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"RUB" 2007 Obituary


RUBENSTEIN  RUBERTO  RUBIANES  RUBIE  RUBIN  RUBINOFF  RUBY 

RUBENSTEIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-09 published
First to show and last to go, he was king of the course at Angus Glen
head groundskeeper at the site of the 2007 Canadian Open believed the maintenance of a golf course was about three things: drainage, drainage and drainage -- that and hard work
By Lorne RUBENSTEIN, Page S8
Ernie AMSLER loved the outdoors and could take apart and repair any machine, anywhere. He couldn't have found a more suitable job than looking after golf courses, where it's crucial to understand grass and machinery. He spent his days, and many of his nights, tending to both with abiding care.
Where Mr. AMSLER grew grass, golf courses and golfers always benefited. The Angus Glen Golf Club in Markham, Ontario, which hosted the Canadian Open on its North course last month, was no exception. As director of agronomy, he was responsible for the care and maintenance of the North and the South course, which was the site of the 2002 Canadian Open.
In 1991, he was right there for the formidable task of turning a former horse farm into Angus Glen. Every year, golfers play 90,000 rounds at the club's two courses, which became popular during Mr. AMSLER's tenure for daily-fee play and corporate tournaments. He and his staff kept the courses up and running and in immaculate condition even while golfers were playing, which he managed by staggering the maintenance work so that scarcely a stroke was disturbed. Mr. AMSLER was on the property most days by 4 a.m., three hours before he expected his staff to arrive. He was the first to show up and usually the last to leave.
Mr. AMSLER loved nothing better than to get up on a bulldozer or some other piece of machinery to do the hard work of construction and grunt work that a good course demands. Course maintenance is all about three things: drainage, drainage and drainage. Whenever it rained, Mr. AMSLER had to restrain himself from immediately getting on a machine and digging a ditch. When the South course needed a couple of new teeing areas before the 2002 Canadian Open, he built them himself. Just before this year's Canadian Open, he realized that a large hill on the North course's 18th hole made a cart path there dangerous. He fired up the bulldozer, scraped off the hill and laid down asphalt. Presto, he had made a hazardous area safe. Over the years, his willingness and ability to do the hard work saved the club hundreds of thousands of dollars.
Ernie AMSLER grew up in Schoenenwerd, a small town halfway between Zurich and Basel in northwestern Switzerland. One of his first jobs as a youngster was helping to deliver groceries by truck. He had been fascinated by cars since an early age, and soon became an expert at repairing them. He was particularly taken by Volkswagens. His interest in cars broadened after he came to Canada in 1966, and eventually he was buying and restoring such automobiles as Mini Coopers and Mercedes.
Mr. AMSLER first lived in the Toronto area with his sister Erika, who had preceded him to Canada. He'd enjoyed skiing in Switzerland and soon took to Canada's vast spaces and the idea of making an impression on the landscape. His first job was in landscaping, where he learned to wield the heavy machinery that became the instruments of his craftsmanship. He subsequently worked at various golf clubs in southern and south-central Ontario, including Windmills Golf Club, Port Carling Golf Club, the Mandarin Golf and Country Club in Markham, and, finally, Angus Glen.
"He could do anything with machinery," said Gordon STOLLERY, the owner of Angus Glen. "It didn't matter if it was a bulldozer, a back hoe or an aerator -- he knew how to work it. Ernie was also a true gentleman, by which I mean a gentle man."
Notwithstanding his courtly manner, Mr. AMSLER was as demanding of his staff as he was of himself. Angus Glen employees knew he monitored them to make sure they carried out his orders. At the same time, he was willing to admit when he made a mistake. A stickler for keeping the equipment in top shape, he took particular care that his staff cleaned the machinery at the end of each working day. It was important, for example, to make sure that gaskets were dry; otherwise, a fire might start.
So it was that one day Mr. AMSLER, in his take-charge way, used one of the bigger machines to cut the high fescue bordering the fairways. At the end of the day, he parked the machine in a back barn and, somehow, a fire broke out. Mr. AMSLER had neglected to do the proper cleaning. He told his staff, "You see, this is what can happen when we don't do the proper cleaning."
Another time, Mr. AMSLER was on a machine called a Bobcat when it hit a gas line. Everybody in the vicinity withdrew, fearing for their safety. He calmly fixed the line, and was soon asking where everyone had gone.
As much as Mr. AMSLER expected to be in charge of everything on the course, it wasn't always possible to exert the same kind of control off the course. In December of 1999, his son Daniel, who was born with cerebral palsy that affected one side of his body, was in a serious car accident. He was driving on Highway 403 when a ladder fell from a transport truck ahead of him. He swerved to avoid the truck and his car flipped twice. Daniel's right leg was mangled, and he spent the next 2½ weeks in a Mississauga hospital. Mr. AMSLER visited his son every day.
Meanwhile, he continued to put in long days and evenings at Angus Glen. With Chip, his border collie, on the seat beside him, Mr. AMSLER made his rounds driving a golf cart as if at a speedway.
Five weeks before this year's Canadian Open, Mr. AMSLER became ill and was admitted to hospital where he was visited, among others, by Kevin THISTLE, president of Angus Glen. After undergoing some tests, Mr. AMSLER was discharged, but he wasn't expected back at work. Inevitably, he showed up at the club. Mr. THISTLE asked him what he was doing there, and got the expected shrug, as if Mr. AMSLER were saying, "This is where I belong." It was clear, however, that he was ill and Mr. THISTLE later insisted that he go home. "I almost had to issue a restraining order."
Even so, Mr. AMSLER did manage to prepare some fields for a temporary pavilion needed for the Canadian Open, and rode a bulldozer for three days in 38-degree heat.
Before long, he was readmitted to hospital, unhappy to be away as the Canadian Open drew near. Nor did he like being away from a new facility he was building for Mr. STOLLERY in nearby Goodwood. Yet, in a way, he never did leave his work. From his hospital bed, he placed orders for sand for the new golf course.
"Ernie loved being outside," Mr. THISTLE said. "That's where he most wanted to be. You'd see him at night, driving around the property, and in the morning, he'd meet the same guys for coffee before he'd come to the club. I lived right beside his office when I first came to Angus Glen. He'd come in at four in the morning and honk his horn to wake me up."
The 2007 Open went on without Mr. AMSLER, although much of the credit for its success went to him. At the end of every tournament, the Professional Golfers' Association Tour issues a report on the host course. In advance of the tournament, Professional Golfers' Association Tour agronomist Jon Scott evaluated the work done at Angus Glen's North course to prepare for the Canadian Open and gave credit to "one of the greatest grass growers I've met in the business, head superintendent Ernie AMSLER."
Ernst AMSLER was born December 4, 1940, in Schoenenwerd, Switzerland. He died of complications from a liver-related condition at Southlake Hospital in Newmarket, Ontario, on July 24, 2007. He was 66. He is survived by his wife, Pia, and by his sons Daniel and Roland from an earlier marriage to Therese LEDREW, with whom he remained a close friend. He also leaves his sisters Erika and Erna, and his brother Kurt.

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RUBERTO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-02 published
WALCARIUS, Edwin " Ed"
At Saint Thomas Elgin General Hospital on Monday, January 1, 2007. Edwin "Ed" WALCARIUS of Aylmer in his 55th year. Beloved husband and best friend of Sharon (TAELMAN) WALCARIUS. Born in Saint Thomas on July 24, 1952 dear son of Christina (SCHRAM) WALCARIUS of Aylmer and the late Algar (WALCARIUS1987.) Dear father of Sheri MONK and husband Kurtis of Dorchester, Cindy MASTRANDREA and husband Michael of Saint Thomas, Melissa RUBERTO and husband Pasquale of London and step-father of Sheena CSAKLI of Aylmer. Loving grandfather of Zachary, Adriana, Emily and Alyssa. Brother of Eldon and wife Rhonda, Darrell and wife Kelly, Henry and wife Nancy. Also survived by a number of aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Ed owned and operated Aylmer Design and Copy and formerly Profile Computers in Saint Thomas. He was a board member of the Aylmer Chamber of Commerce. Friends may call at the H.A. Kebbel Funeral Home, Aylmer on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. The funeral service will be held from Saint Paul's United Church, Aylmer on Thursday, January 4, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment, Queen of Peace Cemetery. Donations to the Cancer Society would be appreciated. Condolences at kebbelfuneralhome.com

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RUBIANES o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
LEGRIS, Joseph Antoine " Tony," Q.C., B.A., LL.B, B.A.Sc. (P.Eng.)
Peacefully in his sleep, at home in Toronto, Joseph Antoine "Tony" LEGRIS in his 89th year. Tony was the devoted husband of Nan Ecclestone LEGRIS for 61 years, who died unexpectedly this past June. Loving father of Paul (Pierrette) of Toronto; Robert (Cheryl) of Calgary; Anne Legris ANDERSON of Toronto; and Rosemary Legris MacKENZIE (Gavin) of Markham. Loving "Grandpa Tony" of Eric and Chris CLIFFORD, Ashley Legris HOBSON (Ryan), Tom LEGRIS, Charlotte, Travis and Brooke MacKENZIE. Great "Grandpa Tony" of Jax HOBSON. He leaves his brothers Ernest LEGRIS (Carol) of Cleveland, Ohio and George LEGRIS of Saint_John, New Brunswick. Tony was predeceased by his sisters Lucille PELLETIER and Marguerite MARQUEZ. He was a loving uncle to many nieces and nephews, whose frequent visits he always thoroughly enjoyed. Tony was the eldest child of Elizabeth Smith LEGRIS and the Honourable Joseph Antoine LEGRIS, and was born in Haileybury, Ontario. He graduated from the University of Ottawa at age 18 and thereafter from Osgoode Hall Law School. Engineering followed at the University of Toronto. He was the managing partner of the patent and trade mark firm of Ridout and Maybee in Toronto for almost 35 years, until his retirement due to illness. He enjoyed many years at his cottage in Muskoka with his family and especially enjoyed water skiing and boating. Tony was cared for tirelessly and with great kindness in the last two years by his wonderful caregiver Rhona RUBIANES. More recently, Rhona's sister, Ria joined her in Tony's excellent care. Our family is deeply indebted to them both. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter Yorke Chapel, 2357 Bloor St. W., on Sunday, from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Gregory's Roman Catholic Church, 122 Rathburn Rd. (at Kipling) on Monday, January 8th at 10 a.m. Interment in Bracebridge in the spring. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Society or the Canadian Diabetes Association.

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RUBIE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-26 published
BEDER, Jean " Jennie" (née SMITH)
In her hundredth year, on Sunday, December 23, 2007, at Mt. Sinai Hospital. Jean BEDER, beloved daughter of the late Rose and Jacob SMITH, wife of the late Monte. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Robert and Sharron, and Nancy BEDER. Dear sister of the late Goldie ROTH. Devoted grandmother of Jeffrey and May LING, Alison and Kenny, Adam and Lindsey, Michael, and Aarin and Michael. Cherished great-grandmother of Hannah RUBIE, Tyler SYDNEY, Aidan JACOB, Rowen ALEXANDER, Caleb MONTE, Jamie BOYD, and Rylee PACE. Special thanks to Christina QUIAZON. At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst (South of Eglinton), for service on Thursday, December 27th at 10: 30 a.m. Interment Beth Tzedec Memorial Park. Shiva 59 Old Colony Road. Memorial donations may be made to the Beder Family H.H.T. Fund c/o Saint Michael's Hospital Foundation at 416-864-5887.

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RUBIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-28 published
AXLER, Sara
Peacefully, surrounded by her family on Saturday, May 26, 2007 at Etobicoke General Hospital. Sara AXLER, beloved wife of the late Lionel AXLER. Proud and loving mother and mother-in-law of Susan and Bruce RUBIN, Jeff and Helena AXLER, and Ellen and Brahm SEITZ. Devoted Bobe to Elyse, David, Joshua, Benjamin, Elliott, and Maury. Cherished aunt to Sherry and Sandy FRIED, and dear sister to the late Jessica BABB and the late William DOLGOFF. Her courage and determination to those she loved was an inspiration. Services were held at Beth Tzedec Synagogue on Sunday, May 27, 2007. Interment Beth Tzedec Section of Dawes Road Cemetery. Shiva 65 Skymark Doctor #1902. If desired, donations may be made to The Sara Axler Educational Fund c/o Beth Tzedec Synagogue at 416-781-3511.

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RUBIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-15 published
KAMARNER, Jeanne (née RUBIN)
On Saturday, October 13, 2007 at the Toronto Western Hospital after complications from Lewy Body Dementia. Jeanne KAMARNER, beloved wife of the late Jack KAMARNER. Loving mother and mother-in-law of Nancy and Colin GREEN of Toronto, and Ann and Conrad WALIGORSKI of Fayetteville, Arkansas. Dear sister of the late Irving RUBIN. Devoted grandmother of Hiram and Ezra GREEN. At Holy Blossom Temple, 1950 Bathurst Street (Bathurst south of Eglinton) for service on Tuesday, October 16, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. Interment Holy Blossom Memorial Park. Shiva 45 Tyrrel Avenue, shiva will conclude Thursday evening October 18th. Donations may be made to the Jeanne Kamarner Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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RUBINOFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-25 published
RUBINOFF, Sarah Ida
It is with deep sorrow that the Rubinoff family announces that Ida Sarah RUBINOFF passed away peacefully with her family by her side at Toronto General Hospital on Friday, June 22, 2007. She was 71. Ida was the quintessential lover of life and always up for the next adventure. Her boundless capacity to love and her wisdom, humour and enthusiasm will be forever missed by her husband, Phillip, her children Marci (Dave WIFFEN) and Adam (Shanna ROSEN,) her two young grandchildren Zachary and Eli, her sister Claire (Martin BINSTOCK) and her family and many, many Friends. She touched so many lives and all of those lucky enough to have known her will treasure her memory always. Even a leukemia diagnosis almost three year ago could not dampen her spirit and she continued to love and live her life to its fullest. The family would like to extend our profound appreciation to Doctor Aaron SCHIMMER and the staff at Princess Margaret Hospital, the nurses and doctors of the Toronto General Hospital Multiple Sclerosis/Intensive Care Unit unit and her special caregivers, Deb, Paulette, and Sheila, whose outstanding care provided great comfort to Ida and therefore to her family as well. A funeral service was held on Sunday, June 24, 2007. Shiva will be observed at 7 Berkindale Drive until Friday, June 29th, with evening service only. The family asks that donations in Ida's memory be directed to the Ida Rubinoff Patient Support Fund at the Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation at 416-946-6560.

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RUBINOFF o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-26 published
CHIRO, Shura
On Sunday, June 24, 2007 at Baycrest Hospital. Shura CHIRO, beloved wife of the late Samuel (Sam). Loving mother of the late Alina RUBINOFF. Dear sister and sister-in-law of the late Luba and Joe KLEINSTEIN. Devoted grandmother of David RUBINOFF, and Mark and Dorota RUBINOFF. A graveside service will be held at the Community Section of Pardes Shalom Cemetery on Tuesday, June 26, 2007 at 12: 00 noon. Donations may be made to the Shura Chiro Memorial Fund c/o The Benjamin Foundation, 3429 Bathurst Street, Toronto, M6A 2C3, 416-780-0324.

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RUBY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-13 published
He was a pillar of society who put a contract on his wife
In 1984, he arranged the attack, delivered his wife to the scene of the crime and watched her plead for her life before being shot in the head in front of their 14-year-old nephew
By Noreen RASBACH, Page S8
His 68-day trial was nothing less than a Canadian sensation, with newspapers detailing the unlikely ways he used cocaine and the lurid testimony about his unseemly trysts with prostitutes.
In the end, the verdict was quick and damning: The jury took only 12½ hours to find Helmuth BUXBAUM, then 46, guilty of first-degree murder for arranging the 1984 contract killing of his wife and business partner, Hanna.
He didn't just arrange the attack, but drove her to the scene of the crime and watched her plead for her life before being shot in the head. The murder took place at the side of a highway near their home in Komoka, a small town outside London, Ontario The couple and their 14-year-old nephew, Roy, stopped to help the occupants of a car that appeared to have broken down. They were immediately ambushed. When a gunman pulled Hanna out of the car, the long-suffering wife of Helmuth BUXBAUM looked at him and said: "Please honey, no, not this way." She was 48.
"It was a big deal at the time; it was a huge story," said Heather BIRD, who covered the trial for the Toronto Star and wrote a book about the case, Conspiracy to Murder: The Helmuth Buxbaum Trail. "It was also a really, really sad story and a very seedy story."
Prominent Baptist
The tawdry details that came out in Mr. BUXBAUM's trial were in stark contrast to his reputation: Successful businessman, prominent Baptist, devoted family man. He and his wife had built a business operating nursing homes that had made them millionaires, while also raising six children, one of whom was an adopted daughter from Costa Rica. "He was well-known in the community," recalled Greg CALCOTT, the investigating officer in the case who recently retired from the Ontario Provincial Police. "He was wealthy and an absolute pillar in the church."
For her part, Mrs. BUXBAUM was known for her extensive charity work. "She was legitimately loved and respected in the community as being the exemplar Christian woman," Mr. CALCOTT said. "She used to stop street people and buy them clothing.
"That, in contrast to his hypocrisy, brought a lot of interest" to the case, he added.
The case may have been irresistible, with its sex, drugs, money and religion, but Mr. BUXBAUM wasn't. The man who was repeatedly unfaithful to his wife almost from the start of their marriage was anything but charming.
"There was nothing charismatic about Mr. BUXBAUM that I saw," Ms. BIRD said.
Mr. CALCOTT agreed. "He came across as arrogant, but he also came across as very childlike - and I don't mean that in terms of innocence. [He had] a kind of naive understanding of what was happening."
That led to his being taken advantage of by the drug dealers and prostitutes with whom he associated. "He liked the idea of being a big-time operator," Mr. CALCOTT said. "I know that Robert BARRETT [who was convicted of conspiring to kill Mrs. BUXBAUM after testifying he hired the killers] used to get him $1,000 of cocaine and Mr. BUXBAUM would pay him cash. BARRETT would get the cocaine and keep three-quarters of it and give the rest to Helmuth, saying that's what $1,000 of cocaine would look like. Of course, he had nothing to compare it to, so he took it on faith.
"I think that everyone in that group who was dealing with him was ripping him off one way or another," Mr. CALCOTT said.
In 1982, after suffering a stroke, Mr. BUXBAUM's behaviour spun out of control.
By the end of the trial, the entire country knew all the sordid details - that he had sexual relations with more than 100 prostitutes (sometimes two or three at a time), that he wanted to have sex with young girls and boys, and that he was a regular user of cocaine which he injected into his ankle and even his penis. The court heard, too, that he disparaged his wife to the prostitutes.
"Even though he did have all that money, there was nothing glamorous about him or his story," Ms. BIRD said.
Helmuth BUXBAUM grew up in Germany as the youngest in a family of 10 children. At his trial, he recounted how his family spent some time in refugee camps; when he came to Canada at 19, he arrived with no money and only one pair of shoes.
He went to work and studied, part-time, for his Grade 13 diploma. In 1960, he met Hanna SCHMIDT, after being introduced by his parents. They had a lot in common, especially their Baptist faith and hard childhoods. Hanna, who was born in Poland, stopped her formal education at 8, when she was sent to a Russian concentration camp with her mother and brother. She was to spend five years in camps, before being released and eventually reaching West Germany, and later Canada. When Helmuth met her, she had already spent seven years working at a meat-packing plant in Kitchener, Ontario
They married in June, 1961, with dreams of becoming medical missionaries. Two years later their son Paul was born, and not long after that Mr. BUXBAUM finished his diploma and decided it was time to go to medical school. The family moved to London, where he enrolled at the University of Western Ontario as a pre-med student. By Christmas he had dropped out of the program, saying it was too difficult. Instead, he pursued a bachelor of science degree, which he received in 1967.
All that time he was supported by Hanna, who scrimped and saved and managed to purchase a house, then a three-suite apartment building and a farm. Eventually, the couple went into the nursing-home business, where they made their millions.
They raised six children, with Mrs. BUXBAUM fighting to keep the family together despite her husband's repeated romantic dalliances. In June, 1984, he packed his bags but she persuaded him to stay. A month later, on July 5, 1984, she was shot by the side of the road.
A little more than two weeks later, on July 23, the police charged Mr. BUXBAUM with murder.
Children Devastated
The shooting devastated his children. The older ones appeared frequently at his trial, but weren't in court to hear the guilty verdict. Their family friend and pastor, Rev. Douglas DAKIN, who was looking after the children during the trial, said at the time that the children "didn't know what to say" about the verdict. "They didn't know what to do if he got out, and they didn't know what to do if he stays in." Reached this week at his home in Komoka, Mr. DAKIN refused comment on both his and the children's behalf. "They all decided not to say anything."
After Mr. BUXBAUM's conviction on February 13, 1986, the case became even more provocative. During the trial, he had not allowed his first lawyer, Edward GREENSPAN, to play up the fact that he had suffered a stroke and how it had affected his ability to reason. Later, he hired another legal heavyweight, Clayton RUBY, who persuaded him to base his appeal on it. Mr. RUBY argued that Mr. BUXBAUM's stroke had rendered him mentally disabled, and that he was insane when the murder occurred. The proof? Mr. BUXBAUM's refusal to allow an insanity defence to show that he was, in fact, insane. The Supreme Court of Canada refused to hear the case, which effectively ended Mr. BUXBAUM's appeal options. Requests to various justice ministers to review the conviction were denied.
Back In Court
There were other legal battles, too: He took on Mr. GREENSPAN to get back some of the $1-million-plus he had paid in legal fees (which his lawyer James CARTHY suggested were the highest ever in Canada.) Mr. BUXBAUM lost.
He was sued by his brother for involving his nephew in the shooting scheme - and for the teen's "severe and traumatic mental and emotional upset and nervous shock" after witnessing his aunt's murder. The nephew won $400,000, which was reduced by $65,000 upon appeal.
Mr. BUXBAUM also fought for control of his wife's $2.8-million estate, objecting to his children's plan to invest the money in Florida real estate.
In the early 1990s, he gave a number of interviews from prison. He complained he had not had a fair trial. He was pursuing yet another attempt to get a justice minister to review his case. He believed he should be the subject of a royal commission.
At Kingston Penitentiary, his prison job was to wash convicts' underwear; when he moved to the medium-security Warkworth Institution, he learned to use a computer and tutored illiterate prisoners. He married again while in prison, but the marriage didn't last.
Not a lot was heard from Mr. BUXBAUM until 1993, when papers around the country ran a story about a personal ad in placed in the Kingston Whig-Standard newspaper. The man who arranged a hit on his wife, watched her get shot in the head, and shattered his family of six kids in the process, was seeking a new companion. Describing himself as "a Christian, generous, caring, loving man," he was seeking someone who was pregnant or had a baby recently but had no man in her life. He was willing to be "a supporting father for your child and a husband-father for yourself."
It's not known whether there were any takers.
Helmuth BUXBAUM was born on March 19, 1939 in East Prussia, Germany. He died of undisclosed causes on November 1, 2007, at Kingston Penitentiary regional hospital, in Kingston, after being transferred there from Warkworth Institution, near Peterborough, Ontario He was 68. He leaves six children, sons Paul, Mark, Phillip and Daniel, and daughters Esther and Ruth.

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