or the Joseph Brant Memorial Hospital Foundation would be sincerely appreciated by the family.

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SPRING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-28 published
SPRING, Claire
It is with great sadness in her 90th year, on Monday, August 27, 2007 at Baycrest Hospital. Claire SPRING, beloved wife of the late Joseph SPRING. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Helena SPRING, and Sheldon and Esther SPRING. Devoted grandmother of Nikki, Joey and Robby. Many thanks to Sharon and Yvette for their loving care and compassion, and to cousin Sarah GOLDMINTZ for her endless love and support to Claire and her family. From Poland to Joliette, Quebec, to Galt, to Toronto, Claire made many lifelong Friends and always made the most of life. Private family service and shiva. Memorial donations may be made to the Baycrest Centre Foundation, 416-785-2875.

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SPRING o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-08 published
SPRING, Allan
On Friday December 7, 2007 in Florida. Allan SPRING beloved husband of Frances. Loving and beloved father of Bobby of Vancouver, Elise, and Lori of Toronto, and Honey of Florida. Dear brother and brother-in-law of Nat and Merle. Devoted grandfather of Sarah, and Mose. Loving cousin of Herb and Ruth TOBIS, Pauline WALSH, and Fern STIMPSON. Services will be held at Benjamin's Park Memorial Chapel, 2401 Steeles Ave. West (3 lights west of Dufferin). Please call (416) 663-9060 on Sunday after 9: 30 a.m. for service information or visit
www.benjamins.ca
Interment, Adath Israel Synagogue Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery. Memorial donations may be made to the Allan Spring Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, Ontario M6A 2C3 (416) 780-0324, www.benjamins.ca

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SPRINGER o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-04 published
Grieving husband can still forgive
Jean SPRINGER was killed after she opened her door to a friend of her son.
By Brodie FENLON, Sun Media, Thurs., January 4, 2007
Toronto -- Jean SPRINGER loved with abandon, "walked the talk" of her deep Christian faith, and would have been the first to forgive her killer, said her husband of 36 years.
Arden-Ray SPRINGER returned to his home on Snowball Crescent yesterday, but could not bear to go inside, where cleaners worked on a front hall foyer after the crime scene tape came down.
It was here that Jean SPRINGER, 60, an accountant and mother of two adult sons, was shot in the head and killed New Year's Day. A man with reported mental illness, who was known to the family, has been charged with first-degree murder.
SPRINGER had been preparing a traditional dinner for Friends and family at the time.
Her husband said he wants the community to move beyond her death, to turn their thoughts to her legacy of love and faith in action.
At times choking back his words, Arden-Ray said he does not question God's master plan, as much as it hurts.
These are his words: "My faith in God comes from Jean… Her involvement in the community… she chose the church to be involved in the community… This is not going to shake my faith in God. Jean&hellip is a beautiful woman. A beautiful life. People should know about that.
"We all know the problems in a multicultural society. And we've had a lot of black-on-black violence. And usually, when we have black-on-black violence, it usually (involves) drugs and gangs&hellip I'd like everyone out there to know this is not the situation here. It's not what happened. None of the stereotypical things&hellip
"The third message may be the most important one because… I know that people are angry, (they want) vengeance. Vengeance is mine, said the Lord. Not always. There's no vengeance here… There's no hate against the person who took Jean… Love of God. It's a gift. And that's the message we would like to put out there because I know that Jean, that's her life. She never hated a person&hellip If more of us could be like Jean, the world would be a better place.
"There was no animosity between my children and (the accused). He was welcomed here. She opened the door and welcomed him.
"The love of God has given us faith. We want people out there to know that the only way we will solve the situation that's present in our society is through God and love. If there's any legacy that Jean leaves for us, it would be that."
A funeral for Jean SPRINGER will be held Saturday.

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SPRINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-03 published
son may have been target
Police make arrest in woman's death
By Raveena AULAKH and Timothy APPLEBY, Page A8
Toronto -- Jean SPRINGER may have been shot down when she tried to protect her youngest son from a friend who showed up at her front door with a gun, according to a Toronto police source.
Ms. SPRINGER, 60, was killed on New Year's Day by a single bullet that struck her in the face. She was pronounced dead at Sunnybrook hospital, becoming the city's first homicide victim of 2007.
Heavily armed officers arrested 26-year-old Altaf IBRAHIM 12 hours later in his basement apartment in Scarborough, a few minutes drive from the SPRINGER home. He is charged with first-degree murder, a charge that implies the killing was planned.
A police source said last night that the gunman may have been looking for Ms. SPRINGER's youngest son Antoine, also 26, when he arrived at the SPRINGER home in the Malvern neighbourhood about 2: 30 p.m.
"It looks like there was some kind of dispute between the two young men and Ms. SPRINGER got between and got shot," a police source said.
The accused is said to have known Ms. SPRINGER's youngest son, who along with an older brother was in his mother's Snowball Crescent home Monday as she prepared New Year's Day dinner.
"They grew up together, at least from their teen years," said Detective Gary GRINTON of the Toronto homicide squad.
Mr. IBRAHIM lives alone in an apartment on Brimorton Drive. He was arrested about 2 a.m. yesterday without a struggle. Clad in orange prison garb, he appeared briefly in court in Scarborough yesterday and was remanded in custody. Police were still seeking the handgun allegedly used to kill Ms. SPRINGER, known locally as "Auntie Jeannie."
"You have what I believe was a truly innocent woman just going about her business," Det. GRINTON said of Ms. SPRINGER, widely described as an exemplary citizen, devoted parent and regular worshipper at the Malvern Methodist Church. "It's shocking."
Neither Mr. IBRAHIM nor any members of the SPRINGER family have criminal records. And if there was any animosity before Monday's shooting, it had not been manifest in the shape of threats or any physical altercations, Det. GRINTON said.
Nor were any gang affiliations involved, he said. "None whatsoever."
He dismissed a news report that said the gunman yelled "Happy New Year," as he opened fire, but agreed that because Ms. SPRINGER let him into her home, she likely perceived no threat.
Beyond stating that postshooting 911 calls were received from several neighbours, as well as from within the SPRINGER home, detectives would not say what led them to charge Mr. IBRAHIM so quickly.
Yesterday, at the three-unit house where Mr. IBRAHIM has lived since last summer, few neighbours seemed to know much about the basement apartment's tall, solitary occupant, who would sometimes step outside for a cigarette but mostly kept to himself.
"He moved in when the new owner bought the house," said George BOORNE, who lives across the street and saw the 2 a.m. arrest. "But I never saw him around."
At the SPRINGER home yesterday, Friends and neighbours voiced shock and sorrow at the brutal death of a woman described as a popular pillar of the community who often helped organize local events.
"I met her on New Year's Eve at the home of one of our sisters, we had a good time," said Norma McKENZIE, who had known Ms. SPRINGER at the Malvern Methodist Church for 10 years.
Ms. McKENZIE described the family of four as God-fearing, close-knit, regular church-goers. "Antoine was part of my team at Ford company and we worked well together."
Other worshippers concurred in praising Ms. SPRINGER's devotion to family and church.
"She was closely involved with the church," said Sandra LECKY, church secretary. "We know where she is today -- there was no victory here."
Church staff brought in extra chairs yesterday evening as mourners packed in to pay their respects. Those in attendance hugged and consoled one another, occasionally rising in songs.
Reading from a statement prepared by Ms. SPRINGER's family -- most attended the service but did not want to speak to reporters youth pastor Marlon MITCHELL described her as "… quiet, charming, intelligent and very much understated in manner. She had style and flair, but all of it counted for nothing compared to how much she celebrated her relationship with God through Jesus Christ."
Ms. SPRINGER was born in 1946 in Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. As a student, she won a scholarship to a grammar school for girls and eventually earned a teacher's diploma. She arrived in Canada in the late 1960s, and initially continued teaching primary school. However, she soon switched jobs, becoming an accountant. Self-employed, she stayed in that line of work until her death.
But it was her religious faith that stood out above all else, Friends said yesterday. Indeed, it is that faith that now allows her family to bear no grudges against the man accused of stepping into her home and taking her life.
"Today we mourn her loss, but our faith calls on us to forgive others [as] God has in Christ forgiven us," Mr. MITCHELL read from the family's statement yesterday. "Jean had a forgiving spirit and we are sure that she would want us to forgive whoever has committed this senseless act."

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SPRINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-02 published
Arrest in first 2007 homicide
Photos By Carlos OSORIO / Toronto Star
Police said Jean SPRINGER was shot in the face after answering the door at her home on Snowball Cres. near Neilson Rd. and Sheppard Ave. E. SPRINGER, who was in her 60s, was pronounced dead at hospital. The slaying is Toronto's first homicide of 2007.
Victim one of four hit by gunshots as 2007 gets off to a violent start in Toronto
By Isabel TEOTONIO, Joanna SMITH and Thulasi SRIKANTHAN, Staff Reporters
It is January 2, only two days into the New Year, and police are already busy investigating a string of shootings throughout the city that left one woman dead and three other people injured.
A man arrested in connection with Toronto's first homicide of 2007 appeared in a Scarborough courthouse this morning wearing an orange jumpsuit and looking dishevelled.
Altaf IBRAHIM, 26, made a brief court appearance after a lengthy delay. He is charged with first-degree murder. Also in the courtroom were three of his male relatives, but they refused to speak with reporters.
Toronto police arrested the man after the shooting death Monday of Jean SPRINGER, 60, in her Malvern home around 2: 30 p.m.
SPRINGER was shot in the face and killed when she opened the door of her home to a caller, believed to be a friend of her son's.
During the wee hours of this morning, another woman was shot, reportedly in the face, in an Etobicoke high-rise.
Emergency crews were called to the 20th floor of the building on Weston Rd. near Lawrence Ave. W. at about 1 a.m., where they found a woman, about 20 years old, suffering from gunshot wounds, police said.
Police would not comment on the extent of her injuries, but said the homicide squad has been called in to monitor the case. She is in hospital and fighting for her life.
Investigators do not have a suspect at this time and the victim's name is being withheld until her family has been notified, police said.
A couple of hours later, around 3: 20 a.m., two men were shot in the leg as doormen were in the process of kicking them out of a downtown Toronto nightclub.
Police are investigating if one of the victims was the shooter and if a doorman was the intended target.
One shooting victim is 19 and the other is around the same age.
Police were called to the Kool Haus, which is part of The Guvernment entertainment complex on Queens Quay E. at Lower Jarvis Street, after shots rang out near the entrance to the club, where a private event was being held.
The two men, who are Friends, were part of a larger group being ejected by security because of a fight that had broken out. Gunfire erupted just outside the Jarvis St. entrance.
One victim tried to flee in a taxi, but moments later it was stopped by police. The other was found at the scene.
Each was transported with non-life threatening injuries to hospital, where they are currently under police watch.
Charges have not been laid against the men.
Anyone with information is asked to call 416-222-8477.

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SPRINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-03 published
A knock, and then a shot
A quiet afternoon preparing to entertain shattered by a visitor on New Year's Day
By Dale Anne FREED, Staff Reporter with files from Thulasi SRIKANTHAN and Betsy POWELL
It was New Year's Day. And the fragrant smells of cow-heel soup, kingfish and chicken wafted through the house when Arden-Ray SPRINGER heard the knock at the front door.
"Answer the door, Jean," he called up from the basement. He thought guests were arriving early for a family party.
Instead, he heard a man's voice. "Is Anton here?"
"No, he's got his own place now," he heard his wife say.
"Is Anwele here?"
Jean called her son. It was the last time he heard her voice.
Then he heard a bang.
"That's a gunshot," he thought. "What's a gunshot doing in my house?"
Arden-Ray ran upstairs, just as a young man was leaving. He turned to the foyer and saw his wife lying near the kitchen, a gunshot wound to her temple.
"She's lying in a pool of blood. She never saw it coming, that's the saving grace. There was no frozen fear on her face."
Then the oldest son, Anwele-Ray, 32, came running down the stairs. He had recognized the voice at the door. It was a friend of his 28-year-old brother, his father said.
"I opened the door. There he was, he was pointing a gun at me. I pushed Anwele to the left and I fell to the right," he said.
"It was a handgun."
The man put his gun away as neighbours started to gather outside the house on Snowball Cres., near Markham Rd. and Sheppard Ave. E.
"Get a licence plate," the father yelled out as he ran to tend to his 60-year-old wife.
"She looked so peaceful like she was sleeping," he said. "The blood is so bright red.
"I'm screaming. I know she's dead," he said.
"Anton isn't there, so he shot Jean."
His son got a partial licence plate and so did the neighbours. But with all the support he got that terrible afternoon, Arden-Ray, 59, couldn't thank one homicide detective enough.
"Dan SHEPPARD did an excellent job. And he got massive cooperation from the community," said a grateful Springer.
"I'd like to reiterate there is no drug activity and no gangs involved in this killing," said Det. SHEPPARD.
At a news conference at police headquarters yesterday, homicide Det. Gary GRINTON said, "It's shocking when you have what I believe is a truly innocent woman who was… just going about her business, was not in an area that would be known for violence.
"She was in her home, that's where we're all supposed to be safe."
But he wouldn't comment on whether the accused was, in the parlance of police, an "emotionally disturbed person."
But a source said police are investigating whether the man had a history of mental illness.
Altaf IBRAHIM, 26, was arrested at his home near Scarborough Golf Club Rd. and Brimorton Doctor at 2 a.m. yesterday and charged with first-degree murder.
He lived alone in a house divided into apartments.
A dishevelled and bearded IBRAHIM appeared in a Scarborough courthouse yesterday, wearing an orange jumpsuit. Three of his male relatives watched anxiously from the back row as two police officers escorted IBRAHIM in handcuffs into the courtroom, which was packed with media.
His next court appearance is scheduled for next Tuesday.
Last night in his house, Arden-Ray SPRINGER was still trying to cope with his loss. Police had finally let him cross the yellow police tape to get some clothes before he went to a memorial service at the Malvern Methodist Church, the same church where Jean was an elder and a prayer co-ordinator.
At the memorial service, hundreds of teary-eyed mourners remembered Jean SPRINGER, who had taken part in the women's ministry and had regularly led prayer time.
"Today we mourn her loss, but our faith calls on us to forgive others and God has in Christ forgiven us," said Marlon MITCHELL, a youth pastor for the church.
Jean, who worked freelance in the accounting field, devoted her life to Malvern Methodist, a church her husband had even helped paint in his off-hours while his wife tended to church matters, said Arden-Ray, a management marketing consultant.
A funeral is expected to be held Saturday at Malvern Methodist Church.
They had been sweethearts since the mid-1960s when they were in their teens.
Both were from Trinidad. He met his future wife on a Caribbean cruise ship.
She'd just graduated from teacher's college. And SPRINGER's mother was a stewardess on the ship and his aunt knew Jean's family.
So they arranged for the two to meet.
SPRINGER became the unofficial tour guide for the group of prim young ladies on vacation.
"Jean and I connected. It was love before first sight. It was spiritual," he said.
After the two moved to Canada and got married more than three decades ago, she taught part-time at grade school and studied accounting at the University of Toronto.
She eventually moved into accounting, he said.
The holidays have all seemed to blur together for Arden-Ray. New Year's Day was his wife's turn to host more than 20 members of the family at the Scarborough home where they have lived for about 28 years.
The couple had spent Christmas and Boxing Day with her two sisters Willie and Carol. And New Year's was reserved for Jean. It was tradition.
Last night, as he looked back on that day, he wished he had never asked her to open that door -- but he bore no malice
"We're devastated, not angry. We do not want revenge, just justice," her husband said.
"She was known as Auntie Jean to everybody," he said.
"She was one of the most beautiful people in the world."

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SPRINGER o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-07 published
Hundreds mourn 2007's first homicide victim
Family members comfort each other after the funeral of Jean SPRINGER, killed when she opened her front door on New Year's Day. Vince TALOTTA / Toronto Star
By Thulasi SRIKANTHAN, Staff Reporter
In the cold spitting rain, hundreds of mourners gathered at a Scarborough church to pay their respects to Jean SPRINGER, Toronto's first homicide victim of 2007.
Row upon row was packed with teary-eyed mourners at Morningstar Christian Fellowship, who prayed and remembered the 60-year-old as a kind and loving mother of two.
"She was selfless," said her friend, Judy SUTHERLAND, as she stood in the cold after the service. "We will miss her but we will celebrate her life."
SPRINGER was shot to death shortly after she opened her door on New Year's Day.
Altaf IBRAHIM, 26, was arrested in connection with the shooting. He is believed to have been a friend of one of SPRINGER's sons.
At the church yesterday, family members hugged each other as they waited in the cold and rain, watching the casket being loaded into the hearse.
Many wiped away tears as they left the service where two photo collages were on display, filled with pictures of SPRINGER through the years, from her childhood days -- to dancing with her husband, Arden-Ray.
A friend, Judy INGRID, said SPRINGER lived her life in a way that inspired others to want to "model our life after her."
With her warmth, faith and her smile, Ingrid said SPRINGER drew many to her.
"From this turnout, you can see."
SPRINGER was born February 9, 1948 to Alva and Gwendolyn REID in the Port of Spain, Trinidad and Tobago. As a young girl, she shone academically.
Eventually, her academic aptitude led her to win a scholarship to Bishop Anstey High School.
In the years following, she went to Trinidad's Mausica Teachers' College where she graduated with a teacher's diploma.
After meeting and marrying her husband, she moved to Canada where she became a bookkeeper and accountant after teaching for a few years.
In Canada, she raised her two sons, Anton and Anwelle.
SPRINGER was also well known in her community as a woman with a strong Christian faith. She often led prayers and took part in the women's ministry at her local church.
"She was a very inspiring lady," said Sandra MILLER, another friend who had come to pay her respects.
A viewing for Friends and family was also held yesterday at Ogden Funeral Home.

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SPRINGETT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-04 published
GOODAIRE, Edgar George (1911-2007)
Peacefully at Lakeridge Health Whitby on July 2, 2007, in his 97th year. Only son of Mary (née WATSON) and George GOODAIRE. Leaving to mourn are his dear wife of 65 years, Winnifred (nee SPRINGETT,) two sons Edgar and David (Pamela,) two grand_sons, Timothy (Sarah) and Mark (Annie) and one dearly loved great-granddaughter Sydney Christina GOODAIRE. Observing their small child play the piano by the hour on a dressing table, Edgar's parents spent a large part of their savings on a piano. That, and the organ were Edgar's life for the next 90 years entertaining countless people as a concert pianist, Church organist at St. Andrew's United Church, Bloor Street for 50 years, pianist for service clubs and Masonic lodges including West Toronto Kiwanis and Downtown Toronto Rotary Club for 60 years (a Paul Harris fellow) and the University Skating Club for many years. His ability to sit down at a piano and play for hours without a note of music amazed everyone who knew him. He was a humble, sensitive, loving man with an infectious laugh, who never raised his voice or was ever seen angry. The perfect father he was genuinely loved by all who knew him, he will be greatly missed. A special thanks to the caring supportive staff at Lakeridge Health Whitby. A Memorial Service will be held at 1 p.m. on Thursday, July 5 at the Anglican Church of St. Clement's, Eglinton (Duplex Avenue at Briar Hill). Reception in the church to follow. Arrangements in the care of the Trull Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, (416) 488-1101.

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SPRINGMAN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
STORMS, Gerry
The family of Gerry STORMS wish to thank Reverend TUZ, the Canadian Corps Unit #12 and the Ladies Auxiliary for the beautiful Poppy Service and their warm and compassionate words and thoughts during this saddened time. The family would also like to thank all Friends and relatives who made donations and sent flowers in Gerry's memory. Also to Needham Funeral Home staff and Victoria Hospital staff for their compassion. Also to Gary SPRINGMAN and Ken MAUDSLEY for the remembrances of Gerry and to all the pall bearers -- Thank you.

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SPROAT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-29 published
SPROAT, Douglas John
World War 2 Veteran,
Royal Canadian Air Force Flight Instructor
Passed away peacefully at the Sunnybrook Veteran's Hospital on December 26, 2007. Douglas leaves behind his two sisters Joan and Miriam SPROAT. At his request, no service will take place. Funeral arrangements entrusted to Ward Funeral Home "Oakville Chapel" 905-844-3221.

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SPROAT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-31 published
SPROAT, John Douglas
On Wednesday, December 26, 2007. Predeceased by his wife Margaret (Peggy), daughter Catherine and sister Elizabeth. He is survived by his sisters Marion and Joan, brother Murray (Jim) and nephews John and Paul.

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SPROTT o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-19 published
SPROTT, Harold
In loving memory of a husband, father, grandfather and great-grandfather, who passed away September 20, 1985.
To live in the hearts of those we leave is not to die
- Lovingly remembered by Jean and Family.
Page 3

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SPROULE o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-11-21 published
CLARK, " Beth" Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren Clark (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.
Page 3

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SPROULE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-20 published
CLARK, “Beth” Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren Clark (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton. For funeral service information please call 924-2810. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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SPROULE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-11-21 published
CLARK, “Beth” Elizabeth Ann (HAWKINS)
At the Grey Bruce Health Services, Markdale, on Monday, November 19, 2007 of Flesherton in her 84th year. Beth HAWKINS was the beloved wife of the late Bob CLARK. Loving mother of Glenna (Kevin) JOYCE of Orillia, and Joe of Barrie. Loved and remembered by grandchildren CLARK (Joy) HAW of Flesherton, and Jody (Jessie) SPROULE of Toronto and great-grandchildren Marshall, Matthew, Ben and Abigal. Dear sister of Vernon, Mary BEARD and the late Roy. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett Funeral Home, Flesherton on Friday, November 23, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Service will be held at Gentle Shepherd Community Church on Saturday, November 24 at 11 a.m. Interment Salem Cemetery, Eugenia. Memorial contributions to the Gentle Shepherd Community Church or to Centre Grey Health Services Foundation.

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SPROULE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2007-01-03 published
Robert Edward SPROULE
In memory of Robert Edward SPROULE. At 3: 40 am on December 23, 2006, with great grace and dignity, Bob SPROULE completed his life journey at home in the arms of his family.
Born in London, Ontario on September 10, 1929, Bob's life was a testimony of love and caring for the well-being of his fellow persons - young and old. Celebrating the gift of his life, along with all those whom he touched, are his wife and soul mate Sharon, and his children Lynne Dee and her husband Henry MINK, Joe and his partner Shelley WILSON and Jim and his partner Melissa CHAVEZ. Bob's grandchildren Joe TRUDEAU and his wife Grace CHAN, and Gabriel MINK share the joy of having Bob as a grandfather. Baby Stella SPROULE will also know of the legacy of his love, and Vanessa, Jason and Lindsay SPROULE have the proud knowledge of their grandfather Bob. Bob was a devoted educator and his love of music, theatre and literature was willingly and joyfully shared with his students at A. B. Ellis Public School, and with his many Friends and colleagues, He made life richer for all those he touched. For those wishing to make a memorial donation, Bob suggested the Espanola Little Theatre, Box 5083 Espanola P5E 1S1, or the Canadian Cancer Society. There will be a gathering on January 12 at 7: 00PM in the Georgian Room of the Pinewood Motor Inn, Espanola, for those who wish to come together to celebrate Bob's life. Arrangements by Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola.

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SPROULE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
SPROULE, Robert " Bob" Edward
Early in the morning on December 23, 2006, with great grace and dignity, Bob SPROULE completed his life journey at home in the arms of his family. Born in London, Ontario on September 10, 1929, Bob's life was a testimony of love and caring for the well being of his fellow persons - young and old. Bob is pre-deceased by his parents Amy Ellen and Edward SPROULE, and his sister Bernice. Celebrating the gift of his life along with all those whom he touched, are his wife and soulmate Sharon, his children Lynne Dee (Henry MINK,) Joe (Shelley WILSON) and Jim (Melissa CHAVEZ,) and his grandchildren Joe TRUDEAU (Grace CHAN,) Gabriel MINK, Vanessa, Jason and Lindsay SPROULE, and baby Stella SPROULE. Bob and Sharon moved to Northern Ontario as newlyweds and soon adopted Espanola as their home. Bob was a gifted violinist and a devoted educator, founding the music program at A.B. Ellis Public School in Espanola, and consistently leading his senior elementary choir to first place festival prizes. He helped make the community better for everyone through his involvement with the Lions Club, the backyard skating rink he made every winter for all the neighbourhood kids to enjoy, and his work with the Espanola Little Theatre. Following his retirement in 1987, Bob continued to share his passion for music, theatre and literature with family and Friends. He became a reluctant star of the community theatre stage in Sault Ste. Marie and Espanola, and was honoured most recently for his stage appearance at the Quonta Drama Festival in Timmins in March 2006. He made life richer for all those he touched. For those wishing to make a memorial donation, Bob suggested the Espanola Little Theatre (Box 5082, Espanola, Ontario P5E 1S1) or the Canadian Cancer Society. There will be a gathering on Friday, January 12, 2007 at 7: 00 p.m. in the Georgian Room of the Pinewood Motor Inn, Espanola for those who wish to come together to celebrate Bob's life. Arrangements by Bourcier Funeral Home, Espanola.

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SPROULE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.toronto_star 2007-01-11 published
Full life's worth of big-hearted giving
By Catherine DUNPHY, Obituary writer, Page R2
People usually have only nice things to say about the departed some of which might even be true -- but with Kelly SILVERSTEIN people always had only nice things to say about him.
He really was just the greatest guy. Always there for kids -- any kid, not simply his own two boys. He was the fundraiser you could count on. And a coach for eight teams spread through four different sports.
He was the brother who rescued his fraternity when it teetered on bankruptcy. The volunteer who always raised the most money every year at Big Brothers and Big Sisters Bowl for Kids Sake. The parent who donated the Raptors tickets that pushed the bidding over the top at the school auction. The Dad who slipped the school principal a cheque for sports camp for an underprivileged student he thought particularly talented.
So when SILVERSTEIN died November 20 at age 42 just four days after he was diagnosed with leukemia, there was a shocked silence throughout his Hillcrest community.
And people wept when they heard.
There was standing room only at Holy Blossom Temple -- more than 1,200 people attended. The line snaked around the corner, and the service was 25 minutes late starting.
"You could feel it," said Rabbi John MOSCOWITZ. " There was a sense the very best one of us had just died."
SILVERSTEIN's Friends and family -- wife Jill, sons Oliver and Jonah -- were there, as were his fraternity brothers, his work colleagues, the teachers from the schools where he coached, kids from the teams he coached, but also the guy who worked in the underground parking lot in the building that housed his office.
He was that kind of guy.
"He was a stand-up kind of guy," said Terry KARIS, his barber at the Forest Hill Barber Shop. The two talked about more than the weather when SILVERSTEIN came in for his camouflage cut -- short on sides, long on top -- to hide the hair thinning on top.
In the fall of 2005, SILVERSTEIN invited KARIS to a hockey old-timers function.
"My son Adam was on the ice with Guy Lafleur. How good is that?" said KARIS.
It got better, though. KARIS had forgotten his camera and just as he and his son were about to leave, SILVERSTEIN hauled them over to Lafleur and took their picture together.
"He found a camera somewhere, somehow, because he knew I was a Montreal fan. And he wasn't even one. He put it in a frame and gave it to me. I treasure that picture," said KARIS.
"He was goodness personified," said Michael KALLES, a fraternity brother. "He gave his all to everything. He wasn't a guy who asked you to lift a heavy piano and he carried the piano bench. He'd be carrying 15 pianos." When they were students at the University of Western Ontario together, it was SILVERSTEIN who started Pi Lambda Phi fraternity.
First they met in a bedroom, then SILVERSTEIN got the idea they should rent a house; then he decided they should buy one -- which they did, choice real estate at the corner of Cheapside and Richmond Sts. -- because he raised a ton of money.
He started a chapter at the University of Windsor as well.
"Kelly did all the heavy lifting," KALLES said. He mobilized them to raise the $10,000 they needed to retain their charter when their chapter got in financial trouble. "He would say that we have to ensure that the frat would be around when our kids wanted to join."
He was always doing it for kids.
"He really was as fine a person as you would ever meet," said John HUNTER, principal of Hillcrest public school, where the SILVERSTEIN sons had attended and their father coached.
He started the basketball team there -- for five years he called practices for 7: 30 a.m. before he went to work. There was an offer on the table for him to come back and coach again this winter.
"He was so kind to the kids. He had a lot of trouble cutting them (from the team)," Hunter said.
For four years he coached two hockey teams in the North Toronto house league. For even longer he also coached two soccer teams, as well as baseball and basketball teams. Basketball was his favourite sport, possibly because he was six-foot-four.
He'd take his teams out for chicken wings; he'd sweep his sons' Friends up along on their family outings.
"Lunch became dinner and then supper. It was always one more invitation. That was the way it was with the whole family. They were a team," said Elaine LESNIAK, a single mom whose son, Ari, 14, had been Oliver's best friend until they went to different schools.
That never stopped SILVERSTEIN. "At the bus when the kids were going off to camp, Kelly always made sure to give Ari a big hug," she said.
"Every time you are with him, you want to be with him more. You are just drawn to him," said Ari.
Maybe he was just a big kid in some ways. He'd take the family and their Friends to a Baskin-Robbins ice cream place, seat them at the window and pay the kids $1 for every person they could get to wave to them. "It was our job to get people to wave, in a freezing cold night," Jill recalled.
SILVERSTEIN attacked life, reading three newspapers daily, tearing out articles to send off to Friends. "We all got them with the note: FYI, K.S.," said Bonnie BLONDER, Jill's best friend since childhood.
As he was often first in the office of Davis + Henderson cheque makers, he'd put on the coffee.
"Kelly just wanted to make sure everyone was happy," said Jill with a smile.
He was the youngest of five children of Sonny and Marlene SILVERSTEIN, of Silverstein's Bakery. "He was always being picked up and cuddled," said his only sister Robin SILVERSTEIN- EISEN.
The family lived in a cul-de-sac near Lawrence and Marlee in a house with a basketball hoop out front that was the centre of activity for all the neighbourhood kids. SILVERSTEIN often took his own family back there.
"He called it our 'drive-bys,'" said Jill. "He'd always tell the kids who lived in the houses. He wanted us to know about the good things."
In 1998, SILVERSTEIN had returned to Toronto after working in Atlanta when his mother was diagnosed with cancer. He postponed finding work to be with her. It was as if he pushed himself to get in a full life's worth of giving.
"This was just his thing -- to do for others," said family friend Barbara SILVERSTEIN (no relation.)
"He was so decent. I have never met anyone like him."
"I can't tell you how many people phoned us to volunteer because they heard about us from Kelly," said Heather SPROULE, executive director of Big Brothers and Sisters.
The day after SILVERSTEIN died, her office received a donation from him via the United Way. "I had no idea that beyond all that he was doing for us, that in his usual quiet fashion he made an annual donation through the United Way."
Next month there will be an award in SILVERSTEIN's name at the 2007 Bowl for Kids Sake.
"We thought about it for less than a second," SPROULE said. "It will be a fundraising award, which at the least is very fitting."

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