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"POL" 2007 Obituary


POLACK  POLACOK  POLAKOW  POLAND  POLANSKI  POLCI  POLE  POLFUSS  POLICARPO  POLIS  POLISKY  POLITI  POLL  POLLAK  POLLARD  POLLOCK  POLONSKY  POLSON  POLUSA 

POLACK o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-02 published
TANNER, Lillian (née FOERSTER)
Lillian TANNER, of Hanover, passed away at Hanover Care Centre, on Monday, October 29, 2007. She was 92. Lillian was born in Normanby Township, daughter of the late Norman and Margaret (nee BENDER) FOERSTER. Survived by daughters Margaret (James) ELDER of Kitchener, Susan (Vincent) WEBER of Hanover, grandchildren Jeremy (Martha) WEBER of Guelph, Katherine WEBER (Rob RYAN) of Mississauga, great-granddaughter Mia WEBER, brothers Milton (Marie) FOERSTER of Hanover, Paul (Barb) FOERSTER of Ayton, brothers-in-law Fred SEIM of Hanover, Francis TONE of Hanover, sisters-in-law Doris FOERSTER of Neustadt and Isabelle (TANNER) KIRSTINE of Hanover.
Predeceased by husband George TANNER, sisters Mabel SEIM and Gertrude TONE and brother Carl FOERSTER.
Visitation was held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover, on Wednesday, 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Service was held Thursday, November 1, 2007 at 1: 30 p.m. at St. Matthew's Ev. Lutheran Church, Hanover. Rev. John POLACK officiated. Interment in Hanover Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society, Canadian Bible Society or the Arthritis Society were appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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POLACK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-28 published
HAGERMAN, Heather (formerly PITEL, née McALISTER)
Passed away in the early morning of Monday, June 25th 2007, after a short but courageous fight. Beloved daughter of the late Merle HOUSTON and Robert McALISTER, sister of Marilyn McALISTER, loving mother to Jennifer HAGERMAN and Lisa PITEL and adored grandmother of Meaghan and Alison POLACK. You'll be there on all our walks, Mom, sharing the pleasures of the journey. If desired, donations may be made to Sunnybrook's Bayview Cancer Clinic or the charity of your choice. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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POLACOK o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-08-03 published
FROOK, Isabel (née JACKLIN)
Isabel FROOK of R.R.#4 Kincardine passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Tuesday, July 24, 2007. She was 74.
Born in Bentinck Township, daughter of the late Victor and Anna (née HOERLE) JACKLIN.
Survived by her daughters Carol HUSK and Don HODGINS of R.R.#2 Kincardine, Sandy and husband Leo LEROUX of Hanover and Gale and husband John POLFUSS of R.R.#1 Ayton, son Grant and wife Catherine FROOK of Kincardine, grandchildren Rod HUSK, Tammy FORSYTH, Connie REID, Tracey LEROUX, Carrie LEROUX, Dean LEROUX, Marcia TEATHER, Gordon POLFUSS, Adam POLFUSS, Martin POLFUSS, Tyler FROOK, Ryan FROOK and eight great-grandchildren.
Isabel is also survived by her brother Warren (Pauline) JACKLIN of R.R.#2 Holland Centre. Predeceased by her husband Ronald “Ron&rdquo FROOK and great-grand_son Jesse HUSK.
Visitation was held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover, on Thursday from 7-9 p.m. where a funeral service was held on Friday, July 27, 2007 at 2: 30 pm. Rev. John POLACOK officiated. Interment in Hanover Cemetery.
Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Hanover and District Hospital were appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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POLAKOW o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-16 published
YUDELMAN, Cynthia Harriet (née POLAKOW)
Was born in Port Elizabeth, South Africa on February 11, 1926. She was the second of six girls, Rhoda, Kiki, Joyce, Lorna and Thelma. Her mother was Dorothy POLAKOW (née SALMON,) and her father was Jack Ruby POLAKOW.
Cynthia lived a full and active life. After serving in the South African Air Force during the Second World War, she was awarded a scholarship to the University of California, Berkeley, California, where she was the first in her family to obtain an undergraduate degree. It was at Berkeley, particularly at International House, where she formed many Friendships that lasted throughout her life. Cynthia frequently remembered the kindness of total strangers and was a lifelong proponent of helping others. Moving to Rome with her new son, John, and her first husband, Monty, she gained a life-long appreciation of design and of things Mediterranean and European in style. Her daughter, Jane, was born in Johannesburg her son, Paul, in New York; and her daughter, Tanya, by her second husband, Ian, was born in London.
Cynthia maintained residences in Portugal and London, England and at various times was active in the antique and real estate trades. Passionate about maintaining her family relationships and Friendships, she frequently visited South Africa, Europe and North America. On becoming a grandmother, she wished for her grandchildren to have the same opportunities for travel and education that she experienced, and she worked hard to that effect.
Her last years were spent in Fort Myers, Florida receiving care for Alzheimers. Cynthia died on October 11, 2007. She will be missed by her surviving sisters, Kiki and Lorna; her children, John, Jane, Paul and Tanya; her daughters- and son-in-law, Linda, Rachel and John and her grandchildren, Erica, Eleanor, Emma, Julia and Adam; as well as her many nieces and nephews, Friends and acquaintances world-wide.
In lieu of flowers, the family requests that gifts be made to International House Open Gateway Scholarship Fund, University of California, Berkeley, 2299 Piedmont Ave., Berkeley, California, 94720-2320 (http://ihouse.berkeley.edu/a/giving).

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POLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-06 published
SLAWSON, Eileen (née GARLAND)
Peacefully at Lincoln Place, Toronto on August 31, 2007. Predeceased by her husband, Bud (Norwood) in 1970. Loving mother of Nicholas James SLAWSON and grandmother to Marc and Christopher. Sister of Patricia POLAND. A private service was held followed by cremation and interment at Mount Hope Cemetery, Toronto. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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POLANSKI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-20 published
POLANSKI, Adam
Passed away at Hamilton Henderson Hospital on Tuesday, July 17, 2007 at the age of 52. Beloved husband of Lidia. Much loved father of Anna, and Natalie. Loving son of Stefan and the late Aniela. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario St. (Hwy 10, North of Queen Elizabeth Way) on Sunday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Maximilian Kolbe Church, 4260 Cawthra Road on Monday, July 23, 2007 at 10: 00 a.m. Interment Springcreek Cemetery.

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POLCI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-11 published
HUSBAND, Mary Helen (née POLCI)
Peacefully at London Health Sciences Centre University Hospital on Tuesday, January 9, 2007 Mary Helen (née POLCI) HUSBAND, in her 87th year. Beloved wife of the late Jack S. HUSBAND. Cherished mother of John and his wife Linda and Dan and his wife Mary Anne. Proud grandmother of Brad, Jamie and Ted and great-grandmother of Leila. Dear sister of Loretta ROELOFSEN. Predeceased by her brothers Louie, Eddie, Joe and Orville POLCI and her sisters Amelia CRAWFORD and Pauline SMYTHE. She will be missed by several nieces and nephews and good Friends. Visitors will be received at John T. Donohue Funeral Home, 362 Waterloo Street at King Street, on Friday from 2-4 and 7-9 o'clock. Funeral Mass will be held at Saint Peter's Basilica, 196 Dufferin Avenue, on Saturday morning at 10: 30 o'clock. Interment in Saint Peter's Cemetery. Parish prayers and C.W.L. prayers will be held Friday afternoon at 3 o'clock. In lieu of flowers, donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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POLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-16 published
FROST, John James
Born August 10, 1947. Passed away while playing squash on Thursday, June 14th at the age of 59. Much loved by his wife Robin KINGSMILL, and family: Brenna FROST, Kim AGAR, Jim and Wendy FROST, Max and Frances FROST, Karen and David BARRETT, Patti and Mike EAST, Carol KINGSMILL and Dave POLE, and kindred sporting spirit Ruth KINGSMILL. Friends may call at Neweduk Funeral Home, (1981 Dundas St. W. Mississauga) Monday, June 18th 7-9 p.m. A memorial service will be held in the chapel on Tuesday, June 19th at 10: 30 a.m. If desired, memorial donations can be made to World Wildlife Fund, 245 Eglinton Ave. E. Suite 410, Toronto, Ontario M4P 3J1.

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POLFUSS o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-08-03 published
FROOK, Isabel (née JACKLIN)
Isabel FROOK of R.R.#4 Kincardine passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Tuesday, July 24, 2007. She was 74.
Born in Bentinck Township, daughter of the late Victor and Anna (née HOERLE) JACKLIN.
Survived by her daughters Carol HUSK and Don HODGINS of R.R.#2 Kincardine, Sandy and husband Leo LEROUX of Hanover and Gale and husband John POLFUSS of R.R.#1 Ayton, son Grant and wife Catherine FROOK of Kincardine, grandchildren Rod HUSK, Tammy FORSYTH, Connie REID, Tracey LEROUX, Carrie LEROUX, Dean LEROUX, Marcia TEATHER, Gordon POLFUSS, Adam POLFUSS, Martin POLFUSS, Tyler FROOK, Ryan FROOK and eight great-grandchildren.
Isabel is also survived by her brother Warren (Pauline) JACKLIN of R.R.#2 Holland Centre. Predeceased by her husband Ronald “Ron&rdquo FROOK and great-grand_son Jesse HUSK.
Visitation was held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover, on Thursday from 7-9 p.m. where a funeral service was held on Friday, July 27, 2007 at 2: 30 pm. Rev. John POLACOK officiated. Interment in Hanover Cemetery.
Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Hanover and District Hospital were appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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POLFUSS o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-02 published
MONACO, Silvano
Passed away at the Hanover and District Hospital on Saturday, October 27, 2007. Silvano MONACO, of R.R.#1 Neustadt, at the age of 67.
Beloved husband of the former Vani GRATTONI. Loving father of Nella and her fiancée Tim WELLS, and Silvia and her boyfriend Martin POLFUSS. Survived by one brother and one sister in Italy. Fondly remembered by the Grattoni family.
Cremation has taken place. A Celebration of Silvano's Life was held at the McCulloch-Watson Funeral Home, Durham on Tuesday afternoon at 1 o'clock, with visitation one hour prior to the service.
As an expression of sympathy, memorial donations to the Lung Association would be appreciated by the family.|

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POLFUSS o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-07-26 published
FROOK, Isabel
Of R.R.#4 Kincardine, passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Tuesday, July 24, 2007. She was 74. Survived by her daughters Carol HUSK and Don HODGINS of R.R.#2 Kincardine, Sandy and husband Leo LEROUX of Hanover and Gale and husband John POLFUSS of R.R.#1 Ayton, son Grant and wife Catherine FROOK of Kincardine, grandchildren Rod HUSK, Tammy FORSYTH, Connie REID, Tracey LEROUX, Carrie LEROUX, Dean LEROUX, Marcia TEATHER, Gordon POLFUSS, Adam POLFUSS, Martin POLFUSS, Tyler FROOK, Ryan FROOK and 8 great-grandchildren. Isabel is also survived by her brother Warren and wife Pauline JACKLIN of R.R.#2 Holland Centre. Predeceased by her husband Ronald “Ron&ldquo FROOK and great-grand_son Jesse HUSK. Visitation at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover, on Thursday 7-9 p.m. where a Funeral Service will be held on Friday, July 27, 2007 at 2: 30 p.m. Interment in Hanover Cemetery. Memorial donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Hanover and District Hospital Foundation would be appreciated as expressions of sympathy. Further information and register book available at www.mightonfuneralhome.ca.

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POLICARPO o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-01 published
Mother's actions saved child from certain death, police say
By Unnati GANDHI with a report from Tim SHUFELT, Page A14
Simply put, Jackie DO VALE- AVELAR lived for her daughter.
From play dates to cooking, drawing to shopping, the 25-year-old mother's every breath was for her three-year-old baby girl, Orbela.
That included her last.
As Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR drove home early yesterday morning to her waiting husband in Brampton, her Dodge SX collided with a tractor-trailer. Police say the truck driver fled the scene, and Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR's badly damaged car came to a stop across two lanes of the eastbound 401 near Cambridge.
Police later found the semi near Napanee, and arrested the driver for failing to remain at the scene of an accident.
Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR grabbed Orbela and put her in the ditch beside the highway's shoulder. But she returned to her totalled car, probably for her cellphone, police say.
As she tried to get in through the driver's door at about 4: 45 a.m. with her back to oncoming traffic, another rig plowed into her. She was pinned.
Ontario Provincial Police Constable David WOODFORD said she likely died on impact.
He said Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR did the right thing by immediately getting her daughter to safety, preventing what could have been an even greater tragedy.
"She got her child out. She saved her child's life, because the child would have been killed," he said.
To her closest Friends, the act of bravery sounded every bit like Jackie.
Candice SHERRETT, who said her Friendship with Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR dates back to elementary school, remembers the day Orbela was born.
"Jackie's life had been fulfilled," she told The Globe and Mail. "… I think some comfort can be taken knowing that Jackie died knowing her daughter was safe and out of harm's way."
Yesterday, Orbela was told, "Mommy has gone to heaven," she said.
Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR's husband, parents, and younger sister, Ligia, were too distraught to comment yesterday.
Jackie DO VALE married her high school sweetheart six years ago after graduating from Saint_Joseph's College School in downtown Toronto. The couple moved to Brampton and their daughter was born three years later.
Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR worked two jobs so Orbela could have whatever she wanted, said one of her best Friends, Alex POLICARPO, 25. During the week, she was a secretary at a local car dealership. On weekends, she worked at a laundromat.
"She liked to do everything in life. She was always the first to try things out," Ms. POLICARPO said.
When Ms. POLICARPO had her baby shower in July, Ms. DO VALE- AVELAR was the first to give her advice. "She told me to tell my husband to do all the work. I was supposed to just sit back and relax," Ms. POLICARPO said.
The Ontario Provincial Police also investigated another serious collision yesterday, in which a 70-year-old woman visiting from Trinidad was killed and three others were injured.
The four were travelling in the Niagara-bound lanes of the Queen Elizabeth Way near St. Catharines with a house trailer in tow just after 7 a.m. As their truck approached a construction zone, it suddenly veered off into a grassy shoulder at highway speed and struck a tree, Constable WOODFORD said.
The Ontario Provincial Police says 295 people have been killed in traffic accidents in the province so far this year, up from 280 in the same period in 2006.

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POLIS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-30 published
STARASTS, Gundega
Peacefully at York Central Hospital on August 28, 2007 after a lengthy struggle with Parkinson's Disease. Gundega beloved wife of the late Hermanis. Loving mother of John (Dale) and Ivars (Lilian). Cherished Nana of Andras, Anna and Tamara. Dear sister of Andras and predeceased by brothers Mintauts UZANS and Janis POLIS. She will be sadly missed by her family in Latvia, U.S.A. and her many Friends around the world. A private family service was held on Thursday, August 30th, 2007 at 2 p.m. at Saint_James' Crematorium Chapel. If so desired, donations to St. Andrew's Latvian Lutheran Church 383 Jarvis St. Toronto, Ontario M5B 2C7 would be appreciated by the family.

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POLISKY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-05-29 published
BROWNS, Morris, C.G.A.
Peacefully at the Queensway Carleton Hospital on Friday, May 25, 2007 at age 85. Beloved husband of Dorothy (née POLISKY.) Loving father of Shmuel (Bonna HABERMAN), Baruch (Rabbi Elyse GOLDSTEIN) and Jonathan (Cindy STELMACKOWICH.) Cherished grandfather of Tiferet, Uriel, Bezalel, Amatai, Adir Chai, Noam, Carmi and Micah. Funeral Service and interment was held in Ottawa. Toronto Shiva at 66 Hove Street, Thursday p.m. through Sunday a.m.

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POLITI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-13 published
SAGMAN, Sadok (Febrary 2, 1927-January 7, 2007)
Passed away peacefully in his 80th year, at the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. Devoted husband of Carmina Araujo SAGMAN. Beloved father of Sara and Ruth, Uri (Sandra), Doron (Yolanda), and Shaul. Grandfather of Gabriel, Reuben and Nathaniel; Aaron, Joel and Evan; Irene and Christine, Daniel and Stephanie. Survived by his brother Ezra. Predeceased by his parents, Flora and David SAGMAN, his brothers Eliyahu and Chaim, and by his first wife, Arlette Politi SAGMAN. Reflecting his Biblical name, meaning "the righteous," Sadok believed in justice and dedicated himself to the values important to him: family and education. The second of four brothers, he was born and raised in Baghdad. In the 1940s, after his family was forced to flee Iraq, he fought for the new State of Israel. In Israel, Sadok married Arlette POLITI, studied economics at the University of Tel Aviv, and became a banker. In 1966, seeking greater opportunities, he emigrated with his young family to Canada, where he worked as an economist for the Federal Government in Ottawa and established himself as a chartered accountant and subsequently as a real estate entrepreneur in Montreal. After the sudden death of his first wife in 1969, he raised three sons alone and later also cared for his aging parents, who joined the household. In 1979 Sadok married Carmina ARAUJO, whom he cherished, and enjoyed a new round of fatherhood with his adored daughters Sara and Ruth. With these blessings came renewed energy and purpose. Throughout his life he remained disciplined, active and optimistic, a fighter to the end. He was truly a self-made man, whose remarkable focus and determination will continue to inspire. The family is grateful to the caring staff of the Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, with particular thanks to Doctor Harvey Chang of the Palliative Care Unit, and also to Doctor Paul GREIG and Doctor Eric CHEN of the University Health Network in Toronto. A memorial service was held on January 7 in Montreal. If desired, memorial donations may be made to the Jewish General Hospital Foundation, (514) 340-8251 or www.jgh.ca

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POLL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-22 published
KNIGHT, David Anthony
Born in Ottawa, Ontario, on December 14, 1961. After a battle with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, passed away peacefully on December 20, 2007 at the age of 46. Survived by his wife Karen (née CORMIER) of Brampton, Ontario. Devoted father to Thomas and Stewart. Loving brother to Patricia POLL, of New Minus, Nova Scotia, and John (Tammy) of Navan, Ontario. Predeceased by his parents Donald and Mary Frances KNIGHT and his sister Elizabeth. Dave will always be remembered by his nephews and extended family. Employee for Primus Telecommunications and previous employee for Nortel for 14 years. Dave was an avid golfer, member of Chinguacousy Curling Club, helped behind the bench with his son's hockey team and enjoyed trailer life at Pike Lake. Family and Friends will be received at Andrews Community Funeral Centre 8190 Dixie Road, Brampton (North of Steeles Avenue) 905-456-8190 on Sunday, December 23, 2007 from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Funeral Mass to be held on Monday, December 24, 2007 at 10: 30 a.m. at St. Anthony of Padua Roman Catholic Church (940 North Park Drive, Brampton.) Memorial donations to the ALS Society of Ontario, 265 Yorkland Blvd, Suite 300, Toronto, Ontario M2J 1S5 would be appreciated by the family.

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POLLAK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-17 published
POLLAK, Fred A., CD
Maj. (Ret'd) Royal Canadian Dragoons
Peacefully at the Elizabeth Bruyere Palliative Care Centre in Ottawa on October 16th, 2007 in his 89th year. Beloved husband of Ann (GUTHRIE.) Wonderful dad of Susan, Catherine (Eric SLONE,) Nancy, Robin (Tim VERSTER) and his late daughter, Elizabeth. Loving grandfather of David, Christopher and Matthew SCHULTZ, Ted and Laura SLONE, and Desiree POLLAK- GARCIA. Delighted great-grandfather of Isabelle FULFORD and Anne-Elise SCHULTZ. Fred will also be greatly missed by his brother, John POLLAK (Zdena) and sister Gerta McLEAN; cousins Hannah SPENCER (Elvins), Mimi ROSENBLUTH (Gideon,) Eva LIPA (the late Michael,) and Margit SMITH (Lloyd) nieces Patsy, Andra and Carla, and nephew Jan; other family members, and many good Friends. Fred was born to Anna and Otto POLLAK in Brezno, Czechoslovakia, on May 20, 1919. His family came to Canada as refugees in 1939. Fred enlisted in the Canadian army, served four years overseas and then settled into a long and colourful career in military intelligence. Fred was a charming, disarming and mischievous man, passionate about history, his family and Friends, and the great outdoors. He and Ann were a splendidly matched duo of world travellers and bon vivants. Fred made us laugh, and the many pleasures of his company will not soon be forgotten. Friends are invited to visit at the Central Chapel of Hulse, Playfair and McGarry, 315 McLeod Street, Ottawa, on Thursday from 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. A Memorial Service will be held in the Chapel on Friday, October 19, 2007 at 11: 30 a.m. with a reception to follow. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation in Fred's memory to the Friends of the Canadian War Museum or a charity of your choice. The family wishes to thank the care providers at Elizabeth Bruyere and the Ottawa General for their kindness and skill. Condolences/donations at www.mcgarryfamily.ca

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POLLAK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-07 published
Refugee fled his Nazi persecutors to become a top-secret eavesdropper
Fluent in German and Czech, he was identified by the Canadian Army as someone who could listen in on enemy signals. It was the first step in a long military career, in both peace and war
By Buzz BOURDON, Special to the Globe and Mail, Page S8
Ottawa -- When Fred POLLAK arrived in Canada in 1939 as a fresh-face young man of 19, he was a penniless refugee who could barely speak English. Scarcely more than two years later, he found himself in a top-secret unit where he spent the rest of the Second World War eavesdropping on the Germans.
Having fled his native Czechoslovakia just one step ahead of the Nazis, Mr. POLLAK resolved to fight the Germans and, in August, 1941, he joined the Canadian army. However, it didn't take long for the brass to notice his special skills as a linguist. Fluent in Czech and German - he was born in Bohemia, the German-speaking part of Czechoslovakia - he was also proficient in shorthand and typing.
Barely six weeks after enlisting and undergoing very little basic training, he was "hijacked" by the army. For once, the brass decided to put a round peg in a round hole and assigned him to a wireless intelligence unit. He was sent to England to learn Morse code, and then to a top-secret radio post on the English Channel to listen in on German-occupied France.
"There, I monitored, copied, collated, analyzed and reported on German military signals traffic across the water in France," Mr. POLLAK wrote decades later. "At this time, literally no one in the Canadian forces had any experience in tactical signal intercept, nor did we possess recording devices. As a result, everything important was copied by hand. We were given some help by the British, but mostly it was on-the-job training."
The hours were long and the work tedious, but Mr. POLLAK and his fellow signalers knew their work was vital to the war effort. If Allied commanders knew what the enemy was up to, then they could plan their operations on the battlefield with greater confidence.
After a quick promotion to the dizzy heights of lance corporal, sadly without extra pay, he soon heard that he was to be made a sergeant. "But the authorities felt this was too much responsibility and sent me to officer cadet training instead," he said, tongue-in-cheek.
In June, 1944, Mr. POLLAK landed in France as a newly minted lieutenant, just weeks after the D-Day invasion of Normandy. From the rear lines, he donned his headset and listened to the stream of enemy signals, even coming to know the voices of individual German operators. "You listen to them for three years, and you get to know who they are," he told The Ottawa Citizen in 2005.
He also began to be able to read between the lines, picking up all sorts of useful information from little verbal tidbits and indiscretions. For example, radio operators talking about vacations or girlfriends could indicate the location of a unit, or an impending troop movement; a shower of Iron Cross medals intended to boost morale were "dead giveaways" that a unit was about to surrender so, too, did lots of "Heil Hitlers" meant to demonstrate loyalty.
Fred POLLAK was born Bedrich Juri POLLAK into a middle-class Jewish merchant family - his father dealt in grain and building supplies, and his mother ran a general store - that had long assimilated into Christian Bohemia. "Religion was not a huge part of their lives," said his daughter, Susan POLLAK. "It was their cultural identity more than anything else. They participated in both Jewish and Christian ceremonies."
But time was running out for all the Jews of Europe. After Nazi Germany took total control of Czechoslovakia in March, 1939, the POLLAK family knew they had to get out. "A neighbour knocked at the door late at night and told grandfather, 'You have to leave now, tonight. Go and get your exit papers, it's still possible - it won't be possible tomorrow,' Susan POLLAK said.
The following day, after paying a huge bribe, the POLLAKs boarded a train bound for uncertain exile. They were penniless and took only what they could carry. After a brief stay in Britain, the family was accepted by Canada. They arrived in August, 1939, only to encounter a bemused immigration official who blinked when Mr. POLLAK told him his complete name. "You have a new first name now - Fred Allen, after the radio personality."
With his parents, and with brother John and sister Gerta, he settled on a farm near Prescott, Ontario "I was a city slicker, and my performance as a farmer could best be described as flawed," he wrote. "I helped local farmers with their chores, and the bane of my existence was a team of horses that had previously pulled a milk delivery wagon. The horses were trained to stop at the slightest sound. I am a gassy individual and, suffice to say, the horses constantly misinterpreted my signals."
After the war, Mr. POLLAK decided to remain in the army. His war-time work, plus his knowledge of history, politics, current events and geography led to his transfer to the Canadian Intelligence Corps. He later became a cavalryman with the Royal Canadian Dragoons, Canada's senior armoured regiment.
The post-war era was an exciting time to be in the army and Mr. POLLAK made the best of it, serving in Laos in 1956 on a United Nations peacekeeping mission. In 1963, he landed "the best posting a soldier could wish for: a two-year term with the British Commander-in-Chief's Mission to the Soviet Forces in East Germany, based in West Berlin and Potsdam."
This was a super job for a Canadian major, he wrote. "There was never a dull moment, with constant friction and confrontation between the Soviet and North Atlantic Treaty Organization forces. Enduring Friendships were made with British, American and French officers."
It helped, too, that Berlin also offered fine museums, good symphony and opera, and excellent restaurants.
His daughter Nancy POLLAK remembers picking mushrooms with her father in the Grunewald forest when she was 10. "We'd run into local people also picking mushrooms. I would listen as my father spoke impeccable German with them, and then afterwards… I felt him wrestling with a kind of disbelief, and grief, at the enormous and calculated brutality of the Nazis," she said. "He returned to the subject often, to put it mildly."
In 1968, he retired. In a half-serious tribute, an army general described Mr. POLLAK's war record: "Freddy was able to predict: a, the Fall of Paris; b, the defeat at Arnhem; c, the Ardennes offensive; d, the end of the war. Unfortunately it took so long to decode, translate and disseminate these scoops that Eisenhower had already got the news from collateral sources."
From 1970-84, Mr. POLLAK joined the department of national defence and worked in an intelligence division that monitored Eastern European armies. After that, he continued his love affair with the military by conducting tours of the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa.
A strong family man who doted on his four daughters - he needed a sense of humour to put up with all those nylons drying in the only bathroom, a friend once quipped - Mr. POLLAK loved skiing, dogs, travelling and gardening. He was always up to something, from organizing family trips to making his own miniature soldiers.
Fred Allen POLLAK was born Bedrich Juri POLLAK on May 20, 1919, in Brezno, Czechoslovakia. He died of cancer in Ottawa on October 16, 2007. He was 88. He leaves Anne, his wife of 57 years, and by daughters Susan, Catherine, Nancy and Robin. He also leaves a brother and a sister. He was predeceased by his daughter Elizabeth.

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POLLARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-12 published
ROSS, Joan (HANNAY)
Formerly of Toronto, passed away at London, Ontario, on Wednesday January 10th 2007 in her 96th year. Beloved wife of the late Douglas ROSS. Dear mother of Nancy POLLARD and her husband Bill of London and Ian ROSS and his wife Norma of Smiths Falls. Predeceased by her daughter Jan KENNEDY (wife of Doug KENNEDY of Coboconk.) Loved by her 7 grandchildren and 13 great-grandchildren. A service to celebrate Joan's life will be held in the chapel of the A. Millard George Funeral Home, 60 Ridout Street South, London, Ontario (1-877-246-7186) on Saturday January 13th at 1 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations would be appreciated to the Alzheimer Society, 555 Southdale Road East, Suite 100, London, Ontario N6E 1A2, or the charity of your choice. On line condolences accepted at www.amgeorgefh.on.ca

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POLLARD o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
HAM, Anne (née DINSMORE)
Anne HAM died at her home in Jupiter, Florida on Friday, October 26, 2007 after a long and courageous fight with breast cancer. Anne was born in Montreal, Quebec on August 18, 1930 to Catherine and Charles DINSMORE. She attended West Hill High School and McGill University. Anne married Leslie HAM, also of Montreal, on June 12, 1954. Anne and Les subsequently lived, worked and played in Toronto, New Canaan, Paris, Hong Kong, London and Jupiter. Anne will be missed by her many Friends throughout Canada and the United States and by her husband Les, three children, Keith HAM of London, England, Susan HALSTEAD of Jupiter, Florida and Candy POLLARD of Nanaimo, British Columbia, her seven grandchildren and brother Robert DINSMORE of Picton, Ontario. Anne had a wonderful smile and kept on smiling throughout her illness. A Memorial Service will be held at 2 p.m. Saturday, November 3, 2007 at the Taylor and Modeen Funeral Home, 250 Center Street, Jupiter, Florida with Chaplain David Miller, officiating. The family suggests contributions to Hospice of Palm Beach County, Inc., 5300 East Ave., West Palm Beach, Florida 33407 in her memory. Taylor and Modeen Funeral Home Family Owned and Operated (561) 744-2030, Jupiter, Florida.

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POLLOCK o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-03 published
WAYLAND, Harold
Peacefully at home on Monday, January 1, 2007 Harold WAYLAND of Thorold in his 79th year. Beloved husband of Valeria WAYLAND and the late Priscilla WAYLAND. Dear step-father of Frank and David COLLAR of Niagara and Ronald and his wife Brenda COLLAR of London. Loving Papa to Terri, Brad, Ryan, Rachel and Alex. Dear brother of Margaret TODD of London, Gordon and his wife Shirley WAYLAND of Kincardine and Earlma and her husband Wally VINES of Port Elgin. Predeceased by sisters Merle, Jean, Millie, Mary and Sadie and brothers George Jr., Frank, Melvin and Grant. Loved by many nieces and nephews. Friends will be received at the Logan Funeral Home, 371 Dundas St. (between Waterloo and Colborne St.) on Thursday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Friday, January 5, 2007 at 1 p.m. with Rev. Murdo POLLOCK officiating. Interment Mount Pleasant Cemetery. Friends who wish may make memorial donations to Heart and Stroke Foundation. Online condolences www.loganfh.ca A tree will be planted as a living memorial to Harold WAYLAND.

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POLLOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-26 published
HULL, Geoffrey David (1959-2007)
Geoffrey David HULL died of cancer in Vancouver at the Cottage Hospice on July 21, 2007. He was a graduate of Lakefield College School, Queen's University and the School of Architecture at the University of British Columbia, and, a practising architect in Vancouver. He is survived by his wife, Fleur PALLIARDI, his son, Aidan, his parents, Margot Finley (Maurice PIGEON) and Ralph HULL (Sherri,) his sister, Susan POLLOCK (Bill) and brother, Andrew HULL (Shaan SYED.)
A tribute to Geoff will be held at 1: 00 o'clock on Sunday, September 23rd, 2007 at Cecil Green Park, 6251 Cecil Green Park Road, Vancouver. Please R.S.V.P. at ghull@shaw.ca

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POLLOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-17 published
POLLOCK, Samuel Patterson Smyth, O.C., C.Q.
After a courageous battle and many lives touched, he left this world on August 15 at the age of 81. 'That Man is a Success who has lived well, laughed often and loved much; who has gained the respect of intelligent women and men and the love of children who never lacks appreciation of the earth's beauty or fails to express it; who follows his dreams and pursues excellence in each task; and brings out the best in others, and gives only the best of himself.' He leaves behind his loving wife Mimi (KINSELLA,) his beloved children Mary (Darren), Sam, Rachel (Andrew); his cherished grandchildren James, Sammy and Katherine; Emma and William; Elizabeth and Drew; his brother Robert (Anne) and many relatives in Ottawa; and his faithful Friends Laddie and Snowflake. He was predeceased by his sister Ruth. Special thanks to his good friend Doctor David Mulder. A mass will be held on Monday, August 20th at Ste Elizabeth Parish in North Hatley, Quebec at 5 p.m. A private funeral service will be held at St. Barnabas Anglican Church in North Hatley on Tuesday, August 21st at 1 p.m. with burial following at North Hatley cemetery. An open reception will be held at Hovey Manor on Tuesday August 21st at 3 p.m. In lieu of flowers donations may be made to Mary Mother of the Poor Charitable Foundation, c/o St. Maurice Parish 4 Perry Street, Ottawa, Ontario K2G 1K5. 'See, I am sending an angel before you to guard you on the way and bring you to the place I have prepared.' Exodus 23: 20 Funeral Arrangements entrusted to the Steve Elkas Funeral Home 601, Conseil St Sherbrooke, Quebec J1G 1K4 Phone 819-565-1155 Fax 819-820-8872 For messages of condolences www.steveelkas.com

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POLLOCK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-05 published
Prolific and brilliant Ojibwa painter was called 'the Picasso of the North'
Like the great Spanish artist, he could draw spontaneously, never lifting his pencil until the image was complete. He is the only native artist to have held a solo exhibition at the National Gallery of Canada
By Donn DOWNEY, Page S8
This obituary was prepared by Donn DOWNEY (who died in April, 2001,) with files from James ADAM/ADAMS.
Toronto -- The descriptions are spectacular and too generous, perhaps. Norval MORRISSEAU was "the Picasso of the North," according to some, and "the most important painter Canada has ever produced," to quote his Toronto art dealer.
Such descriptions, of course, ignore the likes of Tom Thomson, Emily Carr and the Group of Seven and place Mr. MORRISSEAU in a league with the most innovative artist of the 20th century. The hyperbole is forgivable. They are part of the legend - the story of a true primitive who emerged from the Northern Ontario wilderness to awe the sophisticates in the major art centres of the world. Indeed, Mr. MORRISSEAU remains the only native artist ever to have had a solo exhibition (for three months, starting in February, 2006) in the 127-year history of the National Gallery of Canada.
Art dealer Jack POLLOCK, one of the many who claimed to have discovered Mr. MORRISSEAU, was also part of the legend but had a better grasp on his contribution. "He invented a visual vocabulary that never existed before him," Mr. POLLOCK said before his death in 1992. "He gave the demi-gods of his people an image."
Mr. MORRISSEAU could properly lay claim to being the creator and spiritual leader of the Woodland Indian art movement, not only in Canada but in the northeast United States. He developed his style independent of the influence of any other artist and was the first to depict Ojibwa legends and history for the non-native world.
He broke the taboos of his people by revealing sacred stories, but believed it was his mission to put his heritage before the modern world so it could be kept alive. He was "a living bridge to the past," said Donald ROBINSON of Toronto's Kinsman Robinson Galleries, his major dealer for more than 15 years.
Three generations of native artists have followed in his footsteps, producing variations of the MORRISSEAU style using heavy black outlines to enclose colourful, flat shapes. Many of these artists have become wealthy in the process but such success was denied Mr. MORRISSEAU, who never quite escaped the poverty into which he was born.
"To this day, I don't know how we made a living," he wrote in an article published in The Globe and Mail in 1979. "You see, that sense of real necessity is not a thing that most people in white society know anything about." He was raised by his grandfather who was "the most influential person in the whole of my life and also a good provider. We always had moose meat in the house. Also oranges, but no bananas."
Born near Thunder Bay to a family living on the Ojibwa Sand Point Reserve on Lake Nipigon, he was baptized Jean-Baptiste Norman Henry MORRISSEAU. The oldest of five sons, he went to school for six years, but only finished Grade 2. "You see, the first year you get there, they put you in kindergarten," he once wrote. "The next year you come back and they put you in kindergarten again. Next thing you know, you are in Grade 1. Then, the following year, you start Grade 1 all over again. Maybe you stay in Grade 1 three or four years."
He was brought up by both his maternal grandparents. His grandfather was a shaman who schooled him in the traditional ways of his culture while his grandmother, a Catholic, made it her business that he was familiar with Christian beliefs. By all accounts, it was the conflict between the two cultures that influenced his outlook and what would later become his art.
Over the years, legends have developed around Mr. MORRISSEAU. According to one story, he became perilously ill at 19. A visit to the doctor did nothing and a medicine woman was summoned. A renaming ceremony was performed (Anishnaabe tradition holds that a giving powerful name to someone near death can rally strength and save a life). He was renamed Copper Thunderbird, and recovered. Later, he would use it to sign his paintings.
Somewhere along the way, he developed a fondness for alcohol. When Mr. POLLOCK first met him in the summer of 1962, he was drunk. The artist demanded that Mr. POLLOCK look at his work. Mr. POLLOCK was impressed and was interested in mounting an exhibit, but Mr. MORRISSEAU wanted to sell his works on the spot for $5 each. Mr. POLLOCK talked him out of it and a subsequent showing at the Pollock Gallery sold out within 24 hours, netting the artist $3,000. Time magazine declared that "few exhibits in Canadian history have touched off a greater immediate stir than MORRISSEAU's" and predicted that he would launch "a vogue as chic as that of the Cape Dorset Eskimo's prints."
He continued to live in the area north of Lake Superior and apparently squandered much of his money. In 1978 - a year in which he was appointed to the Order of Canada - when someone jokingly suggested that he throw a garden party, just like the Queen, he bought an antique silver tea service and a set of Royal Crown Derby china to entertain 21 of his Friends, colleagues and admirers in his chair-filled wilderness garden. Each was given a rare American buffalo nickel as a gift and a MORRISSEAU original drawing.
Over the years, he remained a master of the primitive school of art. In 1981, Globe and Mail art critic John Bentley MAYS described Mr. MORRISSEAU's as wholly appropriate to the context of his background. "His styles, situations and subjects are exactly what we would expect in the work of a self-taught artist who has lived most of his life in northern Ontario. There is little attention to figurative modelling in these pictures, no delving into the problems of perspective or pictorial depth. Using his small repertoire of techniques, he presents stylized versions of what he knows: the bears, loons, fish and turtles that live in the forests and ponds, and the people in the town around him.
"But these are not ordinary forests, ponds and people. MORRISSEAU's art transports us into a shadowy archetypal realm where ordinary things are wonderful. In his visionary lakes swim mighty fish, armed with bolts of spiritual lightening. A bear spirit -- a dragon-like chimera spangled with bright eyes and brilliant colours suddenly stands in your path."
For all his success, Mr. MORRISSEAU allowed his career and his life to descend relentlessly. In 1987, he was discovered wandering the downtown streets of Vancouver, sleeping in alleys and selling his sketches for the price of a bottle of booze. "To get drunk in Vancouver is the most beautiful thing there is," he was quoted as saying.
Years later, after he had dried out, Mr. MORRISSEAU told The Globe that his drinking binges in part reflected his resentment over "never getting my fair share." Still, he said he enjoyed life on the Vancouver streets: "I met a lot of nice people. I might even do it again - without the booze - so I can remember them all clearly."
Around that time, he met Gabor VADAS, a young man with problems, and the two formed a bond. Mr. MORRISSEAU believed that Mr. VADAS was his son and the younger man presents himself as such. However, the relationship was never ratified "through the legal courts," according to Mr. VADAS's wife, Michele, "but certainly as far as from a traditional native and spiritual point of view [Mr. VADAS was his son] because they take their adoptions very seriously&hellip They never lost faith in each other and have always been very loyal to each other."
In 1989, Mr. MORRISSEAU was the only Canadian painter invited to exhibit at the Georges Pompidou Centre in Paris during the bicentennial of the French Revolution. After seeing the works of Van Gogh and Picasso, he decided they were "all greys" and returned home to paint "some real colour."
He first exhibited with the Kinsman Robinson Galleries the following year. Wearing a new silk suit, he arrived for the opening in a white limousine. The exhibition sold out.
At 65, Mr. MORRISSEAU developed Parkinson's disease but continued to paint. "My hands don't shake when I hold a brush," he told Chris Dafoe of The Globe in 1999.
He had a healthy respect for his own talent. Doctor Henry WEINSTEIN, a doctor in Northern Ontario's Red Lake district who in the 1950s was among the first to recognize Mr. MORRISSEAU as a true original, was a friend of Pablo Picasso and once gave a MORRISSEAU drawing to the Spanish master. On the back, Mr. MORRISSEAU had written, "From one great artist to another." Picasso, after looking at the drawing is said to have remarked: "Well, you never know, do you?" - meaning that great art surfaces in unlikely places.
The comparison of the two artists was not entirely inappropriate. Mr. MORRISSEAU, like Picasso, could draw spontaneously, never lifting his pencil from the paper until the image was complete. "Very few artists in the world have this ability," Doctor WEINSTEIN said.
Mr. MORRISSEAU's early work was created on birch bark or animal hides. Mr. ROBINSON said he at first punched holes in the bark or hide but was later given paints by Doctor WEINSTEIN.
Mr. MORRISSEAU believed he was a "born painter" and said that when he started to paint, the images "just come." He created his designs to beautify the world with colour. "The world needs it," he said. Colour was a key resource in Mr. MORRISSEAU's repertory of symbols. He used connecting lines to depict interdependence. "These paintings only remind you that you're an Indian," the artist said. "Inside somewhere, we're all Indians. So now when I befriend you, I'm trying to get the best Indian, bring out the Indianness in you to make you think everything is scared."
Less inviolate were his family relationships. Mr. MORRISSEAU has six (some say seven) adult children from his marriage in 1957 to Harriet KAKEGAMIC, and has claimed at times to have fathered as many as 14 sons and daughters. Over the years, this has resulted in conflict with some of the children. Three months ago, for instance, one of Mr. MORRISSEAU's sons, Christian, also an artist, announced the creation of the Morrisseau Family Foundation to, in part, "ensure my family's heritage and the integrity of my father's legacy." A month after this, Mr. MORRISSEAU issued through Mr. VADAS a press release declaring that he had "not been consulted or in any way involved" with the Morrisseau Family Foundation, "nor do I support it in any way."
Mr. MORRISSEAU was a prolific artist before illness slackened his output - it's been estimated he produced more than 10,000 works in his lifetime. Aided by Mr. VADAS, he battled in recent years against what they alleged were a spate of fakes.
In the meantime, Mr. VADAS and his wife cared for Mr. MORRISSEAU after the onset of Parkinson's and Mr. MORRISSEAU doted like a grandfather on their two children, Kyle and Robin. Earlier in this decade, he spent some time in an extended care facility on Vancouver Island, but for most of this year, he lived with the VADAS family in their house in Nanaimo, B.C.
All things considered, Mr. MORRISSEAU was proud of his place in Canadian art history. "I may not have a Ferrari, but I'm the first Indian to break into the Canadian art scene and I have forever enriched the Canadian way of life," he said. "I want to make paintings full of colour, laughter, compassion and love... If I can do that, I can paint for 100 years."
He spent much of his last years in a wheelchair, deprived of intelligible speech. He suffered at least two strokes.
In October, Mr. MORRISSEAU travelled to Northern Ontario to receive an honorary degree from the University of Sudbury, and had planned to go to New York to attend the opening of his one-man show at New York's George Gustav Heye Center, which is part of the National Museum of the American Indian. Instead, he became ill in Toronto and was admitted to hospital.
Norval MORRISSEAU was born Norman Henry MORRISSEAU at Beardmore, Ontario, on March 13, 1931. He died yesterday in Toronto General Hospital of complications from Parkinson's disease. He is survived by numerous children.
The public may visit Mr. MORRISSEAU's open casket Thursday and Friday this week from 2 to 4 p.m. and 7 to 9 p.m. each day at Jerrett Funeral Homes, 1141 St. Clair Ave. W., Toronto. It is anticipated that he will be buried near Beardmore, Ontario, or Thunder Bay.

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POLONSKY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-25 published
Fighter pilot became college president and put education in his sights
Royal Canadian Air Force flyer returned from the Second World War determined to get a university degree. He found success in business and passed on his lust for knowledge to a generation of students
By F.F. LANGAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S7
Mel GARLAND was a man who did well at everything he did, and he did an awful lot. A fighter pilot, a businessman and a civil servant, he was also a visionary who helped develop community colleges and trade schools in Ontario.
Mr. GARLAND was the second president of Durham College, a community college at Oshawa, east of Toronto, from 1980 to 1988.
It was a time when the community college system was vigorously expanding. Set up by the Ontario government in 1967, Durham was one of about 20 new tertiary-level schools. The object was to provide students with a practical education that would lead to good jobs, and to improve the province's standard of living. That is why Mr. GARLAND promoted two- and three-year applied engineering programs, and worked to get Durham College - the school closest to a large auto plant - to set up a robotics lab.
"He was a strong believer that a modern society needed knowledge workers above all else, and in particular, leaders in technology," said Gary POLONSKY who succeeded him as president of Durham College. "Mel expanded programs in engineering technology and trades."
As part of running Durham College, he worked at establishing the Skilled Trades Centre in nearby Ajax, Ontario A part of Durham College, it now has about 2,000 students learning to become everything from electricians and plumbers to millwrights and metal fabricators.
Mel GARLAND grew up in Port Dalhousie, Ontario, where the family lived in the same house for 60 years. Both his parents were immigrants from Glasgow, and his father worked as a maintenance foreman at Thompson Products. As a boy, young Mel and his best friend, Pete BELFORD, liked to sneak onto the local tennis courts to play. The president of told them they could play for free if they performed odd jobs around the club. Eventually, the two of them played at the St. Catharines Tennis Club, where one year they won the doubles championship. Later, they went on to win the Niagara District championship.
Mr. GARLAND and Mr. BELFORD did a lot of things together, and remained Friends for life. As youngsters, they joined the Boy Scouts, and once shared first place in a competition. Mr. GARLAND eventually became a King's Scout, the top honour a Scout can earn. They once hitchhiked to Montreal and, when they were old enough, went to Hamilton together to enlist in the Royal Canadian Air Force and serve in the Second World War.
In 1942, Mr. GARLAND was selected for pilot training. At flight school, the same things that had made him a good tennis player - sharp eyesight and quick reflexes - singled him out as a fighter pilot. Just before he went overseas, he went to a tennis club dance and met a young woman named Marguerite ALLEN. They saw each other every night before he left.
He arrived in England in February of 1944, at the age of 21. At that stage in the war, fighter pilots had two main jobs: protecting bombers on their way to Germany, and preparing for the Allied invasion of France. Almost as soon as he arrived, 403 Squadron moved to Tangmere, a Royal Air Force station in West Sussex, to be closer to the English Channel.
By this point, Mr. GARLAND was a flying officer. He and the rest of the squadron were equipped with the latest version of the Spitfire fighter. Armed with cannons and machine guns, this version was a much more deadly weapon than the one that flew in the Battle of Britain. Flying low-level missions over France was also deadly for the pilots.
The squadron moved to an airfield at Dieppe, France, on June 16, just 10 days after the D-Day invasion of Normandy. Almost exactly a month later, Mr. GARLAND's plane was hit by flak while on a mission. At first he thought he could land the plane, but a fire broke out and he was forced to bail out. For a few seconds, he was trapped up in the cockpit and feared his parachute would not open but managed to alight in a field, convinced he was safe. To his surprise, he was soon surrounded by German soldiers.
He spent three weeks as a prisoner of war, though never in a camp. The Germans were in retreat and marched Mr. GARLAND and the other prisoners across France, sometimes covering as much as 40 kilometres a day. In the confusion of the retreat, Mr. GARLAND escaped. He slept in the barns of sympathetic French farmers and slowly made his way back to the Allied lines.
He soon found himself home in Canada, since the Royal Canadian Air Force never sent an escaped PoW back into service, fearing they would be shot if recaptured. But the war in Europe was soon over, and Mr. GARLAND resolved to make use of veterans scholarships and get an education. Before the war, he had finished high school but lacked the money to go to university. The scholarships allowed him to go to Queen's University in Kingston and he graduated in the class of 1948½ (to speed up their schooling and catch up with life, veterans were allowed fall graduation).
While at Queen's, he married Marguerite (with Mr. BELFORD as best man) and the couple set off for Boston. He been accepted to the Harvard Business School, even though he had already used up most of his credits under the veterans' scholarship scheme. To make ends meet, Marguerite found work and he got a night job at the Harvard Library.
After Harvard, they returned home. Mr. GARLAND started work at General Electric Canada. He later worked at General Bakeries and Ford Canada, during the period when the auto maker was building its assembly plant in Oakville, Ontario
Even then, he was concerned about Ontario's ability to compete in the world. In 1967, he became chairman of the education committee of the Ontario Chamber of Commerce, the same year the community college system was founded.
In 1974, Mr. GARLAND joined the Ontario government as executive director of industry and then executive director of trade. It was the beginning of two decades of devotion to fine-tuning Ontario's industrial infrastructure. He carried on with the same mission at Durham College.
"The lack of skilled people to fill the manpower needs of industry is a real problem," he said in 1980, the year he was appointed president. "It's in the schools that we can turn attitudes around to make these skilled jobs desirable careers."
Under his leadership, the school began expanding its industrial facilities.
"He focused on bringing the latest technology to the classroom and constructing a new state-of-the-art robotics lab, the precursor to our Integrated Manufacturing Centre on campus today," said Leah MYERS, president of Durham College. "Mel was known as an entrepreneurial and consummate professional who set high standards for himself and those around him."
Although he was a man with many careers, his neighbours in the Toronto suburb of Etobicoke remember him as a strong family man who was devoted to his six children. Neighbour and close friend Ron Quick said his biggest success was raising his brood and a marriage that lasted 60 years.
His oldest daughter, Linda, said he had an easy manner with both his own children and others on the block. "Much can be said for my father's many achievements, but he was the kind of dad who says after dinner, 'Let's play some ball,' " she said. "We would troop out to the side of the yard for a pickup game of baseball and, within minutes, kids from up and down the street would be joining us. Dad would be the only adult out there."
The flags at Durham College flew at half-mast the week Mr. GARLAND died. His friend Mr. BELFORD, who never left Port Dalhousie, attended the funeral.
Melvin Lloyd GARLAND was born in Port Dalhousie, Ontario, on October 19, 1922. He died on September 3, 2007, in Ancaster, Ontario, of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 84. He is survived by his wife, Marguerite. He also leaves daughters Linda, Jane, Jennifer and Pat, and sons David and Greig.

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POLSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
POLSON, Ethel Georgina Helmer
In celebration of her life, but with deep sorrow, we announce the sudden passing of Ethel Georgina Helmer POLSON, beloved wife of 60 years to Anthony Frank (Tony); dearly loved mother of Toni (Barb) ASHTON (Mrs. Robert MORRISON,) Donald (wife, Valerie,) Rory (wife, Vicki) and Kirk; loving grandmother to Ryan, Jordan, Kara and Alex POLSON, and Meredith and Courtney ASHTON. Ethel lived a life of love, passion, hard work and charity, treasuring each and every day. A prairie girl, she joined the air-force during World War 2 where she met Tony and began a long and inspirational life of adventure and great happiness. Together, she and Tony raised a family, which included all manner of animals and birds, built a camp on One Island Lake, and volunteered in their Thunder Bay and British Columbia communities. Ethel took pleasure in golf, travel, baking, arts and crafts, and gardening. She cherished her Friends and family, always showing great affection and generosity. She fought a courageous battle with Alzheimer's with the same grace and strength that marked her life. The family wishes to thank Sunrise of Unionville, and especially the staff on the Reminiscence floor, for their wonderful care over these last few challenging months. If desired, memorial donations can be made to the Alzheimer's Society, Canadian Cancer Society, or the Toronto Humane Society. The family will receive Friends at the Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East), from 7: 00 to 9:00 p.m. Thursday. A memorial service to celebrate Ethel's life will be held in the chapel on Friday, November 2, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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POLUSA o@ca.on.grey_county.hanover.the_post 2007-11-16 published
MOYER, John
John MOYER, of Hanover, passed away at Hanover and District Hospital on Monday, November 12, 2007. He was 88.
Born in Mount Forest, son of the late Henry and Annie née RUETZ) MOYER. John farmed on his own farm until retiring and was a 3rd Degree Knights of Columbus.
Survived by wife Mildred (ZETTLER) MOYER, children Harvey (Rene) MOYER of Mount Forest, Thelma (Jospeh) VAN OSCH of Lucknow, Doris CAUGHLIN (Steve POLUSA) of Pinewood, Percy (Kathy) MOYER of Ayton, 13 grandchildren and 26 great-grandchildren.
Also survived by a brother Peter MOYER of Walkerton. Predeceased by brothers Leo, Joe, Tony, sisters Cecilia SCHNURR, Marie DIEMERT, son-in-law Harold CAUGHLIN and great-grand_son Jordan YOUNG.
Visitation was held at Mighton Funeral Home, Hanover, on Wednesday 2-4 and 7-9 p.m. with Vigil Rites at 8: 30 pm.
A Funeral Mass was held on Thursday, November 15, 2007 at 10: 30 a.m. at Holy Family Church, Hanover. Father Mervin PERERA officiated.
Interment Holy Family Cemetery, Hanover.
Pall bearers were Perry VAN OSCH, John VAN OSCH, Brian MOYER, Brandon MOYER, Kyle MOYER and Kevin CAUGHLIN.
Memorial donations to the Hanover and District Hospital Foundation or the Canadian Cancer Society were appreciated as expressions of sympathy.

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