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"PED" 2007 Obituary


PEDDLE  PEDERSEN  PEDERSON  PEDLAR  PEDRO  PEDROSA 

PEDDLE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-26 published
PEDDLE, Roger James Earl
Athlete, executive, entrepreneur, activist, mentor, father, husband. Born May 22, 1949, in Brampton, Ontario Died suddenly and unexpectedly May 18 in Timmins, Ontario, aged 57.
By Kathleen Jean PEDDLE, Page L6
Roger was a presence. He filled a room with his personality, intellect, laughter, voice and physical size. He had no ego, no agenda. He sought solutions and was inpatient with inertia. Roger wanted those with a wishbone to have a backbone.
At ease in social, business, health, political and sports circles, he loved to be part of the action. He was an exceptional networker and an entertaining raconteur.
Roger was a fifth-generation resident of Peel County in Ontario, who witnessed the rapid urbanization of his rural origins in Elmbank, now the site of Pearson International Airport.
Imagine him visiting Japan in the 1970s, all 6 foot 3 and more than 400 pounds of him, for a weightlifting competition. His hair was red and curly, afro-style, and he wore a blue-and-white seersucker suit and platform shoes. He became the local attraction, needing a police escort back to his hotel.
Roger trained at Seneca College and York University. At 35 he became the youngest director of Upjohn Health Care in Kalamazoo, Michigan. He was president of Peddle-Morton Health Care Services, and recently worked as a health-care consultant. He received a Queen's Golden Jubilee Medal, and in the late 1990s was named Brampton's Business Person of the Year.
Roger's interest in sports spanned his years competing internationally as a heavyweight power weightlifter - named the third-strongest man in the world for three years - and playing and coaching football. Football terms, for him, were a metaphor for life. He served as president of Ontario Amateur Football and the Brampton Excelsiors lacrosse club.
Roger was a member and leader of many boards, committees and riding associations. He found serenity at the cottage at Ice Chest Lake in Timmins, and enjoyed travelling on everything from local crop tours to a cruise ship, drinking rusty nails and smoking a cigar.
His daughter, Allison Elizabeth CARRIE, and wife, Kathleen Jean, shared Roger with many people and organizations. Roger promised Kathleen Jean when they married, "life would never be dull." They shared a partnership of love and mutual respect for 26 years.
Roger enriched many lives and nurtured young adults, but never sought centre stage or accolades. He was fun, supplying the spark to many occasions. Those who knew and miss him will continue to be inspired and motivated by his legacy of leading, living, laughing, loving, listening, learning and leaving this world better than before.
Kathleen Jean PEDDLE is Roger's wife.

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PEDERSEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-01 published
BORLAND, Elizabeth Geraldine "Betty" (née RUTLEDGE)
81, of Embro and formerly of R.R.#2 Lakeside passed away in Woodingford Lodge, Woodstock on Saturday, December 30, 2006. She was born in Waterdown, Ontario on September 19, 1925, a daughter of the late George Albert RUTLEDGE and the former Beatrice Geraldine MAY. She was a member of Kintore United Church, Kintore. She was predeceased by her 1st husband, Robert Henry VOGEL and her daughter, Charlotte Ann VOGEL, both in June of 1955; her grand_son, Robert BRENNEMAN, on October 5, 1981 and by her brother, Bruce RUTLEDGE. She is survived by two daughters, Judy and husband Alan KEUTSCH of London, Diane and husband Garry BRENNEMAN of R.R.#2 Embro; four grandchildren, Lance and wife Tina KEUTSCH, Jeffrey and wife Susan KEUTSCH, Sara BRENNEMAN and fiancé Michael AVOLEDO and Garry BRENNEMAN Jr.; three great-grandchildren, Lasse PEDERSEN, Wyatt KEUTSCH and Anna KEUTSCH; her sister-in-law, Olive RUTLEDGE of Saint Marys; James BORLAND of Lake St. Peter and many sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law. Relatives and Friends will be received in the Francis Funeral Home, 77 Woodstock Street North, Tavistock on Monday, January 1, 2007 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. where the funeral service will be held on Tuesday, January 2, 2007 at 2 p.m. The Reverend Janice AICKEN will officiate. Interment in Trinity Lutheran Cemetery, Sebastopol-Tavistock. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society or the Multiple Sclerosis Society would be appreciated and may be made through the Francis Funeral Home by calling 1-519-655-2431

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PEDERSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-11 published
DAVIDSON, Patricia (née KIRKPATRICK)
(August 28, 1914-January 10, 2007)
It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of our beloved mother and best friend Patricia Marian DAVIDSON after a 10 year battle with Alzheimer's Disease. Dearly loved wife of the late Kenneth M. DAVIDSON (1998.) She passed peacefully at Leisure World surrounded by her loving daughters Wendy, Judi and Carolyn. She will be remembered fondly by her grandchildren Glorialeigh, Peter, David and Devon and by her sons-in-law Van Angelo, Bill ROGERS and Walter PEDERSEN. She will be sadly missed by nieces, nephews and Friends. Pat will be remembered as a kind, loving and generous woman who was deeply admired by Friends and family. She avidly participated in curling, golf and bridge when she wasn't doing her favourite cryptic crossword puzzles. The family wishes to extend their gratitude to the caring staff of Leisure World (O'Connor Court). Friends may call at the Trull 'North Toronto' Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, 2704 Yonge Street (5 blocks south of Lawrence) on Friday, January 12, 2007 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral service will be held in the chapel on Saturday, January 13, 2007 at 11: 00 a.m. followed by a reception in the 'Lytton Room'. Interment York Cemetery. For those who wish, the family would greatly appreciate memorial contributions to the Alzheimer Society of Toronto, 2323 Yonge St, Suite 500, P.O. Box 26285, Stn Brm B, Toronto Ontario, M7Y 4R1

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PEDERSEN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-10 published
PEDERSEN, Axel
Carpenter, entrepreneur, volunteer, brother, husband, father. Born May 21, 1928, in Jutland, Denmark. Died June 10 in Toronto of Parkinson's disease, aged 79.
By Evelyn PEDERSEN, Page L8
On April 20, 1929, Axel's family arrived at Halifax's Pier 21, weary from the long voyage from Copenhagen. Peder and Maria PEDERSEN settled their small family - Erik, Edith, and baby Axel - in Fox Harbour, Nova Scotia They later had three more children - Greta, Mona, and Mary.
In 1939, Erik and Edith left to join the Canadian war effort, and Peder looked increasingly to Axel for help on the farm. Axel completed Grade 10, then withdrew from school.
He was fiercely protective of his sisters. One February night, fire broke out and the wooden house burned to the ground. Axel, who for a panicked moment imagined that little Mary was trapped inside, had to be restrained from rushing back into the house. For the rest of his life he harboured a fear of fire.
After the war, Axel heard that jobs were plentiful up in Toronto. In 1949, with only a few dollars and a cardboard suitcase, he boarded a bus. Upon arriving in Toronto, Axel learned that a local builder was looking for labourers. He worked the day for him, and a day stretched into years.
In 1951, Axel sent for his parents and sisters to join him. They lived together in a crowded flat until Axel gathered the down payment for a semi-detached house.
A friend introduced Axel to Joan McCLELLAN, a lovely, shy secretary, in 1955. Ever the volunteer, he brought her on their first date to a Sunday-school picnic in his red truck, a band of youngsters jostling in the back on benches.
Axel and Joan were married two years later, and Joan came to live with the PEDERSENs. The couple had a baby, Evelyn, who was still a toddler when they decided to launch their own contracting business.
They transformed the spare bedroom into an office, where Joan handled all the bookkeeping. For the next 24 years, Axel and his carpenter, Aldo, dug and poured, climbed and measured, sawed and pounded. Axel also donated hundreds of hours of building labour, and assisted his brother-in-law with the annual distribution of food hampers.
Arthritis in his knees persuaded Axel to change careers. He immersed himself in a rigorous real-estate course. He aced his exams and became a licensed agent. Axel was honest, and relished the challenge of finding buyers and the excitement of midnight signings.
Axel lived with Parkinson's for 17 years. He urged Evelyn: "Always remember: people matter more than possessions." And, "Never lose your sense of humour - it'll carry you through the tough times."
Evelyn PEDERSEN is Axel's daughter.

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PEDERSON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-28 published
TUPPER, Kathleen Isabel (née CAMPBELL)
Kathleen Isabel (Kaye) TUPPER (née CAMPBELL) died in her sleep at Evergreen House Terminal Care Unit, North Vancouver on Thursday, July 19th, 2007, at the age of 102. She was predeceased by her beloved husband of 64 years Kenneth Franklin TUPPER (1994) and her son, William Allan TUPPER (2005.) Loving mother of Jim TUPPER (Juanita,) Deanne PEDERSON (David) and daughter-in-law Fran TUPPER. Dear aunt to Holly CAMPBELL, Mardie CAMPBELL, Roberta FLECK, Loraleigh RANDLE, and Colin COOPER; Devoted grandmother to Tony, Deborah, Geof, Anna, Ken, Rob, Janet, Gordon and Donald; step-grandmother to Ingrid, Erica, and Kristen; great-grandmother to 18 great-grandchildren.
Kaye was born in Blantyre, Scotland on Dec 9, 1904; she grew up in Glasgow and Calgary, where she met her husband Ken in 1925. They were married in 1930 and moved to Ottawa, where Ken joined National Research Council. They enjoyed skiing and canoeing. After World War 2 they moved to Deep River and then to Toronto, where Kaye learned to drive a car at the age of 50. She saw and adapted to many changes, growing up in a time when everyone walked, took streetcars and trains. Her life involved travel across Canada, to Europe and the West Indies. She lived in Florida and West Vancouver after retirement. Everywhere she went she made new Friends. Her love of dancing and exercising was infectious and she danced up until a few days before her death. She inspired family and Friends with her joy and enthusiasm. Her wisdom about living a long life was to 'keep moving and to give a compliment not a complaint'. Special thanks to her Friends, Del and Maggie, and the staff at Amica, Burnaby and West Vancouver for their love and care; and to the staff at Lion's Gate Hospital and Evergreen Terminal Care Unit for caring for Kaye in her last weeks of life.
A private family celebration of her life was held in West Vancouver, British Columbia. A memorial service will be held at First St. Andrews United Church in London, Ontario, Saturday September 8th, 2007 at two o'clock.

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PEDLAR o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-12-12 published
THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, Mervyn
Maxine and families of the late Mervyn THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON wish to extend a heartfelt and warm thank you to family, Friends and neighbours for the endless support, inquiries and acts of kindness shown to us during Mervyn's illness and recent passing. It has been a great comfort to us all. Special thanks to Penny PEDLAR, nurse-practitioner, Dr. KAETHLER, Doctor WAGMAR, Victorian Order of Nurses, Parameds and all the staff at Markdale Hospital, and to Brigitte and Grant MAY. You were all wonderful and helped immensely with our great loss. We will remember you always.
Page 3

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PEDLAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-06 published
PEDLAR, Barbara Ann (née FLYNN)
On Thursday, January 4, 2007, Barbara Ann PEDLAR (née FLYNN) died at home, age 75, after a courageous and determined battle with cancer. She enjoyed a varied career as a nurse, a stewardess, and a swimming teacher. After retirement, she donated her time and energy as a volunteer to and supporter of several worthy causes. She will be sadly missed be her family and many Friends, but fondly remembered for her kindness, vivacity, and keen wit. Beloved wife of Stan. Loving mother of Stan (Joanne) and Carol. Cherished grandmother of Jordan and Sarah. Caring sister of Diann (Archie MANOIAN.) Fondly remembered by her nieces and nephews. Predeceased by her brother Garry. Friends may pay respects at the Kelly Funeral Home, 580 Eagleson Road, Kanata, Wednesday, January 10, 2007 after 10 a.m. A Service in Memory of Barbara will be held in the Chapel at 11 a.m. In memoriam donations to the charity of your choice appreciated by the family. Kelly Funeral Homes (613) 591-6580

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PEDLAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-27 published
Judge caused a revolution in Ontario family and youth laws
Wronged by his kindergarten teacher, he never forgot the inequity and, as an adult, developed a keen desire to set things right. 'He was greatly offended at injustice'
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
In 1966, Ross FAIR was the youngest man to become a judge in the Ontario Provincial Court. He was just 39. Appointed to the family and criminal divisions, he made his greatest impact in family and youth law reform by influencing Queen's Park's decision to take a long look at the antiquated Deserted Wives and Children Maintenance Act and the Juvenile Delinquents Act. The result was the Family Law Act and the Young Offenders Act.
Ross Harold FAIR grew up in St. Catharines, Ontario, where he was the youngest of five boys. His father Willard worked in insurance, but it was the work of his mother Helen, a legal secretary, that inspired him to choose law as a career.
His sense of injustice developed early in life. Left-handed by nature, he was sent home from kindergarten with a note saying he had been suspended until he started using his right hand, at which point he'd be "welcomed back." The lesson came hard and forever introduced him to ideas about injustice.
Questions of fairness returned less than 10 years later, after the outbreak of the Second World War. Just 14, he watched, perplexed, as Friends and their older brothers headed off to fight. In the end, two-thirds of his classmates joined the military, and a startling percentage of them died in battle. One high-school friend went Absent Without Leave and hid out in the FAIRs' basement, causing much grief for Ross's mother, who was torn between handing him over and keeping him hidden. Another friend joined up reluctantly, certain he'd never make it home. He was right. He was shot dead in Holland.
For his part, Ross was troubled less by the prospect of war. As a teenager, he had spent his summers at a military camp in Petawawa, Ontario - a fairly typical experience for a boy during the early 1940s. He eventually lied about his age and joined the navy at 17 to be stationed at St-Hyacinthe, Quebec, as a wireless operator.
After the war, he completed high school in Hamilton in a program designed for veterans (he graduated alongside Lincoln Alexander, who later became Ontario's 24th lieutenant-governor), then studied political science and economics at Victoria College, University of Toronto. In 1948, he entered Osgoode Hall law school, which at the time entailed going to classes in the morning and then articling for a law firm in the afternoon. His first job was working for lawyer Fred Gardiner, who went on to become chairman of Metropolitan Toronto and the namesake of Toronto's Gardiner Expressway. Between the mundane work of serving documents and searching land titles, the student had the chance to sit in on some of Mr. Gardiner's criminal cases.
"You would hear the clacking in the cells down below and these people, some of them in handcuffs and some of them with ankle chains, stumbled up… And they could be a sorry sight; some of them would have been arrested just a few hours before," he once recalled. "They would come up and get in the prisoner's dock, and Fred would say: 'Well, that is a sorry lot we have got to work with today. It is getting so bad you can't tell the prisoners from the lawyers.' "
In 1952, he was called to the bar. He married his childhood sweetheart, Jean WESTELL, the same year and moved to St. Catharines to join a law firm. But while he enjoyed the feeling of belonging that came with being back in his hometown, there were, as he later put it, "too many in-laws and too many outlaws." Six years later, the family moved to Kitchener, Ontario, and a new law firm where, after the death of his father, he persuaded his mother to return to work as a legal secretary.
In Kitchener, he became more involved in family law and with juvenile offenders, but did not like what he found. What's more, he let his disapproval be known. "We were the poor country cousins of the judicial system," he recalled years later. "Back in the early sixties, the family court was being treated as if they were ashamed of it, and the kids didn't have a chance… we were meeting in basement halls and legion halls and they had no facilities."
While the shift away from criminal law came as a surprise to his colleagues, Judge FAIR found the drama behind family law cases to be irresistible. "In those days, most lawyers wouldn't be caught dead in family court -- myself included -- until I began to see what a disaster was going on, and what a hardship it was for people who were there," he told the Provincial Judges Oral History Project in 1995.
At Easter in 1966, he learned he was to be the new magistrate and juvenile and family court judge for the County of Waterloo. The news came as a complete surprise. He and his wife were spending the holiday weekend in New York when he heard the news in a call from his law partner. In retrospect, he came to believe that his appointment had occurred as a result of his criticism of the system.
In 1977, he was named senior judge for Central-Western Ontario, the same year he was chosen as Kitchener's citizen of the year, primarily because of his work as an advocate for families. His greatest influence was in pretrial mediation services and in reducing confrontational settlements so that families suffered less dislocation. He also hatched community solutions for young people who found themselves in trouble with the law, all the while refusing to be silent about the injustices he discovered. In fact, he fairly shrieked.
"I was screaming about inadequate resources, screaming about the terrible way the damned spousal assault cases were being dealt with, and support locally," he told the history project. "Screaming about the crown attorneys and everybody else not doing anything but paying lip service, screaming about the government putting us in basements and in terrible digs all over the place, and screaming about the training schools situation."
Meanwhile, he sometimes sidestepped policy in favour of his own more expedient solutions. For instance, a man who found himself tangled up in bureaucratic technicalities over a custody payment arrived in court, along with his ex-wife. The couple agreed that nothing was owed but that the man's employer continued to garnishee wages. Judge FAIR immediately picked up his telephone and called the company's accounting office.
"He sorted it out in 20 minutes," said his colleague, Justice Ken PEDLAR of Ontario Superior Court. "He told them: 'The man is paid up and his wife confirms it. I don't want any more pay to come off his cheque.' He was greatly offended at injustice, which is fundamentally about the abuse of power. He tried to correct it whenever he could, with great insight and understanding of the human condition."
Over the years, Judge FAIR went public with his beliefs about the system and spread the word as president of the Ontario Family Law Judges Association and with Big Brothers. He also spoke at high schools, and met with students in social-work programs to alert them to flaws in the judicial system.
"He went from the dark ages to enlightenment in an environment where it's always difficult. From youth being delinquent to youth needing a chance, and he was a leader in that group," said Michael O'SHAUGHNESSY, a Brockville lawyer who appeared before Judge FAIR many times.
In 1985, Judge FAIR and his family moved to Kingston to work as one of two family court judges in the Kingston and Brockville areas. To the end, he championed mediation as an effective courtroom tool for families. He retired in 1993 but continued to work per diem. In 2003, he had the satisfaction of seeing the Ontario laws that he had worked so hard to put in place become further improved and overhauled as the Youth Criminal Justice Act.
Ross Harold FAIR was born October 25, 1925 in Peterborough, Ontario He died June 22, 2007, in Kingston. He was 81. He is survived by his wife Jean and by daughters Janet and Judy. He also leaves grandchildren Bayley and Zack.

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PEDLAR o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-08 published
PEDLAR, Barbara Ann (née FLYNN) (April 24, 1931-January 4, 2007)
Beloved wife of Richard Stanley; mother of Stan and Carol; sister to Garry and Diann. Interment Saturday, September 22, 2007 at 4 p.m. Lakeview Cemetery, 655 King Street, Midland, Ontario. No service by request.

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PEDRO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-04 published
Wiper-fluid punch suspected in death
By Kelly PEDRO and Kate DUBINSKI, Free Press Reporters, Thurs., January 4, 2007
One person is dead and three are in hospital after drinking punch mixed in an windshield-washer fluid container at two holiday parties in Chatham-Kent.
The host of one of the parties, Rebecca DEMEURICHY, 25, died yesterday after drinking punch that police think was contaminated with windshield-wiper fluid, which contains methyl alcohol.
Her husband, Rob DEMEURICHY, is one of the three people being treated at a London hospital.
Police said they are still investigating whether the contamination was intentional.
One person was in critical and another in serious condition at London Health Sciences Centre after being flown by air ambulance from Erieau.
The parties took place in Erieau, Chatham Kent-Police said. The condition of the third person was not known.
Police are urging anyone who was at DEMEURICHY home at 857 Mariners Rd., or at the home of Mary Lou VIDLER and Hartley VIDLER at 1300 Vidler Ave. between December 23 and January 1, to go to the nearest emergency department immediately.
"The sooner you (go) to hospital after drinking something toxic, the better chance you have," said Doctor Margaret THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON, medical director of the Ontario Regional Poison Information Centre.
The VIDLERs, in their 70s, and DEMEURICHYs, in their mid-20s, are related, said Insp. George FLIKWEERT.
Police received a call to 857 Mariners Rd. in Erieau yesterday morning.
When they arrived, they found one person dead. Another was taken by helicopter to a London hospital.
Later yesterday, one more person was flown to a London hospital and another person drove themselves, police said.
The death and illnesses are being linked to an alcoholic mixed punch served at the two addresses on December 23 and December 31, FLIKWEERT said.
The drink concoction was mixed in a container and may have had traces of windshield washer fluid.
An autopsy could begin as early as today to determine DEMEURICHY's cause of death.
The mixed drink was served at an open house party at the VIDLER residence on December 23 and again at a New Year's Eve party at the DEMEURICHY home.
Rebecca DEMEURICHY was ill Tuesday, two days after the second party, FLIKWEERT said.
Between 12 and 18 people who were at one or both of the residences have already been contacted and gone to hospital, FLIKWEERT said. He said anyone who was at either house for a drink may have been contaminated.
"People may be laying around thinking they have the flu and in fact it's a… poisoning that may cause serious bodily harm or death," he said.
The problem with drinking "other alcohols" such as those found in gasoline antifreeze and windshield-washer fluid is that the body doesn't metabolize them right away, THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said.
Someone who drank "bad alcohol" could just feel drunk, and then feel nothing at all.
"They're not toxic until they're broken down into their byproducts," THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said.
If the "bad alcohol" was mixed with the usual stuff people drink at parties -- spirits, wine or beer -- then the symptoms would be delayed, she added, because kidneys first break down the non-toxic alcohol.
Symptoms include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, abdominal pain, shortness of breath or difficulty breath or vision changes, said Willi KIRENKO, a nurse practitioner.
She said only people who were at either address and drank an alcoholic beverage should be concerned.
People experiencing symptoms will have blood work taken and will know in about 30 minutes how serious their condition is, KIRENKO said
She urged people to take the warning seriously.
"The treatment for this… is time sensitive," she said.
Poison control has been helping direct the hospital with treatment.
Treatment includes dialysis -- one of the effects of drinking something such as windshield-washer fluid is kidney failure -- and intravenous fluids, THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON said.
"It's very serious. We could save your life, but you could have permanent blindness… If all the byproducts haven't been made by the time you go to the hospital, we can delay the formation of the byproducts. (But) we can't reverse the problems," she said.
If You Where There
Police ask anyone who was at either address -- 1300 Vidler Ave. or 857 Mariners Rd., in Erieau -- during the holidays to contact Chatham-Kent police at 519-436-6616 and go to the nearest emergency department.

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PEDRO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-05 published
Crash victims cling to life
Five people die in crashes in a devastating weekend on Southwestern Ontario roads.
By Kelly PEDRO, Sun Media, Tues., June 5, 2007
Two people were clinging to life in a London hospital yesterday after a deadly weekend on Southwestern Ontario roads claimed five lives.
The weekend deaths were among 11 lives lost on area roads in the past 17 days.
"It's been a very devastating weekend for the officers investigating the crashes, as well as the families left behind to deal with the tragedies," said Western Region Ontario Provincial Police Sgt. Dave Rektor.
"The worst part is, it's all preventable."
In the most recent death, a 44-year-old London man was killed when the motorcycle he was driving collided with a pickup truck near Saint Marys.
The pickup was travelling south on the 15th Line when it collided in the intersection with the motorcycle travelling west on Zorra Road 92 about 6 p.m. Sunday, said Oxford Ontario Provincial Police.
The intersection is controlled by stop signs on the 15th Line, police said. Roads were dry and clear at the time.
Other weekend deaths:
- Joel SCHILLER, 55, of Tecumseh died after the all-terrain vehicle dune buggy he was driving on Northville Road south of Port Franks, rolled into a ditch Sunday afternoon. SCHILLER suffered fatal head injuries. Ontario Provincial Police are investigating.
- April JILLSON, 22, of Corunna and Jennifer SEABROOK, 33, of London, were killed after the car they were in collided with another vehicle at Littlewood Drive and Carriage Road Friday afternoon. JILLSON and SEABROOK were travelling west on Littlewood, south of London at the time. The intersection is controlled by stop signs on Littlewood, Ontario Provincial Police said.
- Three hours later, Judy Mae ABRAM, 51, of Muncey died after the car she was driving failed to stop for a stop sign on Jubilee Drive and Muncey Road and collided with an embankment. Two passengers, Marie GROSBECK, 47, and Morgan WILLIAMS, 23, also of Muncey, were in critical condition in a London hospital yesterday.
Though the Ontario Provincial Police have increased visibility and public education efforts, the safe-driving message seems to be falling on deaf ears, Rektor said.
"Unless the public buys into this message that they need to change their driving, then they could be next," he said.
"If people felt that way, they might reconsider the way they're driving every day."

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PEDRO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-08 published
'An irrational act'
Top-ranking female officer, retired superintendent found in scene of horror The service pistol used belonged to Kelly JOHNSON, a leader in fighting domestic violence.
By Randy RICHMOND and Kelly PEDRO, Sun Media, Fri., June 8, 2007
Just before London police's "rising female star" and her ex-lover, a retired officer, were killed in a murder-suicide, she made a mysterious stop at the police station.
Then, Acting Insp. Kelly JOHNSON, the force's highest- ranking female officer, jumped into a waiting van.
Minutes later, two gunshots were fired inside a van before it crashed into a brick wall six blocks away from the station, outside JOHNSON's apartment building at 7 Picton St.
Stunned neighbours found JOHNSON, 40, dead, her face bloody, her 9 mm Glock service pistol -- which she wasn't authorized to have with her -- on her lap.
Beside her, the driver of the van and her ex-lover, retired superintendent David LUCIO, 57, was slumped over with what witnesses: called a bullet wound to the head.
Neighbours called 911 at 12: 01 a.m. yesterday and police arrived within four minutes to discover the unthinkable: two of their own were dead.
Even more unthinkable -- police and civilian sources and witness accounts pointed yesterday to JOHNSON -- a noted community leader in fighting domestic violence -- as the one who shot LUCIO.
A subdued police Chief Murray FAULKNER stressed police won't know who shot whom until after an autopsy scheduled for today.
"Nothing that happened last night makes any sense right yet," he told The Free Press. "There will be sources that say that (JOHNSON was the shooter,) and I understand that."
"But we need to have proof, not just speculation, not just opinion," FAULKNER said.
Even after the autopsies, police may never know why the killings occurred.
"Was there anything yesterday that would indicate there would be a problem at midnight last night? Not a single thing. Was there anything in her mood, anything? No, no," FAULKNER said.
FAULKNER said he didn't know why JOHNSON, after leaving work about 5 p.m., returned just before midnight.
"Did she come to get some workout clothes? Did she come to get her service revolver? I don't know."
She wasn't authorized to take her gun home, FAULKNER said.
An officer who saw JOHNSON at the station noticed nothing amiss, FAULKNER said.
The first civilians to find JOHNSON and LUCIO after the shooting described a scene of quiet horror.
"I heard a gunshot, then I heard an engine revving and then a crash," said Brian KEARN, who was in the front lobby of his apartment building near where the van crashed.
He and several other building residents ran outside.
"We tried to get in the van and help the victims but the doors were locked," he said.
KEARN said he saw a female passenger, with a severe head wound from a gunshot, sitting in the passenger side. A handgun rested on her lap.
The male driver appeared to have a bullet wound to his right temple, KEARN said.
"There was no movement. The people were obviously dead."
Other witnesses: described seeing the man with a bloody left arm and blood down his back.
"It was awful, just gruesome" said one woman, a nearby resident. "You could see blood on the airbags."
Another resident of the same building said he heard a bang and watched from his second-floor window as the van rolled back after hitting the wall.
When he got to the van, "they were lifeless."
Police on the scene grew instantly quiet once they opened the van, KEARN said.
"There were quite subdued. They were quite quiet."
JOHNSON was an 18-year veteran of the force.
She's served for several years as the detective sergeant in charge of the sexual assault and child abuse section and supervised the force's domestic violence co-ordinator.
Five days ago, she was named acting inspector of the department's professional standards branch.
Kelly "was a very bright, articulate community-minded officer&hellip If there was a rising star, specifically female, she was it," FAULKNER said.
LUCIO retired as superintendent in 2004 after 35 years of service.
JOHNSON was a role model for many of the about 100 female officers, FAULKNER said.
"LUCIO was a role model for many of the male officers," FAULKNER said.
"When you see this happen to two people that you either very much admire and emulate, it shakes your confidence."
Most of the force's 180 civilian employees took the news especially hard, FAULKNER said.
"It's the tough cop that doesn't show emotion, but civilian staff are not used to that."
A shaken police board chairperson, Ab CHAHBAR, said it was a sad day for the force.
"You can see it all over their faces," he said.
FAULKNER confirmed JOHNSON and LUCIO had had a relationship, but didn't say how close they were.
The two were ex-lovers, several sources told The Free Press.
JOHNSON had been married for several years to a fellow London officer, Steve PEARSON, but they separated.
LUCIO was also separated from his wife.
It wasn't clear if LUCIO and JOHNSON still had a relationship.
The deaths stunned not only the 720 members of the force, but hundreds more in community groups where the two high-profile officers volunteered.
"It's just a great personal tragedy for both families, Friends and loved ones and anyone who worked with either one of them," said Megan WALKER, head of the London Abused Women's Centre.
"He was a very, very close friend of mine… He loved being a cop," said Dave SCATCHERD, owner of the Oakwood resort in Grand Bend.
Police called Ontario's Special Investigations Unit, which probes civilian deaths and injuries from police actions, but the agency left the case to London police because the "subject officer" was dead, FAULKNER said.

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PEDRO o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-29 published
Kitchener trucker killed on 401
His tractor-trailer slammed into the back of another rig.
By Kelly PEDRO, Sun Media, Fri., June 29, 2007
An Ontario Provincial Police officer examines the crushed cab of a transport truck that was involved in a fatal collision with another yesterday in the eastbound lanes of Highway 401 just east of Currie Road. The driver, a 22-year-old man from Kitchener, died after his rig ran into the back of the other. (Sue REEVE, Sun Media)
Ontario's police watchdog is investigating a crash on Highway 401 near Dutton yesterday morning that killed a 22-year-old Kitchener trucker.
The unidentified trucker died after the rig he was driving slammed into the back of another tractor-trailer.
The crash closed the eastbound lanes of the highway for more than eight hours as Ontario Provincial Police re-routed traffic onto Currie Road.
The collision happened about 9: 30 a.m., said Elgin Ontario Provincial Police Const. Michelle SMITH.
Elgin Ontario Provincial Police officers were escorting a truck towing another tractor-trailer from an earlier crash. In that crash, a tractor-trailer rolled into a ditch on the 401 near Currie Road about 4 a.m.
Police decided it was too dangerous to move the rolled vehicle and called in a tow truck, said Rose Bliss, spokesperson for the Special Investigations Unit.
A marked cruiser with its lights and sirens activated was leading the tow truck. Another marked cruiser followed the tow truck and tractor-trailer.
They were on the south shoulder of the eastbound lanes of the highway when the 22-year-old's tractor-trailer passed the convoy and slammed into the back of another truck, Bliss said.
"We're investigating because there was police presence at the time the crash occurred," she said.
"We're looking at the nature and extent of police involvement. Once we have a complete picture of what happened we can assess where we're going to take it from there."
Eight investigators with the agency are involved in the probe. The Special Investigations Unit probes cases where police actions may have resulted in serious injury or death.
Debris from the smashed cab of the tractor-trailer was strewn across the highway. Part of the cab was crumpled underneath the truck in front. Traffic collision investigators were still on scene late yesterday afternoon, probing the cause. No one else was hurt.
The death was the second this week on Elgin County roads. On Tuesday, Michael HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, 71, of Port Stanley was killed in a crash with a fuel tanker. He was driving east on Highway 3 between Quaker and Belmont roads when his car collided with the rear tires of a westbound tanker.
Police are still investigating that crash.
As police gear up for the long weekend, Smith reminded drivers to be safe on the roads.
"Like any other day of any other season, drive safely, leave enough time to get to your destination and be cautious," she said.

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PEDROSA o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-27 published
VAN TOCH, Ian Lawson
Passed away suddenly on Friday, August 24, 2007 in his 23rd year. Beloved son of Debra, John, Ted and Jane. Loving brother of Andrea, Spencer and Jeremy. Adored grand_son of Handa, Lila, Carmen and Cliff. Loved companion of Sarah PEDROSA. He was an incredible young man who was an inspiration to all those who knew him. The family will receive Friends at the 'Humphrey Funeral Home - A.W. Miles Chapel, 1403 Bayview Avenue (south of Eglinton Avenue East) from 6-9 p.m. on Sunday, August 26th and 6-9 p.m. on Monday, August 27th. A funeral mass will be held in De La Salle College Auditorium, 131 Farnham Avenue on Tuesday, August 28th at 11: 00 a.m. If desired, donations may be made to Second Harvest, 1450 Lodestar Road, Unit 18, Toronto, M3J 3C1. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com

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