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"RAE" 2007 Obituary


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RAE o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-12 published
RAE, Jane Agnes " Jean"
In loving memory of a dear friend, Jane Agnes (Jean), who passed away two years ago, September 15, 2005.
Beautiful memories are treasured forever
Of happy days when we were all together.
- Think of you often, Reg and June TYLER
Page 3

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RAE o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-07-22 published
Manhunt in Huron County
Ontario Provincial Police swarm a rural Huron County township seeking Jesse IMESON, 22, right, wanted in a Windsor killing.
By Kate DUBINSKI and April KEMICK, Sun Media, Sun., July 22, Const. Charlie RAE of the Huron Ontario Provincial Police stands watch over the perimeter of a cordoned area just south of Crediton, where police continued their hunt last night for a suspect in the slaying of a Windsor man. (Susan BRADNAM, Sun Media)
Police officers and dogs combed a rural area of Huron County yesterday as they searched for an "armed and dangerous" suspect in a Windsor homicide.
Dozens of Ontario Provincial Police officers and dogs scoured a five-kilometre-wide stretch of land in Stephen Township -- from Ausable Line to Parr Line north of Mount Carmel Drive -- in search of Jesse Norman IMESON, 22.
IMESON is wanted by police in connection with the slaying of Carlos RIVERA, 26, of Lasalle.
The search for IMESON -- which earlier had police scouring Grand Bend, after investigators found the slain man's car there -- began when RIVERA's Friends reported him missing to Windsor police on Wednesday.
He was last seen at 6 a.m. that day.
Investigators tracing RIVERA's movements went to the Tap, a gay strip club in Windsor where he tended bar. RIVERA didn't show up for his Wednesday night shift, which wasn't like him, Friends said.
RIVERA was last seen in his silver two-door Honda Civic, which was being driven by IMESON, police said.
Police went to IMESON's Erie Street apartment in Windsor Thursday night and found RIVERA's "decomposing" body, said Windsor police Staff Sgt. William DONNELLY.
Police then found RIVERA's car in Grand Bend early Friday.
There, investigators obtained video of IMESON and another man at Gables, a Main Street bar.
The surveillance images were taken sometime between Wednesday and Friday, police said.
Police fear the man in the video with IMESON might be in danger, and searched the town for clues to their whereabouts.
"We've been doing door-to-door searches, going to businesses and asking them if they recognize anyone," Lambton Ontario Provincial Police Const. Todd MONAGHAN said yesterday.
"We're hoping the public knows something, or perhaps Mr. IMESON can put an end to this and come speak to us."
The man with IMESON has collar-length hair and was wearing a dark ball cap and white shirt, police said.
IMESON is six-foot-one, 200 pounds with short, almost shaved brown hair, brown eyes and numerous tattoos on his arms.
Windsor police said IMESON is known to police.
Last night, an Ontario Provincial Police helicopter joined the manhunt for IMESON in Huron County.
As night fell, marked and unmarked cruisers -- along with armed officers -- lined a perimeter in Stephen Township that framed corn fields, wooded areas and the Ausable River.
Passing motorists were warned not to pick up hitchhikers, and area homeowners were told to keep vehicles and homes locked.
"I've got my doors locked and I'm staying inside, because you just don't know," said one woman, who didn't want her name used.
Wayne GLANVILLE, whose property borders the search area, said it's rare to see such a police presence in the quiet countryside.
"It makes me a little nervous," he said of the suspect on the loose.
The Stephen Township area is full of nooks and crannies where a suspect could hide, said Huron Ontario Provincial Police Const. Jeff WALRAVEN.
"There's so many different avenues -- trees, bushes, holes," he said.
But scouring for suspects is "something the Ontario Provincial Police excels at," he added.
WALRAVEN wouldn't comment as to how long police would remain on the perimeter.
RIVERA was a "nice guy" who always had a smile for everyone, said one Tap employee who didn't want to be named.
"It's really scary. I'm hoping the police can find who did this."
An autopsy on RIVERA was slated for yesterday in London. No results have been released.

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RAE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-10 published
Detective with a steel-trap memory excelled at undercover surveillance
He did everything from wire tapping to following vehicles, even though weaving in and out of traffic while remaining undetected by a suspect is not for everyone
By Alwynne GWILT, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S10
John (Freebie) FREEMAN was a York Regional detective in Ontario who never gave up a case until all the parts of the puzzle were perfectly in place. For much of his career, he was a surveillance expert with a steel-trap memory who knew the name, address and activities of every bad guy in his bailiwick.
The son of a dentist father and a homemaker mother, he grew up in a two-storey brick home on Chine Drive in Scarborough, now part of Toronto. As a boy, he was surrounded by a large extended family. In 1964, his father and uncle bought an outdoor skating rink that they called Little Switzerland; it was the job of the family men to keep it up, packing snow down and flooding it on cold winter nights. He spent a couple of winters with his cousin, Greg, working at the rink, before both families decided to go rural and move to the village of Zephyr, just north of Uxbridge, Ontario, where home became about 80 hectares of blissful farmland. Along with his cousins, he bused 15 kilometres every day to attend secondary school in Uxbridge.
But country life was not for him. As soon as he turned 19, he joined the Toronto Metro Police. For a young man who loved almost any kind of motor vehicle, the highlight of joining so young was to be assigned the use of a Harley Davidson police motorcycle. They were fast times: From his motor bikes to his new job and a marriage at 21 to Ellen Dianne HENDERSON, Mr. FREEMAN left city life nearly as quickly as he entered it. After only four years in Toronto, he moved north to York Regional Police, where he would spend the rest of his career. In 1975, he began work as a uniformed officer in Newmarket, Ontario
Five years later, he was selected to be part of York Region's first surveillance unit. He had a near-photographic memory that was perfect for the job, and there was rarely a criminal whose name, address and activities he did not know by heart or could not recount easily to colleagues. Friends considered him a walking computer and liked to ask random questions simply to see whether he knew the answer.
As part of the Special Sections Unit, his work entailed everything from wire tapping to following vehicles. It was his love of driving that really cut him out as the person to tail cars. Weaving in and out of traffic while remaining undetected by the suspect is not a job for every police officer, but it was a skill that Mr. FREEMAN mastered, according to York Regional Police Chief Armand LA BARGE.
"If you're careless, you'd never survive," Mr. LA BARGE said. "But he had abilities beyond the norm, and there was a passion in Craig."
But Mr. FREEMAN possessed more than just memory skills and excelled at connecting with people through his quiet wit and friendly manner. Known as Freebie, he possessed a relaxed demeanour that came in handy when a situation needed to be defused. Answering a complaint about a noisy bar in nearby Vaughan, he convinced the owner that, rather than trying to lower the decibels, maybe the party should be fully shut down. Where most police officers would get an angry response, Mr. FREEMAN found respect.
Colleagues said you could also never tell whether he was serious or joking. Wes BONNER, his former partner, liked to recount the story of a female officer from outside the district who arrived dressed in a leather outfit.
"I just love a woman when she dresses in leather," remarked Mr. FREEMAN.
"What do you mean by that?" she asked.
"Well, you smell like a new car."
During the early years in surveillance, Mr. FREEMAN became especially close to his team, since the unit's six or seven members worked the same hours. They spent off-time together, sometimes becoming close enough to share Christmas holidays or vacation trips. It wasn't easy work and could be dangerous, investigating organized crime, auto theft and motorcycle gangs. After only a couple of years, Mr. FREEMAN was promoted to detective and took over running his team.
Everyone in the unit knew they had to pull their weight to meet his expectations. Mr. FREEMAN saw hard work as simply keeping up the standards he felt every officer should share - in the work, the uniform or even the vehicle they drove. As detective, most of his work should have been focused behind the desk or in administrative duties, but he could often be seen hopping in a car with colleagues and chasing after criminals.
During this time, he separated from and then divorced his wife. Later, he met Daneen RAE, a fellow police officer. The two became close and moved in together. In the mid-1980s, Ms. RAE was diagnosed with leukemia and given just three months to live. He stuck with her and she fought on for more than three years before dying in 1988. Not long afterward, Mr. FREEMAN transferred out of the special sections unit.
In April of 1994, he unexpectedly experienced a change in his social life that would set the course for years to come. At 42, he met the love of his life on a blind date set up by one of her Friends. Craig FREEMAN and Doctor Carol ROLHEISER made an unusual couple: She was an associated dean at the Ontario Institute of Studies in Education, while he was deep in the subculture of law enforcement.
In 1997, they married. But while honeymooning in San Francisco, Mr. FREEMAN began having problems with pain in his feet. When he returned to work, he began a quest to find out what on earth was troubling him. Over the next couple of years, he tried to figure out the cause, but he and his doctors remained puzzled. When he was finally hospitalized because of a blood clot, doctors suggested amputating his legs. That struck him as a ridiculous notion.
Dr. ROLHEISER called in some favours through her university network and the couple found a doctor who finally solved the mystery. Three years in, Mr. FREEMAN found out he was suffering from POEMS syndrome, a very rare blood disorder with no real explanation that doctors believe may involve an overgrowth of bone-marrow cells. Its unusual acronym is made up from elements of its most common symptoms: Polyneuropathy (peripheral nerve damage); organomegaly (abnormal enlargement of organs); endocrinopathy (damage to hormone-producing glands)/Edema; M protein (an abnormal antibody); and skin abnormalities.
In the end, doctors had to amputate one leg below the knee. For the next seven years, Mr. FREEMAN maintained a positive attitude and acquired all the gadgets necessary to outfit a van in a way that would allow him to motor on. Although he technically semi-retired in 1999, he remained a member of the police force and delighted in finding his Friends gifts on the Internet. Sometimes, colleagues would open the door to discover a new kitchen gadget or even, since he was the "world's biggest Jimmy Buffet fan," the latest margarita machine.
This year, with his health deteriorating, Mr. FREEMAN drove himself to his official retirement ceremony, but fell very ill in August. In hospital, he charmed the staff with his attitude. Even in his last days, his humour was not to be messed with.
"Do you know you are in Toronto General Hospital?" asked Doctor ROLHEISER, testing his cognition.
"Well, I'm not in Kansas City," he replied.
John Craig FREEMAN was born in Toronto on July 6, 1952. He died at Toronto General Hospital on August 19, 2007. He was 55. He is survived by his wife, Carol ROLHEISER, and his brother, Mark FREEMAN. He also leaves many others in his extended family.

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RAE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-12 published
STREEF, Cory (née CLACK)
President of Faye Clack Communications Inc. Passed away Peacefully in her 47th year on Thursday November 8, 2007, at Credit Valley Hospital. Cory, beloved wife of Albert STREEF. Proud and loving mother of Fallon and Jillian STREEF, and Sadie-May STREEF- HOLTZWORTH. Dearly loved daughter of Faye CLACK (Ewing RAE) and William CLACK (Pat DAMM.) Survived by her grandmother, Vereda HOBBS. Cherished sister of Virginia ZIMM (Jim JENKINSON) and Scott CLACK (Kim MAYER- CLACK.) Cory will also be lovingly remembered by Albert's parents, Jan and Johanna STREEF; his brothers and their Families Martin (Olivia), Peter (Anna), John (Lena) and Jacob (Janna) STREEF and sister-in-law Karen Soles STREEF. Cory was the past president of the Ontario Produce Marketing Association, was an honourary director of the Ontario Produce Marketing Association and was honoured as the Produce Person of the Year in 2005 for her fundraising efforts for the flood victims of Hurricane Katrina. Cory was also an owner of Streef Produce Ltd. She will be sorely missed by so many. Friends will be received at the J. Scott Early Funeral Home, 21 James Street, Milton (905) 878-2669 on Wednesday November 14 from 2: 00-5:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. A celebration of Cory's life will be held at the Gambrel Barn, Country Heritage Park (Tremaine Road, north of Steeles Avenue) in Milton (905) 878-8151, Hyperlink www.countryheritagepark.com on Thursday November 15, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to Faye Clack Communications Inc., In Trust for, The Cory Clack-Streef Memorial Fund, which is a registered charity with Royal Bank of Canada.

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RAEBURN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-12 published
RAEBURN, Fiona
Died peacefully, at the age of 88, at the Bradgate Arms Retirement Residence, Toronto on October 3rd, 2007. Beloved aunt of John RAEBURN of Oriental, North Carolina, U.S.A., Jeremy RAEBURN- BALE, of Exeter, Devon, England, and Joanna BONNET, of Lieston, Suffolk, England. Fiona was the daughter of George Michie RAEBURN and Amy Josephine RAEBURN of Harrogate, Yorkshire, England and was born on March 28th 1919. She will be greatly missed by her family and Friends. Fiona emigrated to Canada with her mother in the late 1940s and worked as an executive assistant at the Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce in Toronto until retirement. A memorial service will be held in Timothy Eaton Memorial Church, 230 St. Clair Avenue West, Toronto, Ontario M4V 1R5 on Wednesday, October 24th at 11 a.m. Donations in lieu of flowers to Timothy Eaton Memorial Church would be appreciated.

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