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"PAQ" 2007 Obituary


PAQUETTE  PAQUIN 

PAQUETTE o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-21 published
O'BYRNE, James Brendan
At the Southampton Care Centre, on Thursday December 20, 2007. James O'BYRNE of Southampton in his 80th year. Beloved Husband of Rita for over 50 years. Loving father of William of Hamilton, Padhraig and his wife Guylaine of Ottawa, Jennifer PAQUETTE and her husband Chuck of Port Elgin. He will be sadly missed and remembered by his grandchildren Joey, Nicole, Daniel, Leana, Ronan, and Shane. Survived by his sister Bernadette and her husband Joe CLEARY of Dublin, Ireland, and his brother Frank and his wife Sue of London, England. Visitation from the Eagleson Funeral Home, Southampton, on Saturday December 22, 2007 from 7-9 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, Southampton, on Sunday December 23, 2007 at 2 p.m. Parish Prayers will be offered at the Funeral Home on Saturday evening at 8: 30 p.m. Expressions of Remembrance may be made to the Alzheimer's Society of Grey-Bruce. Condolences may be forwarded to the family through www.eaglesonfuneralhome.com

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PAQUETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-02 published
GRENON, J. Émile
By Aline GRENON, Page A14
Father, cribbage player. Born June 17, 1909, in Casselman, Ontario Died August 22 in Montreal, probably of heart failure, aged 97.
The son of an enterprising farmer turned carpenter, Émile was born the second of seven children. Graduating with a commerce degree from Bourget College, in Rigaud, Qué., in 1933, at the height of the Depression, most of Émile's first year out of school was spent looking for work. It was not until he heard of a Sudbury merchant in need of a bookkeeper that things began to look up. Telephoning from the Casselman general store, he was asked "How soon can you get here?" He responded "Within 24 hours."
After a year bunking out in the back-room of the place where he worked, Émile acquired a surrogate family when he moved into the boarding house operated by Mme. Clémentine LEFEBVRE- PAQUETTE, a remarkable woman for whom Émile developed a high regard. However, it was her entrepreneurial son Roméo who would change Émile's life. The two struck up a Friendship and one day, Roméo let drop that a well run grocery business in the then-booming mining town of Larder Lake stood a good chance of success. Émile agreed that it probably would and promptly forgot about it until Roméo informed him that he had purchased the lot that would hold their store. Although taken aback, Émile felt obliged to honour his unintentional promise and, with a small sum of borrowed money, he left Sudbury to join Roméo in business. Thus was born Paquette and Grenon (or P and G as it soon became known): the result of one man's vision and another's commitment to Friendship.
The initial years were difficult. To make ends meet, the partners delivered firewood house-to-house with a horse and wagon. At the best of times, the future appeared uncertain, and at the worse it was downright bleak, particularly when a bank manager, convinced that French-Canadians lacked business acumen, cut off their line of credit without warning. Luckily, a local bootlegger named "Black Nellie" lent them sufficient money to permit the business to survive and thrive. P and G eventually grew to eight stores.
With the advent of the Second World War, Émile enlisted in the Canadian army. Although he had no medical training, he was posted to the Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps. He often joked that this was because his brother was a doctor and one of his sisters a nurse! His was, in the parlance of the times, a "good" war. Stationed mainly at Camp Borden, Émile continued to look after P and G's accounting needs. On three occasions, he received orders to ship out to Europe, only to have them rescinded. It was during one such occasion, while awaiting transportation in Québec City that he met the charming and attractive Berthe SAMPSON/SAMSON, who was working in a munitions factory. They wed in 1946. That she married him in spite of a mix-up as to his background (the result of a letter from a confused Casselman priest who mistook him for an unsavoury cousin with a similar name) proves the extent of her faith in him. Together they would have three children. Sadly, Berthe died in early 1967, after a struggle with breast cancer.
Émile's loneliness over the next 20 years was mitigated somewhat by frequent travel, his love of golf, curling and cards, a close circle of Friends and the presence of his children. However, the next milestone in his life occurred when he met the remarkable Phyllis FRISBY, whom he married in 1986. Fun-loving and strong-willed, she reintroduced a degree of warmth and bustle into his life. He found it difficult to recover from Phil's death in 2002.
Émile's last years were spent in Montréal. Possibly his greatest joy during this period came from the countless games of cribbage he played with his children and his grand_son, Daniel.
Aline is Émile's daughter.

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PAQUETTE o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-29 published
PAQUETTE, Hector Cameron " Cam"
It is with great sadness that we announce our dear father Cameron PAQUETTE has passed away peacefully. He was predeceased by his devoted wife Bertha BASLER in 1995. He will be sadly missed by his sons Richard (Marika) and Andrew (Judy). Much loved grandfather of Jennifer, Jessica, Lisa and Taylor.
Cam was co-owner of Pyramide Rental with Richard, and Bravo Rental with Andrew for over 20 years. He believed in sharing his wisdom by working on behalf of a number of organizations including The American Rental Association and The Canadian Rental Association. He was also a founding member of Lou-Tec in Quebec.
Cam was a wonderful, kind and loving man who enjoyed life to its fullest. His favorite place was Lac Gustave spending time with family, Friends, and watching the sunset. He will be missed.
Visitation is on Friday, November 30th, from 4: 00 to 9:00 p.m. at Rideau Funeral Home, 4275 boul Des Sources in Dollard-des-Ormeaux (514) 685-3344. A private family service will follow at a later date. In lieu of flowers the family requests donations to the Shriner's Hospital for Children or the American Rental Association Foundation.

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PAQUIN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-12-20 published
BYERS strummed a happy tune
By Randy RICHMOND, Sun Media, Thurs., December 20, 2007
The people of the street gathered for a Christmas party and Sean BYERS was there, of course.
Eating platefuls of food, making people laugh, he won the Christmas carol trivia contest at the party run by Streetlight.
Each player got more points for singing the answers and even more points for getting everyone to sing along.
"Sean got everyone singing," remembers Gil CLELLAND, the director of Streetlight ministry.
When CLELLAND went home that night, Tuesday, December 11, he thought of the joy at the gathering.
"I thought maybe this is that peace that we all hear about at Christmas," he said.
Then came Wednesday.
"And I thought, where is that peace today? I asked God. Where are you? What happened?"
What happened?
BYERS left the party and went to a Unity Project crash bed that night.
Sometime the next morning he left the shelter, then snuck back in. A worker found him in a locked bathroom.
Maybe BYERS, 28, took his own life. Maybe it was an accident. The needle never cares.
The death of the engaging young man has rattled the street to its supposedly hardened core. More than 100 people, from the homeless to the workers helping them, gathered at the Central Library this week to remember.
"Sean was a really awesome guy," said Trevor JOHNSON, a transition services manager at Youth Action Centre.
"He was generous, very well spoken, very well read, intelligent. He struggled at times and made mistakes."
It's hard to pinpoint where and when the struggle began, his mother, Myra GARNETT, told The Free Press. There were problems at home that hit her son hard, she admitted.
"He was a very, very thoughtful boy."
Although he was identified as a gifted pupil in Grade 1, BYERS struggled later in school and by 15 had dropped out and left home. He took the roads so many lost boys take, sometimes turning to drugs and petty crime that led to jail, sometimes trying to make it, getting a job and treatment for his growing addiction.
No matter which way he turned, he played guitar or sketched, and cared for others.
"No matter how much pain he was in, he would see someone else and reach right through his pain to theirs," GARNETT said.
JOHNSON joined the Youth Action Centre about 10 years ago and met BYERS, who was doing volunteer work. BYERS would make ends meet by busking at the market or on weekend nights outside the bars on Richmond Row.
The memorial service was held at the library because he loved books so much, JOHNSON said.
"Give him his coffee, his paper, a smoke and his guitar and he was a happy guy."
BYERS always put on a smiling face to the world. But when he was really down, he took his guitar to the park and played, JOHNSON said.
BYERS and a few other young men his age all became hooked on the needle and hung around together.
One of those men was Jay DUCKWORTH, a Saint Thomas resident, who died December 8. He, too, was remembered this week.
"Although they struggled with self-medicating, they had strong spirits," Jim WATKIN, executive director of the London Harm Reduction Coalition, said at the service.
"You would see it in their eyes. That is what we need to remember. It is not about shame or guilt. We need to get rid of that. We need to let our spirits flourish."
The world looks at the Seans and the Jays as addicts and nothing more, said Matti PAQUIN, once an addict and now a worker at the Unity Project shelter.
"I loved those two boys. They were good people who tended to do drugs."
But their deaths must serve as a warning, others said at the memorial service.
"I cared for these guys for a long time. I hoped a miracle would happen and these men would excel," said Lawrence BOOM of Street Connection, a drop-in centre. "We have to come to terms with this. We have to start looking at drug addiction as an illness, not a weakness."
Over the next few months, city council will wrestle with questions of where to spend this year's budget. The city's community services department wants politicians to spend more money helping the homeless and the addicted.
The people of the street think the government should do more to help as well. In the meantime, they will continue to help each other the best they can. They will gather.
"I think that is where the peace is today," CLELLAND said, his voice breaking with grief at the memorial service.
"The peace we seek at Christmas is that in these tough moments we don't leave each other alone. When we say, 'I need you in my life right now.' "
Who To Call
If you need help:
Youth Action Centre: 519-434-6500
Street Connection: 519-438-7300
Streetlight (Youth for Christ) 686-0093
If you or someone you know is suicidal:
- Distress Centre (24 hours), 667-6711, 667-6600
- London Mental Health Crisis Service (24 hours), 519-433-2023
- Canadian Mental Health Association, 519-434-9191
- Mother Reach Postpartum Depression Line, 519-672-4673

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