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"MUL" 2007 Obituary


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MULAK o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-17 published
STUDER, Margaret " Margie" Harte
Margaret Harte STUDER, known to all as Margie, passed away in Ottawa on Saturday, August 11, after a short illness. She was just shy of her 87th birthday. Loving and beloved wife for 47 years of the late G/C (Ret.) H.R. STUDER, remembered with pride and affection by sons David (Susan BISHOP,) Michael (Alicia MULAK) and Peter (Gillian) and by grandchildren Christopher and Paola, Nicholas and Stephanie, and Erica and Ashton. Predeceased by sister Catherine and brother Philip, she is mourned by many nieces and nephews and legions of warm Friends. This resilient daughter of Glace Bay, Nova Scotia rose to all challenges: raising three sons, quarterbacking countless military moves, starting a successful career in her 50s. Comfortable among brass and regular folk alike, she was ever true to her own golden rule: 'Do good unto others, regardless.' Per her wishes, interment immediate family only. A memorial reception will be held Friday August 24, from 2 to 4 p.m., in the Burgundy Room, mezzanine level of The Chateau Laurier, Ottawa. Charitable donations can be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation.

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MULCAHY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-19 published
STEFURAK, Taras John
It is with sadness that the Stefurak family announces the peaceful passing of Taras on Tuesday, December 18th, 2007. He will be sadly missed by his family; his daughters Olesia, Larissa and Taresa and her husband Stuart MULCAHY and their children Sybil, Callum and Bronwyn, his wife Luba and his mother Pearl SYCH.
Friends will be received at the Cardinal Funeral Home, 92 Annette Street (near Keele), on Friday, December 21st from 5-9 p.m. Panachida Friday at 7 p.m. Funeral Mass to be held at Saint_Basil's Ukrainian Catholic Church (449 Vaughan Road) on Saturday, December 22nd at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Mount Hope Cemetery. If desired, donations may be made to the Heart and Stroke Foundation. Online condolences may be made at www.cardinalfuneralhomes.com

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MULDOON o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-15 published
MULDOON, Lawrence " Laurie"
Passed away in his seventy-seventh year with dignity surrounded by family on September 12, 2007 at Trillium Health Centre in Mississauga. Laurie is dearly missed by Shirley, wife of fifty-one years, Dear Old Dad of Teresa and Gary, Mary and Norm, Ruth and Michael and Tim, and Silly Ole Granddad to Shaun, Heather, Emily, Rosemary, Thomas, Nicholas, and deceased grandchildren Amanda and Matthew. Brother of Peter (deceased), Nick, and Mary and fondly remembered by extended family and Friends in England and by Lise, Lauren, Will, and Luc. Born in London, England, Laurie married Shirley and the two immigrated to Toronto in 1956 to start a new life. Laurie began his career at Toronto Western Hospital and moved to Hillcrest Hospital in 1965, where he assumed the position of President and Chief Executive Officer in 1972. After many years at Hillcrest, and after gaining much respect and admiration from his colleagues, Laurie left the hospital in 1993 to enjoy his retirement. In retirement, many organizations benefited from Laurie's expertise in administration, including St. Patrick's Church, St. Vincent de Paul, ShareLife, and Kipling Acres. Shirley and Laurie also fulfilled their dreams by traveling the world extensively, meeting many new Friends along the way. Laurie was a voracious reader and passionately enjoyed the arts - music, ballet and theatre. He was an avid sports fan and enjoyed complaining about the Leafs, watching Jay's games with a beer, and cheering on the Cowboys, and he was a staunch supporter of the Gunners until the end. Beyond all his accomplishments and what he loved in life, Laurie will be remembered by those who knew him as being a kind, generous, funny, and charming gentleman. We are all better for having known him. Friends may call at the Turner and Porter 'Peel' Chapel, 2180 Hurontario Street, Mississauga (Hwy 10, N. of the Queen Elizabeth Way) (905) 279-7663 from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. on Monday, September 17. The Funeral Mass to be held at St. Patrick's Church, 921 Flagship Drive in Mississauga on Tuesday September 18 at 11 a.m. Interment to follow at Assumption Cemetery. (Tomken Road and Derry Road) We would like to extend a heartfelt thanks to the staff at Sunnybrook and a special thanks to the staff at Trillium, especially 4D and 4B, who generously gave exceptional and compassionate care to Laurie and his family in his final days. In lieu of flowers, donations made to Trillium Health Centre or St. Patrick's Church would be appreciated. 'Farewell my Friends'

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MULHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-01-10 published
BROERENG, Clemens
Entered into rest in Louise Marshall Hospital, Mount Forest on Wednesday, January 3, 2097, in his 74th year. Clemens BROERENG, beloved husband of the late Karin BROERENG. Survived by his four sisters Elizabeth (John) MULHALL of R.R.#2 Conn, Maria DIERS, Clara (Monir) BAHJAT of R.R.#5 Dundalk, his nephews Johannes (Imtinan) BAHJAT, Raphael (Nicola) BAHJAT of Ireland, John R. (Pam) MULHALL of R.R.#5 Milton and a niece Catherine (Peter) YAKE of Acton. Will be fondly remembered by Duraid and Naal NAYEF. Predeceased by four brothers Hans, Meinhard, August, Joseph and a sister Johanna Clara BROERENG. Rested at the McMillan and Jack Funeral Home, Dundalk. Funeral Mass was held in St. Patrick's Roman Catholic Church, South Proton on Friday, January 5, 2007 at 12 noon. Interment in St. Patrick's Cemetery. Donations to the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
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MULHALL o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-12-31 published
NEWMAN, Freda Lucille (SEAFOOT) (1914-2007)
At the Humber Valley Regional Hospital in Toronto Thursday morning December 27, 2007. The former Freda SEAFOOT of Toronto in her 94th year. Beloved wife of the late Ross NEWMAN (1972.) Loving mother of Robert NEWMAN of Toronto. Dear sister of Durward SEAFOOT of Webb, Saskatchewan and Hazel MULHALL of Gull Lake, Saskatchewan. Lovingly remembered by her niece Mary HAWKYARD and her husband Harry of Leamington as well as several other nieces and nephews. Predeceased by one sister Phyllis SHELLEY and one brother Orval COVELL. Funeral Service will be conducted from the Downs and son Funeral Home Hepworth Thursday morning January 3, 2008 at 11: 00 a.m. with Rev. Robert GATES officiating. Visitation one hour prior to service. Spring interment Hillcrest Cemetery, Tara. Memorial contributions to the Ontario Heart and Stroke Foundation would be appreciated as your expression of sympathy. Messages of condolence for the family are welcome at www.downsandsonfuneralhome.com. A tree will be planted in the Memorial Forest of the Grey Sauble Conservation Foundation in memory of Freda by the Downs and son Funeral Home.

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MULHALL o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-12-10 published
HICKEY, Reverend John Joseph
(Roman Catholic Priest of the Diocese of Peterborough)
At Rubidge Retirement Home, Peterborough on the Feast of the Immaculate Conception, 2007 in his 85th year. son of the late Henry HICKEY and Katherine O'BRIEN. Dear brother of Barbara MURRAY, and Maureen MULHALL and her husband Vernon, of Peterborough. Predeceased by his sister Helen HILAND and her husband Edward, William HICKEY and his wife Norma, and his brother-in-law Richard MURRAY. He will be sadly missed by his nieces and nephews; Edward HILAND (Antonia), Katherine McKEEN (Stuart), Peter HILAND, Sheilagh BRESKEY (Jeffrey), Mary MULHALL, John MULHALL (Susan), Bishop Michael MULHALL, Henry MULHALL (Cara). John HILAND predeceased.
Fr. HICKEY was born in Peterborough on September 20, 1923 and educated in Saint Peter's elementary and secondary schools. Following his studies at St. Augustine's Seminary and the University of Saint Michael's College, Father HICKEY was ordained Priest by His Excellency Bishop Gerald BERRY in the Cathedral of St. Peter-In-Chains on May 19, 1951. Father HICKEY had served in several parishes throughout his priestly life including Saint Peter's Cathedral 1951-1958, Saint_Joseph's Bracebridge, 1958-1970, Saint Mary's Church, Huntsville, 1970-1980, and Saint Mary's Church, Campbellford, 1980-1988, and in his retirement Sacred Heart Church, Peterborough. He will be fondly remembered by the Priests, Deacons, Religious, and laity of the Diocese of Peterborough for his warmth, approachability, good humour, and dedication which endeared him to those whom he served so well. Fr. HICKEY will Lie in State at the Cathedral of St. Peter-In-Chains on Monday from the Rite of Reception at 3: 00 p.m. until 8:00 p.m. (Office For the Dead 7:00 p.m.)
Funeral Mass in the Cathedral of St. Peter-In-Chains, Peterborough on Tuesday, December 11, 2007 at 2: 00 p.m. His Excellency Most Reverend Nicola DE ANGELIS, Bishop of Peterborough, officiating, assisted by his brother Priests of the Diocese of Peterborough. Bishop Michael MULHALL, Bishop of Pembrooke, Fr. HICKEY's nephew, will con-celebrate the Mass and preach the homily.
Rite of Committal Prayers Saint Peter's Cemetery. Please say a prayer or offer a Mass for the repose of the soul of Fr. John HICKEY. Funeral Arrangements entrusted to Kaye Funeral Home "Memorial Chapel"

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MULHOLLAND o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-01-10 published
MULHOLLAND, Norman
In loving memory of my dear husband Norman, who passed away on January 12, 1997.
Along the road to yesterday, that leads me straight to you
Are memories of the happy days we once knew
Your memory is my keepsake with which I'll never part
God has you in his keeping, while I have you in my heart.
- Louise.
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MULHOLLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-10 published
MULHOLLAND, William "Bill" David Jr.
Died peacefully at home with his family on September 8, 2007, at the age of 81. He is remembered with love by his wife of 50 years, Nancy (née BOOTH;) children William David, Charles Douglass, James Andrew, John Alexander, Elizabeth Helen, Madeline Louise, Sarah Alexandra, Caroline Marie, and Bruce Henry; and grandchildren Matthew, Eric, Fiona, Samuel, Patrick, Veronique, Isabelle, Madison, Finny, William and Andrew. Born in Albany, New York 1926, to the late William David and Helen Elizabeth (FLACK) MULHOLLAND, Bill graduated from the Christian Brothers Academy in 1944 and immediately enlisted in the U.S. Army, where he was commissioned in the infantry and served in the Philippines until honourably discharged in 1946. He then completed his education at Harvard College (B.A. cum laude 1951) and Harvard Business School (M.B.A. 1952). Joining Morgan Stanley and Co. in 1952, he became a general partner in 1962 and spearheaded the then largest-ever sale of corporate securities to finance construction of the Churchill Falls hydro-electric project in Labrador. In 1970, he accepted the position of Brinco President and Chief Executive Officer, driving construction of the $1 billion hydro-electric plant to its successful completion ahead of schedule and under budget in 1974. In 1975, he moved to the Bank of Montreal where he served as President (1975-81), Chief Executive Officer (1979-89) and Chairman of the Board (1981-90). During his tenure, he led Canada's oldest bank into the modern era of financial services, orchestrated its expansion into the United States with the purchase of Harris Bank, and significantly improved the bank's performance, readying it for the intense competition of the emerging global marketplace. Bill was a champion of excellence and believed strongly in the importance of ethics, setting a clear standard in all of his business undertakings and consistently delivering this message publicly, especially to business students. He contributed actively to many organizations, including Saint Mary's Hospital, Montreal Symphony Orchestra, Memorial University, Queen's University, Atlantic Brücke, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police Foundation, the Canada Olympic Trust, Saint Michael's College Foundation, L'École des Hautes Études Commerciales, the Hudson Institute, and the Canadian Council of Christians and Jews. He served as a Director of numerous companies, including Upjohn, Standard Life Assurance, Canadian Pacific Railway, and Kimberley-Clark. In recognition of his public service, he was awarded honorary doctorates by Memorial University (1972) and Queen's University (1988), as well as Israel's Prime Minister's Medal (1987) and the Knight Commander's Cross (Badge and Star) Order of Merit from the Federal Republic of Germany (1989). On his retirement, Bill was able to realize a lifelong passion, working with his wife Nancy, son James and daughter-in-law Elke to build one of the premier Hanoverian stud farms in the world, Windswept Farm. Friends are invited to join the family for visitation from 2: 00-4:00 p.m. and 7:00-9:00 p.m. Tuesday, September 11, at the J.S. Jones and son Funeral Home, 11582 Trafalgar Rd, Georgetown, Ontario. A funeral mass will be held at Holy Cross Church (224 Maple Ave.) in Georgetown, Ontario at 10: 00 a.m. on Wednesday, September 12. Followed by a reception at his residence Windswept Farm 8th line Georgetown, Ontario, Canada. In lieu of memorials, donations to the Parkinson's Society of Canada - Ontario Region (416 227-9700) are welcomed with gratitude. Bill will be interred in the United States with full military honours in recognition of his service to his country.

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MULHOLLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-11 published
Bill MULHOLLAND: 81
Bank Of Montreal Chief Executive Officer Led Expansion Into U.S.
By Canadian Press, Page S8
Toronto -- Bill MULHOLLAND, the former chairman and chief executive of Bank of Montreal and the man who led its growth into U.S. markets and the brokerage industry, died Saturday at his home in Georgetown, Ontario He was 81.
The Albany, N.Y.-born former U.S. Army soldier joined Bank of Montreal in 1975 as president after a stint as a Wall Street investment banker. At Bank of Montreal, he led the 1984 acquisition of Harris Bankcorp Inc. of Chicago, a unit the Toronto bank has since used to expand its footprint in the key U.S. Midwestern market.
Mr. MULHOLLAND also helped negotiate the acquisition of Nesbitt Thomson Inc. in 1987, the first bank takeover of a Bay Street brokerage, after Ottawa eased the barriers that had separated banks, trust companies, insurers and brokers in Canada.
After leaving the army in 1946, he graduated from Harvard University and later joined Morgan Stanley and Co. While there, he led what was then largest-ever sale of corporate securities to finance the Churchill Falls hydroelectric project in Labrador. In 1970, he became president and Chief Executive Officer of Brinco, the company that built the $1-billion hydroelectric plant, a project completed in 1974.
A full obituary is forthcoming.

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MULHOLLAND o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-09-12 published
Headstrong Chief Executive Officer saved Churchill Falls and rescued the Bank of Montreal
An emergency boss who took over after a plane crash wiped out everyone else, he brought the power project in on time before moving to a troubled Bank of Montreal, where he ruthlessly cleaned house
By Gordon PITTS, Page S8
Besides banking and family, William MULHOLLAND's grand passion was raising Hanoverian riding horses, which, according to one of his nine children, are "headstrong, able and smart." Those adjectives can just as easily be applied to her demanding father, said Caroline VAN NOSTRAND.
Those traits helped propel Mr. MULHOLLAND, a U.S.-born outsider, into one of Canada's most exciting and controversial management careers. He was the emergency boss who came in to save the massive Churchill Falls power project in Labrador. Then he turned around the Bank of Montreal, Canada's oldest bank, and as a financial-services innovator helped change the country's banking industry.
As an agent of change at the lacklustre Bank of Montreal, he fired executives who didn't measure up, winning a reputation as a tough, uncompromising boss. He tightened credit policies, led technological innovation and bought a Chicago bank in a far-sighted move that anticipated a North American market. He helped lead the Canadian commercial banks' march into investment banking with the purchase of brokerage Nesbitt Thomson.
Like many turnaround managers, he was accused of staying too long as Chief Executive Officer and losing touch with a rapidly evolving industry. Yet he reached down into the ranks to develop a new generation of Bank of Montreal leaders that included future Chief Executive Officers Matthew Barrett and Anthony Comper.
He was a complicated man who was seen as remote, autocratic, introverted and eccentric, but he was regarded as brilliant for some of his strategic moves. He could become deeply absorbed in detail and alarmingly inattentive to people's feelings. In describing him, Friends often fall back on that old cliché: "He did not suffer fools gladly."
"My father was not always easy," said Ms. VAN NOSTRAND, who lives in Toronto. "He had exacting standards and he upheld them for himself and expected others to do their best to get that same quality.
"But you can't mistake that for a lack of true caring and love and a huge commitment to family."
Still, for all his high standards and strategic thinking, Mr. MULHOLLAND's own career was almost haphazard, the product of tragic circumstances, timing and managerial agility.
He was born in Albany, New York the son of a civil servant who became New York's director of parks. Even at birth, he had a Canadian connection - his maternal great-grandmother was a French-Canadian from Trois-Rivières. He attended Christian Brothers Academy, a Catholic military school in Albany, where he became an expert rider, marksman, and fly fisherman -- interests he pursued throughout his life.
He graduated from high school, joined the U.S. Army during the Second World War and trained as a weapons instructor before being posted to the Philippines. After discharge, he entered Harvard College, got his B.A., then earned an M.B.A. from Harvard Business School, while working in the summers as a park ranger.
He then parlayed a social connection with the financier Morgan family to join the investment banking house Morgan Stanley and pursue a career on Wall Street.
He married the daughter of a family friend, Nancy BOOTH, on June 22, 1957. Their rearing of nine children (four daughters and five sons) has been attributed by his wife to the consequences of a union between an Irish Catholic and a Free Methodist.
Mr. MULHOLLAND thrived in investment banking. One of his clients was Brinco, a Montreal firm of British-Canadian origins that was building the $1-billion Churchill Falls hydro project. He placed a $500-million bond issue for the company - at that time, a record sale of securities by a corporation.
But on November 11, 1969, Brinco's executive jet crashed, killing six members of its senior team, including the president and finance vice-president. The company was leaderless at a critical juncture in the Churchill Falls project. Mr. MULHOLLAND "was the last man standing who knew what it was all about," said Richard O'HAGAN, who was later his public-affairs specialist at Bank of Montreal.
In January, 1970, at the age of 43, he moved to Montreal to become Brinco's president and Chief Executive Officer. He also joined the board of the Bank of Montreal, which was the principal commercial banker for the Churchill Falls project. He brought the project in five months ahead of schedule and under budget.
Ron SOUTHERN, the Calgary-based head of Atco Ltd., was supplying Brinco with housing for its Churchill Falls work force. He was also negotiating to build housing factories in the Soviet Union and invited Soviet president Alexsei Kosygin to tour his facilities in Montreal. Mr. MULHOLLAND agreed to provide testimonials for the Atco products, and impressed Mr. SOUTHERN with his ability to hold his own in intense geopolitical discussions.
It was the beginning of a Friendship that was cemented in the mid-1970s, when Mr. SOUTHERN opened his Spruce Meadows equestrian centre near Calgary. Mr. MULHOLLAND attended the first major equestrian event, impressing Mr. SOUTHERN with his own riding skills. Each year, he would take a long country ride on the morning of the big event.
With Churchill Falls complete, Mr. MULHOLLAND was recruited to become the Bank of Montreal's president in 1975. He found another organization in crisis mode. "It took him about a year to get a grip on the bank, but he was a bulldog and he got it done," Mr. SOUTHERN said.
The new banker became immersed in Bank of Montreal's liquidity problems and cost-control challenges, as well as its struggles to move from manual systems to the computer age. After the incumbent Chief Executive Officer retired, he took the top job in January, 1979, adding the chairman's role 2½ years later.
He was involved in hiring Mr. O'HAGAN, who had served in the Prime Minister's Office under another eccentric legend, Pierre Trudeau. Mr. O'HAGAN recalled how his job interview with Mr. MULHOLLAND stretched to more than two hours, until he finally telephoned his next interview party to beg forbearance. Mr. O'HAGAN was fascinated by this brilliant, obsessive man and joined the Bank of Montreal team.
That extended interview was a harbinger of the MULHOLLAND style. He was notorious for unpredictably long meetings, forcing managers to queue up for hours, awaiting audiences that lasted long into the evening.
He was determined to weed out the perceived dead wood that had allowed the bank's problems to build. In his zeal to cleanse the ranks, he was accused of creating a demographic crisis in the bank. One unidentified manager told Report on Business magazine in 1989 that "an entire generation of management has been cremated."
"Those judgments were not made whimsically - they were made on the basis of performance," insisted Grant REUBER, the bank's president during the MULHOLLAND era. "I don't think he relished letting people go, but if they hadn't measured up and they hadn't recovered, they probably didn't survive."
Jeff CHISHOLM, a retired Bank of Montreal executive, said he never saw this side of his former boss - Mr. MULHOLLAND simply demanded honest answers from his managers. He said his positive traits never came to light because the Chief Executive Officer did not really care what critics thought of him.
Mr. MULHOLLAND also pulled off a deal that transformed the bank: the 1984 purchase of Harris Bank, a U.S. Midwest regional powerhouse based in Chicago. Some critics have contended that once the deal was done, the bank didn't really capitalize on its new U.S. platform - but at minimum, Mr. MULHOLLAND created the potential platform.
"He had a vision about what was going to happen to the North American economy and to financial services within North America," said Mr. Chisholm, a former Harris Bank executive who joined Bank of Montreal.
Later, Mr. MULHOLLAND moved quickly on the deregulation of Canada's financial industry by acquiring Nesbitt Thomson, the foundation of today's Bank of Montreal Nesbitt Burns Inc., the bank's investment subsidiary.
Whether he stayed too long is much debated; it's a common problem with strong leaders in politics and business. But Mr. MULHOLLAND's saving grace was to leave the bank in good hands.
Mr. Barrett, his successor, was a charming people person who provided a sharp contrast with his more aloof predecessor. Mr. MULHOLLAND "knew he was not Mr. Popularity with everybody," Mr. O'HAGAN said. "He recognized there would be a contrast and that Barrett's personal style would register differently. I think that was part of the reason he chose him."
Mr. Barrett, now retired from banking, said in an e-mail message that "Bank of Montreal shareholders and employees owe a debt of gratitude to Bill for stepping into the bank at a difficult time in its history. Those that succeeded him benefited greatly from his legacy.
"He once joked that he built the Stradivarius that others played beautifully. I certainly agree with that."
After he retired in 1990, Mr. MULHOLLAND had time to focus on family, horses and his beloved Windswept Farm near Georgetown, west of Toronto. He worked to develop the Hanoverian breed in Canada.
But in recent years, Parkinson's disease took its toll. At the MULHOLLANDs' 50th wedding anniversary party in early July, Friends felt he almost willed himself to attend. It wasn't long afterward that he was admitted to hospital.
William MULHOLLAND was born in Albany, New York on June 16, 1926. He died of complications from Parkinson's disease and other medical problems at his home near Georgetown, Ontario, on September 8, 2007. He was 81. He is survived by his wife Nancy, nine children and 11 grandchildren.

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MULLALY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-08 published
HUNT, Arthur Murray, D.D.S.
Passed away in his 89th year at Sunnybrook Hospital on June 7, 2007. Survived by his loving wife Catherine MULLALY and predeceased by his wife Grace (née MEINERS) in 2000. Dear father of Nancy ROSE (Bill) and Jane WRIGHT (Bob.) Grandfather of Brian (Kristen) and Gregory ROSE, and Matthew and Nigel WRIGHT. Also a proud great-grandfather of Scott ROSE. Murray was a Professor Emeritus of the University of Toronto Faculty of Dentistry. Cremation has taken place. A celebration of his life will be held at Forest Grove United Church, 43 Forest Grove Drive, North York, on Monday June 11 at 11: 00 a.m. In lieu of flowers a donation to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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MULLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-30 published
POKRUPA, Esther C. (née MANTS,) R.N., B.A.
Passed away peacefully October 22, 2007 in her 90th year. After 57 years of happy marriage, she is survived by her husband, Peter and her sons Ronald (married to Karen M. SMITH) and Paul (companion to Elaine,) two granddaughters, Tamara POKRUPA and Celina NAHANNI (both at Queen's University) and grand_son Taj NAHANNI, his wife Adrienne and three great-grandchildren; Tristan, Russell and Sierra of Montreal. Her brother Jim MANTS of Winnipeg and sister Norah MULLAN of Minneapolis also survive her. Born in Saskatchewan, Esther graduated as a registered nurse. During World War 2 she joined the Canadian Army and tended casualties at the Canadian Military Hospital in Basingstoke. After the war she was one of very few women to study at the Canadian Khaki University in Watford, United Kingdom. She transferred to the University of Saskatchewan where she completed her B.A. and met her future husband. According to her wishes she was cremated. There will be a memorial gathering at the University Club at Queen's, 168 Stuart Street, Kingston, Ontario, Friday November 30 from 4-7 p.m. In lieu of flowers contributions can be made to the "Pokrupa-Smith Medical Student Bursary" and endowment fund at Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario K7L 3N6. Thanks are given to the staff of Kingston General Hospital, Saint Mary's of the Lake Hospital and Helen Henderson Nursing Home who cared for here in her declining months.
www.jamesreidfuneralhome.com

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MULLAN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-09 published
She served in wartime Britain and attended the Khaki University
Raised in the dustbowl of Depression Saskatchewan, she tended to the wounded in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals and then took up the study of economics
By Noreen SHANAHAN, Special to The Globe and Mail, Page S8
Esther POKRUPA found her way out of the swirl of Saskatchewan dust during the bleakest days of the Depression by paying careful attention to a future that led her to nursing, enlistment in the Canadian army and a degree in commerce and economics whose beginnings took shape in a unique institution called the Khaki University.
She had begun her life as a farmer's daughter in North Battleford, Saskatchewan. Her parents were homesteaders from Norfolk, England, who had crossed the Prairies by train after arriving in Halifax in 1905. Her father, Jack MANTS, kept a travel diary and, upon arriving in Saskatchewan, he wrote a succinct description of the landscape: "There are a lot of train wrecks here."
Farming in southern Saskatchewan was never easy. Land that had previously been disturbed only by grazing animals went under the plows of thousands of farmers. The top soil, made dry by drought, became airborne in immense black clouds of dirt so that dust lay thick on the kitchen counters during Esther's childhood. Later, in the bleakest days of the Depression, she was sent to work as a 14-year-old au pair in Edmonton. It was fortunate that her employer was also her high-school principal; she was able to stay in school as well as hold down a job.
Esther weighed her prospects. As she saw it, she had two choices: nursing or teaching. She chose nursing because it paid better. She attended Edmonton nursing college and, after graduating in 1941, started work as a public-health nurse in a town called Bonanza, near Peace River, Alberta. She lived alone in the bush and travelled from community to community but decided, after a while, that her nursing skills would be more useful elsewhere. By then it was the middle of the Second World War, so she enlisted in the military alongside her younger brother, Jim, who became a pilot in the Royal Canadian Air Force.
In 1944, Ms. POKRUPA joined Canada's Nursing Sisters and went overseas to serve in Royal Canadian Army Medical Corps hospitals. First, however, she was sent to work for a short time at a prisoner of war camp at the exhibition grounds in Medicine Hat, Alberta. The camp housed more than 12,000 Germans, many of whom were ardent Nazis who that same year famously court-martialed and executed fellow PoWs for expressing defeatist views.
Once overseas, she ended up working in two well-established British army hospitals, one near Basingstoke, in northeast Hampshire, and the other near Horsham, in West Sussex. Basingstoke was the site of the No. 1 Canadian Neurological and Plastic Surgical Hospital.
"In Basingstoke, she worked with burn victims from airplanes used in [the air war mainly over Europe]," said her husband, Peter POKRUPA, a retired economist with Shell Canada. "After the D-Day invasion, she was in another hospital near Horsham, where the casualties were brought in."
As well as keeping up with the frantic pace of an army hospital in wartime, she also had to contend with peculiar restrictions placed on officers - some of them with a particularly repressive twist reserved for women. As a lieutenant, she was not permitted to marry; nor could she socialize with enlisted men.
After the war, she stayed in Britain and attended the Khaki University at Watford, just north of London. Established and managed by the Canadian Army in Britain at the end of the First World War, the school was revived in 1945 to help prepare servicemen for their return to civilian life.
While there were few women among the student body, and most of them women studied home economics, that was not for Esther POKRUPA. With a shrewd eye towards a career and financial independence, she took up economics. Her husband described a school photograph of her from that time: "There were hundreds of men and three women. [The women sat] with crossed legs in the front row. It was an incredible picture, very unusual to have women in university at all in the 1940s - especially in England - so it was quite unique."
Unfortunately, her studies were interrupted by a serious bout of tuberculosis, contracted while nursing at Basingstoke. She was sent home on a troopship and at Halifax she was carried down to the dock on a stretcher. There, someone in the crowd reached out and placed an apple on her blanket, a gesture she found deeply touching. She spent long months in a sanatorium before she could return to her books.
In 1948, she was finally well enough to resume her studies. She transferred her credits from the Khaki University to the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon and pursued her interest in economics. "Her reason for going into nursing… was not a hard-felt passion," said her son, Ronald POKRUPA, a neurosurgeon in Kingston. "She wanted to do something more than be a registered nurse."
While at University of Saskatchewan, she met Peter POKRUPA. By all accounts, he was first smitten with her because of her independence - and by the fact that she owned her own car. He was a war refugee from Czechoslovakia, also working towards at degree in economics, and they shared some classes.
They were married in 1950, the same year she graduated with an economics degree. The couple moved to Toronto and their two sons were born a short while after. A few years later, she suffered a serious relapse of tuberculosis. In 1956, she spent nine months in a Toronto sanatorium. "That was during the early years of chemotherapy for tuberculosis," Doctor POKRUPA said. "Before that it was a death sentence. She was in one of the lucky groups that got the drugs, and so she recovered."
Dr. POKRUPA remembers being six years old and visiting her at the sanatorium. Years later he realized the illness cost her dearly. "I always suspected that her having had tuberculosis damaged her ambitions… [it was a] sobering, frightening experience to go through, and had an impact on her attitude toward her children as well. She had been a doting mother, but for months she couldn't have contact [with us] for fear that we'd catch tuberculosis."
Later, she applied her nursing skills to her younger son, Paul. In 1970, while living in Tucson, Arizona., he was shot in a robbery and spent several weeks recuperating in hospital - with his mother nearby.
In 1971, Ms. POKRUPA moved to England with her husband for two years and spent some time travelling. One of their trips was to areas where she had nursed during the war to try and locate the actual hospitals. Sadly, she was disappointed. Some of the hospitals were large stately homes that had been pressed into service. At Horsham, the hospital was said to have been the home of the Duke of Wellington, victor of the Battle of Waterloo and later a prime minister of Britain, and that his horse was buried in the yard.
"We tried at Horsham," Mr. POKRUPA said. "We asked people and they said, 'Oh yes, there was a military hospital here, long ago… not exactly sure where it was.' "
After returning home, Ms. POKRUPA continued to work as a public health nurse in Toronto until she retired in 1984 but her joie de vivre continued long after. "Esther was interested in everything," her husband said. "Women's clubs, the Canadian Club in London&hellip she even went to tea at Buckingham Palace. She was interested in history, music; whenever we could, we would attend extension classes at the University of Toronto, York, Elderhostel." In a last gesture toward the living, Ms. POKRUPA and her husband planted 20,000 pine trees on the rocky stretch of the Canadian Shield north of Kingston.
Esther POKRUPA was born Esther MANTS in North Battleford, Saskatchewan., on August 3, 1918. She died peacefully in Kingston on October 22, 2007. She was 90. She is survived by her husband, Peter POKRUPA, and by her sons Peter and Ronald. She also leaves her brother, Jim MANTS, and her sister, Norah MULLAN, and by numerous grandchildren.

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MULLANEY o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-29 published
ALDERDICE, Eva Mary (née WILLIAMSON)
In Meaford on Sunday, August 26, 2007. The former Eva WILLIAMSON, daughter of the late Robert and Martha (née CASWELL) WILLIAMSON, in her 81st year. Loved mother of Mary Jane and her husband Pat MULLANEY of Oregon, and Darryl HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON and Barb of R.R.#4, Meaford. Remembered also by Ross ALDERDICE of R.R.#4, Meaford. Predeceased by a son Robert 'Bob' HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON in May 2006 and by William “Bing” HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON in March 2007. Loving grandmother of Erin and Blue of Collingwood, Keegan, Colleen and Mark MULLANEY, Amber, Jocelyn, Devin and Joel HUTCHINSON/HUTCHISON, and Jason and Ryan VAIL and great-grandmother of Haley. Dear sister of John WILLIAMSON and his wife Doreen of Burlington, Reg WILLIAMSON and his wife Marie of Hanover, Hilda THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON of Markdale and Irene MCINNES/MCINNIS, also of Markdale. Predeceased by a brother Ed WILLIAMSON of Berkeley and fondly remembered by several nieces and nephews and their families. Family will receive Friends at the Ferguson Funeral Home, The Valley Chapel, Thornbury on Thursday 5 until 8 p.m. Funeral services, officiated by Reverend Doctor Brian GOODINGS, will be conducted at Grace United Church in Thornbury on Friday August 31 at 11: 00 a.m. Interment and committal services will be conducted at 1: 30 p.m. at the Markdale Cemetery. As your expression of sympathy, donations to the Beaver Valley Athletic Association or the Meaford Amateur Athletic Association would be appreciated.

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MULLEN o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-01-13 published
WICKERSON, Barbara
The family of the late Barbara WICKERSON wishes to extend to each of you our most heartfelt thanks and gratitude for your many acts of kindness. To all of our families, Friends and neighbours in various communities, our sincere thanks for the food, flowers, cards, phone calls and donations. Thank you to Reverend Peter WICKERSON and Paul MULLEN for their love and guidance at this difficult time. Thank you to those who assisted Mom at the accident site. Sincerely, Nancy and Rob, Murray, Liz and Travis.

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MULLENS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-08-09 published
MARSHALL, Helen Patricia
Passed away peacefully on August 7th at Toronto East General at the age of 92. Beloved wife of the late Allan MARSHALL of Acton, loving mother of John MARSHALL (Heather DOUGLAS/DOUGLASS) and the late Bill MARSHALL (Lorraine,) also survived by her brother and sister-in-law Ted and Elizabeth MULLENS. Dear grandmother of David, Emily, Christine, Daniel and Alissa MARSHALL. Great-grandmother of Dylan. Helen will be fondly remembered by her many relatives and Friends. A special heartfelt thanks to Helen's amazing circle of Friends and the staff at The Wexford Residence for their excellent care and support. Family and Friends will be received at the McDougall and Brown Funeral Home "Scarborough Chapel", 2900 Kingston Road (just east of St. Clair Ave. E.) on Saturday from 2-3 p.m. with a memorial service to follow in the chapel at 3 p.m. If desired, in lieu of flowers, donations to a charity of your choice would be greatly appreciated.

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MULLER o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-06-04 published
GOLDSMITH, Joyce Elizabeth (née HENRY)
Peacefully in Durham with her daughters at her side on Friday June 1, 2007. Joyce (née HENRY) of Durham in her 78th year. Wife of the late Roger GOLDSMITH. Loving and devoted mother of Kendra (Dale BONN) GOLDSMITH of Kitchener and Kara (Dan) MULLER of Ilderton. Dear sister of June (Myles) GILSON of Georgetown. Sadly missed by her grandchildren Danya GOLDSMITH- MILNE and Megan and Nicolas MULLER and her sisters-in-law and brothers-in-law and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by 3 infant children. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Monday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at Knox United Church, Durham at 11: 00 a.m. on Tuesday June 5, 2007. Interment Durham Cemetery. As expressions of sympathy, donations to the Canadian Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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MULLEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-25 published
CLOUTER, Albert Horatio
The winds of time
Sound very happy chime.
They chime and they chime
As they pass you by,
Like a warm, soothing bath
They shower gentle breezes in your path.
Your face does not show
All the years that you know
And those sweet breezes,
They continue to blow
They leave over you
This beautiful glow.
And now we know, why your face is aglow.
And of course, that is why
All your years don't show.
A lover of music, the arts, and all things good and beautiful, age 71, died of cancer at Sunnybrook Hospital in Toronto on June 23, 2007. Predeceased by his parents Lewis Albert CLOUTER and Ethel May (née MULLEY) CLOUTER of Elliston, Newfoundland and Labrador. Leaving to mourn, his wife and loving companion of 25 years, Diana SIRCAR (of Norbay, Newfoundland and Labrador,) sister Margaret GRACE (Paul,) brother Maynard John (Eleanor) of Saint_John's, Newfoundland, and a wide circle of Friends and co-workers at the Royal Conservatory of Music in Toronto. The Conservatory would be pleased to receive donations in his memory. Service to be held at 1 p.m. Wednesday, June 27 at Saint_James Cathedral, 165 Church Street, Toronto, Ontario. Condolences and memories may be forwarded through www.humphreymiles.com.

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MULLIGAN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-09-12 published
MULLIGAN, Hazel Violet (LEE)
In loving memory of our mom, grandma, and great-grandma, Hazel Violet MULLIGAN (LEE) who passed away September 17, 2006.
We did not know when the call came that day
That we would spend the weekend watching you slip away.
You did not seem to suffer; you appeared to have no pain
But we never got a last chance to say "we love you!" again.
We have added three little ones to the fold
Jacob, Megan and Avery will certainly be told
Stories of the wonderful great-grandma they had,
Memories are treasurers and we're so glad
We had so many years with you to share,
To show each other we really do care
Life goes on but it isn't the same
We often think of you and speak your name,
In each of our hearts you will remain
Our loving, caring mom and grandma; until we meet again.
Lovingly remembered by Donna, Linda, Ivan, Helen Kathy, Don, Patti and Marlene and families.
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MULLIN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-03 published
BROWN, Melvina Ethel (formerly RIDDELL, née TALBOT)
Suddenly at her residence on Saturday, September 29, 2007. Melvina (née TALBOT) of Durham in her 87th year. Wife of the late Clifford RIDDELL and the late James A. BROWN. Loving friend of Thys GROEN. Loved mother of Carolyn (Douglas) LEITH of R.R.#1 Priceville, Lorne (Carol) Riddell of R.R.#1 Dundalk, Barbara Gordon (Denis MOORE) of R.R.#1 Maxwell and Gwen (Brian) MULLIN of R.R.#1 Feversham. Dear sister of Mervyn (Marie) TALBOT of Creemore, Marjorie BLAKEY of Orangeville and Morris (Shirley) TALBOT of Desboro. Sadly missed by sister-in-law Velma TALBOT of Collingwood, 17 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by one granddaughter and 2 brothers. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Tuesday. Funeral Service will be held at the Durham Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 3, 2007. Interment in Dundalk Cemetery at 3 p.m. Wednesday. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Durham Presbyterian Church, Durham Seniors' Silver Threads or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.
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MULLIN o@ca.on.grey_county.artemesia.flesherton.the_flesherton_advance 2007-10-17 published
BROWN, Melvina
The family of Melvina BROWN would like to thank family, Friends and neighbours for your kindness and thoughtfulness. We are grateful for the support you have given us and the Friendship you have shared with mom. Thank you to Rev. John JOHNSON, the Durham Presbyterian Church, the Silver Threads Choir and Annabelle NEUMAN, pianist. Thank you to Ian LEITH for playing your Grandma's favourite music. Your thoughtfulness will not be forgotten. - Douglas and Carolyn LEITH and family, Lorne and Carol RIDDELL and family, Dennis MOORE and Barb GORDON and family, Brian and Gwen MULLIN and family, the Talbot family, and Thys GROEN.
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MULLIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-08-03 published
HARRISON, George William
Age 92, formerly of Mt. Forest, passed away peacefully at People Care, Stratford on Sunday, July 29, 2007. He was born in Erin Township, son of the late Thomas and Mary HARRISON. He was predeceased by his wife Ruth (McKEE) in 2002. Survived by his daughters Anna-Marie SIMPSON, Owen Sound, Dianne MULLIN (Dan); four Grandchildren Ben HARRISON, Mike VON HATTEN, Jen VON HATTEN and partner Craig DOBBIN, Kristina SIMPSON; two great-grandchildren Emma and Liam HAIGHT; brothers Charles HARRISON, and Ralph WHITE/WHYTE. Besides his wife and parents he was predeceased by a son Paul HARRISON, a son-in-law Royce SIMPSON and sisters Marie WOOD and Ruth CUMMING. Family services will take place with burial in Culross - Teeswater Cemetery, Monday, August 6 at 1: 30 p.m. As expressions of sympathy, memorial donations may be made to the Alzheimer's Society through the W.G. Young Funeral Home, 430 Huron Street, Stratford at www.wgyoungfuneralhome.com

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MULLIN o@ca.on.grey_county.owen_sound.the_sun_times 2007-10-01 published
BROWN, Melvina Ethel (formerly RIDDELL, née TALBOT)
Suddenly at her residence on Saturday, September 29, 2007. Melvina (née TALBOT) of Durham in her 87th year. Wife of the late Clifford RIDDELL and the late James A. BROWN. Loving friend of Thys GROEN. Loved mother of Carolyn (Douglas) LEITH of R.R.#1, Priceville, Lorne (Carol) RIDDELL of R.R. #1, Dundalk, Barbara GORDON (Denis MOORE) of R.R.#1, Maxwell and Gwen (Brian) MULLIN of R.R.#1, Feversham. Dear sister of Mervyn (Marie) TALBOT of Creemore, Marjorie BLAKEY of Orangeville and Morris (Shirley) TALBOT of Desboro. Sadly missed by sister-in-law Velma TALBOT of Collingwood, 17 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren. Predeceased by 1 granddaughter and 2 brothers. The family will receive Friends at the Fawcett-McEachern Funeral Home and Cremation Centre, Durham on Tuesday from 2-4 p.m. and 7-9 p.m. Funeral Service will be held at the Durham Presbyterian Church at 11 a.m. on Wednesday, October 3, 2007. Interment in Dundalk Cemetery at 3 p.m. Wednesday. As expressions of sympathy, donations to Durham Presbyterian Church, Durham Seniors' Silver Threads or the charity of your choice would be appreciated.

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MULLINS o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-18 published
LEA, Beryl (MULLINS)
Peacefully on June 15, 2007. Beloved wife of the late John C. LEA and dear sister of Gertrude, Louise, Bert and Harry. Resting at the Murray E. Newbigging Funeral Home, 733 Mount Pleasant Road (south of Eglinton). A Chapel service will be held on Tuesday, June 19, 2007 at 1 p.m. with visitation one hour prior to service time. Interment to follow at Mount Pleasant Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations to the Christian Blind Mission, Billy Graham Evangelical Association or the Anglican Church of the Transfiguration, would be appreciated by the family.

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MULOIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-15 published
MULOIN, William Henry (1925-2007)
Of Qualicum Beach, British Columbia on November 12, 2007. He was born in Schreiber, Ontario and grew up in the Thunder Bay area of Ontario. He served at sea in The Royal Canadian Navy from 1943 to 1946 during World War 2. On returning home he completed his high schooling in Port Arthur, Ontario and then graduated in 1951 from Queen's University at Kingston with a B.Sc. in Metallurgical Engineering. He spent all of his professional life in the mining industry. He worked 10 years with Noranda Mines at Waite Amulet Mines in Noranda, Québec and Gaspe Copper Mines in Murdockville, Québec. He joined Pickands-Mather and Co. at the Hilton Mines, Shawville, Québec in 1961. He was transferred to Tasmania, Australia as General Manager of Savage River Mines in 1968 and returned to Canada in 1971 to Wabush Mines and served as General Manager, located in Sept-Isles, Québec until his retirement in 1991. He was a life member of the C.I.M.M. and a member of the S.M.E. He is survived by three children, William, Kathleen and Peter all of Montreal. He was pre-deceased by son Joseph and daughter Shannon. Also survived by brother Darcy of French Creek, British Columbia. He will be missed by his eight grandchildren, James, Jennifer, Thomas Jay, Zachary, Rachelle, Matthew, Xavier and Meghan, all of Montreal. In lieu of flowers, the family would appreciate expressions of sympathy be made to the Canadian Cancer Society, Yukon British Columbia Division. Celebration of his life at the Parksville Funeral Home on November 16, 2007 at 1: 00 p.m.
May he rest in peace

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MULROONEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-07-11 published
O'CONNELL, John F.X., P.Eng.
"I am full of wonder at what is coming next… it's gonna be powerful"
Peacefully on Monday, July 9, 2007 at Credit Valley Hospital, following a long illness borne with integrity, humility and courage. Predeceased by his beloved Ange (née Angela McGOWAN) in 2000. Forever missed by his children Tish (Letitia O'CONNELL,) Dan with fiancée Diane O'DWYER and Kate O'Connell MAYFIELD. His grandchildren John, Clare and Daniel Barker and Michael Mayfield will always be inspired by their beloved Gramps. Also missed by sisters Pat BARLETTA and Joan MULROONEY, sister-in-law Joan O'CONNELL and many nieces and nephews. Predeceased by sister Jean and brothers Jim and Bill. Born in Brooklyn, New York in 1930, John was recruited out of his graduating class at Brooklyn Polytechnical Institute to come to Toronto to help build its new subway. Throughout a long career in design and construction he was a leader on many projects that shaped Southwestern Ontario. He was fiercely proud of his Irish heritage and citizenship, and lived by the motto, "American by birth, Irish by the grace of God."Possessed of an inquiring and discerning mind, his quiet, perspicacious and slyly mischievous nature endeared him to many. He was a man of deep faith, selflessly devoted to his family, a wise father who taught by quiet example and a model of integrity to his children and grandchildren. He will never be forgotten. The family will receive Friends from 6-9 p.m. on Wednesday, July 11 at the Ward Funeral Home, 52 Main Street South, (Highway 10), Brampton. Mass of Christian Burial at Saint Mary's Roman Catholic Church, 66A Main Street South, Brampton on Thursday, July 12 at 10: 30 a.m. followed by interment at Mount Calvary Cemetery in Trenton.

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MULSANT o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-10-18 published
Death of elderly Scarborough couple suspected murder-suicide
By Jessica RAFUSE, Page A12
The death of an elderly couple marks the city's second suspected murder-suicide in less than a month, sparking concerns about the issues geriatric caregivers face when they are ill themselves.
A woman visiting her parents' Scarborough home late Tuesday evening discovered the body of her 81-year-old mother in a bedroom. She had a gunshot wound to the head. Police later found her 83-year-old father in a car in the garage, also shot in the head.
Neighbours say the elderly woman had cancer, while her husband, who had been her primary support and caregiver, was recently hospitalized for heart complications.
"I guess he just couldn't cope any more," said neighbour Ramon SMITH, who is 75 and takes care of his wife, who suffers from Alzheimer's disease.
The scene in Scarborough was eerily familiar for Toronto police, who just last month found the bodies of Percy STEIN, 66, and his mother Sarah GRUPSTEIN, 84, in a condominium downtown, in what is also believed to be a "mercy killing."
Rather than succumb to the stomach cancer Mr. STEIN was battling and leave his wheelchair-bound mother to be sent to a nursing home, he decided to end their lives himself. He shot her before killing himself on the bed beside her. He left a note.
Benoit MULSANT, clinical director of geriatric mental health at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health, said these cases highlight an important type of murder-suicide in which an individual who is taking care of an older person, usually debilitated and dependent, comes to the "distorted conclusion" that they are both better off dead.
"When looked at, it first appears to be humane," said Doctor MULSANT. "But the person who is killed is not consulted and not able to express his or her opinion."
While murder-suicides are rare, depression and feelings of hopelessness are not a natural part of aging and need to be treated, Doctor MULSANT said.
"People expect older people to be miserable, so this makes it acceptable. But, wrongly so."
The uncertainty of what lies ahead, loss of companionship and the shifts in roles and responsibilities are some of the major challenges elder caregivers deal with, said Arlene CONSKY, a social worker for Baycrest Centre for Geriatric Care.
The difficulties with coping and adjusting to these changes can be a source of depression, especially when caregivers are battling illnesses of their own, and have negative consequences on their behaviour and frame of mind if left untreated.
Dr. MULSANT advises people to pay serious attention when individuals make negative comments about their life, have sleeping problems, are experiencing weight loss or lose passion and interest in their usual activities.
It's important to watch for these symptoms because many elderly patients who suffer from them won't necessarily bring them up, often due to the stigma surrounding mental illness and old age.
Dr. MULSANT also reminds people that if they're concerned about someone, they shouldn't be afraid to ask them if they are thinking about death or want to die for fear they're planting ideas in their head.
"Many people are relieved that someone cares," Doctor MULSANT said. "Many people who are suicidal will tell you the truth and are happy that you want to help."
Accessing support and services that assist caregivers is one of the most important steps to reducing rates of depression, said Ms. CONSKY.
"Knowing they're not alone and not the only ones has a way of transforming the way they're coping from a victim to an empowered person," she said.

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MULTANI o@ca.on.middlesex_county.london.london_free_press 2007-06-20 published
Dead trucker called hero in needless crash
By Canadian Press, Wed., June 20, 2007
Toronto -- A car can be as dangerous as "a loaded gun," and as much as the government has done to crack down on street racing and reckless driving, the responsibility ultimately lies in the hands of those behind the wheel, Premier Dalton McGuinty said yesterday.
McGuinty was commenting on a Monday morning crash on the busy Highway 400 that killed a truck driver and snarled commuter traffic until late that night.
Three men face a total of 11 charges in the crash, in which police blame speed and dangerous driving.
David VIRGOE, 48, of Stroud, was identified yesterday as the driver of the tractor-trailer who died in the crash. VIRGOE leaves behind three children and five grandchildren.
Family members told the media VIRGOE was a very safe and experienced driver who drove that stretch of highway each day.
The crash was the third major accident in four days on the busy north-south highway, and the second fatal one.
"There is no excuse for this kind of tragedy to unfold on Ontario highways," McGuinty said.
"We'll continue to talk to our police and ask them what it is more that we might do to make our highways safer, but at the end of the day there's one individual who sits behind the wheel in a car. It's like a loaded gun," he said at an auto industry funding announcement.
Prabhjit MULTANI, 20, and Nauman NUSRAT, 19, the two men accused in VIRGOE's death, appeared in Barrie court yesterday and were remanded in custody pending a bail hearing set for Friday.
witnesses: said two or three cars were speeding and weaving in and out of traffic when one caused the tractor-trailer to lose control. The big rig ripped out a guardrail and careened back across the highway, tumbling down an embankment and into a ditch.
"This is happening every day on our highways and I hope our justice system pulls through and sends a message out," said Ontario Provincial Police Const. Dave WOODFORDE.
Drivers are hailing VIRGOE as a hero for veering away from traffic and saving lives in the process.
"That truck driver decided at some point in a split second that he was going to save the lives of at least a dozen people on that highway," said Brian PATTERSON of the Ontario Safety League.
"That guy's a hero."

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MULTANI o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-06-20 published
Wife of crash victim calls for tougher laws
'My husband was a grandfather of five. He was 48 years old. And I shouldn't be burying him,' she says
By Unnati GANDHI with a report from Matt HARTLEY, Page A13
A day before David VIRGOE was killed in a horrific highway accident for which police blame street racing, the carefree man was enjoying Father's Day with his daughter and newborn grand_son.
Just before the family sat down for dinner that evening, he saw a snake under a patio bench and decided to have some fun with his daughter, Bobbi Jo. He chased the 29-year-old around the backyard while waving his hand at her, pretending he was holding a snake.
"She's screaming like a little girl and getting a kick out of it, and he's laughing and running after her," his wife, Debbie, told The Globe and Mail yesterday. "He was such a funny guy."
That scene, she said, keeps replaying in her mind. Not even 24 hours later, the tanker truck Mr. VIRGOE was driving was sideswiped by a speeding car on Highway 400, causing him to veer into the guardrail and crash into a ditch. He was pronounced dead at the scene - and hailed as a hero for avoiding an even deadlier crash.
Police say two cars were racing in the northbound lanes near Bradford that morning. Three men in their early 20s have been charged with dangerous driving, street racing and other offences.
But Mrs. VIRGOE, citing a similar accident that sent 11 people to hospital on the same stretch of highway just two days before her husband was killed, wants more done to prevent future tragedies.
"They govern our big trucks so that they don't go over certain speeds. It's time that they governed cars," she said from her Innisfil home. "None of the speed limits are over 100 kilometres. How come our cars go over 200?"
A friend of 19-year-old Nauman NUSRAT, one of the men charged, said Mr. NUSRAT was known to go at speeds of up to 180 kilometres an hour in his Pontiac Grand Am.
"He was into racing. It was just like for fun," said the 21-year-old, who did not want his name published. The two had worked together at an Etobicoke Tim Hortons for the last year.
"When I was there, I didn't let him do that. I'm like, 'Don't do it, don't do it,' he said, adding Mr. NUSRAT would laugh at him for being cautious. "His other Friends were kind of scared, too. This guy's kind of a bold guy."
A woman who identified herself as the mother of another accused, Prabjit MULTANI, 20 - also charged with dangerous driving and street racing - declined comment when contacted by The Globe and Mail. Both men appeared in Barrie court yesterday and were remanded into custody pending a bail hearing set for Friday. A third man, charged with dangerous driving, also appeared in court.
Mrs. VIRGOE said the charges against the men are too lax.
"They just murdered a man on the street. Was it an intent to set out to do that? In my mind, yes. The minute you get behind a vehicle, it is a weapon all on its own. It has the ability to do great damage, just like putting a knife in a child's hand," she said.
"My husband was a grandfather of five. He was 48 years old. And I shouldn't be burying him on Friday."
In a sad twist, Mr. VIRGOE just met the latest addition to the family, born on May 14, on Sunday.
Brad VIRGOE, 23, said his father was always working hard for his family. He would leave for work on Sunday nights, and come home on Friday nights. He said his parents, after more than 20 years, were about to move into their first house on July 6. They spent all of Saturday packing.
"They were renting the house they were at and saving up money so they can go out and put down the mortgage."
Professional driver George CHAMBERS drives the 400 regularly. At a truck stop just south of the crash site yesterday, he said drivers always need to be watchful for vehicles speeding and weaving, but they must be especially vigilant near cities.
"It's a big problem," he said.
Mr. CHAMBERS said Mr. VIRGOE did the right thing by putting the truck in the ditch to save the lives of the other drivers. "I would have done the same thing if I had to," he said.

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MULVENEY o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-11-03 published
SMITH, Annie, PhD
November 21, 1940 (Elmira, New York) - October 31, 2007 (Toronto)
Our 'Annie Bear', 'Doctor Bear', as she was affectionately known, set sail from our shores on Halloween, her gremlins set free at last. She was surrounded by loving Friends. Annie was predeceased by her parents, Doctor Earl and Ruth (MANNING) SMITH. She is survived by her brother, Neil and her very dear friend, Joan MULVENEY. Annie's other Friends and admirers are beyond count. Annie was an alumnus of Wellesley College, Stanford University and also of the University of Toronto where she earned her PhD. She was justifiably proud of her role in founding the Art and Art History Program at Sheridan College. This program is the first of its kind to link a fine art university program with a college of art and technology. It simultaneously offers students a B.A. from the University of Toronto at Mississauga and a diploma in Art and Art History from Sheridan College. 'The Annie Smith Arts Centre' at Sheridan is a tribute to Annie's influence in the field of art education. She was an outstanding, innovative teacher. A gifted author and artist in her own right, she published several books. The best known book is 'Bearing Up with Cancer', featuring her signature doodle, a cartoon bear. The bear is used to illustrate Annie's journey with cancer, from breast cancer in 1986 to ovarian cancer in 1999. Annie defied the odds and used her extraordinary talents to advantage as a speaker for the National Ovarian Cancer Association both at home and abroad. Annie inspired not only those dealing with cancer, but also their families and health care professionals. The most important place in the world to Annie was 'The Barn' at Sunny Point on Keuka Lake, New York State. It was her refuge, her joy, a place of beauty where she could be as one with nature and where she always felt restored in body and mind. A natural athlete, Annie especially loved to sail on Keuka Lake and to play tennis at The Toronto Lawn Tennis Club. As Annie wished, there will be no funeral service. A celebration of her life will be held at Sheridan Campus in the spring of 2008. Special thanks are given to the health care providers at Princess Margaret Hospital, Toronto General Hospital and the Toronto Grace Health Centre. If you so wish, donations in Annie's memory may be made to 'The Annie Smith Bear Fund for Ovarian Cancer', Princess Margaret Hospital Foundation, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Ontario, M5G 2M9 - 416-946-6560 and/or National Ovarian Cancer Association, who have recently amalgamated with Ovarian Cancer Canada at 145 Front Street, Toronto, Ontario, M5A 1E3 - 416-962-2700.

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MULVILLE o@ca.on.manitoulin.howland.little_current.manitoulin_expositor 2007-01-17 published
William Delanore CRONK
Del CRONK, a resident of Billings Township, died at home on Sunday, January 14, 2007 at the age of 61 years.
He was born in Kagawong, son of the late John and Laurinda (ORR) CRONK. He drove truck most of his life, with imperial Oil for over 20 years, and for commercial Transport, Day Transport and lastly Manitoulin Transport. Del loved the outdoors, hunting, fishing and golfing. He will be sadly missed, but many memories will be cherished. Del is survived by dearest friend Ethel BOWERMAN of Mindemoya, brothers Mark of Billings Township , Ross (Marilyn WYERS) of Billings Township , Charles (Chris RACEY) of Gore Bay and sisters Laura MULVILLE (Ron THORNTON) of Gravenhurst, Gladys BELAND (Clifford) of Sudbury, Peggy THIBAULT (Earl DAHL) of Sudbury and Mary Ellen THOMPSON/THOMSON/TOMPSON/TOMSON (Ron) of Sault + Sainte Marie. Predeceased by brothers Thomas and Billy. Also survived by many nieces and nephews. Friends called at the Culgin Funeral Home Tuesday. The funeral service will be conducted in the William G. Turner Chapel on Wednesday, January 17, 2007 at 11.00 am with Reverend Mary Jo ECKERT TRACY officiating. Cremation to follow. In remembrance, donations to the Cancer Society would be appreciated.

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MULVIN o@ca.on.york_county.toronto.globe_and_mail 2007-01-11 published
McCAULEY, Joan Rosalie (August 29, 1929-January 5, 2007)
In precisely the fashion she wanted, Joan McCAULEY died suddenly at home on January 5, 2007. Joan was predeceased by her dearly loved husband Jack in 2003. Joan's life revolved around her family. She cherished and was profoundly loved by her boys Patrick, John, Brian and Gordon, and her daughters Lyn and Laurel. She loved deeply her daughters-in-law Justine SIEGEL and Catherine McCAULEY and her son-in-law Guy PRICHARD. And she found immeasurable joy in her grandchildren Roxanne, Ryan, and Jasmine, and Peter, Heather and Jay. While she will be missed profoundly, Joan's family knows her love intensely and bears her lessons forever. Joan will be missed deeply by her sister and brother-in-law Irene and Bob MULVIN, and their family, to whom she was a very special Auntie Joan. She is mourned by countless close and dear Friends in every corner of the globe. Joan grew up in Vancouver and retained a deep attachment to its mountains and beaches, and her lifelong Friends there. Jack brought her to Toronto in the 1960s and she built a vibrant life in Etobicoke and The Kingsway. When her boys were settled in school Joan entered real estate, and for 25 years was a highly successful and respected member of the profession. She loved a good party, but as a wonderful hostess Joan loved to entertain more. She compelled engagement in passionate debates about important issues. She was a professional mentor to many and a surrogate Mom to many more. Joan was an inveterate traveller and continued to explore both distant lands and local attractions. She also loved a good card game and will be missed by her bridge partners, many of whom have been playing together for 40 years or more. Most importantly, Joan believed in people: that each person could and must be heard and make a difference that no one should be marginalized; that we have a duty to each other to love, to laugh, to help, to speak the truth. In celebration of this great lady, Joan's family will host a reception at St. George's Golf and Country Club, 1668 Islington Avenue, on Thursday, January 11, 2007 from 5: 00 p.m. to 7:00 p.m., and would be thrilled to share stories, laughs, and memories of a meaningful life well lived. In lieu of flowers, Joan would have appreciated donations to your favourite charity.

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